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Old Dominion University

2014-2015 Catalog

CHEM - Chemistry and Biochemistry

CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY Courses

CHEM 103. Introductory Chemistry. 3 Credits.

An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the basic principles of chemistry. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic algebra.

CHEM 105N. Introductory Chemistry. 3 Credits.

This course is the first part of a two-semester sequence of chemistry covering topics in general, organic, and biological chemistry. In this part, an introduction to the principles of inorganic (general) chemistry is provided. The topics to be covered include measurements, atoms and elements, compounds and their bonds, energy and matter, gases, solutions, acids and bases, chemical reactions and quantities, chemical equilibrium, and nuclear chemistry. This course does not meet the prerequisite for CHEM 123N, and cannot be used toward the CHEM major or minor. Students wishing to pursue advanced study in chemistry should take CHEM 121N, CHEM 122N, CHEM 123N, and CHEM 124N. Credit for CHEM 105N is not allowed if a student has prior credit for CHEM 121N. CHEM 105N + CHEM 106N satisfy four credits of the University's Nature of Science general education requirement. Corequisite: CHEM 106N. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic algegra.

CHEM 106N. Introductory Chemistry Laboratory. 1 Credit.

An introduction to common laboratory techniques and the process of science is provided. CHEM 105N + CHEM 106N satisfy four credits of the University's Nature of Science general education requirement. Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 105N.

CHEM 107N. Introductory Organic and Biochemistry. 3 Credits.

This course is the second part of a two-semester sequence of chemistry covering topics in general, organic, and biological chemistry. In this part, an introduction to organic compounds and their role in biological systems is provided. The topics to be covered include the structure, nomenclature, and reactivity of organic compounds, the structure and function of important biomolecules, and the chemistry of metabolic pathways. This course does not meet the prerequisite for CHEM 211, and cannot be used toward the CHEM major or minor. Students wishing to pursue advanced study in chemistry should take CHEM 121N, CHEM 122N, CHEM 123N, and CHEM 124N. CHEM 107N + CHEM 108N satisfy four credits of the University's Nature of Science general education requirement. Corequisite: CHEM 108N. Prerequisite: CHEM 105N with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 108N. Introductory Organic and Biochemistry Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory experiments involving organic compounds and biomolecules are performed. CHEM 107N + CHEM 108N satisfy four credits of the University's Nature of Science general education requirement. Prerequisite: CHEM 106N with a grade of C or better. Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 107N.

CHEM 121N. Foundations of Chemistry I Lecture. 3 Credits.

This is the first of a two-course series, designed for science and engineering majors, that prepares the student for subsequent studies in molecular science and constitutes the foundation for all upper-level chemistry courses. Topics include the descriptive chemistry of selected elements, modern atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, thermocheistry, and gas laws. A student receiving credit for CHEM 121N cannot receive additional credit for CHEM 103 or CHEM 105N or CHEM 137N. CHEM 121N + CHEM 122N satisfy 4 credits of the University's Nature of Science general education requirement. High School chemistry or CHEM 103 is strongly recommended. Prerequisite: MATH 102M or MATH 103M or higher with a grade of C or better. Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 122N.

CHEM 122N. Foundations of Chemistry I Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory experiments are designed to complement the topics presented in the companion lecture course, CHEM 121N. A student receiving credit for CHEM 122N cannot receive additional credit for CHEM 106N. CHEM 121N + CHEM 122N satisfy 4 credits of the University's Nature of Science general education requirement. Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 121N.

CHEM 123N. Foundations of Chemistry II Lecture. 3 Credits.

This is the second of a two-course series, designed for science majors, that prepares the student for subsequent studies in molecular science and constitutes the foundation for all upper-level chemistry courses. Topics include states of matter, solutions, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, equilibria, and kinetics. CHEM 123N + CHEM 124N satisfy 4 credits of the University's Nature of Science general education requirement. Prerequisite: CHEM 121N with a grade of C or better. Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 124N.

CHEM 124N. Foundations of Chemistry II Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory experiments are designed to complement the topics in the companion lecture course, CHEM 123N. CHEM 123N + CHEM 124N satisfy 4 credits of the University's Nature of Science general education requirement. Prerequisites: CHEM 121N and CHEM 122N with grades of C or better. Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 123N.

