http://www.odu.edu/cepd

Renee Felts, Assistant Vice President for Academic Initiatives & Continuing Education
 

The School of Continuing Education is focused on delivering practical, applied knowledge through its non-credit, and credit-bearing courses, certificates and certification preparatory classes. Staff in the School of Continuing Education interact with each of the academic colleges to utilize the existing courses in an interdisciplinary fashion, frequently at the request of the military, businesses and various industry sectors.

Mission

The School of Continuing Education will meet the evolving needs of our local, regional and global community via online and face-to-face offerings. We help students, professional and lifelong learners move ahead and stay ahead.

Vision

The School of Continuing Education will seek to add value to University programs by engaging with students, faculty, and alumni to help achieve their personal and professional goals.

Center for Professional Development

The primary mission of the Center for Professional Development (CPD) is to develop interdisciplinary certificate programs targeted for specific groups of professionals.  The CPD will work across the ODU campus, including all academic colleges as well Distance Learning, in developing new multidisciplinary certificates. 

Graduate Certificate in Homeland Security

Candidates for the Graduate Certificate in Homeland Security will possess the fundamental aspects of national safety and security skills commensurate to those pursued for positions in various government and private agencies. Catastrophic prevention, preparation, communication, responsiveness and recovery are a unique and vital set of skills coveted in areas of public administration, particularly in civil security including emergency and crisis management, business continuity, infrastructure protection, intelligence analysis, law enforcement, and physical security. While the federal government's Department of Homeland Security and federal agencies may be among the largest employers of homeland security professionals, homeland security-related jobs can be found across the country as an ever-growing field and has the potential for huge employment growth. Due to the number of jobs in homeland security, individuals earning a Graduate Certificate in Homeland Security can choose from a range of professional roles.

By earning a Graduate Certification in Homeland Security, a professional can find work in such occupations as: administration/management; emergency management; disaster recovery; education; policy planning; facilities management; and research.

Admission Requirements

All degree-seeking applicants admitted to the certificate program must meet ODU requirements for graduate admission: an earned baccalaureate degree from a regionally-accredited institution or an equivalent degree from a foreign institution. Those whose native language is not English must submit a minimum score of 230 on the computer-based TOEFL or 80 on the TOEFL iBT.

Non-degree seeking students are required to have these same credentials, though documentation is not required. Ultimately, students must apply to the program in order to obtain the certificate.

Curriculum

Required Courses
ENMA 724Risk Analysis3
PADM 712Emergency Management and Policy3
Electives (Choose one of the following)3
Cybersecurity Principles
Leadership and Management in Cybersecurity
Total Hours9

Graduate Certificate in Mission Analysis & Engineering

The graduate certificate in Mission Analysis and Engineering provides students and professionals with the necessary understanding to manage engineering and systems engineering activities such that  mission supporting capabilities are achieved In even the most complex conditions.  The program is designed to elevate understanding of the difficulties that are endemic to working with complex, socio-technical systems, or system of systems, in extremely transient and uncertain situations.  It provides the student with the opportunity to hone planning, decision-making, and/or execution skills necessary to work transformational environments. It is recommended that students intending to take the certificate contact the certificate director to develop a plan of study that will most benefit the student’s goals.

Transferability of courses: The certificate is listed as a graduate certificate by the State Council for a Higher Education in Virginia. The program offers "for-credit", graduate-level, courses listed in the Old Dominion University Graduate Catalog. Courses taken for the certificate may be used towards graduate studies with approval of the student's Advisor or Graduate Program Director. Non-degree seeking students completing the certificate may later apply the credit hours earned towards graduate degrees in engineering and other disciples with approval of the Graduate Program Director of the program to which the student has been admitted or is seeking admission.

The certificate may be customized to specific domains such as the U.S. Navy or Department of Defense when offered through the School of Continuing Education. Students or organizations should contact the School for additional details.

Admission Requirements

All degree-seeking applicants admitted to the certificate program must meet ODU requirements for graduate admission: an earned baccalaureate degree from a regionally-accredited institution or an equivalent degree from a foreign institution. Those whose native language is not English must submit a minimum score of 230 on the computer-based TOEFL or 80 on the TOEFL iBT.

