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Old Dominion University

2014-2015 Catalog

ENGL - English

ENGLISH Courses

ENGL 110C. English Composition. 3 Credits.

The principal objective of the course is to prepare students to be effective writers of the kinds of compositions they will be called on to produce during their college careers. By the end of the course, students should be more mature in their understanding and use of language, should develop efficient writing processes, and should know and demonstrate the qualities of effective composition in a given rhetorical situation. Prerequisites: A passing grade on the Writing Sample Placement Test.

ENGL 112L. Introduction to Literature. 3 Credits.

This course shows the general student how to understand the distinctive forms and meanings of poems, plays, short stories and fiction, and key notions such as character, plot, and imagery. Through critical reading, analysis, class and small group discussions, formal essays and examinations, students will develop an understanding of the effective use of the English language and its contribution to our cultural heritage. Works include women and minority writers.

ENGL 114L. American Writers, American Experiences. 3 Credits.

This course introduces the student to the diversity of American culture as depicted in American literature. Works include minority and women writers and provide visions of city, frontier and regional life; ethnic and racial immigrant experiences; religion, democracy, can capitalism. A student with credit for ENGL 144L cannot receive credit for ENGL 114L.

ENGL 126C. Honors: English Composition. 3 Credits.

Special honors sections of ENGL 110C. Prerequisites: A passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test.

ENGL 127L. Honors: Introduction to Literature. 3 Credits.

Open only to students in the Honors College. A special honors section of ENGL 112L.

ENGL 200. Introduction to English Studies. 1 Credit.

A preview of the subject areas of an English major (literature, linguistics, creative writing, journalism, professional writing, rhetoric, teaching) with attention to the student's curricular and career planning. Required of English majors. Open to anyone interested in English.

ENGL 211C. English Composition. 3 Credits.

This course emphasizes critical reading, thinking, and writing. Students are introduced to principles of analysis and argumentation and taught the requisite skills that will allow them properly to paraphrase, summarize, and synthesize research in the common modes of academic writing. The course culminates in the preparation of a fully-documented research paper. A student with credit for ENGL 111C cannot receive credit for ENGL 211C. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C with a grade of C or higher.

ENGL 221C. Introduction to Writing in Business, Education and Social Sciences. 3 Credits.

This course emphasizes critical reading, thinking, and writing as they apply to business, education, and the social sciences. Students are introduced to principles of analysis and argumentation and taught the requisite skills that will allow them to properly paraphrase, summarize, and synthesize research as it applies to and is most commonly found in business, education, and the social sciences. The course culminates in the preparation of a fully-documented research paper. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C.

ENGL 231C. Introduction to Technical Writing. 3 Credits.

This course emphasizes critical reading, thinking, and writing as they apply to the technical and scientific disciplines. Students are introduced to principles of analysis and argumentation and taught the requisite skills that will allow them properly to paraphrase, summarize, and synthesize research as it applies to and is most commonly found in the technical and scientific communities. The course culminates in the preparation of a fully-documented research paper. A student with credit for ENGL 131C cannot receive credit for ENGL 231C. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C.

ENGL 300. Introduction to Creative Writing. 3 Credits.

A creative writing workshop course combining individual conferences with the instructor and class discussion of student writing. Students will work in fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C and a passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test.

ENGL 301. Introduction to British Literature I. 3 Credits.

A survey of British literature from the beginning of textual records until 1780, focusing on the development of different literary forms in their social and cultural contexts. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, literature way of knowing requirement, and 6-hour General Education composition requirement or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 302. Introduction to British Literature II. 3 Credits.

A survey of British literature after 1780, focusing on the development of different literary forms in their social and cultural contexts. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, literature way of knowing requirement and 6-hour General Education composition requirement or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 303. Shakespeare's Histories and Comedies. 3 Credits.

An exploration of Shakespearean comedy and historical drama, through plays such as, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, As You Like It, Measure for Measure, and The Tempest for the former; Richard II, Henry IV, and Richard III for the latter. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, literature way of knowing requirement, 6-hour General Education composition requirement, and three additional hours in literature or permission of instructor.

ENGL 304. Shakespeare's Tragedies and Poetry. 3 Credits.

A study of Shakespearean poetry and tragedy through the longer poems and the sonnets for the former, and through plays such as Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra for the latter. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, literature way of knowing requirement, 6-hour General Education composition requirement, and three additional hours in literature or permission of instructor.

ENGL 307T. Digital Writing. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to issues of writing in various digital environments like web pages, email, blogs, wikis, and discussion boards. It also introduces fundamentals of hypertext authoring, digital and visual rhetoric, and image manipulation. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 312. The Film. 3 Credits.

A multimedia course using slides, video cassettes, and 16mm films to increase appreciation of film as an art form, particularly as a narrative medium. Attention is given to all the elements of filmmaking (including directing, acting, writing, editing, visual composition, and music), especially as they contribute to the way films tell stories. After students become familiar with film techniques, they study eight to ten films for their narrative methods. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and three semester hours in English.

ENGL 325. Introduction to Rhetorical Studies. 3 Credits.

Explores the nature and function of rhetoric and its contribution to the knowledge-making enterprises of English studies and other disciplines. Students will use that 'lens' to assess the effectiveness of their own language practices. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and 6-hour General Education composition requirement.

ENGL 327W. Advanced Composition. 3 Credits.

This course emphasizes development of a mature, professional style in expository writing by study of the stylistic and analytical principles underlying effective prose writing. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and a grade of C or better in one of the following: ENGL 211C, ENGL 221C, or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 333. Introduction to Critical Theory. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to theories about the nature and value of literature and gives them experience in applying such theories to specific literary texts. Prerequisites: Passing score on Writing Sample Placement Test and three hours of literature or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 334W. Technical Writing. 3 Credits.

This course provides the student with a working knowledge of various types of technical communication, including the writing of proposals, instructions, and reports for both the specialist and the nonspecialist. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and a grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 335. Editing and Document Design. 3 Credits.

This course provides practical experience in copy editing and includes an analysis of technical formats used in journalism, business, industry, and government. It features hands-on lab work in document presentation, page layout, and design. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and six hours in English to include ENGL 334W or ENGL 380.

ENGL 336. The Short Story. 3 Credits.

A genre course on the art of the short story. Students will explore how the writers' careful selection of detail creates meanings that emerge through the characters, plot, setting, diction, point of view, and other elements of fiction. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, literature way of knowing requirement and 6-hour General Education composition requirement or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 340. American Drama. 3 Credits.

A study of American drama from its beginnings to the present day. The course includes plays from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with a generous selection from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, literature way of knowing requirement and 6-hour General Education composition requirement or permission of instructor.

ENGL 342. Southern Literature. 3 Credits.

A survey of the literature of the American South from William Byrd to Ernest Gaines. Selected writings are studied not only for their literary value but also as expressions of evolving regional attitudes to be evaluated in terms of the mainstream of American culture. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, literature way of knowing requirement and 6-hour General Education composition requirement or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 345. American Literature to 1860. 3 Credits.

The course presents a survey of American literature from the beginning to the Civil War. Among the authors studied are Franklin, Bryant, Poe, Hawthorne, Emerson, Thoreau, and Melville. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, literature way of knowing requirement and 6-hour General Education composition requirement or permission of instructor.

ENGL 346. American Literature Since 1860. 3 Credits.

The course focuses upon major movements and writers. Among the authors studied are Whitman, Twain, James, and Frost. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, literature way of knowing requirement and 6-hour General Education composition requirement or permission of instructor.

ENGL 349. The Contemporary American Novel. 3 Credits.

Reading and analysis of American novels published since 1945. Emphasis on contemporary themes and techniques. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, literature way of knowing requirement and 6-hour General Education composition requirement or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 350. Aspects of the English Language. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the grammar of mainstream English. Primary focus is on analyzing English sentences, including study of parts of speech, phrases, clauses, and sentence types. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and junior standing or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 351. Fiction Workshop. 3 Credits.

Students write, criticize, discuss, and revise works of fiction. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test; ENGL 300 and junior standing or permission of the instructor, based on writing samples submitted.

ENGL 352. Poetry Workshop. 3 Credits.

Students write, criticize, discuss, and revise poetry. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test; ENGL 300; and junior standing or permission of the instructor, based on writing samples submitted.

ENGL 354. Client-Based Research Writing. 3 Credits.

This is a client-based research course that aims to provide students with workplace research experience. The primary objective is to teach students the rhetorical nature of conducting and reporting research in professional contexts for multiple audiences. Research methods such as surveys, interviews, and observations will be covered. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C.

