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Old Dominion University

2013-2014 Catalog

Sociology and Criminal Justice

Xiushi Yang, Chair
Jeffrey Toussaint, Chief Department Advisor

The Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice offers courses in anthropology, criminal justice, sociology and social welfare.  Students may earn a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science with a major in sociology or criminal justice. The department also offers a Master of Arts in applied sociology with tracks in sociology, criminal justice, or women's studies and a Ph.D. in criminology and criminal justice. Please refer to the graduate catalog for more information on graduate programs.

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science – Sociology Major

Lower Division General Education
Written Communication *6
Oral Communication3
Mathematics3
Elementary Statistics (required)
Language and Culture **0-12
Information Literacy and Research3
Human Creativity3
Interpreting the Past3
Literature3
Philosophy and Ethics3
The Nature of Science8
Impact of Technology3
Human Behavior ***3
Total Hours41-53

*

Grade of C or better required in both courses and in ENGL 110C before declaring major.

**

BS students' competence must be at the 102 level; BA students must have competence through the 202 level and BA competency is not met by the associate degree.

***

SOC 201S cannot be used to satisfy this requirement.

Major Requirements

BA students must complete three credits from the Human Behavior Way of Knowing category in addition to the general education course selected, and BS students must complete an additional six credits.

Foundation Courses *12
Introduction to Sociology
Introduction to Social Research
Sociological Theory **
Capstone Research Project
Majors must select one of the following Emphasis Areas:
General Sociology Emphasis ***24
SOC 300-400 Level Electives
Social Welfare Emphasis24
Social Inequality
Social Welfare
Sociology of Child Welfare
Five SOC 300-400 Level Electives ****

*

Required of all emphasis areas.

**

Must be completed with a C or better

***

Up to six hours of internship course work may be used.

****

See course descriptions for choices.

Electives

Elective courses may be taken for the remainder of the minimum 120 credits required for the degree.

Upper Division General Education

  • Option A. Approved Minor, 12-24 hours; also second degree or second major.
  • Option B. Interdisciplinary Minor, 12 hours specified by the department, 3 of which may be in the major area of study.
  • Option C. International business and regional courses or an approved certification program, such as teaching licensure.
  • Option D. Two Upper-Division Courses from outside the College of Arts and Letters or from the Arts and Humanities Component within the College of Arts and Letters that are not required by the major (6 hours).

Requirements for graduation include a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 overall and in the major, 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours of upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or 221C and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, and completion of Senior Assessment.

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science - Criminal Justice Major

Students are urged to take elective courses or to consider minoring in psychology, sociology, political science, computer science, information systems, or management.

Students interested in careers in corrections work including probation and parole are urged to take courses in the social welfare sequence (SOC 320, SOC 325, SOC 402) and/or minor in either sociology with a social welfare specialization or human services.

Course requirements are as follows:

Lower Division General Education Credits

Lower Division General Education
Written Communication *6
Oral Communication3
Mathematics3
Elementary Statistics (required)
Language and Culture **0-12
Information Literacy and Research3
Human Creativity3
Interpreting the Past3
Literature3
Philosophy and Ethics3
The Nature of Science8
Impact of Technology3
Human Behavior3
Introduction to Sociology (required)
Total Hours41-53

*

Grade of C or better required in both courses and in ENGL 110C before declaring major

**

BS students' competence must be at the 102 level. BA students must have competence through the 202 level and BA competence is not met by the associate degree.

Major Requirements

BA and BS students must complete PSYC 201S. BS students must also complete three credits from the Human Behavior Way of Knowing category in addition to the general education course selected (CRJS 215S cannot be used to meet this requirement).

Foundation Courses18
Introduction to Criminology
The Criminal Justice System
Law and the Criminal Justice System
Introduction to Social Research
Criminological Theory *
Capstone Research Project
Stratification Course3
Social Inequality
Sociology of Minority Families
Sociology of Women
Sociology of Child Welfare
The Sociology of Minority Groups
The Sexes in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Upper Level Law Component3
Law and Social Control
Women, Sex Discrimination and the Law
Substantive Criminal Law
or other approved course
Criminal Justice 300-400 Level Electives **18
Total Hours42

*

 Course must be completed with a C or better

**

Any 300-400 level criminal justice course may satisfy the elective requirements. Up to six hours of internship course work may also be used.