Non-degree seeking students are required to have these same credentials, though documentation is not required. Ultimately, students must apply to the program in order to obtain the certificate.

Curriculum

Required Course
ENMA 650Mission Analysis and Engineering3
Electives
ENMA 660Systems Architectures3
ENMA 702Systemic Decision Making3
ENMA 715Systems Analysis3
ENMA 750System of Systems Engineering3
ENMA 755Human System Engineering3
Capstone Course
ENMA 605Program Capstone (Required) *1
Total Hours19

Graduate Certificate in Project Management

This certificate program addresses the demand from professionals seeking to enhance their project management leadership skills in a variety of technology-focused organizations. The certificate will include concepts, management tools, and processes designed for overseeing projects in the workplace. Several key areas in the certificate are agile project management, the systems approach to planning projects, project monitoring and control, project management evaluation, capital budgeting, and leadership for engineering managers.

Graduates will gain skills and knowledge to oversee a wide variety of technology-focused projects in business and industry, military, government, and education. They will be able to oversee projects from launch to completion. They will manage capital budgets that are part of these projects, and apply agile approaches to their work.

Admission Requirements

All degree-seeking applicants admitted to the certificate program must meet ODU requirements for graduate admission: an earned baccalaureate degree from a regionally-accredited institution or an equivalent degree from a foreign institution. Those whose native language is not English must submit a minimum score of 230 on the computer-based TOEFL or 80 on the TOEFL iBT.

Non-degree seeking students are required to have these same credentials, though documentation is not required. Ultimately, students must apply to the program in order to obtain the certificate.

Curriculum

ENMA 510Agile Project Management3
ENMA 604Project Management3
ENMA 700Economic Analysis of Capital Projects3
ENMA 780Leadership for Engineering Managers3
Total Hours12

Graduate Certificate in Public Sector Leadership

This certificate program is interdisciplinary in nature and is focused on organizational leadership within non-profit, military, governmental, and other public sector entities. Leadership theories, best practices, and competencies are addressed for students enrolled in this program. Four key competency areas within the scope of leadership are presented to those employed or seeking employment in military and other public organizations: financial management, strategic management, contracting principles, and network security.

Members of the Armed Forces in Hampton Roads requested this program in order to provide officers with enhanced knowledge and understanding of leadership components pertinent to public sector work. Graduates will be prepared to lead teams in contract negotiations, finance, and strategic initiatives. In addition, they will have a strong understanding of cyber security within this arena. The courses are ones that will meet the needs of both military and other public sector organizations.

Admission Requirements

All applicants admitted to the certificate program must meet ODU requirements for graduate admission: an earned baccalaureate degree from a regionally-accredited institution or an equivalent degree from a foreign institution. Those whose native language is not English must submit a minimum score of 230 on the computer-based TOEFL or 80 on the TOEFL iBT.

Curriculum

COMM 603Social Change and Communication Systems3
CS 562Cybersecurity Fundamentals3
PADM 671Public Budgeting and Financial Management3
PPCM 726Introduction to Public Procurement3
Total Hours12

Continuing Education Programs

Prior Learning Assessment

The Prior Learning Assessment unit offers students the opportunity to have their prior learning assessed and applied for academic credit. Visit www.odu.edu/priorlearning for more information.

Continuing Education Programs in Engineering

 This unit offers certificates, workshops, courses and conferences.  The courses are designed primarily for adult learners in content and logistics. Most courses are delivered in the late afternoon to early evening at a variety of locations and are delivered online.  The courses are delivered in an open enrollment format (open to the general public) as well as in contract training settings.

Continuing Education Programs in Health Sciences

Short courses, national conferences, workshops, refresher courses, certificate programs and seminars are offered by the different schools in the College of Health Sciences on and off campus on a noncredit continuing education (CEU) basis. Professional continuing education programs cover a wide range of topics, including environmental health, occupational safety, industrial hygiene, dental hygiene, dental assisting, nursing, nuclear medicine technology, health-care management, medical technology, physical therapy, and community health.