ENGL 360. World Masterpieces I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to selected major works in translation from the beginnings of world literature through the early seventeenth century. Works will be chosen that illustrate the relationship of literature to cultural tradition in different global regions. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, literature way of knowing requirement, 6-hour General Education composition requirement, and three additional hours in literature or permission of instructor.

ENGL 363. World Masterpieces II. 3 Credits.

An introduction to selected major works of literature in translation from the seventeenth century to the present day. Works from a variety of world cultures will be used to explore the interaction between literature and society in centuries of expanding global awareness. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, literature way of knowing requirement, 6-hour General Education composition requirement, and three additional hours in literature or permission of instructor.

ENGL 366. Public Journalism in the Digital Age. 3 Credits.

This course exposes students to conventional and alternative approaches to reporting in public journalism. Students use a combination of conventional and alternative approaches as they research, interview and construct a story on a local community issue or concern. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C; ENGL 380 or ENGL 382 or COMM 260 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 367. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits.

Student participation for credit based on the academic relevance of the work experience, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and the Cooperative Education program prior to the semester in which the work experience is to take place. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and approval of the department and Career Management.

ENGL 368. Writing Internship. 1-3 Credits.

A structured work experience involving writing and/or editing. A paper, a portfolio of work done, and satisfactory evaluations by supervisor and cooperating faculty member are required. No more than two English internships (chosen among 368, 369, 468, or cooperative education courses of similar content) may be counted towards a degree. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and 15 hours in English, with ENGL 327W or ENGL 334W recommended; permission of departmental internship coordinator.

ENGL 369. Research Practicum. 3 Credits.

This course enables students to combine traditional research in scholarship with real world applications. Can be repeated for credit. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, ENGL 327W or ENGL 335, plus 15 hours in the major (with sufficient coursework in an involved emphasis) and approval by faculty practicum advisor.

ENGL 370. English Linguistics. 3 Credits.

A survey of topics in English linguistics. Topics include the sound system, the structure of words, the ways in which words and phrases form meaningful utterances, the structure of conversations, differences between spoken and written English, language acquisition by children, language variation, and language in its social context. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and junior standing or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 371W. Communication Across Cultures. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary examination of intercultural communication through film and readings in anthropology, linguistics, and world literature, this course will compare the values, beliefs, social structures and conventions of a number of cultures to those of the U.S. This course is part of the World Cultures interdisciplinary minor. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 380. Reporting and News Writing I. 3 Credits.

This class focuses on media literacy and on the role of media in society. Students learn and practice elements of news writing, including writing leads, organizing stories, reporting techniques, and interviewing. Story assignments come from handouts, press releases, press conferences, speeches, and public meetings. Some assignments are completed under simulated deadline pressure in the computer lab. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and six semester hours in English.

ENGL 381. Public Relations. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce the student to certain disciplines related to the public relations process. The emphasis is equally distributed between the handling of written materials and the dynamics of group relations, i.e., the publicist and the person or persons whom he or she is representing. The focus is distinguished from advertising by virtue of its emphasis upon public service, particularly the continued need for the free flow of information in the democratic process. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and six semester hours in English.

ENGL 382. Reporting News for Television and Digital Media. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on writing for television news and producing online news reports. Students strengthen their journalistic skills and learn the importance of writing clearly for a viewing audience while working under newsroom deadlines. By the end of the course, students should feel confident in producing accurate, detailed reports for both television news and online news sites. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C.

ENGL 395. Topics in English. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and three semester hours in literature.

ENGL 396. Topics in English. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and three semester hours in literature.

ENGL 403/503. Medieval Literature. 3 Credits.

An introduction to representative works of English literature (some in translation) from Beowulf through Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, The Book of Margery Kempe, The Second Shepherd's Play, and Malory's Morte d'Arthur. Students will discover how medieval literature has contributed to and continues to complicate modern conceptions of reading, writing, and aesthetics. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and one 300-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 406/506. The Teaching of Literature. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide an intensive examination of issues, approaches, and methods utilized in the teaching of literature, particularly literature written for children and young adults. Prerequisites: One 300-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 407/507. Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. 3 Credits.

A study of The Canterbury Tales with an introduction to Middle English language and culture. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and three semester hours in literature.

ENGL 414/514. Motherhood: Texts and Images. 3 Credits.

This course examines the role of the mother, the experience of mothering and the institution of motherhood through a number of disciplinary and theoretical lenses. It considers how motherhood functions to women's advantage or disadvantage, in professional and economic areas as well as the mother's ideological construction in public discourse, imagery, nonfiction, and film. Prerequisites: ENGL 211C or equivalent.

ENGL 416/516. English Renaissance Drama. 3 Credits.

An extensive survey of the secular national dramas of Renaissance England that were written and performed by Shakespeare's contemporaries in London between 1576 and 1642. Students study the literary features, social contexts and ideological underpinning of representative works by Kyd, Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, Ford, and others. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and one 300-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 418W/518. Jewish Writers. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the Jewish literary traditions and the cultural trends shaping these traditions and the Jewish identity. It will examine the impact of such issues as immigration, family, marginality, the Holocaust, assimilation, cultural diversity, feminism, Israel, race and religion. The readings will consist of short stories, poems, essays, novels, and autobiographical writing. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: One 300-level literature course or permission of instructor and a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 421/521. British Literature 1660-1800. 3 Credits.

British literature from the Restoration of the monarchy after the Civil War and Puritan Commonwealth to the French Revolution, focusing on how cultural changes (legalized female actors, commercialized printing, colonialism, and growing market capitalism) interacted with the flowering of satire and scandalous theatrical comedy, and the emergence of modern literary forms (periodical journalism, 'picturesque' poetry, and the novel). Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and one 300-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 423/523. The Romantic Movement in Britain. 3 Credits.

A study of the literature written in Britain between 1770-1830, focusing on how the literary experiments and innovations of poets like Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Percy Shelley, Keats, Burns, and Barbauld, and of novelists like Mary Shelley, Radcliffe, and Scott interacted with cultural changes such as the Industrial Revolution, the French Revolution, and the emergence of feminism and working-class radicalism. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and one 300-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 424/524. Short Works in Narrative Media. 3 Credits.

This course examines short narrative forms in film, video, literature, and multi-media. Individual works will be considered, both for the specific ways in which they make use of the medium in which they appear and for the qualities they share. Particular emphasis will be placed on the relationship between writing and visualization. Students will engage in both creative and critical exercises, so as to see the process from both sides: creative production and critical analysis. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and ENGL 312 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 425/525. World Film Directors in Context. 3 Credits.

This course will explore the works of several directors from a variety of world regions. Films will be considered as part of the body of work by each director, as well as in the context of the regions' other arts, traditions, popular culture, and historical events. Students will become familiar, therefore, with aesthetic, literary, sociological, anthropological and historical approaches to the analysis of film. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and ENGL 312 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 427W/527. Writing in the Disciplines. 3 Credits.

This is a discussion/workshop course emphasizing contexts and strategies of text production in and across academic disciplines and professional settings. Students will produce a variety of texts designed to meet the needs of specific audiences. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 432/532. Origins and Early Development of the British Novel to 1800. 3 Credits.

A study of early novels and how the novel developed from other traditions such as the epic, romance, criminal biography, and travel narrative. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and one 300-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 433/533. Victorian Literature. 3 Credits.

A study of the chief writers and the cultural and philosophical backgrounds of the Victorian era, touching on the changes from the early to the later part of the period. Works analyzed include fiction, nonfiction prose, and poetry. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and one 300-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 435W/535. Management Writing. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on writing as a means of making and presenting management decisions. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, and six semester hours in English, to include ENGL 334W or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 438/538. The Twentieth-Century British Novel. 3 Credits.

Offered in specific sections of 1900-1945, 1945-present, 1900-present. Major British novels are studied. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and one 300-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 439/539. Writing in Digital Spaces. 3 Credits.

This course offers composition practice in critical contemporary digital environments. Readings and discussions will provide the history of and context for these digital spaces. Students should expect to participate in, develop, and engage in critical discussions about a range of digital spaces, including websites, wikis, blogs, and various interactive media. Prerequisites: ENGL 307T or equivalent or permission of instructor.

ENGL 440/540. General Linguistics. 3 Credits.

An introduction to linguistic analysis. Emphasis is on the analysis of sound systems (phonetics, phonology) and the structure of words and sentences (morphology and syntax). Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, ENGL 110C, and three additional hours in English.

ENGL 441/541. American Travel Literature. 3 Credits.