Electives 

Elective courses may be taken for the remainder of the minimum 120 credits required for the degree.

Upper Division General Education

  • Option A. Approved Minor, 12-24 hours; also second degree or second major.
  • Option B. Interdisciplinary Minor, 12 hours specified by the department, 3 of which may be in the major area of study.
  • Option C. International business and regional courses or an approved certification program, such as teaching licensure.
  • Option D. Two Upper-Division Courses from outside the College of Arts and Letters or from the Arts and Humanities Component within the College of Arts and Letters that are not required by the major (6 hours).

Requirements for graduation include a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 overall and in the major, 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours of upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, and completion of Senior Assessment.

Minors in Sociology and Criminal Justice

Requirements for minors in sociology and criminal justice are as follows:

Sociology

SOC 201S is a prerequisite for the minor and is not included in the calculation of the grade point average for the minor. Required courses are:

Select one of the following:3
Social Inequality
Introduction to Social Research
Sociological Theory
300/400 Level Sociology Courses *9
Total Hours12

*

Excluding SOC 320 and SOC 368 

 A maximum of one topics course (SOC 395/SOC 396 or SOC 495/SOC 496) may be included. If SOC 320 or SOC 337 is used to satisfy another requirement, it cannot be used for the minor.

Sociology (Social Welfare Specialization)

SOC 201S is a prerequisite for the minor and is not included in the calculation of the grade point average for the minor. Required courses are:

SOC 325Social Welfare3
SOC 402Sociology of Child Welfare3
SOC 320Social Inequality3
One 300/400-level SOC course *3
Total Hours12

*

Excluding SOC 367 and SOC 368

Criminal Justice

CRJS 215S and CRJS 222 are prerequisites for the minor and are not included in the calculation of the grade point average for the minor. Required courses are:

Four 300/400-level Criminal Justice courses *12
Total Hours12

 

*

Excluding CRJS 367 and CRJS 368 

For completion of a minor, a student must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the minor exclusive of lower-level courses and prerequisite courses and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Children’s Rights Interdisciplinary Minor

Karen Polonko, Coordinator

This interdisciplinary minor is focused on the exploration of child rights within and across diverse disciplines and in the U.S. and internationally. This perspective challenges approaches in the various disciplines that have in their study of children traditionally denied or failed to recognize children’s human rights and dignity. In place of the traditional perspectives, courses in this interdisciplinary minor frame the study of children within the larger framework of human rights, more specifically, children’s rights and status as a group within society in social science research and theory, literature, the arts, humanities, education, counseling, law and public policy.

Course options are as follows:

COMM 427Children's Communication Theory and Research3
CRJS/SOC 403Violence in the World of Children3
CRJS/SOC 408Children's Rights and the Law3
HMSV 448Interventions and Advocacy with Children3
PSYC 351Child Psychology3
SOC 402Sociology of Child Welfare3
TLED 476Practical Applications in the World of Children3


The children's rights interdisciplinary minor requires 12 credit hours of 300/400-level courses selected from at least two different disciplines with a maximum of six credits from any one discipline.  For completion of the interdisciplinary minor, students must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the minor exclusive of lower-level courses and prerequisite courses.  At least six hours of 300/400 upper-level courses must be taken through courses offered by Old Dominion University.  Three credit hours may be in the major, if a major course is listed as an option for the interdisciplinary minor. As such, it will be credited toward both the major and the interdisciplinary minor. 

Double Major or Major and Minor in Criminal Justice and Sociology

Students double majoring in criminal justice and sociology (or vice versa) may use a maximum of five cross-listed courses for both majors. Students with a major in criminal justice and a minor in sociology (or vice versa) cannot use any cross-listed course to meet requirements for both the major and minor.

Advanced Placement

Students interested in credit by examination should consult with the department chair.

ANTHROPOLOGY Courses

ANTR 110S. Introduction to Anthropology. 3 Credits.

A survey of what we know about the emergence of humans: where we came from; how we developed physically and why; how human cultures became more complex through time; and the variety of human ways of life today.

ANTR 226S. Honors: Human Origins and Ways of Life An Introduction to Anthropology. 3 Credits.

A special Honors section of ANTR 110S. Open only to students in the Honors College.

ANTR 300. Human Cultures Around the World. 3 Credits.