Continuing education serves the following functions:

  •     Licensure and certification for professionals and practitioners,
  •     Credential and degree achievement and
  •     Professional development to update knowledge and skills.

Clientele served by the programs include nursing, public health and allied health professionals, human service workers, managers and supervisory personnel, technicians, laboratory personnel, and health educators.

Executive Development Program

 The mission of this unit is to provide businesses, organizations, and individuals with high quality professional development and continuing education programs in virtually all areas of business, management, and executive education. The unit offers public programs for individuals seeking professional certificate programs, preparation for certification exams, career advancement and career change. In addition, the unit develops and delivers custom programs and consulting services to meet specific organizational and employee development needs of businesses and organizations regionally, nationally and internationally.

Executive Certificate in Financial Planning:

XEDC 1851 - FP1: Introduction to Financial Planning and Risk Management Part One: Introduction to Financial Planning The first two sessions introduce financial planning. Instruction centers on the financial planning process and including gathering data from clients, analyzing data to determine needs, and compiling and presenting recommendations in a clear and concise manner. Part Two: Risk Management - Individual Insurance & Employee Benefits The remainder of this course focuses on risk management including life, health, disability, property, casualty, and liability. Since most risk can be transferred through insurance, the nature of insurance programs and policies, as well as specific coverage offered by various programs, will be covered along with the financial rating and operation of insurance companies.

XEDC 1852 - FP2: Income Management and Tax Planning In this introduction to financial taxation concepts, emphasis will be placed on individual tax returns, property transactions, gifts and inheritances, and choice of business entity. The passive loss rules will be discussed, as well as like-kind exchanges, involuntary conversions, and tax consequences of personal home sales. Also covered will be basic rules for moving deductions, hobby losses, depreciation (MMACRS), and choice of accounting methods. Tax planning and other potentials tips to clients will be interspersed throughout the course.

XEDC 1853 - FP3: Investment Alternatives: Wealth Accumulation and/or Income Production Providing a survey of financial investment analysis, emphasis is placed on understanding the valuation process for alternative investment vehicles and the economic factors which affect their risk. Topics include the mechanics of present and future value analysis, real estate valuation, stocks, bonds, real estate, options, and futures. All of these are discussed within the context of developing portfolio strategies, which are consistent with the objectives of individual clients and their willingness and ability to undertake risk.

XEDC 1854 - FP4: Estate Planning The primary objective of estate planning is to assist people in planning for the management of their assets and the passing of those assets to their intended beneficiaries in the most efficient and least costly manner. This course gives the foundations of estate planning, from basic concepts of joint ownership of property to complex planning with wills and trusts, including probate avoidance, federal estate and gift taxation, marital and charitable deduction planning, medical directives, and planning for second marriages. Students will be better equipped to counsel clients and understand the necessary estate planning documents.

XEDC 1855 - FP5: Retirement Plan and Employee Benefits
This course will cover specific provisions of qualified retirement plans including profit sharing, defined benefits, 401k plans, IRAs, and SEPs. Other employee benefit topics include Social Security, non-qualified deferred compensation, and income tax impact of employee benefits and retirement plans on both the employer and employee.

XEDC 1856 - FP6: Capstone Case Course
Case Study Required
*Prerequisites: modules 1-5
The focus in the final course is on integrating information provided in the previous courses and beginning to apply what has been learned to practical situations through the use of case studies and other methods. This course culminates with each student completing a comprehensive financial plan for a client, the practicum required for successful completion of
the program.


SHRM Learning System:

XEDC 1165 – SHRM Learning System- The SHRM Learning System for SHRM-CP and SHRM-SCP includes five modules covering the comprehensive SHRM Body
of Competency and Knowledge™ (SHRM BoCK™) so you'll learn everything you need for the SHRM-CP or SHRM-SCP exam. Study with learning modules that provide an in-depth exploration of the knowledge domains and behavioral competencies tested on the SHRM exams. SHRM Certified Professional (SHRM-CP™) and SHRM Senior Certified Professional (SHRM-SCP™) are the new standard for all HR professionals around the globe, as it is among the first HR certification that is focused on the practical, real-life information HR professionals need to excel in their careers today, including behavioral competencies, knowledge and skills.