This is a survey course that examines the American experience, American identity and American culture through travel “texts” that include prose, poetry, art, and film. The course takes an interdisciplinary American Studies approach, using lenses such as race, gender, and class. Prerequisites: ENGL 112L or ENGL 114L.

ENGL 442/542. English Grammar. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: ENGL 350 or permission of instructor. This course is a descriptive study of English grammar as it relates to the contexts in which it is used, with implications for grammar pedagogy and TESOL classrooms.

ENGL 443/543. Southern and African American English. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the linguistic diversity of the American South, with emphasis on Southern White and African American varieties of English. It examines variation and change in the phonological, lexical, and syntactic systems, language contact, and dialect discrimination directed towards Southern and African American speakers, both inside and out of the South. Prerequisites: Passing score on Writing Sample Placement Test and three upper division hours in English or permission of instructor.

ENGL 444/544. History of the English Language. 3 Credits.

A study of the origins and development of the English language. Primary focus is on sound, word, and grammatical changes. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and one 300-level linguistics course (ENGL 370 recommended).

ENGL 446/546. Studies in American Drama. 3 Credits.

With rotating topics, this course will pursue particular themes or periods in American drama and theater. Potential areas of inquiry might include melodrama, the early transatlantic stage, rise of stage realism, age of O'Neill, or the contemporary drama. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and 300-level literature course, ENGL 340 preferred.

ENGL 447/547. The American Novel to 1920. 3 Credits.

Examination of the American novel from its origins in the late eighteenth century through World War I. The course will emphasize the novel as a genre, cultural trends during the period, and such relevant literary modes as romanticism, realism, and naturalism. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and one 300-level literature course, ENGL 346 preferred.

ENGL 448/548. The American Novel 1920 to Present. 3 Credits.

Examination of the American novel from the end of World War I to the present day. The course will emphasize formal issues related to the genre of the novel and relevant literary and cultural trends during the period including modernism and postmodernism. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and one 300-level literature course, ENGL 346 preferred.

ENGL 449/549. Craft of Literary Nonfiction. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of technique in literary nonfiction with an emphasis on the memoir, the essay, reportage, and travel narrative. Especially designed for, but not limited to, creative writing students; supplements the creative writing workshops. Prerequisites: ENGL 300 and six semester hours in literature, or three semester hours in literature and permission of the instructor.

ENGL 450/550. American English. 3 Credits.

This course explores the geographic, social, and stylistic diversity of English spoken in the U.S. It also examines how perceptions of dialect diversity affect access to education and other socioeconomic opportunities. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and one 300-level linguistics course or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 451/551. Advanced Fiction Workshop. 3 Credits.

This course, an expansion of the principles and techniques learned in ENGL 351, focuses on the writing and criticism of the short story, the novella, and the novel. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and ENGL 351; junior standing, or permission of the instructor, based on writing samples submitted.

ENGL 452/552. Advanced Poetry Workshop. 3 Credits.

This course, an expansion of the principles and techniques learned in ENGL 352, focuses on the writing and criticism of poetry. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test; ENGL 352; and junior standing or permission of the instructor, based on writing samples submitted.

ENGL 454/554. Creative Nonfiction. 3 Credits.

A course in the techniques of writing nonfiction imaginatively within a factual context. Emphasis is placed on regard for reader psychology, selection of significant detail, and the development of a style at once lively and lucid. Assignments are made individually with regard to the student's field of interest--- history, biography, science, politics, informal essay, etc. Advice is given on the marketing of promising manuscripts. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test; ENGL 327W or ENGL 351; and junior standing or permission of the instructor, based on writing samples submitted.

ENGL 455/555. The Teaching of Composition, Grades 6-12. 3 Credits.

A study of the theory and practice of teaching writing. Special attention will be given to the ways effective teachers allow theories and experiences to inform their pedagogical strategies. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and twelve semester hours in English to include ENGL 327W.

ENGL 456/556. The Craft of Fiction. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of fictional technique in the novel and short story, with emphasis on character development, conflict, point of view, plot, setting, mood, tone, and diction. Especially designed for, but not limited to, creative writing students; supplements the creative writing workshops. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test; six semester hours in literature or ENGL 300 plus three semester hours in literature; junior standing or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 457/557. The Craft of Poetry. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of technique in poetry, with emphasis on form, imagery, rhythm, and symbolism. Especially designed for, but not limited to, creative writing students; supplements the creative writing workshops. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test; six semester hours in literature or ENGL 300 plus three semester hours in literature; junior standing or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 459W/559. New Literatures in English. 3 Credits.

A study of the diverse "new" literatures in English, including those of the Caribbean and Central America, Africa, India, as well as of Canada and Australia, in their current historical and political contexts. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 460/560. The Literature of Fact. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of the literary tradition of creative nonfiction. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and one 300-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 461/561. Poetry of the Early Twentieth Century. 3 Credits.

Works of major British and American poets from 1900 to 1945 are studied. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and one 300-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 462/562. Sacred Texts as Literature. 3 Credits.

A study of how sacred texts reshape a variety of literary forms (narratives, drama, poetry, biography, history). The course may focus on a particular text or a collection of texts drawn from a variety of faith traditions and/or spiritual experiences. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, literature way of knowing requirement and six-hour general education composition requirement or permission of instructor.

ENGL 463W/563. Women Writers. 3 Credits.

This course applies concepts developed through women's studies scholarship and feminist literary criticism to works by women writers of different races and cultures. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C and one 300-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 464W/564. Native American Literature. 3 Credits.

This class offers an investigation of Native American literature both past and present and seeks to foster an appreciation for indigenous cultures, traditions, and the ongoing concerns that inform so much of Native literary output. By privileging Native centered approaches to narrative and history-keeping, the course hopes to instill a greater understanding of the issues Native peoples faced in the colonial milieu and the continued implications of those histories for Native communities and indigenous identities today. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, passing score on the Writing Sample Test and one 300-level literature course.

ENGL 465W/565. African American Literature. 3 Credits.

An investigation of the ways in which literary movements, historical events, social transitions, and political upheavals have influenced African-American literature. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and one 300-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 466W/566. Asian American Literature. 3 Credits.

The course introduces students to key texts in Asian American literature, supported by critical studies (and occasion films) to interrogate the theme of Asian American identities in their multiple forms. The course will examine sociopolitical histories that undercut the literature and the contributions of Asian American writers to the breadth and scope of American as well as global literature today. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, and any 300-level literature course.

ENGL 468. Advanced Writing Internship. 3 Credits.

Permission of department internship coordinator required. A structured work experience involving writing and editing in a professional setting. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and 15 hours in English, with ENGL 327W or ENGL 334W recommended.

ENGL 473/573. Writing with Video. 3 Credits.

This course engages students in a comprehensive exploration of video as a rhetorical narrative medium, with emphasis on the actual production of video work. Writing is also integrated into the production process. From brainstorming to storyboarding and critique, writing is positioned as an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: ENGL 307T.

ENGL 474. Teaching Literature with Film. 3 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to help current or prospective English teachers effectively use films or movies to teach their literature courses. The course will examine appropriate aspects of film and literary theory as well as provide students practice in teaching literature with film. Prerequisites: ENGL 112L and ENGL 114L.

ENGL 477/577. Language, Gender and Power. 3 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course explores how language reflects and interacts with society, with particular emphasis on gender and race. Topics include definition, framing, stereotypes, language taboos, and powerful and powerless language. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, junior standing and three upper division hours in English, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 478. The Craft of Multimedia Journalism. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce students to audio and visual storytelling. Students will expand their reporting repertoire to incorporate the use of audio, still photography, and video into what they have already learned about print reporting. Staff positions in media organizations and freelance journalism now require a command of multimedia skills; however, the foundation of all good story telling--even in the multi-platform, digital age--remains the written word. This course will enable students to develop an understanding of visual story-telling and the production of multimedia news and feature stories. Prerequisites: ENGL 380 and ENGL 382.

ENGL 480/580. Investigative Reporting Techniques. 3 Credits.

This course explores how journalists pursue investigative projects that expose waste, mismanagement, conflicts of interest, dangerous business practices, and otherwise challenge the status quo. With a focus on both high tech and traditional research skills, the course will provide instruction in accessing government records kept by local, state and federal agencies. In pursuing in-depth stories that make a difference, contemporary journalists develop strategies for gathering and analyzing data, use social media in pursuit of stories and present stories for print, broadcast and online platforms. Prerequisites: passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and ENGL 380.

ENGL 481/581. Advanced Public Relations. 3 Credits.