CHEM 137N. Advanced General Chemistry I and II Lecture. 4 Credits.

This lecture, along with CHEM 138N, will fulfill all requirements for a complete year of general chemistry. This combination will satisfy all general chemistry prerequisites for upper level chemistry courses. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 162M.

CHEM 138N. Advanced General Chemistry I and II Laboratory. 4 Credits.

This laboratory course is intended for students who have completed CHEM 137N. Experiments cover foundational topics and skills in chemistry and introduce students to chemical research. Prerequisite: CHEM 137N.

CHEM 195. Selected Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Selected laboratory or lecture topics designed for students who need to supplement a transfer course to fulfill a course requirement. Prerequisite: permission of the chief departmental advisor or chair of the department.

CHEM 211. Organic Chemistry Lecture. 3 Credits.

Chemistry of carbon compounds with in-depth treatments of reaction mechanisms, modern spectral techniques, and new synthetic methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 123N or CHEM 137N with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 212. Organic Chemistry Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Experience is offered in synthetic, separation, and analytical methods of organic chemistry. Modern synthetic and spectroscopic techniques are introduced. Prerequisites: CHEM 124N or CHEM 138N with a grade of C or better. Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 211 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 213. Organic Chemistry Lecture. 3 Credits.

Chemistry of carbon compounds with in-depth treatments of reaction mechanisms, modern spectral techniques, and new synthetic methods to meet the needs of chemistry and biochemistry majors. Prerequisite: CHEM 211 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 214. Organic Chemistry Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Experience is offered in synthetic, separation, and analytical methods of organic chemistry. Modern synthetic and spectroscopic techniques are introduced. Prerequisites: CHEM 212 with a grade of C or better. Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 213 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 321. Analytical Chemistry Lecture. 3 Credits.

A study of the fundamental principles of quantitative chemical analysis including the application of principles of equilibria to analytical processes. Emphasis is given to gravimetric and titrimetric methods as well as consideration of electrical, optical, and other methods of chemical analysis. Prerequisites: CHEM 123N or CHEM 137N/CHEM 138N and MATH 211 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 322. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Statistical principles or measurements and error analysis are integrated with experiments designed to evaluate and refine techniques of fundamental measurements to a level of analytical competency. These techniques are applied to the analysis of samples using gravimetric, titrimetric, electrical and optical methods. Prerequisite: CHEM 124N or CHEM 138N with a grade of C or better. Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 321 or permission of the instructor.

CHEM 331. Physical Chemistry Lecture I. 3 Credits.

Quantum chemistry, molecular structure, and spectroscopy. Prerequisites: CHEM 321, CHEM 213 and PHYS 231N-PHYS 232N with a grade of C or better. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 312 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 332W. Experimental Physical Chemistry I. 2 Credits.

Physical chemical techniques are applied to studies on thermodynamics, solution phenomena, gases, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, and spectroscopy. Statistical analysis of data. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisite: grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C. Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 331 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 333. Physical Chemistry Lecture II. 3 Credits.

Chemical thermodynamics of pure substances and solutions, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, and statistical thermodynamics. Prerequisites: CHEM 331 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 334W. Experimental Physical Chemistry II. 2 Credits.

Physical chemical techniques are applied to studies on thermodynamics, solution phenomena, gases, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, and spectroscopy. Statistical analysis of data. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisite: grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C. Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 332W and CHEM 333 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 351. Inorganic Chemistry. 3 Credits.

This foundational course provides an introduction to inorganic chemistry. Topics include periodic law, bonding theory, oxidation/reduction, acid/base theory, descriptive chemistry of the main group, and an introduction to transition metal coordination chemistry. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in CHEM 137N or CHEM 123N.

CHEM 352. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Synthesis of metal and nonmetal inorganic compounds and organometallic compounds, their characterization by physical methods, and a study of their properties. Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 351 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 365. Undergraduate Teaching Experience. 1-3 Credits.

Teaching experience in a chemistry classroom or laboratory setting under the direct supervision of the course instructor. Prerequisite: junior standing and/or approval of the appropriate departmental coordinator. Available for Pass/Fail grading only.

CHEM 367. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits.

May be repeated for credit. Student participation for credit is based on the academic relevance of the work experience, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and the Cooperative Education program prior to the semester in which the work experience is to take place. Available for pass/fail grading only. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisite: approval by the department and Cooperative Education/Career Management in accordance with the policy for granting credit for Cooperative Education programs.