Education Programs and Virginia Department of Education Alternative Route to Teacher Licensure (Career Switcher) Program

The purpose of this unit is to extend to the community special conferences, workshops, seminars, in-service training, and short courses. Drawing on the faculty of the academic colleges and experts in the field, programs are designed in areas such as leadership, counseling/interpersonal skills, learning and curriculum design, training and development, health education, and physical fitness. Clients consist of educators as well as professionals in business, industry, and public, private and governmental agencies. Programs are designed to help professionals increase and upgrade their development activities. Professional and personal development programs are awarded continuing education credit (CEUs).

Career Switcher - An Alternative Route to Teacher Licensure Program

Program Director:  Lisa M. Temple
Assistant Director for Curriculum and Development:  Pete Baker
Assistant Director for Student Support:  Samantha Fabio

The Career Switcher program is certified by the Virginia Department of Education.

PREREQUISITES

The following requirements must be completed prior to applying to the Old Dominion University Career Switcher Program. 

  • An application process 
  • A baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university 
  • The completion of requirements for an endorsement in a teaching area or the equivalent through verifiable experience or academic study; [Refer to the Licensure Regulations for School Personnel on the following Web address: http://www.doe.virginia.gov/teaching/licensure/licensure_regs.pdf] 
  • At least three years of full-time work experience or its equivalent; and 
  • Virginia qualifying scores on the professional teacher’s assessments as prescribed by the Board of Education. Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA); 
  • (2) Praxis II (subject area test); and (3) Reading for Virginia Educators (RVE) (if applicable).

APPLICATION PROCESS

  • Career Switcher Program Application
  • Application Fee
  • Assessment Exams
  • Official Transcripts
  • Letter of Intent
  • Resume
  • Child Abuse and Neglect Training
  • First Aid, CPR and AED Training
  • Dyslexia Training
  • Pre-Assessment Questionnaire Form 

LEVEL I PREPARATION

Intensive Level I preparation includes a minimum of 180 clock hours of instruction, including field experience. This phase includes, but is not limited to, curriculum and instruction (including instructional technology), reading in the content area, language acquisition, differentiation of instruction, classroom/behavior management, instructional design based on assessment data, human growth and development and other specific course work related to the Virginia Standards of Learning. Level I requirements must be completed during the course of a single year and may be offered through a variety of delivery systems, including distance learning programs. After completing Level I preparation, candidates may be awarded a one-year Provisional Career Switcher License (July 1 to June 30 of given year). The Provisional Career Switcher License is active for the first year after the completion of the program requirements. During this time, candidates are expected to seek and obtain employment in a Virginia public school division or accredited nonpublic school in Virginia. If a candidate is unsuccessful in finding employment during the first year of the life of the Provisional Career Switcher License, the license may be extended annually for up to two additional years upon the recommendation of an employing school division or accredited nonpublic school. A Provisional Career Switcher license is limited to a total of three years.

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM

Clock Hours: 302

The Elementary Education curriculum is comprised of the following courses:  XPCL 5000, XPCL 5005, XPCL 5010, XPCL 5015, XPCL 5020, XPCL 5025, XPCL 5030, XPCL 5035, XPCL 5040, XPCL 5049, TLED 568, XPCL 5052, XPCL 5053, XPCL 5065, XPCL 5077, XPCL 5080, XPCL 5095, XPCL 6000, and XPCL 6005. 

MIDDLE EDUCATION CURRICULUM

Clock Hours: 279

The Middle Education curriculum is comprised of the following courses:  XPCL 5000, XPCL 5005, XPCL 5010, XPCL 5015, XPCL 5020, XPCL 5025, XPCL 5030, XPCL 5035, XPCL 5040, XPCL 5043, XPCL 5045, XPCL 5046, TLED 568, XPCL 5050, XPCL 5055, XPCL 5065, XPCL 5070, XPCL 5075, XPCL 5077, XPCL 5080, XPCL 5095, and XPCL 6000.