A cross-cultural examination of human economic, social and ideological behavior, with the aim of showing both human cultural diversity and the ways in which the various parts of culture (e.g., trade, marriage practices, witchcraft, etc.) go together to make coherent wholes. Prerequisites: ANTR 110S.

ANTR 303. Biological Anthropology. 3 Credits.

Human physical and cultural evolution from our earliest primate beginnings through the appearance of anatomically modern humans. Prerequisites: ANTR 110S.

ANTR 304. Digging Up the Past. 3 Credits.

A comprehensive study of the philosophical and scientific foundations of archaeology and of a general prehistory to which they are applied. The course includes discussions of methods and theories used to reconstruct ancient Egypt and Mexico and other early cultures. Prerequisites: ANTR 110S or completion of the human behavior requirement or permission of the instructor.

ANTR 305. North American Archaeology. 3 Credits.

The study of the prehistory of native cultures north of Mexico from the peopling of the New World to contact with Europeans. Prerequisites: ANTR 110S or completion of the human behavior requirement or permission of the instructor.

ANTR 320. The Sexes in Cross-Cultural Perspective. 3 Credits.

An examination of the socialization and perpetuation of sex roles in different societies around the world. The course investigates issues of gender and sexuality throughout an individual's life. Prerequisites: ANTR 110S or completion of the human behavior perspective or permission of the instructor.

ANTR 395. Topics in Anthropology. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics, designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: ANTR 110S or permission of instructor.

ANTR 396. Topics in Anthropology. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics, designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors. Prerequisites: ANTR 110S or permission of instructor.

ANTR 495/595. Topics in Anthropology. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for either majors or nonmajors. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: Senior standing or approval of the department chair.

ANTR 496/596. Topics in Anthropology. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for either majors or nonmajors. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: Senior standing or approval of the department chair.

ANTR 497/597. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Anthropology. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of department chair.

ANTR 498/598. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Anthropology. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of department chair.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE Courses

CRJS 215S. Introduction to Criminology. 3 Credits.

Introduction to criminology as a science, including the study of crime, criminals, and society's response to them.

CRJS 222. The Criminal Justice System. 3 Credits.

A study of social response to criminal behavior as cases move through the machinery of justice. Describes the interdependence of crime statistics, law enforcement, criminal courts, and correctional procedures for purposes of analyzing the entire system.

CRJS 226S. Honors: Introduction to Criminology. 3 Credits.

Open only to students in the Honors College. Special honors section of CRJS 215S.

CRJS 262. Law and the Criminal Justice System. 3 Credits.

The course covers both substantive and procedural law related to the definitions, investigations, processing and punishment of crimes. It is meant to provide the students with an overall understanding of the articulation between law and the criminal justice system.

CRJS 316. Juvenile Delinquency. 3 Credits.

A study of juvenile misbehavior in the contemporary community, its nature, extent, treatment, and control, including juvenile court procedure and philosophy. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or SOC 201S or permission of instructor.

CRJS 317. Correctional Institutions. 3 Credits.

Examines the history of prisons and jails, their formal and informal organization, their effects on individuals, and issues and philosophies of penal reform. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or CRJS 222 or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 318. Probation, Parole and Community-Based Corrections. 3 Credits.

Examines the history, law, administration and social setting of probation, parole and other noninstitutional sentencing alternatives. Also explores nontraditional alternatives to criminal adjudication such as arbitration and diversion programs. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 319. Public and Private Security. 3 Credits.

The organization of security systems in public and private agencies and institutions. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 320. Law and Social Control. 3 Credits.

Examines the creation, use and effectiveness of formal and informal mechanisms of social control for both criminal and noncriminal deviant behavior. Cross-cultural comparisons are given special emphasis. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 323. Police in American Society. 3 Credits.

Examines the role of police in a free society. Police functions, subculture, community relations and decision making receive special attention. Problems such as police corruption, violence and the methods by which society attempts to control police behavior are also discussed. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or CRJS 222 or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 325. Women and Crime. 3 Credits.

Examines the role of women as offenders, victims and employees of the criminal justice system. Theories of female criminality and the treatment of female offenders are explored. Attention is given to the victimization of women, specifically wife abuse and rape, problems of minority women, and the impact of current legislation. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 340. White-Collar Crime. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: CRJS 215S. This course will describe and explain corporate, state-corporate, government (state) crime and crimes of globalization from sociological and criminological perspectives. Although the course will deal with the general topic of white collar crime, the specific focus will be on organizational offenders such as business corporations, government, state agencies and international finance organizations.

