SOCIOLOGY Courses

SOC 201S. Introduction to Sociology. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the discipline and methods of sociology. Major topics include socialization, social inequality, family, education, gender roles, ethnic and minority relations.

SOC 203S. Diversity and Society. 3 Credits.

This course examines social diversity and inclusivity in American society and is designed to sensitize students to the roles that typology such as race, ethnicity, social class, religion, sex and gender, age, health, (dis)ability, sexual orientation, and language play in societal definitions of social diversity.

SOC 226S. Honors: Introduction to Sociology. 3 Credits.

Open only to students in the Honors College. A special honors section of SOC 201S.

SOC 300. Social Problems. 3 Credits.

An analysis of the major social problems confronting groups and individuals in a society marked by rapid change. Emphasis is given to the study of social phenomena including both historical and comparative perspectives. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 303. Families and Society. 3 Credits.

This class explores both contemporary and historical aspects of singlehood, courtship, mate selection, cohabitation, marriage, sexuality, and family. Relationship quality, communication, conflict, and the termination of relationships is also examined. Emphasis is placed on examining the diversity of relationships and family structures as well as how our family experiences are shaped by gender, race/ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation. Prerequisites: Any "S" (Human Behavior general education) course.

SOC 306. Religion and Society. 3 Credits.

Sociological analysis of religion as a social institution, of the functions of religion and its relationship to other institutions and to social change, and of the religious behavior of individuals. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 309. Population and Society. 3 Credits.

This course offers an introduction to the field of population and its interconnection to broader societal changes. It introduces students to the concepts, issues and concerns in population studies and examines the interaction between population processes and economic development, social changes and environment. Topics include theories, fertility, mortality, migration, distribution and composition, population and development, population and environment, and policy. Emphasis is given to a critical assessment of population processes as both causes and consequences of development and societal changes with a focus on comparative patterns between developing countries and the more developed countries. Prerequisites: Six semester hours in human behavior or permission of the instructor.

SOC 316. Juvenile Delinquency. 3 Credits.

A study of juvenile misbehavior in the contemporary community, its nature, extent, treatment, and control, including juvenile court procedure and philosophy. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or SOC 201S or permission of instructor.

SOC 320. Social Inequality. 3 Credits.

An analysis of social differentiation, stratification, and social class. Emphasis is placed upon modern American society, with some comparison with historical and contemporary systems of other societies. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 323. Sociology of Minority Families. 3 Credits.

Examination and explanation of minority families' lives in relationship to other societal institutions and historical developments. The course focuses on issues of minority families and places these issues in a sociological framework, e.g., stratification, poverty and gender. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 325. Social Welfare. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the broad field of social welfare. The philosophy, values, purposes, goals, and functions of social welfare are examined. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 326. LGBTQ People, Crime, and Justice. 3 Credits.

Learning appropriate terminology to discuss LGBTQ individuals, as well as a review of the social issues facing these populations, including damaging cultural stereotypes. Critically exploring the history of interactions between LGBTQ communities and agents of formal control, such as schools and the police, including responses to bullying and bias crimes. Interrogating how changing political and social contexts affect policy regarding formal responses to LGBTQ communities. Prerequisite: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S.

SOC 330. Society and the Individual. 3 Credits.

Social psychological theory and research on current topics of interest on the relationship of the individual to society. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 337. Introduction to Social Research. 3 Credits.

An overview of the scientific approach to the study of social phenomena. Includes the application of descriptive measures, graphic techniques, survey and experimental analysis to the study of these phenomena and techniques for making qualitative judgements about such research. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or SOC 201S.

SOC 340. Sociology of Women. 3 Credits.

An exploration of the role and status of women in contemporary American society from a feminist sociological perspective. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or six credits in human behavior or permission of the instructor.

SOC 343. Sexualities in Society. 3 Credits.