SECONDARY EDUCATION/PREK-12 CURRICULUM

Clock Hours: 234

The Secondary Education/PreK-12 curriculum is comprised of the following courses:  XPCL 5000, XPCL 5005, XPCL 5010, XPCL 5015, XPCL 5020, XPCL 5025, XPCL 5030, XPCL 5035, XPCL 5040, XPCL 5043, XPCL 5045, XPCL 5046, XPCL 5050, XPCL 5055, XPCL 5065, XPCL 5070, XPCL 5075, XPCL 5077, XPCL 5080, XPCL 5095, and XPCL 6000.

NONCREDIT COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

XPCL 5000. Foundations of Education. 7 Contact Hours Elementary/Middle/Secondary Education

This course provides an overview of many issues that are central to the teaching profession including diversity and equity, philosophy’s role in education, instructional technology, legal issues associated with teachers’ and students’ rights and responsibilities, and administering the public education system in the US.  In this course, candidates begin the development of their personal educational philosophies and engage in activities that prepare them for deeper, more focused learning in the Career Switcher Program’s subsequent modules.   

XPCL 5005. Curriculum and Instructional Procedures:  Design for Effective Instruction. 35 Contact Hours Elementary/Middle/Secondary Education

This is a course in generic lesson design which provides students with essential ways to design and deliver content that make efficient use of instructional time and current research while also maximizing instructional effectiveness. Emphasis is on efficient use of instructional time, lesson design, assessment tools and relevant and current research. A primary goal of the course is assisting students in their respective development of a holistic attitude toward their instruction that successfully integrates teaching practices to what is to be learned by their students. These generic teaching behaviors identified in the course competencies will be framed within a specific piece of content selected from a subject the student eventually wants to teach and applied through the actual development of classroom lesson plans.

XPCL 5010. Curriculum and Instructional Procedures:  Student Assessment. 7 Contact Hours Elementary/Middle/Secondary Education

This course is designed to help with data driven instruction. It will differentiate between norm- and criterion references tests. The candidates will explore different test formats and the advantages of using a test blueprint and how to construct and score tests. In addition, the class will present the use of rubrics and portfolios in the classroom with ways to use them effectively.

XPCL 5015. Curriculum and Instructional Procedures:  Exploring the Curriculum Framework. 7 Contact Hours Elementary/Middle/Secondary Education

Candidates will identify “essential” standards of a lesson and explore how to develop clear learning goals and objectives by using various state and national resources. Candidates will learn how to shift students’ focus from “answer getting” to problem solving and critical thinking by exposing students to a large variety of complex texts in ALL subject areas. Candidates will also connect the standard topics to the prior knowledge of students. 

XPCL 5020 Curriculum and Instructional Procedures:  General Classroom Management. 14 Contact Hours. Elementary/Middle/Secondary Education

This is a course in general classroom management that will develop the candidate’s philosophy of management and establish the candidate’s style. It will address the classroom environment, importance of procedures, communication and discipline and feelings of belonging for all students as well as preparing the climate for diverse strategies.

XPCL 5025. Human Growth and Development:  Fundamentals of Human Growth and Development. 7 contact hours Elementary/Middle/Secondary Education

Candidates will learn theoretical concepts of Human Growth and Development to include the cognitive, social, emotional, physical, and moral domains and how these domains make up the total person.  Additionally, they will learn how these factors influence the student’s ability to learn.

XPCL 5030. Human Growth and Development:  Student with Special Needs. 7 contact hours Elementary/Middle/Secondary Education

The purpose of this module is to introduce Career Switcher participants to the fundamentals of providing quality instruction to students with diverse needs.  The module will focus on legal issues surrounding special education, and will extend to strategies to provide an effective learning environment for all students.

XPCL 5035.  Curriculum and Instructional Procedures:  Dealing Effectively with Parents, Students and School Culture. 7 contact hours Elementary/Middle/Secondary Education

Candidates will become familiar with the influence of socio-economic status (SES) on a person’s worldview, especially as it applies to communicating with parents and students.  They will learn effective communication strategies and become familiar with the professional expectations parents, students, faculty and administrators have of them.  Additionally, they will clarify their expectations of the teaching profession along with typical expectations of their supervisors and colleagues.