CRJS 345. Organized Crime: A Survey of Domestic and World-Wide Organized Crime Activities. 3 Credits.

A broad survey of the history and consequences of organized crime in the United States and the world. Special focus will be directed at the economic, social and developmental effects of organized criminal activities. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S, CRJS 222, or CRJS 262.

CRJS 350. Victimology. 3 Credits.

Examination of the multifaceted problem of criminal victimization. Focuses on defining victimization, the incidents of victimization, social characteristics of victims, treatment of victims in the criminal justice system, and efforts designed to alleviate the consequences of victimization. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S or six hours of social science perspective or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 355. Crime and the Community. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the effect of crime on communities and the ways in which communities affect crime. The class considers both ethnographic community studies as well as larger-scale demographic analysis. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 367. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits.

Student participation for credit based on the academic relevance of the work experience, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and Career Management prior to the semester in which the work experience is to take place. Available for pass/fail grading only. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: Approval of the department and Career Management in accordance with the policy for granting credit for Cooperative Education programs.

CRJS 368. Internship. 1-6 Credits.

This course allows students to volunteer to work in an agency related to their major. Students must volunteer for 50 hours per course credit. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: Approval by the department internship director.

CRJS 369. Practicum. 3-6 Credits.

Field experience in a criminal justice area.(Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: Permission of the department chair.

CRJS 395. Topics in Criminal Justice. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 396. Topics in Criminal Justice. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 401/501. Understanding Violence. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or SOC 201S or permission of instructor. Examines a variety of forms of violence from suicide, child abuse, rape and family violence, terrorism, torture, death squads and the death penalty and hate violence. Explores the circumstances, rationalizations, patterns, explanations and effects on survivors.

CRJS 403. Violence in the World of Children. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S or six hours in human behavior or permission of the instructor. This child-centered course examines the interaction of adults in violent conflict with the world of children, children's experience of violence and its meaning in the lives of children. Topics include: valuing children, violence toward children in culture, families, and schools; child physical and sexual abuse and neglect; gangs, violent communities and children and war. The effects of childhood experiences of violence, children's coping with violence, and alternatives to violence are also developed.

CRJS 408. Children's Rights and the Law. 3 Credits.

A study of the law concerning children from a children’s rights perspective. The rights of children in the US will be compared to other nations with special emphasis being placed on the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Prerequisites: SOC 201S OR CRJS 215S or related social science Way of Knowing or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 410/510. Correctional Treatment. 3 Credits.

Methods and programs which attempt to correct the behaviors of juvenile delinquents and adult criminal offenders are explored. Treatment strategies employed in both community and institutional settings are examined. Techniques of classification and the role of the correctional worker are also discussed. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or CRJS 222 or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 415. Courtroom As a Social System. 3 Credits.

An overview of the role of all of the actors in the American courtroom, the interaction of these actors and the effect of social forces on their behavior. Includes prosecutor, plaintiff and defense lawyers, judges, juries, eye witnesses, expert witnesses, and court staff. Prerequisites: CRJS 222 or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 416. The American Jury. 3 Credits.

A review of the literature, law and practical materials that cover the American jury system from the creation of the master list through the verdict. Includes history, social context and jury selection. Prerequisites: CRJS 222 or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 418. Crime, Society, and the Media. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or CRJS 222 or permission of the instructor. A critical exploration of media portrayals of crime and criminal justice. News and entertainment genres are examined. Connections between the mass media and crime, culture, politics, society, and individual behavior receive special attention.

CRJS 421/521. Deviant Behavior. 3 Credits.

A study of various definitions and forms of deviant behavior, theoretical explanations of causes of deviant behavior, and the impact of deviant behavior on society and the individual. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 426W/526. Criminological Theory. 3 Credits.

An in-depth study of the major theoretical issues in criminology. Deals extensively with issues of crime causation. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: Senior standing, CRJS 215S, and grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 427/527. Violence Against Women. 3 Credits.

A critical analysis of violence against women as an institution of social control. Examines violence in the context of social and political inequality and feminist critique. Issues explored include pornography, prostitution, sexual harassment, incest, battering and rape. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S or other human behavior course or permission of instructor.