Designed to strengthen the skills of the public relations practitioner with emphasis on the creative aspects of problem solving. Attention is given to crisis public relations, interviewing, speech writing, and graphics. Prerequisites: ENGL 381 and passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 482/582. Sports Journalism. 3 Credits.

This is primarily a sportswriting course in which students are introduced to various types and styles of sports stories that are representative of sports journalism as practiced in newspapers and magazines. The course also explores the role of sports in American society. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C; passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test.

ENGL 483W/583. Reporting and News Writing II. 3 Credits.

Designed to familiarize students with the fundamentals of beat reporting and its practice in the multi-media environment of "converged" newsrooms. The course emphatically focuses on writing but also provides instruction on how the tools and techniques of multimedia platforms are used to enhance storytelling. Emphasis is also placed on accessing information through web-based resources and government documents. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C; ENGL 380 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 484/584. Feature Story Writing. 3 Credits.

Course includes discussion and practice of writing a variety of newspaper and magazine feature stories. Students will write and critique stories on people, places, businesses, trends, and issues. Assistance is given in the marketing of manuscripts. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and nine semester hours in English.

ENGL 485W/585. Editorial and Persuasive Writing. 3 Credits.

A study of the practice and function of writing editorials, commentary, reviews and columns for newspapers and online media. Lectures will focus on the techniques of crafting a persuasive argument, content analyses of Pulitzer Prize-winning editorials and columns, and guest lectures by newspaper editorial writers. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C; ENGL 380.

ENGL 486/586. Media Law and Ethics. 3 Credits.

Designed to introduce students to components of communication law that may affect the professional writer or broadcaster. Topics include defamation, constitutional constraints, freedom of information, privacy, copyright, and telecommunications law. Ethical issues relating to the mass media will also be examined. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and junior standing or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 487. Television News Production Workshop. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce students to the reporting, writing, and production of a television news program. Students will learn how to create a 30-minute news program from the framing of story ideas and news gathering to shooting and editing video along with the production process involved in recording a live news broadcast. Each student will spend time both in front of and behind the video and television studio cameras. The goal of this course is to produce weekly news broadcasts. In doing so, students will alternately assume the roles of reporter, writer, producer, director, anchor, photojournalist, technician, and more. Using the campus and surrounding neighborhoods as our news universe, students will report news and feature stories that impact the University and its neighbors. Prerequisites: ENGL 380 or ENGL 382 or COMM 271 or THEA 271.

ENGL 492/592. Modern World Drama. 3 Credits.

A comparative study of selected major dramatic works of the world, featuring texts drawn from a range of cultures from around the globe. The course will begin in the late nineteenth century and continue to the present. Works written in languages other than English will be read in translation. Prerequisites: passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and one 300-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 493/593. Contemporary World Literature. 3 Credits.

Fiction, poetry, and plays written during the last fifty years in nations throughout the world. Most texts will have been written originally in languages other than English. The course will focus on a comparative study of works produced in a variety of cultural contexts, and will explore a range of approaches to defining or circumscribing world literature. Prerequisites: passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and one 300-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 495/595. Topics in English. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, because of their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors. Prerequisites: passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and three semester hours in literature.

ENGL 496/596. Topics in English. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, because of their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors. Prerequisites: passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test and three semester hours in literature.

ENGL 497. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in English. 1-3 Credits.

Independent study in literature, writing, or linguistics according to a program of reading and/or writing designed under the direction of an instructor. Prerequisites: passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, senior standing and approval of the chair of the Department of English.

ENGL 498. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in English. 1-3 Credits.

Independent study in literature, writing, or linguistics according to a program of reading and/or writing designed under the direction of an instructor. Prerequisites: passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test, senior standing and approval of the chair of the Department of English.

ENGL 503. Medieval Literature. 3 Credits.

An introduction to representative works of English literature(some in translation) from Beowulf through Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, The Book of Margery Kempe, The Second Shepherd’s Play, and Malory’s Morte d’Arthur. Students will discover how medieval literature has contributed to and continues to complicate modern conceptions of reading, writing, and aesthetics.

ENGL 506. The Teaching of Literature. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide an intensive examination of issues, approaches, and methods utilized in the teaching of literature, particularly literature written for children and young adults.

ENGL 507. Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. 3 Credits.

A study of The Canterbury Tales with an introduction to Middle English language and culture.

ENGL 514. Motherhood: Texts and Images. 3 Credits.

This course examines the role of the mother, the experience of mothering and the institution of motherhood through a number of disciplinary and theoretical lenses. It considers how motherhood functions to women’s advantage or disadvantage in professional and economic areas as well as the mother’s ideological construction in public discourse, imagery, non-fiction, and film.

ENGL 516. English Renaissance Drama. 3 Credits.

An extensive survey of the secular national dramas of Renaissance England that were written and performed by Shakespeare’s contemporaries in London between 1576 and 1642. Students study the literary features, social contexts and ideological underpinning of representative works by Kyd, Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, Ford, and others.

ENGL 518. Jewish Writers. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the Jewish literary traditions and the cultural trends shaping these traditions and the Jewish identity. It will examine the impact of such issues as immigration, family, marginality, the Holocaust, assimilation, cultural diversity, feminism, Israel, race and religion. The readings will consist of short stories, poems, essays, novels, and autobiographical writing.

ENGL 521. British Literature 1660-1800. 3 Credits.

British literature from the Restoration of the monarchy after the Civil War and Puritan Commonwealth to the French Revolution, focusing on how cultural changes (legalized female actors, commercialized printing, colonialism, and growing market capitalism) interacted with the flowering of satire and scandalous theatrical comedy, and the emergence of modern literary forms (periodical journalism, “picturesque” poetry, and the novel).

ENGL 523. The Romantic Movement in Britain. 3 Credits.

A study of the literature written in Britain between 1770-1830, focusing on how the literary experiments and innovations of poets like Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Percy Shelley, Keats, Burns, and Barbauld, and of novelists like Mary Shelley, Radcliffe, and Scott interacted with cultural changes such as the Industrial Revolution, the French Revolution, and the emergence of feminism and working-class radicalism.

ENGL 524. Short Works in Narrative Media. 3 Credits.

This course examines short narrative forms in film, video, literature, and multi-media. Individual works will be considered, both for the specific ways in which they make use of the medium in which they appear and for the qualities they share. Particular emphasis will be placed on the relationship between writing and visualization. Students will engage in both creative and critical exercises, so as to see the process from both sides: creative production and critical analysis.

ENGL 525. World Film Directors in Context. 3 Credits.

This course will explore the works of several directors from a variety of world regions. Films will be considered as part of the body of work by each director, as well as in the context of the regions’ other arts, traditions, popular culture, and historical events. Students will become familiar, therefore, with aesthetic, literary, sociological, anthropological and historical approaches to the analysis of film.

ENGL 527. Writing in the Disciplines. 3 Credits.

This is a discussion/workshop course emphasizing contexts and strategies of text production in and across academic disciplines and professional settings. Students will produce a variety of texts designed to meet the needs of specific audiences. (This is a writing intensive course.).

ENGL 532. Origins and Early Development of the British Novel to 1800. 3 Credits.

A study of early novels and how the novel developed from other traditions such as the epic, romance, criminal biography, and travel narrative.

ENGL 533. Victorian Literature. 3 Credits.

A study of the chief writers and the cultural and philosophical backgrounds of the Victorian era, touching on the changes from the early to the later part of the period. Works analyzed include fiction, nonfiction prose, and poetry.

ENGL 535. Management Writing. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on writing as a means of making and presenting management decisions.

ENGL 538. The Twentieth-Century British Novel. 3 Credits.

Examination and analysis of a variety of novels in their editorial and cultural contexts.

ENGL 539. Writing in Digital Spaces. 3 Credits.

This course offers composition practice in critical contemporary digital environments. Readings and discussions will provide the history of and context for these digital spaces. Students should expect to participate in, develop, and engage in critical discussions about a range of digital spaces, including websites, wikis, blogs, and various interactive media.

ENGL 540. General Linguistics. 3 Credits.

An introduction to linguistic analysis. Emphasis is on the analysis of sound systems (phonetics, phonology) and the structure of words and sentences (morphology and syntax).

ENGL 541. American Travel Literature. 3 Credits.

This is a survey course that examines the American experience, American identity and American culture through travel “texts” that include prose, poetry, art, and film. The course takes an interdisciplinary American Studies approach, using lenses such as race, gender, and class.

ENGL 542. English Grammar. 3 Credits.