XPCL 5040. Curriculum and Instructional Procedures:  Technology Standards for Instructional Personnel. 14 contact hours Elementary/Middle/Secondary Education

The Technology Standards for Instructional Personnel course is required for teacher licensure in the state of Virginia and is essential to preparing pre-service teachers for the 21st century classroom. Candidates will learn strategies for effective technology integration and develop the skills associated with the Commonwealth of Virginia’s Technology Standards for Instructional Personnel.  The course addresses the Technology Standards for Instructional Personal (TSIP) competencies and upon completion students should be able to pass or apply for exemption from their school district’s TSIP exam. 

XPCL 5043. Curriculum and Instructional Procedures (Classroom and Behavior Management):  Secondary Classroom Management Techniques. 14 contact hours Middle and Secondary Education

This course has 10 sections that are designed to lead the Career Switcher to be confident in their ability to create a positive classroom environment that will facilitate academic success for all students. The 10 sections of this course (Discipline Plans; Procedures & Routines; Positive Learning Environment; Positive Relationships; Teacher Preparation; Student Responsibility; Classroom & Instructional Triggers; Pro Active Prevention; Dealing with Chronic Disruptions; How to Stay in Control when dealing with Classroom Management issues) will address professionally appropriate behavioral and management techniques, building an appropriate educational environment through classroom community and positive redirection of behavior as well as the development of social skills and self-discipline.  

XPCL 5045. Curriculum and Instructional Procedures:  Differentiation of Instruction. 7 contact hours Middle and Secondary Education

Candidates will learn strategies to deal effectively with at-risk students based on theoretical concepts.  Additionally, they will learn the strategies to motivate students, strategies to engage them more in the learning process, and how to successfully cope with the stressors of dealing with challenging situations

XPCL 5046. Curriculum and Instructional Procedures:  Writing to Learn Across the Curriculum. 7 contact hours Middle and Secondary Education

This course reviews, evaluates, and promotes the concept that learning in all subjects can be more meaningful and enhanced by using writing and thinking strategies to better convey, comprehend and retain course content.   

XPCL 5049. Curriculum and Instructional Procedures:  Reading Strategies. 21 contact hours Elementary Education 

This course is designed to provide information on balance reading instruction in grades PRE-K-6.  Topics will include:  language acquisition, phonemic awareness, word identification strategies, vocabulary development strategies, comprehension strategies, and reading-writing connections. 

TLED 568 Language Acquisition and Reading for Students with Diverse Learning Needs. 3 semester hours Elementary and Middle Education (Online)

This course provides an overview of normal language development and language disorders which impact the acquisition of language-based curriculum skills such as listening, speaking, reading and written expression. Course content includes the theoretical framework and basic instructional practices and strategies associated with literacy instruction in an elementary classroom.  Emphasis is placed on instructional techniques to assist individuals with disabilities achieve basic reading skills and advanced comprehension.  Effective reading strategies and curricula for individuals with disabilities will also be reviewed. (Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits). 

XPCL 5050. Curriculum and Instructional Procedures:  Teacher Questioning Skills. 7 contact hours Middle and Secondary Education 

This course focuses on the principles of the Socratic method and how teachers in the classroom can employ it.  We’ll spend time discussing inquiry-based instruction and how it positively impacts student learning and engagement.  We will examine and demonstrate the use of teacher created simulations and active participation activities to assist student learning. We will learn the positive impact of creating context before delivering information. Research suggests that an inquiry-based approach is the most effective way to engage students, motivate them, leading to constructive participation and retention of material.  

XPCL 5052. Curriculum and Instructional Procedures: Elementary Education Reading Methods.  21 contact hours Elementary Education 

This course is a methods course that focuses on the teaching and learning of reading.  It will allow students the opportunity to apply knowledge gained in their Reading Strategies course work. It will consist of both theory and practice in which components of a comprehensive reading program are modeled, demonstrated, and experienced.  Students in this course will participate in a variety of activities that will enhance their understanding of literacy teaching and learning with elementary students.   

XPCL 5053.  Curriculum and Instructional Procedures:  Independent Study. 30 contact hours Elementary Education

This course is designed to enhance the pre-service teacher’s understanding of the emergent, beginning, transitional, and instructional readers in elementary grades and the implementation of practical strategies that will help early learners become successful readers.  Pre-service teachers will have the opportunity to design and create learning opportunities for their prospective classroom.    