CHEM 369. Chemistry Practicum. 1-3 Credits.

A student may choose a coop, internship, research, or student teaching experience to gain out-of-class experience related to the major. Prerequisite: CHEM 331/332W (Chemistry major) or CHEM 441/442 (Biochemistry major) and the approval of the appropriate departmental coordinator. (qualifies as a CAP experience).

CHEM 415/515. Intermediate Organic Chemistry. 3 Credits.

An in-depth treatment of the chemistry of carbon compounds, including reaction mechanisms, spectral techniques, polymerization, pericyclic reactions, and biomolecules. Prerequisite: CHEM 211-CHEM 213 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 421/521. Instrumental Analysis Lecture. 3 Credits.

Designed to be taken concurrently with CHEM 422/CHEM 522. A study of the basic principles of spectroscopic, chromatographic, and electrochemical methods of quantitative chemical analysis. Methods of chemical instrumentation are also included. Prerequisite: CHEM 331 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 422/522. Instrumental Analysis Laboratory. 3 Credits.

An intensive laboratory study of the principles of analytical chemistry. Experiments in spectroscopic, chromatographic, and electrochemical methods are conducted to illustrate fundamental principles and to provide the opportunity to develop skills in the use of instrumentation for chemical measurement. Prerequisite: CHEM 332W with a grade of C or better. Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 421/CHEM 521 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 441/541. Biochemistry Lecture. 3 Credits.

This course is a one-semester survey of the major molecular constituents, bioenergetics, enzymes, nucleic acid structure, and genetic information transfer pathways fundamental to biochemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 213 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 442W/542. Biochemistry Laboratory. 4 Credits.

Principles and techniques of biochemical and immunological procedures involving protein characterization and isolation, enzymology, bioinformatics, and common molecular biology techniques for nucleic acids will be presented. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisite: CHEM 214 with a grade of C or better and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C with a grade of C or better. Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 441/CHEM 541 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 443/543. Intermediate Biochemistry. 3 Credits.

This course presents and in-depth study of protein structure, folding, and synthesis. The major metabolic pathways will be studied in detail regarding thermodynamics and mechanism of regulation or control of individual enzymes and entire metabolic pathways. Concepts of metabolic disease will be introduced and effects on integrated metabolism will be presented. Prerequisite: CHEM 441/CHEM 541 with a grade of C or better or equivalent.

CHEM 449. Environmental Chemistry. 3 Credits.

An overview of the natural chemical systems operating in Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere (natural waters), and terrestrial environment, and the effects that human activities may have on them. Specific topics to be discussed include: origin and evolution of Earth and life, chemistry of the atmosphere (including the ozone layer and greenhouse effect), organic and inorganic components of soil and water, the hydrologic cycle, chemical weathering, chemical speciation and complexation, and microbial processes in soil and water. Prerequisites: CHEM 123N or CHEM 137N, CHEM 213 and CHEM 321 with a grade of C or higher or permission of the instructor.

CHEM 451/551. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Theoretical aspects of modern inorganic chemistry: bonding theories, stereochemistry, acid-base theories, coordination compounds, organometallic and bioinorganic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 333 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 452/552. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Synthesis of metal and nonmetal inorganic compounds and organometallic compounds, their characterization by modern physical methods, and a study of their properties. Prerequisites: CHEM 351 and CHEM 352.

CHEM 453/553. Essentials of Toxicology. 3 Credits.

Fundamental principles of toxicology: dose-response relationship, toxicologic testing, chemical and biological factors influencing toxicity, organ toxicology, carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, teratogenesis. Prerequisite: CHEM 213 with a grade of C or higher.

CHEM 460/560. Frontiers in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. 1 Credit.

Nanotechnology presents unparalleled opportunities for advances in technology and medicine. Simultaneously, nanotechnology presents new challenges to organisms and to our environment. These undefined risk factors threaten to slow the development of new technologies and novel medical therapies. This course will review: structure, synthesis and properties of key nanomaterials; key applications of nanomaterials in technology and medicine; and impacts of nanomaterials on plant and animal physiology and the environment more generally. This course will be team-taught by faculty members in Biological Sciences, Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Engineering. Prerequisite: junior standing.