CRJS 430. Homicide. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S or another human behavior course. This course explores the topic of homicide in the U.S. It includes a discussion of the types of homicide, historical patterns and trends, and characteristics of offenders and victims. A variety of theoretical frameworks are utilized to examine homicide at micro and macro levels. In-depth examination of specific types of homicide is included.

CRJS 436. Capstone Research Project. 3 Credits.

Students work in groups to plan, design, and carry out a research project. Final papers which report the results for the study are presented in a formal research seminar. The projects reflect knowledge gained from undergraduate work and training received in STAT 130M and SOC 337. Prerequisites: Senior standing, STAT 130M and SOC 337.

CRJS 441/541. Drugs and Society. 3 Credits.

The study of sociological and social-psychological explanations of drug-using behaviors and of legal and medical control of drugs. Topics include changes in the legal status of drugs, cross-cultural and historical variations in the control of drugs, and social epidemiology of drug use in contemporary society. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S.

CRJS 444. Community Justice. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S. This is a service learning course designed to study how the emerging field of community justice, a neighborhood-based strategy, can reduce crime and improve public safety by investing in social, human and cultural capital.

CRJS 448/548. Women, Sex Discrimination and the Law. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to legal issues which specifically affect women and examines historical attitudes that have been used to justify differential treatment of women. It explores various legal approaches used to achieve equal protection under the law and examines a variety of specific topics such as: the equal protection analysis; Title VII and Title IX and their relationship to sex discrimination; affirmative action; and reproductive freedom. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 450/550. Blacks, Crime and Justice. 3 Credits.

Examines historical and contemporary theories and research on African-Americans, criminal behavior and the administration of justice. Selected topics will include African-American perspectives, the death penalty, victimization, police brutality, and justice systems in Africa and the Caribbean. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S and CRJS 222 or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 452. Diversity in Criminal Justice Organizations. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S or permission of instructor. This course examines the impact of diversity, culture, and ethnic origin in criminal justice organizations. The course is designed to better prepare students to meet the challenge of diversity in criminal justice organizations.

CRJS 462/562. Substantive Criminal Law. 3 Credits.

This course deals with the major substantive concepts involved in American criminal law, including development of criminal law, elements of criminal liability, defenses against criminal responsibility, and descriptions and definitions of specific offenses. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or CRJS 222 or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 475/575. Criminal Justice Systems Around the World. 3 Credits.

The study of criminal justice systems around the world in order to understand how criminal behavior is defined and responded to in various cultures. Cultural differences will be highlighted in order to recognize that definitions of and responses to crimes closely reflect the cultures in which they exist. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or CRJS 222 or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 495/595. Topics in Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 496/596. Topics in Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor.

CRJS 497/597. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Criminal Justice. 1-3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the department chair. Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate.

CRJS 498/598. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Criminal Justice. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the department chair.

SOCIOLOGY Courses

SOC 201S. Introduction to Sociology. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the discipline and methods of sociology. Major topics include socialization, social inequality, family, education, gender roles, ethnic and minority relations.

SOC 226S. Honors: Introduction to Sociology. 3 Credits.

Open only to students in the Honors College. A special honors section of SOC 201S.

SOC 300. Social Problems. 3 Credits.

An analysis of the major social problems confronting groups and individuals in a society marked by rapid change. Emphasis is given to the study of social phenomena including both historical and comparative perspectives. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 303. Introduction to Marriage and the Family. 3 Credits.

A wide variety of topics are covered, including gender-role socialization, dating, premarital sex, power, negotiation, conflict and violence as well as satisfaction in relationships, singlehood, cohabitation, commuter and dual-career relationships, and relationship dissolution. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 306. Religion and Society. 3 Credits.

Sociological analysis of religion as a social institution, of the functions of religion and its relationship to other institutions and to social change, and of the religious behavior of individuals. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 309. Population and Society. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Six semester hours in human behavior or permission of the instructor. This course offers an introduction to the field of population and its interconnection to broader societal changes. It introduces students to the concepts, issues and concerns in population studies and examines the interaction between population processes and economic development, social changes and environment. Topics include theories, fertility, mortality, migration, distribution and composition, population and development, population and environment, and policy. Emphasis is given to a critical assessment of population processes as both causes and consequences of development and societal changes with a focus on comparative patterns between developing countries and the more developed countries.