XPCL 5055.  Curriculum and Instructional Procedures:  Helping Students to Become Confident Readers 14 contact hours Middle and Secondary Education

Candidates will learn methods to identify students who are struggling readers in their content class and to design strategies and activities for content learning plans which differentiate to the reading instructional needs of these students.

XPCL 5065. Curriculum and Instructional Procedures:  Content Training 21 contact hours Elementary/Middle/Secondary

Education Candidates will learn specific training based on their endorsement area.  These classes introduces unit planning, pacing, lesson planning, teaching strategies and classroom management.  Discussions, lectures, demonstrations, and some role playing will be introduced. 

XPCL 5070. Curriculum and Instructional Procedures:  Dealing with At-Risk Students. 7 contact hours Middle and Secondary Education 

Candidates will learn strategies to deal effectively with at-risk students based on theoretical concepts.  Additionally, they will learn the strategies to motivate students, strategies to engage them more in the learning process, and how to successfully cope with the stressors of dealing with this challenging cohort.  

XPCL 5075. Curriculum and Instructional Procedures:  Preparing an Effective Lesson Plan. 7 contact hours Middle and Secondary Education 

This module in generic lesson design review provides candidates essential ways to review the design, delivery, and assessment of Learning Plans. Emphasis is on efficient use of instructional time, lesson design, assessment tools and relevant and current research. A primary goal of the workshop is assisting students in their respective development of a holistic attitude toward their instruction that successfully integrates teaching practices to what is to be learned by their students. These generic teaching behaviors identified in the DEI course competencies will be framed, reviewed and critiqued within the content specific Learning Plans submitted. Results of the critiques will be shared with the authors of the learning plans

XPCL 5077 Curriculum and Instructional Procedures: The Management of Learning and Instruction. 7 contact hours Elementary/Middle/Secondary Education

Classroom Management Techniques that will develop the candidate’s plan for the management of instruction by developing a specific Classroom Management Plan to fit the grade level and content of the teacher. Candidates will address the classroom environment, importance of procedures, communication and discipline 

XPCL 5080. Curriculum and Instructional Procedures:  Issues and Answers for New Teachers. 7 contact hours Elementary/Middle/Secondary 

Education Issues and Answers for New Teachers for Career Switchers is designed to support new teachers and facilitate the successful entry of transitioning/beginning teachers into the teaching profession by addressing topics that impact their day to day professional and teaching decisions.   

XPCL 5095. Practicum Observation. 30 contact hours Elementary/Middle/Secondary 

Experiences in PK12 classrooms represent an important component within the Career Switcher Program and all high-quality teacher preparation programs. Required in-school observation offers participants the opportunity to make contacts in school districts while gaining knowledge about teacher responsibilities and instructional strategies. All Career Switcher candidates are required to complete a minimum of 30 practicum hours by reflecting on the Professional Study Requirements and how it correlates with the Career Switcher Program’s Enduring Understandings (i.e., VDOE’s Uniform Teacher Performance Standards).  

 XPCL 6000. Curriculum and Instructional Procedures: Lesson Plan Presentation. 1 contact hour Elementary/Middle/Secondary Education

All Career Switcher candidates all required to present a 1 hour lesson plan.  The lesson plan will be assessed by instructor’s and peers. 

XPCL 6005 Elementary Education Classroom Management 14 contact hours 

Students will formulate a personal philosophy of classroom management, examine effective techniques for arranging the classroom, formulating classroom rules, identifying and teaching classroom procedures and routines.  This course will also prepare prospective teachers with respected philosophies and approaches that deal with appropriate social behaviors and classroom management systems, and provide strategies and suggestions that will enable them to be successful and confident while compare the beliefs and strategies of selected theorists that relate to effective classroom management (i.e. Skinner, Gordon and Dreikurs).