This course offers an introduction to the sociological study of sexualities. This course focuses on the ways in which sexuality as a social institution and identity intersects with other hierarchies of privilege and inequality, such as race, social class, and gender. A range of topics will be covered including LGBTQ+ identities, the social construction of sexuality, historical accounts of sexual practices, and contemporary theories and research in sexualities studies. Prerequisites: SOC 201S.

SOC 344. Social Science and Crime Mapping. 3 Credits.

A critical exploration of applying geographic information system (GIS) to view, understand, question, interpret, and visualize social science and crime data that reveal relationships, patterns, and trends. Students will learn to 1) frame a research question or hypothesis from a location-based perspective; 2) collect, create and examine geographically referenced demographic, social, and criminological data; 3) learn to use GIS mapping software to visualize, manage and analyze this data in order to investigate the relationship between geographic, demographic, social and criminological variables; and 4) arrive upon decisions and conclusions and communicate these via the creation of publishable maps. Prerequisite: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 347. Sport Sociology. 3 Credits.

This course applies the sociological perspective to the world of sports. It provides the student with a better understanding of the social processes involved in sports. The course looks at how the media, community, tradition, and privilege play an integral role in the participation of sporting events. It also covers why sports exist, who plays sports, and what will become of sports in the future. Prerequisite: SOC 201S OR CRJS 215S.

SOC 352. War and Peace. 3 Credits.

Critical examination of the social problem of war and the social construction of peace. The course includes investigations into the etiology of war and the effects of war on society, as well as, the relationships between war, peace, and justice, and methods of reducing war and promoting peace. Prerequisites: Six hours of human behavior courses or permission of the instructor.

SOC 353. Sociology of the Middle East. 3 Credits.

A comparative survey of population and culture and other sociological characteristics of Middle Eastern and Arab League States. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or six hours of human behavior or permission of the instructor.

SOC 367. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits.

Student participation for credit based on the academic relevance of the work experience, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and Career Development Services prior to the semester in which the work experience is to take place. Prerequisites: Approval of the department and Career Development Services.

SOC 368. Internship. 1-6 Credits.

This course allows students to volunteer in an agency related to their major for pass/fail credit. Students must volunteer for 50 hours per course credit. Internships for fewer than 3 credits require prior approval by the Internship Faculty Director. Prerequisites: Permission of the department internship director.

SOC 369. Practicum. 3-6 Credits.

This course is for students participating in the Career Advantage Program. Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

SOC 395. Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 396. Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 400/500. War and Gender. 3 Credits.

In this course students grapple with issues concerning war, gender roles, and gender inequality. The course addresses gender roles in war throughout history, globally and across cultures. However, the United States military and military involvement in the 20th and 21st century remain the primary focus areas. Discussions include how social norms and ideals of masculinity and femininity shape, and in turn are shaped by, images and realities of war, including gendered aspects of nationalism and just war theories. The military involvement of men, women (and children) in war and in peacetime, as participants and observers, perpetrators and victims, supporters and opponents of war is also discussed. Prerequisites: SOC 201S and junior standing.

SOC 402/502. Sociology of Child Welfare. 3 Credits.

A sociological analysis of the field of child welfare. Topics include social inequality as it applies to children as a group in the U.S. and globally; understanding violence against children within the global context of children's rights; examining data on the degree to which policies, programs and research in the field fail to protect children and why; prevalence, causes and consequences of child sexual, physical and emotional abuse and neglect; evaluation of programs like "family preservation" and of placement in "substitute" care, i.e., foster care, adoption, institutionalization; changes that would protect and advance the interests and rights of children at the parent-child, agency, and societal level. Prerequisites: SOC 201S.

SOC 403. Violence in the World of Children. 3 Credits.

This 'child- centered' course examines the interaction of adults in violent conflict with the world of children, children's experience of violence and its meaning in the lives of children. Topics include: valuing children, violence toward children in culture, families, and schools; child physical and sexual abuse and neglect; gangs, violent communities, and children and war. The effects of childhood experiences of violence, children's coping with violence, and alternatives to violence are also developed. Prerequisites: Six hours in the human behavior perspective or SOC 201S or CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 405/505. Social Change and Social Movements. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the nature and causes of social change, major social movements, and their impact upon contemporary society. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 407. Violence Against Children Internationally. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the research on child maltreatment abuse internationally, in particular on the most common types of child abuse and neglect—i.e., perpetrated by parents, family members. The negative effects of child abuse and neglect are associated subsequently with every social problem from poverty, teenage motherhood, substance abuse, violent crime, domestic violence, and mental health problems, to ill-health—from cancer to diabetes. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S.