CHEM 485. Chemistry and Biochemistry Seminar. 1 Credit.

The formal presentation of a chemical or biochemical topic before students and faculty. Students will also take Major Field Test during this course. Prerequisite: CHEM 331 and Senior standing.

CHEM 490. Senior Thesis I. 1 Credit.

Part one of a two-semester thesis project involving literature research, development of scientific writing skills, and obtaining lab experience using a variety of techniques and equipment. Each student will undertake a research experience under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. A preliminary report of research findings is required at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: Chemistry or Biochemistry major; Senior standing; Cumulative GPA of 3.20 or higher.

CHEM 495. Selected Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Study of selected topics. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

CHEM 497. Independent Study. 1 Credit.

An opportunity is afforded students to undertake independent study or an original investigation under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisites: course background appropriate to the proposed study project and approval of the department chair and the faculty/research advisor.

CHEM 498. Independent Study. 2 Credits.

An opportunity is afforded students to undertake independent study or an original investigation under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisites: course background appropriate to the proposed study project and approval of the department chair and the faculty/research advisor.

CHEM 499. Senior Thesis II. 2 Credits.

Continuation of CHEM 490. The research culminates in a thesis that includes a literature review, description of methods, results and conclusions, and an oral presentation. Prerequisite: CHEM 490 and a cumulative GPA of 3.20 or better.

CHEM 515. Intermediate Organic Chemistry. 3 Credits.

An in-depth treatment of the chemistry of carbon compounds, including reaction mechanisms, spectral techniques, polymerization, pericyclic reactions, and biomolecules.

CHEM 521. Instrumental Analysis Lecture. 3 Credits.

Designed to be taken concurrently with CHEM 522. A study of the basic principles of spectroscopic, chromatographic, and electrochemical methods of quantitative chemical analysis. Methods of chemical instrumentation are also included.

CHEM 522. Instrumental Analysis Laboratory. 3 Credits.

An intensive laboratory study of the principles of analytical chemistry. Experiments in spectroscopic, chromatographic, and electrochemical methods are conducted to illustrate fundamental principles and to provide the opportunity to develop skills in the use of instrumentation for chemical measurement. Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 521 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 541. Biochemistry Lecture. 3 Credits.

This course is a one-semester survey of the major molecular constituents, bioenergetics, enzymes, nucleic acid structure, and genetic information transfer pathways fundamental to biochemistry.

CHEM 542. Biochemistry Laboratory. 4 Credits.

Principles and techniques of biochemical and immunological procedures involving protein characterization and isolation, enzymology, bioinformatics, and common molecular biology techniques for nucleic acids will be presented. (This is a writing intensive course.) Pre- or corequisite: CHEM 541 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 543. Intermediate Biochemistry. 3 Credits.

This course presents and in-depth study of protein structure, folding, and synthesis. The major metabolic pathways will be studied in detail regarding thermodynamics and mechanism of regulation or control of individual enzymes and entire metabolic pathways. Concepts of metabolic disease will be introduced and effects on integrated metabolism will be presented. Prerequisite: CHEM 541 with a grade of C or better or equivalent.

CHEM 551. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Theoretical aspects of modern inorganic chemistry: bonding theories, stereochemistry, acid-base theories, coordination compounds, organometallic and bioinorganic compounds.

CHEM 552. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Advanced topics in inorganic synthesis. Prerequisite: CHEM 551 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 553. Essentials of Toxicology. 3 Credits.

Fundamental principles of toxicology: dose-response relationship, toxicologic testing, chemical and biological factors influencing toxicity, organ toxicology, carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, teratogenesis.

CHEM 560. Frontiers in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. 1 Credit.

Nanotechnology presents unparalleled opportunities for advances in technology and medicine. Simultaneously, nanotechnology presents new challenges to organisms and to our environment. These undefined risk factors threaten to slow the development of new technologies and novel medical therapies. This course will review: structure, synthesis and properties of key nanomaterials; key applications of nanomaterials in technology and medicine; and impacts of nanomaterials on plant and animal physiology and the environment more generally. This course will be team-taught by faculty members in Biological Sciences, Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Engineering.

CHEM 669. In-Service Practicum. 3-6 Credits.

6 credits; 50 hours per credit. Prerequisites: CHEM 631 632. One semester of work experience in local hospital, forensic, or industrial laboratory. Available for pass/fail grading only.