LEVEL II PREPARATION

Preparation begins during the first year of employment. Career Switchers attend a minimum of five seminars to expand the intensive preparation requirements associated with instructional topics.  The five seminars award a minimum of 20 cumulative instructional hours and feature various instructional techniques.  During Level II, a school mentor is assigned to assist the candidate throughout their first year of employment.    

XPCL 5085. Behavior Management. 4 contact hours 

Candidates will acquire strategies to help prevent behavior problems, identify actions that need to be taken when behavior problems occur, and learn how to effectively help students resolve problems in the classroom. 

XPCL 5086. Empowering Teachers who serve English as a Language Learners (ESL). 4 contact hours  

The ESL workshop is designed to give new teachers some basic information about who the ESL students are. The workshop is mandatory because at some point of the participants teaching experience they will have ELL students in their classroom. The participants will learn how the ESL students make it into the classroom. Participants will also get some teaching strategies useful when differentiating their instruction for English Language Learners. The goals of the workshops are to identify how these ESL students are enrolled, Demonstrate and create awareness about ESL students various Linguistic Proficiency level and what that means to the classroom teacher. Participants will become familiar with ESL Assessment like the WAPT and annual ACCESS for ESL students. Participants will learn about culture and multicultural in the classroom and how to use this knowledge when planning instruction. Finally, participants will develop awareness about LEP students SOL accommodations and how these accommodations impact ESL students with Special Education needs. 

 XPCL 5087 School Law:  Basics for Teachers. 4 contact hours 

Participants will be introduced to legal concepts related to their employment as teachers including their duties to students, education malpractice, employment rights, and constitutional rights such as free 

speech, free exercise of religion, and the right to be free from discrimination and harassment in the workplace. In groups, participants will grapple with real-life scenarios and discuss court decisions and school division policies. Professionalism, especially with regard to social media, will be emphasized. 

XPCL 5088. Strategies for Success in the Classroom.  4 contact hours 

Candidates will acquire practical strategies that they will be able to use with their students.  This workshop includes instructional, vocabulary, memory, and review activities that can be used with any student, including slow learners and special education students. 

XPCL 5089. Poverty:  Students Achievement for Rural Urban Learners. 4 contact hours 

Candidates will learn strategies to promote students’ academic success effectively with urban and rural learners in poverty based on theoretical concepts.  Additionally, they will gain insights regarding the impact of poverty for schools, leaders, teachers and students. The participants will engage in a variety of experiences for adult learners to increase the teachers’ awareness of poverty and educators’ roles to address student scholastic achievement in school. The workshop will explore through the use of this PowerPoint presentation as guidance document to support practical application in this seminar. This interactive session will highlight the poverty research by Dr. Ruby Payne. 

XPCL 5090. The Teacher as a Professional:  Communicating with Stakeholders. 4 contact hours 

Participants will become familiar with the issues and standards related to professionalism and teacher evaluation. , the participants will become familiar with The Virginia Standards for the Professional Practice of Teachers (VSPPT) and discuss expectations for teacher conduct within and without the classroom. Concrete strategies and tools for interaction with students, parents, administrators, and colleagues will be provided.  Participants will engage in role-play to appreciate their responsibility in building supportive relationships with their students and their families.  In addition, Assessment of, and for, Student Learning will be addressed, as grading is the primary mode of communication with parents, particularly at the secondary level. 

 XPCL 5091. Parents:  A User’s Guide. 4 contact hours 

This workshop will deal with the relationship teachers need to develop with parents, outline concerns from a parent's perspective, from a school's perspective, and develop responses to those concerns. This workshop will employ teaching strategies embedded into the PowerPoint, therefore providing practical application to the content (Communication with Parents).  The agenda will include overviews and strategies, definition of stakeholders, analysis of the types of teacher-parent communication, presentation of positive techniques and strategies, and the review, evaluation, and practical use of authentic case studies.

XPCL 5093.  Diversity in the Classroom. 4 contact hours

Participants will define diversity and identify what constitutes diversity in the classroom. Students will discern personal subjectivities and examine how those subjectivities affect student populations in the classroom.  Students will understand the microsystem, exosystem, and macrosystem that influences the development of individuals through Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Model. Students will engage with culture, language, and socioeconomic status to gain a deeper understanding of the backgrounds students come with to school.