SOC 316. Juvenile Delinquency. 3 Credits.

A study of juvenile misbehavior in the contemporary community, its nature, extent, treatment, and control, including juvenile court procedure and philosophy. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or SOC 201S or permission of instructor.

SOC 320. Social Inequality. 3 Credits.

An analysis of social differentiation, stratification, and social class. Emphasis is placed upon modern American society, with some comparison with historical and contemporary systems of other societies. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 323. Sociology of Minority Families. 3 Credits.

Examination and explanation of minority families' lives in relationship to other societal institutions and historical developments. The course focuses on issues of minority families and places these issues in a sociological framework, e.g., stratification, poverty and gender. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 325. Social Welfare. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the broad field of social welfare. The philosophy, values, purposes, goals, and functions of social welfare are examined. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 330. Society and the Individual. 3 Credits.

Social psychological theory and research on current topics of interest on the relationship of the individual to society. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 337. Introduction to Social Research. 3 Credits.

An overview of the scientific approach to the study of social phenomena. Includes the application of descriptive measures, graphic techniques, survey and experimental analysis to the study of these phenomena and techniques for making qualitative judgements about such research. Prerequisites: CRJS 215S or SOC 201S.

SOC 340. Sociology of Women. 3 Credits.

An exploration of the role and status of women in contemporary American society from a feminist sociological perspective. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or six credits in human behavior or permission of the instructor.

SOC 342. Feminist Research Methods. 3 Credits.

An introduction to feminist critiques of mainstream social science research methods and to feminist approaches to social science research as applied to current issues pertaining to women. Prerequisites: WMST 201S and an introductory human behavior research methods course or permission of the instructor.

SOC 343. Sociology of Sexuality. 3 Credits.

Study of the sociological research and theory on sexuality. Wide range of issues covered including childhood sexuality and arousal, premarital sex, adult erotic behavior, response to pornography, rape and incest. Prerequisites: SOC 201S.

SOC 345. Philippine Society & Culture. 3 Credits.

This course examines the social forces that shape the Philippines and their impact on the country’s social, cultural, economic and political development. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 346. The Filipino American Community. 3 Credits.

The course examines the histories, lived experiences, cultures, identities, and contributions of Filipino Americans. Using multiple theoretical perspectives it explores the intersection of class, race/ethnicity, gender, and specific immigration circumstances and historical background that are paramount in the community. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 352. War and Peace. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the nature and implications of nuclear weapons. Focus on sociological and psychological dimensions of the nuclear threat. Prerequisites: Six hours of human behavior courses or permission of the instructor.

SOC 353. Sociology of the Middle East. 3 Credits.

A comparative survey of population and culture and other sociological characteristics of Middle Eastern and Arab League States. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or six hours of human behavior or permission of the instructor.

SOC 367. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits.

Student participation for credit based on the academic relevance of the work experience, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and Career Management prior to the semester in which the work experience is to take place. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: Approval of the department and Career Management.

SOC 368. Internship. 1-6 Credits.

This course allows students to volunteer in an agency related to their major for pass/fail credit. Students must volunteer for 50 hours per course credit. Internships for fewer than 3 credits require prior approval by the Internship Faculty Director. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: Permission of the department internship director.

SOC 369. Practicum. 3-6 Credits.

This course is for students participating in the Career Advantage Program. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

SOC 395. Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 396. Topics in Sociology. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 400/500. War and Gender. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: SOC 201S and junior standing. In this course students grapple with issues concerning war, gender roles, and gender inequality. The course addresses gender roles in war throughout history, globally and across cultures. However, the United States military and military involvement in the 20th and 21st century remain the primary focus areas. Discussions include how social norms and ideals of masculinity and femininity shape, and in turn are shaped by, images and realities of war, including gendered aspects of nationalism and just war theories. The military involvement of men, women (and children) in war and in peacetime, as participants and observers, perpetrators and victims, supporters and opponents of war is also discussed.