SOC 408. Children's Rights and the Law. 3 Credits.

A study of the law concerning children from a children's rights perspective. The rights of children in the US will be compared to other nations with special emphasis being placed on the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Prerequisites: SOC 201S OR CRJS 215S or related human behavior Way of Knowing or permission of the instructor.

SOC 409W. Sociological Theory. 3 Credits.

The development of sociological thought during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Analysis of major contributions to the development of systematic thinking in contemporary sociology. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: SOC 201S and a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

SOC 415. Sociology of Work and Occupations. 3 Credits.

The study of the social processes involved in the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services within various political economic systems. Includes the study of occupations and the nature of work. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 418. Crime, Society and the Media. 3 Credits.

A critical exploration of media portrayals of crime and criminal justice. News and entertainment genres are examined. Connections between the mass media and crime, culture, politics, society, and individual behavior receive special attention. (cross listed with CRJS 418) Prerequisite: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 419. Animals and Society. 3 Credits.

This is a class about the role of nonhuman animals in society. Animals are used to entertain, to do work, to provide companionship, to provide food, and more. In this class, we also discuss the causes and consequences of both individual and institutional animal abuse. Society's relation to wildlife is also an important component and includes poaching, sport and trophy hunting, and society's reaction to wolves, coyotes, and wild horses in the West. Cross-listed with CRJS 419. Prerequisites: Any human behavior ("S") course, such as SOC 201S, CRJS 215S, PSYC 201S, COMM 200S, or permission of instructor.

SOC 421/521. Deviant Behavior. 3 Credits.

A study of various definitions and forms of deviant behavior, theoretical explanations of causes of deviant behavior and the impact of deviant behavior on society and the individual. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 423/523. Women, Health and Healing. 3 Credits.

An examination of women's experiences with health and illness and women's roles in the health-care system as patients and care providers from a feminist sociological perspective. Prerequisites: Six hours of human behavior courses or permission of the instructor.

SOC 426/526. The Sociology of Minority Groups. 3 Credits.

The study of the process of and responses to the oppression of racial, religious, ethnic, and national minorities in a variety of countries within a historical and comparative perspective. Special emphasis given to American minorities and especially African Americans. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 427/527. Violence Against Women. 3 Credits.

A critical analysis of violence against women as an institution of social control. Examines violence in the context of social and political inequality and feminist critique. Issues explored include pornography, prostitution, sexual harassment, incest, battering and rape. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 436. Capstone Research Project. 3 Credits.

Students work in groups to plan, design, and carry out a research project. Final papers which report the results of the study are presented in a formal research seminar. The projects are to reflect knowledge gained from undergraduate work and training received in STAT 130M and SOC 337. Prerequisites: SOC 337 and STAT 130M and senior status.

SOC 438. Education and Society. 3 Credits.

Sociological theory and research investigating contemporary education as a social institution. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 440/540. Sociology of Health and Wellbeing. 3 Credits.

The study of health and wellbeing. After exploring how health is conceptualized by the prevailing allopathic medical model, an emergent alternative or "integrative" health perspective is examined with a focus on how wellbeing may be understood. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 441/541. Drugs and Society. 3 Credits.

The study of sociological and social psychological explanations of drug-using behaviors and of legal and medical control of drugs. Topics include changes in the legal status of drugs, cross-cultural and historical variations in the control and use of drugs, and social epidemiology of drug use in contemporary society. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 444. Community Justice. 3 Credits.

This is a service learning course designed to study how the emerging field of community justice, a neighborhood-based strategy, can reduce crime and improve public safety by investing in social, human and cultural capital. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S.