This course is a descriptive study of English grammar as it relates to the contexts in which it is used, with implication for grammar pedagogy and TESOL classrooms.

ENGL 543. Southern and African American English. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the linguistic diversity of the American South, with emphasis on Southern White and African American varieties of English. It examines variation and change in the phonological, lexical, and syntactic systems, language contact, and dialect discrimination directed towards Southern and African American speakers both inside and out of the South.

ENGL 544. History of the English Language. 3 Credits.

A study of the origins and development of the English language. Primary focus is on sound, word, and grammatical changes.

ENGL 546. Studies in American Drama. 3 Credits.

With rotating topics, this course will pursue particular themes or periods in American drama and theater. Potential areas of inquiry might include melodrama, the early transatlantic stage, rise of stage realism, age of O’Neill, or the contemporary drama.

ENGL 547. The American Novel to 1920. 3 Credits.

Examination of the American novel from its origins in the late eighteenth century through World War I. The course will emphasize the novel as a genre, cultural trends during the period, and such relevant literary modes as romanticism, realism, and naturalism.

ENGL 548. The American Novel 1920 to Present. 3 Credits.

Examination of the American novel from the end of World War I to the present day. The course will emphasize formal issues related to the genre of the novel and relevant literary and cultural trends during the period including modernism and postmodernism.

ENGL 549. Craft of Literary Nonfiction. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of technique in literary nonfiction with an emphasis on the memoir, the essay, reportage, and travel narrative. Especially designed for, but not limited to, creative writing students; supplements the creative writing workshops. Prerequisites: ENGL 300 and six semester hours in literature, or three semester hours in literature and permission of the instructor.

ENGL 550. American English. 3 Credits.

This course explores the geographic, social and stylistic diversity of English spoken in the U.S. It also examines how perceptions of dialect diversity affect access to education and other socioeconomic opportunities.

ENGL 551. Advanced Fiction Workshop. 3 Credits.

This course, an expansion of the principles and techniques learned in ENGL 451, focuses on the writing and criticism of the short story, the novella, and the novel. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: ENGL 351 or permission of the instructor, based on writing samples submitted.

ENGL 552. Advanced Poetry Workshop. 3 Credits.

This course, an expansion of the principles and techniques learned in ENGL 452, focuses on the writing and criticism of poetry. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: ENGL 352 or permission of the instructor, based on writing samples submitted.

ENGL 554. Creative Nonfiction. 3 Credits.

A course in the techniques of writing nonfiction imaginatively within a factual context. Emphasis is placed on concern for reader psychology, selection of significant detail, and the development of a style at once lively and lucid. Assignments are made individually with regard to the student’s field of interest—history, biography, science, politics, informal essay, etc. Advice is given on the marketing of promising manuscripts. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: ENGL 327W or ENGL 351 or permission of the instructor, based on writing samples submitted.

ENGL 555. The Teaching of Composition, Grades 6-12. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. A study of the theory and practice of teaching writing. Special attention will be given to the ways effective teachers allow theories and experiences to inform their pedagogical strategies.

ENGL 556. The Craft of Fiction. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of fictional technique in the novel and short story, with emphasis on character development, conflict, point of view, plot, setting, mood, tone, and diction. Especially designed for, but not limited to, creative writing students; supplements the creative writing workshops. Prerequisites: ENGL 300 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 557. The Craft of Poetry. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of technique in poetry, with emphasis on form, imagery, rhythm, and symbolism. Especially designed for, but not limited to, creative writing students; supplements the creative writing workshops. Prerequisites: ENGL 300 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 559. New Literatures in English. 3 Credits.

A study of the diverse “new” literatures in English of the Caribbean and Central America, Africa, India, as well as of Canada and Australia, in their current historical and political contexts.

ENGL 560. The Literature of Fact. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of the literary tradition of creative nonfiction. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

ENGL 561. Poetry of the Early Twentieth Century. 3 Credits.

Works of major British and American poets from 1900 to 1945 are studied.

ENGL 562. Sacred Texts as Literature. 3 Credits.

A study of how sacred texts reshape a variety of literary forms (narratives, drama, poetry, biography, history). The course may focus on a particular text or a collection of texts drawn from a variety of faith traditions and/or spiritual experiences.

ENGL 563. Women Writers. 3 Credits.

This course applies concepts developed through women’s studies scholarship and feminist literary criticism to works by women writers of different races and cultures.

ENGL 564. Native American Literature. 3 Credits.

This class offers an investigation of Native American literature both past and present and seeks to foster an appreciation for indigenous cultures, traditions, and the ongoing concerns that inform so much of Native literary output. By privileging Native centered approaches to narrative and history-keeping, the course hopes to instill a greater understanding of the issues Native peoples faced in the colonial milieu and the continued implications of those histories for Native communities and indigenous identities today.

ENGL 565. African-American Literature. 3 Credits.

An investigation of the ways in which literary movements, historical events, social transitions, and political upheavals have influenced African-American literature.

ENGL 566. Asian American Literature. 3 Credits.

The course introduces students to key texts in Asian American literature, supported by critical studies (and on occasion films) to interrogate the theme of Asian American identities in their multiple forms. The course will examine sociopolitical histories that undercut the literature, and the contributions of Asian American writers to the breadth and scope of American as well as global literatures today. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

ENGL 573. Writing with Video. 3 Credits.

This course engages students in a comprehensive exploration of video as a rhetorical narrative medium, with emphasis on the actual production of video work. Writing is also integrated into the production process. From brainstorming to storyboarding and critique, writing is positioned as an integral part of the course.

ENGL 577. Language, Gender and Power. 3 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course explores how language reflects and interacts with society, with particular emphasis on gender and race. Topics include definition, framing, stereotypes, language taboos, and powerful and powerless language.

ENGL 580. Investigative Reporting Techniques. 3 Credits.

This course explores how journalists pursue investigative projects that expose waste, mismanagement, conflicts of interest, dangerous business practices, and otherwise challenge the status quo. With a focus on both high tech and traditional research skills, the course will provide instruction in accessing government records kept by local, state and federal agencies. In pursuing in-depth stories that make a difference, contemporary journalists develop strategies for gathering and analyzing data, use social media in pursuit of stories and present stories for print, broadcast and online platforms.

ENGL 581. Advanced Public Relations. 3 Credits.

Designed to strengthen the skills of the public relations practitioner with emphasis on the creative aspects of problem solving. Attention is given to crisis public relations, interviewing, speech writing, and graphics.

ENGL 582. Sports Journalism. 3 Credits.

This is primarily a sportswriting course in which students are introduced to various types and styles of sports stories that are representative of sports journalism as practiced in newspapers and magazines. The course also explores the role of sports in American society.

ENGL 583. Reporting and News Writing II. 3 Credits.

Designed to familiarize students with the fundamentals of beat reporting and its practice in the multi-media environment of “converged” newsrooms. The course emphatically focuses on writing but also provides instruction on how the tools and techniques of multimedia platforms are used to enhance storytelling. Emphasis is also placed on accessing information through web-based resources and government documents.

ENGL 584. Feature Story Writing. 3 Credits.

Course includes discussion and practice of writing a variety of newspaper and magazine feature stories. Students will write and critique stories on people, places, businesses, trends, and issues. Assistance is given in the marketing of manuscripts.

ENGL 585. Editorial and Persuasive Writing. 3 Credits.

A study of the practice and function of writing editorials, commentary, reviews and columns for newspapers and online media. Lectures will focus on the techniques of crafting a persuasive argument, content analyses of Pulitzer Prize-winning editorials and columns, and guest lectures by newspaper editorial writers.

ENGL 586. Media Law and Ethics. 3 Credits.

Designed to introduce students to components of communication law that may affect the professional writer or broadcaster. Topics include defamation, constitutional constraints, freedom of information, privacy, copyright, and telecommunications law. Ethical issues relating to the mass media will also be examined.

ENGL 592. Modern World Drama. 3 Credits.

A comparative study of selected major dramatic works of the world, featuring texts drawn from a range of cultures from around the globe. The course will begin in the late nineteenth century and continue to the present. Works written in languages other than English will be read in translation.

ENGL 593. Contemporary World Literature. 3 Credits.

Fiction, poetry, and plays written during the last fifty years in nations throughout the world. Most texts will have been written originally in languages other than English. The course will focus on the comparative study of works produced in a variety of cultural contexts, and will explore a range of approaches to defining or circumscribing world literature.

ENGL 595. Topics in English. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, because of their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors.