SOC 402/502. Sociology of Child Welfare. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: SOC 201S. A sociological analysis of the field of child welfare. Topics include social inequality as it applies to children as a group in the U.S. and globally; understanding violence against children within the global context of children's rights; examining data on the degree to which policies, programs and research in the field fail to protect children and why; prevalence, causes and consequences of child sexual, physical and emotional abuse and neglect; evaluation of programs like "family preservation" and of placement in "substitute" care, i.e., foster care, adoption, institutionalization; changes that would protect and advance the interests and rights of children at the parent-child, agency, and societal level.

SOC 403. Violence in the World of Children. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Six hours in the human behavior perspective or SOC 201S or CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor. This 'child- centered' course examines the interaction of adults in violent conflict with the world of children, children's experience of violence and its meaning in the lives of children. Topics include: valuing children, violence toward children in culture, families, and schools; child physical and sexual abuse and neglect; gangs, violent communities, and children and war. The effects of childhood experiences of violence, children's coping with violence, and alternatives to violence are also developed.

SOC 405/505. Social Change and Social Movements. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the nature and causes of social change, major social movements, and their impact upon contemporary society. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 408. Children's Rights and the Law. 3 Credits.

A study of the law concerning children from a children’s rights perspective. The rights of children in the US will be compared to other nations with special emphasis being placed on the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Prerequisites: SOC 201S OR CRJS 215S or related human behavior Way of Knowing or permission of the instructor.

SOC 409W. Sociological Theory. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: SOC 201S and a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C. The development of sociological thought during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Analysis of major contributions to the development of systematic thinking in contemporary sociology. (This is a writing intensive course.).

SOC 415. Sociology of Work and Occupations. 3 Credits.

The study of the social processes involved in the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services within various political economic systems. Includes the study of occupations and the nature of work. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 421/521. Deviant Behavior. 3 Credits.

A study of various definitions and forms of deviant behavior, theoretical explanations of causes of deviant behavior and the impact of deviant behavior on society and the individual. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 423/523. Women, Health and Healing. 3 Credits.

An examination of women's experiences with health and illness and women's roles in the health-care system as patients and care providers from a feminist sociological perspective. Prerequisites: Six hours of human behavior courses or permission of the instructor.

SOC 426/526. The Sociology of Minority Groups. 3 Credits.

The study of the process of and responses to the oppression of racial, religious, ethnic, and national minorities in a variety of countries within a historical and comparative perspective. Special emphasis given to American minorities and especially African Americans. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 427/527. Violence Against Women. 3 Credits.

A critical analysis of violence against women as an institution of social control. Examines violence in the context of social and political inequality and feminist critique. Issues explored include pornography, prostitution, sexual harassment, incest, battering and rape. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 436. Capstone Research Project. 3 Credits.

Students work in groups to plan, design, and carry out a research project. Final papers which report the results of the study are presented in a formal research seminar. The projects are to reflect knowledge gained from undergraduate work and training received in STAT 130M and SOC 337. Prerequisites: SOC 337 and STAT 130M and senior status.

SOC 438. Sociology of Education. 3 Credits.

Sociological theory and research investigating contemporary education as a social institution. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 440/540. Health, Illness, and Society. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Six hours in human behavior or permission of the instructor. The study of social and social-psychological factors related to health, illness, and treatment with a focus on social epidemiology, the medical industry, and health, illness, and sick-role behavior.

SOC 441/541. Drugs and Society. 3 Credits.

The study of sociological and social psychological explanations of drug-using behaviors and of legal and medical control of drugs. Topics include changes in the legal status of drugs, cross-cultural and historical variations in the control and use of drugs, and social epidemiology of drug use in contemporary society. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 444. Community Justice. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S. This is a service learning course designed to study how the emerging field of community justice, a neighborhood-based strategy, can reduce crime and improve public safety by investing in social, human and cultural capital.

SOC 446. Social Issues Across the Life Cycle. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on age stratification across the life cycle. An analysis of social forces and issues affecting lives at various stages of the life cycle is offered. Prerequisites: Six hours in sociology or permission of the instructor.

SOC 452. Diversity in Criminal Justice Organizations. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: SOC 201S or CRJS 215S or permission of instructor. This course examines the impact of diversity, culture, and ethnic origin in criminal justice organizations. The course is designed to better prepare students to meet the challenge of diversity in criminal justice organizations.

SOC 495/595. Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 496/596. Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: SOC 201S or permission of the instructor.

SOC 497/597. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Sociology. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the department chair.

SOC 498/598. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Sociology. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the department chair.