SOC 445. Workplace Law and Society. 3 Credits.

This course examines the laws of the workplace from a sociological and issue-driven approach considering two perspectives – both employer and employee. Relevant laws are identified, explored and made relevant through examples of their application in real-world situations. Sometimes the wisdom of these laws will be challenged; students will be encouraged to raise questions about a law’s utility, justice or fairness, whether in principle or in application. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

SOC 451. Race, Ethnicity, Crime and Justice. 3 Credits.

This course will examine the intersectionality of race, ethnicity, crime, justice and the operation of the criminal justice system and will critically assess controversial issues surrounding race, ethnicity, crime, and justice. Students will discuss contemporary social justice issues as they relate to race, ethnicity, crime, and justice. The theoretical frameworks that explain the intersection between race, ethnicity, crime and justice will be examined. The course will also investigate the broad range of policy issues and recommendations impacting communities of color and the administration of criminal and social justice. Prerequisite: CRJS 215S or SOC 201S.

SOC 452. Diversity in Criminal Justice Organizations. 3 Credits.

This course examines the impact of diversity, culture, and ethnic origin in criminal justice organizations. The course is designed to better prepare students to meet the challenge of diversity in criminal justice organizations. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S or permission of instructor.

SOC 494. Entrepreneurship in Sociology/Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to help students enhance their personal and professional development through innovation guided by faculty members and professionals. It offers students an opportunity to integrate disciplinary theory and knowledge through developing a nonprofit program, product, business, or other initiative. The real-world experiences that entrepreneurships provided will help students understand how academic knowledge leads to transformations, innovations, and solutions to different types of problems. The course can be delivered either as an independent project for individual students or as group projects similar to those sometimes offered in topics courses. Prerequisite: junior standing.

SOC 495/595. Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 496/596. Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 497/597. Independent Study. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the department chair.

SOC 498/598. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Sociology. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the department chair.

SOC 500. War and Gender. 3 Credits.

In this course students grapple with issues concerning war, gender roles, and gender inequality. The course addresses gender roles in war throughout history, globally and across cultures. However, the United States military and military involvement in the 20th and 21st century will remain the primary focus areas. Discussions include how social norms and ideals of masculinity and femininity shape, and in turn are shaped by, images and realities of war, including gendered aspects of nationalism and just war theories. The military involvement of men, women (and children) in war and in peacetime, as participants and observers, perpetrators and victims, supporters and opponents of war is also discussed.

SOC 502. Sociology of Child Welfare. 3 Credits.

A sociological analysis of the field of child welfare. Topics include social inequality as it applies to children as a group in the U.S. and globally; understanding violence against children within the global context of children's rights; examining data on the degree to which policies, programs and research in the field fail to protect children and why; prevalence, causes and consequences of child sexual, physical and emotional abuse and neglect; evaluation of programs like "family preservation" and placement in "substitute" care, i.e. foster care, adoption, institutionalization; changes that would protect and advance the interests and rights of children at the parent-child, agency and societal level.

SOC 505. Social Change and Social Movements. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the nature and causes of social change, major social movements, and their impact upon contemporary society.

SOC 521. Deviant Behavior. 3 Credits.

A study of various definitions and forms of deviant behavior, theoretical explanations of causes of deviant behavior and the impact of deviant behavior on society and the individual.

SOC 523. Women, Health and Healing. 3 Credits.

An examination of women's experiences with health and illness and women's roles in the health-care system as patients and care providers from a feminist sociological perspective.

SOC 526. The Sociology of Minority Groups. 3 Credits.

The study of the process of and responses to the oppression of racial, religious, ethnic, and national minorities in a variety of countries within a historical and comparative perspective. Special emphasis given to American minorities and especially African Americans.

SOC 527. Violence Against Women. 3 Credits.

A critical analysis of violence against women as an institution of social control. Examines violence in the context of social and political inequality and feminist critique. Issues explored include pornography, prostitution, sexual harassment, incest, battering and rape.