ENGL 596. Topics in English. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, because of their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

ENGL 600. Introduction to Research and Criticism. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Required of most graduate students in English, usually in the first semester. Survey of English as an academic discipline; issues and trends in scholarly journals; research strategies and conventions for graduate-level papers and master's theses; critical approaches to literature.

ENGL 615. Shakespeare. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An application of advanced theoretical and critical approaches to Shakespeare’s works. May be repeated more than once for credit if different group of works or themes is being studied.

ENGL 632. 18th Century British Literature. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. A study of the literature written in the British Isles from the “Glorious Revolution” of 1688 until 1800, focusing on how the flowering of satire and the emergence of literary forms such as periodical journalism, “picturesque” poetry, and the novel interacted with the growth of distinctly modern institutions and philosophies such as a free, commercial press, market capitalism, colonialism, political radicalism, and industrialism.

ENGL 641. 19th Century British Literature. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. A study of a selection of the literature written in Britain during the romantic and Victorian ages, focusing on the social, historical, and ideological contexts informing its production. Texts analyzed include poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.

ENGL 642. Nineteenth-Century British Novel. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. A study of 19th Century British novels in context of the economic, social, and political issues of the period, emphasizing their formal and aesthetic concerns.

ENGL 645. 20th Century British Literature. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Studies of major poets, dramatists and prose writers. Some attention will be given to the movements, trends, forces, and ideas of the period.

ENGL 650. Creative Writing. 3 Credits.

Guided study and practice in writing short stories, novels, poetry, and creative nonfiction, offered in specific sections of Fiction, Poetry, and Nonfiction. This course can be repeated for credit. Students planning to write a creative thesis must take this course at least twice with their thesis director. Prerequisites: Admission to the MFA program and permission of the instructor.

ENGL 655. Topics in World Literature. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Examination of a theme, genre, or other literary topic as it appears in the literature of several countries. All works are assigned in English translation if not originally written in English. Specific topics are listed in the schedule booklet, and course descriptions appear in a booklet distributed to all academic advisors.

ENGL 656. American Literature to 1810. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Intensive study of a variety of texts from several genres reflecting the historical forces, aesthetic movements, social trends, and representative works of the period.

ENGL 657. American Literature 1810-1870. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Intensive study of a variety of texts from several genres reflecting the historical forces, aesthetic movements, social trends, and representative works of the period.

ENGL 658. American Literature 1870-1946. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Intensive study of a variety of texts from several genres reflecting the historical forces, aesthetic movements, social trends, and representative works of the period.

ENGL 659. American Literature 1945-Present. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Intensive study of a variety of texts from several genres reflecting the historical forces, aesthetic movements, social trends, and representative works of the period.

ENGL 660. Craft of Narrative. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of the techniques of fiction and nonfiction with some emphasis given to the various theories informing the genres. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGL 661. Craft of Poetry. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of the techniques of poetry with some emphasis on the various theories informing the genre. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGL 662. Cybercultures and Digital Writing. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: three units of digital writing or instructor’s permission. In this course, students will explore the social, theoretical, and cultural implications of composing with the ever-evolving digital writing technologies. They will also consider how to study the practices the writers use to compose with these technologies.

ENGL 664. Teaching College Composition. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An intensive examination of alternative approaches to teaching first-year and advanced composition at the college level, with special attention to current schools of composition theory and research.

ENGL 665. Teaching Writing with Technology. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL 539 and either ENGL 555 or ENGL 664. Students in this course will explore different writing environments and educational applications and learn how they are designed to help writers compose, collaborate, research, and think. Students will assess the values and thoretical assumptions underlying those applications and learn to articulate their own philosophies of using technologies in the writing classroom.

ENGL 668. Graduate Internship and Project in Professional Writing. 1-3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisites: 15 graduate credits in English. Structured work experience involving extensive writing and editing in a professional setting. The result of the internship is an analytic paper and a portfolio of written work.

ENGL 670. Methods and Materials in TESOL. 3 Credits.

A practical introduction to methods, materials, and course organization in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages). The course includes language assessment and teaching language in its cultural context as well as technology-enhanced language teaching.

ENGL 671. Phonology. 3 Credits.

An examination of the sound systems of natural languages, with emphasis on English and how it differs from other languages. The course includes articulatory and acoustic phonetics with analyses of data and exercises in transcription, as well as introduction to different phonological theories and their assumptions and notations. Prerequisites: ENGL 540 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 672. Syntax. 3 Credits.

A detailed examination of morphosyntactic structures found in the world’s languages with an emphasis on English grammar. Prerequisites: ENGL 540 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 673. Discourse Analysis. 3 Credits.

A survey of approaches to the analysis of spoken discourse. Readings and assignments emphasize issues related to transcription methods, conversational discourse, narrative, social interaction, the influence of prior discourses on texts, and relationships between discourse and power. Prerequisites: ENGL 540 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 674. Internship in Applied Linguistics. 3 Credits.

A structured work experience involving teaching or work in applied linguistics in a professional setting. To be documented by a portfolio of written work. Prerequisites: 12 graduate credits in linguistics.

ENGL 675. Practicum in TESOL. 3 Credits.

Supervised practice in teaching English to speakers of other languages. Available to those enrolled in the M.A. in Applied Linguistics or TESOL Certificate who have completed core courses. Prerequisites: ENGL 670 and permission of the instructor.

ENGL 676. Semantics. 3 Credits.

This class is an advanced survey of semantic theories and practices. Topics include terminology and taxonomies used in the study of meaning; relationships between linguistic meaning, culture, and cognition (e.g. reference, linguistic relativity, categorization); word meaning; and ways in which contexts of language use influence interpretation. Prerequisites: ENGL 540 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 677. Language and Communication Across Cultures. 3 Credits.

An investigation of how language and cultural differences affect communication. Readings from linguistics, anthropology, and literature address problems of intercultural communication.

ENGL 678. Sociolinguistics. 3 Credits.

Sociolinguistics is the study of language in its social context with emphasis on ethnography and other qualitative methods, quantitative methods, and linguistic and social differentiation between individuals and groups. Prerequisites: Any upper-division linguistics course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 679. First and Second Language Acquisition. 3 Credits.

An investigation of first and second language acquisition with emphasis on examining evidence about second language learning which supports or fails to support different approaches to teaching a second language.

ENGL 680. Second Language Writing Pedagogy. 3 Credits.

Students engage in many of the theoretical debates about teaching L2 writers, as well as practical responses to these debates. With this knowledge students are prepared to enter the debate, teach L2 writers, and conduct research on L2 writers and writing.

ENGL 681. Contemporary Classics: The Thesis Reading List. 3 Credits.

This course offers students enrolled in the MFA in Creative Writing program the opportunity for rigorous study of contemporary master works in a particular genre. Designed to provide students with the opportunity to deeply investigate contemporary works for the required thesis reading list, this course counts as one of the literature requirements for the MFA degree. The course is best suited for students in the second year of the program; however, any MFA student may register. The course cannot be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGL 683. Literary Editing and Publishing. 3 Credits.

This course is for MFA Creative Writing students, and is meant to provide basic concepts of literary editing and publishing, theoretical and practical frameworks, and hands-on/internship types of experiences managing/reading/editing for the MFA program’s literary journal, Barely South Review. This course can count once toward elective credit in the MFA curriculum and may not be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Students must be in good graduate standing and must have earned at least 9 credit hours in the MFA program. Pre- or corequisite: This course is a corequisite for actual internship work in the journal, though students who take this course are NOT automatically guaranteed a staff position in the journal.

ENGL 685. Writing Research. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: 6 graduate credits in English. This course explores current methods and methodologies in writing research. Students will design and carry out original studies of academic, professional, or personal writing as it is practiced in classrooms, work places, and other settings.

ENGL 686. Introduction to Rhetoric and Writing Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course presents key concepts, principles, traditions, and conversations that define the field of rhetoric and composition, surveying major texts, movements, issues, and methodologies. This course is designed primarily to prepare students for advanced courses in professional writing; however, it will also benefit any student who is interested in gaining insights about language, knowledge, and power from the perspective of rhetoric.

ENGL 687. Colloquium for Teachers of English. 3 Credits.

This course discusses theories of teaching, writing and literature and helps explore the challenges facing 21st century educators in terms of finding ways to reach the 21st century student. The course investigates ways to help students understand the inherent value of reading and writing. Additionally, the course looks at pedagogical models and examines how they can be applied to individual areas of expertise. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

ENGL 694. Thesis Colloquium. 3 Credits.