CHEM 670. Graduate Orientation. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. An introduction to graduate studies in chemistry. Topics include responsible conduct of research (RCR), grant writing skills, oral presentation of chemical research and methods for searching the chemical literature. Attendance at departmental seminars is required. Limited to first-year chemistry doctoral students.

CHEM 685. Frontiers in Chemistry. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits each semester. Prerequisite: permission of the department chair. Topics representing the most recent advances in various fields of chemistry or ones which represent an interdisciplinary advancement.

CHEM 690. Seminar. 1 Credit.

1 credit. Master’s students attend seminars given by researchers from across the country in order to expose them to additional areas of research in chemistry and biochemistry.

CHEM 691. Master’s Seminar. 2 Credits.

2 credits. Master’s students attend seminars; attend a class on giving seminars; and present a seminar on their own research.

CHEM 695. Topics in Chemistry. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits each semester. Prerequisite: permission of the department chair.

CHEM 698. Master’s Research. 1-9 Credits.

CHEM 699. Master’s Thesis. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Departmental permission required.

CHEM 701. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. The theoretical and practical foundation of analysis with emphasis on recent analytical developments and current literature; topics may include figures of merit and data treatment, sampling and extraction, HPLC, electrochemistry, circular dichroism, FT-IR, Raman, MS, electrophoresis and NMR. Lectures are given by experts in those techniques.

CHEM 702. Advanced Analytical Chemistry II. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: Instrumental Analysis (or its equivalent). This course will review the most cutting-edge Advances Analytical Chemistry Instrumentation and Methods, spanning over three core areas of analytical chemistry (Spectroscopy, Separation and Electrochemistry) and offer the in depth understanding of objectives, motivations, and future directions of Advanced Analytical Chemistry Instrumentation. The course will focus on advanced instrumentation and methodologies that can achieve ultra sensitive analysis and detection, including single molecular spectroscopy, nanoparticle probes, high-speed separation in microfluidic devices, ultramicroelectrodes for sensing and imaging.

CHEM 703. Chromatographic Separations by HPLC and GC. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course covers basic principles of chromatography emphasizing high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC), as well as separation modes, instrumentation, detection methods, quantification, and sample preparation including solid phase extraction. Examples from environmental sciences, biosciences and industry will be stressed.

CHEM 704. HPLC and GC Laboratory. 2,3 Credits.

Laboratory 4 or 6 hours; 2 or 3 credits. Corequisite: CHEM 703. This lab course consists of six to seven independent HPLC and GC exercises based on examples from environmental, bioscience, and industrial applications.

CHEM 715. Automation and Management of the Clinical Chemistry Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Lecture 1 hour; 1 credit. Prerequisite: CHEM 631 or permission of the instructor. The basic principles of management of the clinical chemistry laboratory and regulatory issues in laboratory management are presented.

CHEM 716. Electrochemical Methods of Analysis. 1,2 Credit.

2 credits. This course presents the fundamental principals and practical applications of modern electrochemical methods of analysis. Lectures and text readings cover the basic concepts and fundamental principals of this division of analytical techniques. Detailed descriptions and demonstrations of modern electrochemical research instrumentation will be provided. Students will obtain hands-on experience with this instrumentation by performing a required chemical determination using an electroanalytical method, and by undertaking a special analytical project. Research applications of other electroanalytical techniques and instrumentation, in addition to those actually used by the students in this course, will be discussed and/or demonstrated.

CHEM 720. Experimental Design and Data Treatment. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. A hands-on approach to experimental design and multivariate data analysis. Modern computer-based chemometric theories will be presented.

CHEM 722. Bonding and Group Theory. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Introduction to group theory and application to problems in bonding and spectroscopy.

CHEM 723. Modern Synthetic Organic Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Design of complex organic molecules. Topics covered will include: retrosynthetic analysis, stereochemical control and contemporary methods. Prerequisite: CHEM 415 or CHEM 515 or a pass in the organic placement exam.

CHEM 724. Bioinorganic Chemistry. 3 Credits.

3 credits. This course is a survey of the mechanisms of biochemical activity of the trace elements. Topics include oxygen uptake, oxidation-reduction, metabolism, and toxicity.