SOC 540. Sociology of Health and Wellbeing. 3 Credits.

The study of health and wellbeing. After exploring how health is conceptualized by the prevailing allopathic medical model, an emergent alternative or "integrative" health perspective is examined with a focus on how wellbeing may be understood.

SOC 541. Drugs and Society. 3 Credits.

Topics include changes in the legal status of drugs, cross-cultural and historical variations in the control and use of drugs, and social epidemiology of drug use in contemporary society.

SOC 595. Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors.

SOC 596. Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors.

SOC 597. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Sociology. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate.

SOC 598. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Sociology. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate.

SOC 610. Applied Social Research Methods. 3 Credits.

The application of social science methods to practical problems. The topics of research design, measurement, scaling, sampling, data collection, and research organization are taught with reference to issues of reliability, validity and ethical concerns.

SOC 615. Perspectives on Racial Inequality. 3 Credits.

This course explores racial inequality in the United States. The course is organized by the question: “Why, in 21st Century United States, are there still different social outcomes for the descendants of American slaves and descendants of European immigrants?” Students are given a selection of materials from a variety of perspectives attempting to answer the question.

SOC 620. Proseminar in Sociological Theory. 3 Credits.

An examination of classical and contemporary sociological theories about the relations between the individual and society; the ways theory shapes and informs the study of social issues; and the relationship among theory, research and practice.

SOC 627. Violence Against Women. 3 Credits.

This course examines the many ways in which violence against women functions as an agent of social control. Violence is viewed on a continuum in order to determine how a variety of acts contribute to the subordination of women. Specific types of violence are explored including: wife assault, rape, incest, sexual harassment and pornography.

SOC 630. Applied Social Statistics. 3 Credits.

This course is a graduate-level introduction to social statistics as they may be applied to various practical problems. Students will learn the appropriate use of various statistical procedures through discussion and application. Prerequisites: SOC 610.

SOC 640. Sociological Application of Computer and Data Analysis. 3 Credits.

This course is a graduate-level introduction to the use of the computer in problems of data management and analysis. Students will use existing software packages (e.g, SPSS, SAS) to build specified data files and carry out various statistical procedures. Prerequisites: SOC 610.

SOC 650. Research Seminar. 3 Credits.

This seminar integrates the skills needed to complete a master's thesis. Exercises include formulating research questions, developing a research design, and writing a publishable paper. Students practice these skills assignments in class and by completing their thesis proposal. Prerequisites: SOC 610, SOC 620 or CRJS 620, SOC 630, and SOC 640.

SOC 668. Internship. 3 Credits.

Students gain first-hand experience in professional settings which are deemed appropriate given their academic background and career objectives. Students will be required to complete a research project which corresponds to their specific internship placement. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

SOC 695. Topics of Sociology. 3 Credits.

Topics vary each semester.

SOC 696. Topics of Sociology. 3 Credits.

Topics vary each semester.

SOC 697. Independent Study in Special Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Approval of the department chair.

SOC 698. Independent Study in Special Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Approval of the department chair.

SOC 699. Thesis. 3-9 Credits.

Credit hours to continue thesis work.

SOC 740. Demographic Techniques. 3 Credits.

Basic methods of demographic analysis. Topics include population estimation and projection and the measurement of fertility, mortality, and migration.

SOC 795. Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

Topics vary by semester. Prerequisites: Six hours of graduate credit.

SOC 797. Independent Study in Sociology. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Prerequisites: Approval of department chair and 6 hours of graduate credit.

SOC 895. Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

Topics vary by semester. Prerequisites: Six hours of graduate credit.

SOC 897. Independent Study in Sociology. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Prerequisites: Approval of department chair and 6 hours of graduate credit.

SOC 998. Master's Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course for master's students in their final semester. It may be taken to fulfill the registration requirement necessary for graduation. All master's students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour in the semester of their graduation.

SOC 999. Doctoral Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course doctoral students may take to maintain active status after successfully passing the candidacy examination. All doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour every semester until their graduation.