All MFA students are required to take ENGL 694 before their final semester. The course brings together all genres in a collaborative focus in which students discuss specific thesis projects, format requirements, publishing opportunities and reading lists for the 10-page prefatory essay required for their defense. Prerequisites: May be taken after 24 graduate hours have been completed.

ENGL 695. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

3 credits. The advanced study of a selected topic in English. Topics courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors.

ENGL 696. Independent Readings. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Designed for the advanced student (15-20 hours) who wants to study in-depth a sharply focused area of literature, linguistics, or pedagogy. Before registering for the course, the student must make out a prospectus with the instructor and submit it. No graduate student is permitted to take more than two independent readings courses.

ENGL 698. Thesis Research. 1-9 Credits.

Lecture 1-9 hours; 1-9 credits. Instructor approval required. Prerequisite: Student must have completed 30 hours of course work first. Preparatory course designed to assist students in the writing of a thesis. Students will consult regularly with the faculty.

ENGL 699. Thesis. 3-9 Credits.

Lecture1-9 hours; 1-9 credits. Instructor approval required Prerequisite: Student must have completed 30 hours of course work first. Writing of the creative thesis.

ENGL 701. Texts and Technologies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Tracing the development of writing technologies from Ancient Greece through contemporary blogs and wikis, this course focuses on the relationships between a text’s physical qualities and its composition, production, and reception.

ENGL 705. Discourse and Rhetoric Across Cultures. 3 Credits.

The course is a survey of language use both within and across cultures. Topics include relationships between language and conceptualization (linguistic relativity); description and interpretation of linguistic and rhetorical patterns; the organization, expression, and analysis of cultural meaning (e.g. frames, cultural models, narratives); relational aspects of language use; and literacy practices. Prerequisites: Admission into the Applied Linguistics M.A. or the Ph.D. in English.

ENGL 706. Visual Rhetoric and Document Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course focuses on how visual elements, whether verbal or graphic, work within different types of documents. Theory and research in visual rhetoric and technical communication will be used to develop models for how people process visual information in terms of a variety of social and cultural contexts.

ENGL 710. Major Debates in English Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course introduces students to the principal questions and concerns of the field and includes a comparison and contrast of the subspecialties in English, including how they form and address key issues.

ENGL 715. Professional Writing Theories and Practices. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course surveys the history of professional writing, competing theories and research methodologies in the field. The tensions between workplace practices, professional writing scholarship, and professional writing pedagogy will also be explored.

ENGL 716. International Professional Writing. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL 715. This course focuses on the linguistic and cultural factors that business writers and technical writers must consider when working with/for global audiences. Students will learn to approach cross-cultural communication as a process that starts with researching the target audience.

ENGL 720. Pedagogy and Instructional Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Students in this course will be prepared to develop pedagogical plans, teach and assess writing in four instructional areas: advanced and professional writing courses, writing across the curriculum, workplace instruction, and distributed learning. New pedagogical tools, especially computer-based technologies, will be taught, analyzed and tested.

ENGL 721. Compositions as Applied Rhetoric. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: 3 credits of a graduate level rhetoric or composition course or instructor’s permission. Students will examine how the field of rhetoric has shaped composition pedagogy in the United States from its inception at Harvard to postmodern possibilities of today’s writing classroom.

ENGL 724. Online Writing Instructions. 3 Credits.

Students will learn how to negotiate the intersection between online instruction and writing pedagogy by exploring and interrogating the ways that various means of course mediation shapes the literacy pedagogy an instructor can develop. ENGL 664 is recommended as a prerequisite.

ENGL 725. Scholarly Editing and Textual Scholarship. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Instructor approval required. Surveys the theory and practice of scholarly editing, of the physical description of texts as material artifacts, and of the historical and social contextualization of texts as material artifacts. Focus is on texts produced in manuscripts and print, but consideration is given to oral texts and digital texts.

ENGL 730. The Digital Humanities. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Taking historical, cultural, and theoretical views, this course bridges literary studies with new media. How has technology historically affected literature and culture? Can the democratization of information accelerate literary development? Topics will include digital archives, intellectual property in the information age, and electronic textuality.

ENGL 735. Postcolonial Literature and Theory. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Any equivalent graduate level critical theory course or instructor permission. An examination of the discourse of postcolonial critical theory literature produced in postcolonial, diasporic and global contexts.

ENGL 740. Empirical Research Methods and Project Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course focuses on the theory and design of empirical research conducted in academic and nonacademic settings. Students will examine the methodological complexities of ethnography, meta-analysis, feminist research and other approaches.

ENGL 750. Service Learning in English Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Instructor approval required. Students will engage in service-learning activities and apply various concepts and skills from their experience and coursework to identify and respond to the needs in the community. An analytical paper and portfolio of service-learning materials are required.

ENGL 755. Critical Race Theory. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The goal of this course is to examine various approaches to Critical Race Studies and, in light of its theoretical commitments, explore its problems, possibilities, and limitations. How might we better understand our history and contemporary politics through the methodologies of critical race theory? Does critical race theory open up new areas for exploration or does it make our understanding of race and ethnicity more indefinite? Such an exploration will require us to think carefully about race and racism, but also other forms of identity like gender, class, and sexuality.

ENGL 760. Classical Rhetoric and Theory Building. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Analysis and discussion of classical theories of rhetoric, with attention to how rhetoric describes discourse in the public sphere.

ENGL 763. Seminar in Discourse Analysis. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: ENGL 540 or permission of the instructor. This course focuses on relationships among language users, text, grammar, context, and purpose within a discourse perspective. Readings and assignments emphasize theoretical and methodological issues related to interactive discourse, registers and genres, narrative and identity, and language, ideology and power.

ENGL 764. Theories of Literature. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An in-depth study of selected theories about the form, history, and cultural significance of literature, such as narrative theory, poststructuralism, Marxism, and feminism. Specific topics may vary by semester, but all sections will engage comprehensively with a body of theoretical texts and concerns.

ENGL 765. Modern Rhetoric and Theory Building. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course concerns the development of rhetoric as an academic discipline in the twentieth century, in particular how rhetoric has distinguished itself from literary, historical, philosophical, and linguistic modes of inquiry.

ENGL 766. New Media Theory and Practice I. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course involves hands-on instruction in a variety of software packages used to create websites and multi-media projects. Students will explore the rhetorical, literary, and technical aspects of their own projects as well as other web-based and multi-media compositions/products.

ENGL 770. Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. This course introduces basic concepts, methods, and techniques used to investigate topics and problems in applied linguistics. Both quantitative and qualitative approaches are presented. Methods include surveys, ethnographies, case studies, and experimental designs. Two major goals are emphasized: to become better readers of research reports and develop research and analytical skills applicable to applied linguistics and related fields.

ENGL 771. New Media Theory and Practice II. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 hours. Prerequisite: ENG 766. This course builds on the study of new media textual production and consumption in English Studies begun in New Media Theory and Practice I and gives students the opportunity to engage in more advanced theoretical and production work. This course will focus on the integration of multiple modes and media using a variety of software and hardware.

ENGL 775. Seminar in English Studies Pedogogy and Curriculum Design. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to literacy theory and challenges them to apply it in specific disciplines within English Studies. ENGL 720 or ENGL 820 is recommended as a prerequisite.

ENGL 778. Seminar in Sociolinguistics. 3 Credits.

This seminar investigates socially meaningful language variation. The focus will be on everyday types of speech that people use to situate themselves in social worlds. Topics include ethnography of communication, language ideologies, social and regional variation, and quantitative analysis.

ENGL 783. Seminar in Professional Writing. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 hours. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. This course will provide an intensive examination of a specific topic or issue in professional writing and serve as a field course for Professional Writing and New Media.

ENGL 790. Seminar in Textual Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. This course will provide an intensive examination of a specific topic or issue in textual studies and serve as a field course for Rhetoric and Textual Studies.

ENGL 791. Seminar in Literary Studies. 3 Credits.

Intensive seminar in a variable topic within literary or literary/cultural studies.

ENGL 793. Seminar in Rhetoric. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. This course will provide an intensive examination of a specific topic or issue in rhetoric and serve as a field course for Rhetoric and Textual Studies.

ENGL 794. Seminar in New Media. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. This course will provide an intensive examination of a specific topic or issue in new media and serve as a field course for Professional Writing and New Media.

ENGL 795. Topics. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisite: students must be enrolled in a graduate program to take this course. Variable course material for students in PhD in English degree program.

ENGL 797. Independent Study in English. 3 Credits.

Hours to be arranged; 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Provides opportunities for doctoral students to do independent research in areas of their interests.