CHEM 725. Physical Organic Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Approaches to the study of reaction mechanisms, including molecular orbital theory, thermochemistry, kinetics, isotop effects, solvent and substituent effects (including linear free energy relationships), acidity, acid catalysis, and detection of reactive intermediates.

CHEM 726. Medicinal Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: CHEM 721 or permission of the instructor. Study of the chemistry and mode of action of various medicinal and physiologically active compounds.

CHEM 734. Organic Spectroscopy. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Organic functional group and structure analysis with ultraviolet, infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass, and other spectroscopic techniques.

CHEM 736. Introduction to Organic Synthesis. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Detailed coverage of fundamental organic transformations with emphasis on reduction, oxidation, carbon-carbon bond formation, and protecting group strategy.

CHEM 741. Stable Isotope Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course investigates the stable isotope systematics of carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen and sulfur in biological, chemical and geological systems. Course material includes analytical methods, fractionations and applications of stable isotope analyses in a wide range of natural systems. Recommended to graduate students in chemistry, earth sciences and biological sciences with an interest in environmental processes.

CHEM 742. Advanced Mass Spectroscopy. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisites: CHEM 423/523.This course trains students in the theory and application of advanced mass spectrometric methods as used in all subdisciplines of chemistry and biochemistry.

CHEM 743. Organic Geochemistry. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Organic geochemistry is the study of organic compounds originally produced by photosynthesis and altered as they cycle through the soils, atmosphere, rivers, oceans, and crustal rocks. This course will include the carbon/oxygen cycles, biomarkers, organic matter diagenesis/catagenesis, analytical techniques used in organic geochemistry, and an introduction to carbon isotopes.

CHEM 744. NMR Spectroscopy. 3 Credits.

3 credits. This course presents the basics of NMR spectroscopy. Topics include basic NMR theory, NMR instrumentation, one- and two- dimensional 1H and 13C techniques, and introduction to solid-state NMR.

CHEM 748. Environmental Chemistry Laboratory. 3 Credits.

Laboratory 6 hours; 3 credits. Study of the basic principles and methods of trace chemical analysis of environmental systems, including spectroscopic, chromatographic, and electrochemical instrumental methods, in addition to wet chemical methods.

CHEM 749. Environmental Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An overview of the natural chemistry systems operating in the atmosphere, in the terrestrial environment (both water and soils), and in the oceans, and the potential effects that human activities may have on them. Specific topics include the origin and evolution of the earth and life, the chemistry of the atmosphere (including the ozone layer and greenhouse effect), the organic and inorganic components of soil and water, chemical weathering of rocks, metal complexation, biological processes in soil and water, and global-scale chemical processes.

CHEM 754. Quantum Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. Overview of the development and application of quantum mechanics from a chemical perspective.

CHEM 755. Computational Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: CHEM 754 or permission of the instructor. Comprehensive overview of ab initio (quantum) calculations and molecular dynamic simulations, the two most widely used computational methods. Plus a brief overview of other computational applications in chemistry and biology.

CHEM 756. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. 3 Credits.

3 credits. This course is a survey of the major mechanisms of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Topics include kinetics, ligand substitution, electron transfer, and photochemistry.

CHEM 757. Organic Chemistry Mechanisms. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisites: CHEM 725/825. The application of physical organic techniques to study the mechanisms of key organic reactions and the structures of reaction intermediates. Includes photochemistry and pericyclic reactions.

CHEM 760. Molecular Spectroscopy. 3 Credits.

An introductory survey of the rotational, vibrational and electronic spectroscopy of molecules from the perspective of quantum mechanics and group theory. Prerequisite: CHEM 333.

CHEM 762. Advanced Techniques in Biochemistry. 1-3 Credits.

Laboratory 2-6 hours; 1-3 credits. A laboratory course in modern experimental methodology and instrumentation in biochemistry.

CHEM 765. Advanced Biochemistry. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. Topics will include: macromolecular structure, function, thermodynamic stability and folding kinetics; protein chemistry; molecular biology; molecular mechanisms of disease and bioinformatics.

CHEM 767. Enzymology. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Consideration of experimental methods for examining the kinetic data and rate equations from enzymes, examination of various models of enzyme catalysis, comprehensive pr esentation of the mechanisms of coenzyme action, and studies of mechanism of enzyme action.