ENGL 801. Texts and Technologies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Tracing the development of writing technologies from Ancient Greece through contemporary blogs and wikis, this course focuses on the relationships between a text’s physical qualities and its composition, production, and reception.

ENGL 805. Discourse and Rhetoric Across Cultures. 3 Credits.

The course is a survey of language use both within and across cultures. Topics include relationships between language and conceptualization (linguistic relativity); description and interpretation of linguistic and rhetorical patterns; the organization, expression, and analysis of cultural meaning (e.g. frames, cultural models, narratives); relational aspects of language use; and literacy practices. Prerequisites: Admission into the Applied Linguistics M.A. or the Ph.D. in English.

ENGL 806. Visual Rhetoric and Document Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course focuses on how visual elements, whether verbal or graphic, work within different types of documents. Theory and research in visual rhetoric and technical communication will be used to develop models for how people process visual information in terms of a variety of social and cultural contexts.

ENGL 810. Major Debates in English Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course introduces students to the principal questions and concerns of the field and includes a comparison and contrast of the subspecialties in English, including how they form and address key issues.

ENGL 815. Professional Writing Theories and Practices. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course surveys the history of professional writing, competing theories and research methodologies in the field. The tensions between workplace practices, professional writing scholarship, and professional writing pedagogy will also be explored.

ENGL 816. International Professional Writing. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL 815. This course focuses on the linguistic and cultural factors that business writers and technical writers must consider when working with/for global audiences. Students will learn to approach cross-cultural communication as a process that starts with researching the target audience.

ENGL 820. Pedagogy and Instructional Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Students in this course will be prepared to develop pedagogical plans, teach and assess writing in four instructional areas: advanced and professional writing courses, writing across the curriculum, workplace instruction, and distributed learning. New pedagogical tools, especially computer-based technologies, will be taught, analyzed and tested.

ENGL 821. Compositions as Applied Rhetoric. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: 3 credits of a graduate level rhetoric or composition course or instructor’s permission. Students will examine how the field of rhetoric has shaped composition pedagogy in the United States from its inception at Harvard to postmodern possibilities of today’s writing classroom.

ENGL 824. Online Writing Instruction. 3 Credits.

Students will learn how to negotiate the intersection between online instruction and writing pedagogy by exploring and interrogating the ways that various means of course mediation shapes the literacy pedagogy an instructor can develop.

ENGL 825. Scholarly Editing and Textual Scholarship. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Instructor approval required. Surveys the theory and practice of scholarly editing, of the physical description of texts as material artifacts, and of the historical and social contextualization of texts as material artifacts. Focus is on texts produced in manuscripts and print, but consideration is given to oral texts and digital texts.

ENGL 830. The Digital Humanities. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Taking historical, cultural, and theoretical views, this course bridges literary studies with new media. How has technology historically affected literature and culture? Can the democratization of information accelerate literary development? Topics will include digital archives, intellectual property in the information age, and electronic textuality.

ENGL 835. Postcolonial Literature and Theory. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Any equivalent graduate level critical theory course or instructor permission. An examination of the discourse of postcolonial critical theory literature produced in postcolonial, diasporic and global contexts.

ENGL 840. Empirical Research Methods and Project Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course focuses on the theory and design of empirical research conducted in academic and nonacademic settings. Students will examine the methodological complexities of ethnography, meta-analysis, feminist research and other approaches.

ENGL 850. Service Learning in English Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Instructor approval required. Students will engage in service-learning activities and apply various concepts and skills from their experience and coursework to identify and respond to the needs in the community. An analytical paper and portfolio of service-learning materials are required.

ENGL 855. Critical Race Theory. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The goal of this course is to examine various approaches to Critical Race Studies and, in light of its theoretical commitments, explore its problems, possibilities, and limitations. How might we better understand our history and contemporary politics through the methodologies of critical race theory? Does critical race theory open up new areas for exploration or does it make our understanding of race and ethnicity more indefinite? Such an exploration will require us to think carefully about race and racism, but also other forms of identity like gender, class, and sexuality.

ENGL 860. Classical Rhetoric and Theory Building. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Analysis and discussion of classical theories of rhetoric, with attention to how rhetoric describes discourse in the public sphere.

ENGL 863. Seminar in Discourse Analysis. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: ENGL 805 or permission of the instructor. This course focuses on relationships among language users, text, grammar, context, and purpose within a discourse perspective. Readings and assignments emphasize theoretical and methodological issues related to interactive discourse, registers and genres, narrative and identity, and language, ideology and power.

ENGL 864. Theories of Literature. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An in-depth study of selected theories about the form, history, and cultural significance of literature, such as narrative theory, poststructuralism, Marxism, and feminism. Specific topics may vary by semester, but all sections will engage comprehensively with a body of theoretical texts and concerns.

ENGL 865. Modern Rhetoric and Theory Building. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course concerns the development of rhetoric as an academic discipline in the twentieth century, in particular how rhetoric has distinguished itself from literary, historical, philosophical, and linguistic modes of inquiry.

ENGL 866. New Media Theory and Practice I. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course involves hands-on instruction in a variety of software packages used to create websites and multi-media projects. Students will explore the rhetorical, literary, and technical aspects of their own projects as well as other web-based and multi-media compositions/products.

ENGL 870. Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. This course introduces basic concepts, methods, and techniques used to investigate topics and problems in applied linguistics. Both quantitative and qualitative approaches are presented. Methods include surveys, ethnographies, case studies, and experimental designs. Two major goals are emphasized: to become better readers of research reports and develop research and analytical skills applicable to applied linguistics and related fields.

ENGL 871. New Media Theory and Practice II. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 hours. Prerequisite: ENG 866. This course builds on the study of new media textual production and consumption in English Studies begun in New Media Theory and Practice I and gives students the opportunity to engage in more advanced theoretical and production work. This course will focus on the integration of multiple modes and media using a variety of software and hardware.

ENGL 875. Seminar in English Studies Pedagogy and Curriculum Design. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to literacy theory and challenges them to apply it in specific disciplines within English Studies. ENGL 720 or ENGL 820 is recommended as a prerequisite.

ENGL 878. Seminar in Sociolinguistics. 3 Credits.

This seminar investigates socially meaningful language variation. The focus will be on everyday types of speech that people use to situate themselves in social worlds. Topics include ethnography of communication, language ideologies, social and regional variation, and quantitative analysis.

ENGL 883. Seminar in Professional Writing. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 hours. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. This course will provide an intensive examination of a specific topic or issue in professional writing and serve as a field course for Professional Writing and New Media.

ENGL 890. Seminar in Textual Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. This course will provide an intensive examination of a specific topic or issue in textual studies and serve as a field course for Rhetoric and Textual Studies.

ENGL 891. Seminar in Literary Studies. 3 Credits.

Intensive seminar in a variable topic within literary or literary/cultural studies. Prerequisites: Student must be enrolled in doctoral program to take this course.

ENGL 892. Dissertation Seminar. 3 Credits.

This course is taken prior to doctoral candidacy exams. It enables students to develop and refine a topic for the dissertation, do preliminary research, and construct a bibliography under the guidance of a faculty mentor. Students will also us the seminar to prepare bibliographies to be used in candidacy exams. Prerequisite: All core, field, and elective coursework must be completed prior to enrollment.

ENGL 893. Seminar in Rhetoric. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. This course will provide an intensive examination of a specific topic or issue in rhetoric and serve as a field course for Rhetoric and Textual Studies.

ENGL 894. Seminar in New Media. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. This course will provide an intensive examination of a specific topic or issue in new media and serve as a field course for Professional Writing and New Media.

ENGL 895. Topics. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisite: students must be enrolled in a graduate program to take this course. Variable course material for students in PhD in English degree program.

ENGL 897. Independent Study in English. 1-3 Credits.

Hours to be arranged; 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Provides opportunities for doctoral students to do independent research in areas of their interests.

ENGL 898. Directed Research. 1-9 Credits.

1-9 credits. Prerequisite: instructor approval. This course can be taken as a supplement to the Dissertation Seminar for independent investigation in the topic for dissertation.

ENGL 899. Dissertation. 1-9 Credits.

1-9 credits. Prerequisite: 892 Dissertation Seminar and passing Candidacy examination. This course is to be taken only by students who have passed the candidacy exams for the purpose of researching and writing the dissertation.

ENGL 998. ENGL 998. 1 Credit.

ENGL 999. English 999. 1 Credit.

1 credit. A one-hour pass/fail registration required of all graduate students to maintain active status during the final semester prior to graduation. After successfully passing the candidacy examination, all doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit each term until the degree is complete.