CHEM 769. Nucleic Acids Biochemistry. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. A comprehensive presentation of the chemistry of RNA and DNA. Modern concepts of gene regulation, the control over transcription, RNA processing and translation, cell cycle control and molecular carcinogenesis.

CHEM 775. Physical Biochemistry. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Physical characterization of macromolecules, polarized light, absorption and fluorescence, sedimentation and transport hydrodynamics, electrophoretic mobility, light scattering, and structural x-ray crystallography of proteins and nucleic acids.

CHEM 779. Kinetics and Thermodynamics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. A survey of modern theories of reaction rates and mechanisms, classic thermodynamic functions, and an introduction to statistical thermodynamics.

CHEM 795. Selected Topics in Chemistry and Biochemistry. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Thorough coverage of areas selected to meet special needs and interests.

CHEM 814. Biomedical Sciences Laboratory. 2 Credits.

2 credits each semester. With approval of the program director.

CHEM 815. Biomedical Sciences Laboratory. 2 Credits.

2 credits each semester. With approval of the program director.

CHEM 816. Electrochemical Methods of Analysis. 1,2 Credit.

2 credits. This course presents the fundamental principals and practical applications of modern electrochemical methods of analysis. Lectures and text readings cover the basic concepts and fundamental principals of this division of analytical techniques. Detailed descriptions and demonstrations of modern electrochemical research instrumentation will be provided. Students will obtain hands-on experience with this instrumentation by performing a required chemical determination using an electroanalytical method, and by undertaking a special analytical project. Research applications of other electroanalytical techniques and instrumentation, in addition to those actually used by the students in this course, will be discussed and/or demonstrated.

CHEM 822. Bonding and Group Theory. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Introduction to group theory and application to problems in bonding and spectroscopy.

CHEM 824. Bioinorganic Chemistry. 3 Credits.

3 credits. This course is a survey of the mechanisms of biochemical activity of the trace elements. Topics include oxygen uptake, oxidation-reduction, metabolism, and toxicity.

CHEM 834. Organic Spectroscopy. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Organic functional group and structure analysis with ultraviolet, infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass, and other spectroscopic techniques.

CHEM 836. Introduction to Organic Synthesis. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Detailed coverage of fundamental organic transformations with emphasis on reduction, oxidation, carbon-carbon bond formation, and protecting group strategy.

CHEM 842. Advanced Mass Spectroscopy. 3 Credits.

3 credits. This course trains students in the theory and application of advanced mass spectrometric methods as used in all subdisciplines of chemistry and biochemistry.

CHEM 844. NMR Spectroscopy. 3 Credits.

3 credits. This course presents the basics of NMR spectroscopy. Topics include basic NMR theory, NMR instrumentation, one- and two- dimensional 1H and 13C techniques, and introduction to solid-state NMR.

CHEM 856. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. 3 Credits.

3 credits. This course is a survey of the major mechanisms of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Topics include kinetics, ligand substitution, electron transfer, and photochemistry.

CHEM 857. Organic Chemistry Mechanisms. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisites: CHEM 725/825. The application of physical organic techniques to study the mechanisms of key organic reactions and the structures of reaction intermediates. Includes photochemistry and pericyclic reactions.

CHEM 862. Advanced Techniques in Biochemistry. 1-3 Credits.

Laboratory 2-6 hours; 1-3 credits. A laboratory course in modern experimental methodology and instrumentation in biochemistry.

CHEM 890. Chemistry Seminar. 1 Credit.

1 credit. Students attend seminars given by researchers from across the country on order to expose them to additional areas of research in chemistry and biochemistry.

CHEM 891. Doctoral Seminar. 2 Credits.

2 credits. Students attend seminars; attend a class on giving seminars; and present a seminar on their own research.

CHEM 895. Intern in Clinical Laboratory Management. 1-3 Credits.

Lecture 1-3 hours; 1-3 credits each semester. Lecture and discussion of recent advances in the field of biomedical sciences.

CHEM 898. Doctoral Research. 1-9 Credits.

CHEM 899. Dissertation. 1-9 Credits.

CHEM 999. Chemistry 999. 1 Credit.

1 credit. A one-hour pass/fail registration required of all graduate students to maintain active status during the final semester prior to graduation. After successfully passing the candidacy examination, all doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit each term until the degree is complete.