HUMANITIES Courses

HUM 410/510. Social Justice Theory and Practice. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to equip students with tools and perspectives to be effective and knowledgeable leaders and participants in organizing communities around issues and challenges related to social justice. Course readings will be used to ground, inform, and challenge students as they explore the complex and exciting dynamics of social justice work. Students are also expected to engage in the practical work or critique and evaluation of an organizing campaign with which they are already involved or interested. Prerequisite: Instructor permission required.

HUM 411/511. Health and Humanities Pro-seminar. 3 Credits.

This course is concerned with addressing the human side of medicine and as such draws theoretical, critical and practical insights from across the social sciences and the arts to explore the meanings attached to illness, disease, embodiment, disability, health and therapeutic encounters (from both a professional and patient perspective). It embraces matters of ethics, aesthetics, history, representation and reflective practice. Prerequisite: Instructor permission required.

HUM 510. Social Justice Theory and Practice. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to equip students with tools and perspectives to be effective and knowledgeable leaders and participants in organizing communities around issues and challenges related to social justice. Course readings will be used to ground, inform, and challenge students as they explore the complex and exciting dynamics of social justice work. Students are also expected to engage in the practical work or critique and evaluation of an organizing campaign with which they are already involved or interested.

HUM 511. Health and Humanities Pro-seminar. 3 Credits.

This course is concerned with addressing the human side of medicine and as such draws theoretical, critical and practical insights from across the social sciences and the arts to explore the meanings attached to illness, disease, embodiment, disability, health and therapeutic encounters (from both a professional and patient perspective). It embraces matters of ethics, aesthetics, history, representation and reflective practice.

HUM 595. Topics in Humanities. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Advanced study of selected topics designed for small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully descried in information distributed to academic advisors.

HUM 597. Tutorial Work in Humanities. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Independend reading and study on a topic selected under the direction of an instructor.

HUM 601. Introduction to the Humanities. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. This class introduces students to the study of the humanities with a focus on the enduring questions and ideas of human history. These include questions of culture, reality, society, power, truth, communication, and mediation. Students address these questions and ideas by engaging with some of the great works of social theory from the twentieth century.

HUM 602. Theory and Methods in Humanities. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This class instructs students in various theoretical and methodological approaches for conducting research within the humanistic disciplines. Students will become familiar with literary theory, critical/cultural studies, historical methods, qualitative social scientific approaches, and visual studies, as well as the conduct of research across disciplinary boundaries.

HUM 603. Preparing Humanities Teachers & Scholars Pro-seminar. 3 Credits.

The purposes of the pro-seminar are A)to help prepare Humanities graduate students to teach discipline-specific college-level introductory courses from an interdisciplinary perspective, and B)to provide Humanities students with opportunities to engage scholars who are producing new work across a range of disciplines, in turn learning to present their own research in public.

HUM 604. Debates in the Digital Humanities. 3 Credits.

This class will emphasize the ways in which the digital humanities intersects with critical theory and cultural studies approaches to studying digital media. Students will gain an understanding of the emerging role of the digital humanities across several academic disciplines. The course employs an experimental immersive learning component. Prerequisites: HUM 601 and departmental approval.

HUM 630. The Information Society. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course explores the theories, questions, claims and myths that have accompanied the rise of new communication technologies and electronically derived digital information that define the “Electronic Revolution,” also known as the Information Society. (cross-listed with COMM 630).

HUM 640. Television and Politics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This class closely examines television’s role in shaping and reflecting contemporary American political culture, the conduct of foreign policy, and formal political processes, such as elections. (cross-listed with COMM 640).

HUM 657. Introduction to American Popular Culture. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course introduces students to the history and diversity of popular culture forms, industries, criticism, and debates in the United States. The course is interdisciplinary, with a focus on the relationship of cultural hierarchy to social and national identity.

HUM 668. Internship. 3 Credits.

3 credits. This course allows graduate students in Humanities to pursue a structured work experience in a field relevant to a student’s course of study. Student will work with a supervisor at the work site and a faculty advisor in Humanities. Requirements include a formal essay connected to the experience, portfolio, and satisfactory evaluation by the supervisor. Permission of Humanities director required. Pass/fail grading only.

HUM 692. Humanities Thesis and Non-Thesis Preparation. 3 Credits.

This class is designed to prepare students for completion of their final projects in the program. The class is designed to teach students how to conduct research. Students workshop their projects as they are being developed. It also teaches students to navigate the various institutional requirements for completing this work. Prerequisites: HUM 601, HUM 602, and departmental approval. Pre- or corequisite: HUM 603.

HUM 693. Non-Thesis Project. 3 Credits.

Students have the option of creating a theoretically-informed final project instead of a traditional thesis. Individual projects must be approved by the program director, but can include creative works, art installations, film and video, interactive and born-digital works, as well as other forms of community engagement. Projects are developed with help of supervisor. Prerequisites: HUM 601, HUM 602, HUM 603, HUM 604, HUM 692 and departmental approval.

HUM 694. Interdisciplinarity and the Humanities: Theory and Practice. 3 Credits.

The capstone seminar for non-thesis humanities students. The seminar provides a forum in which to discuss contemporary theories and questions concerning interdisciplinary humanities research. Students will also develop and complete a research paper which reflects their own interdisciplinary programs of study. Prerequisites: HUM 601 and HUM 602.

HUM 696. Special Topics in Humanities. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Appropriate advanced study of small groups on special topics selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate.

HUM 697. Tutorial Work in Humanities. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate.

HUM 698. Thesis. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisites: HUM 601 and HUM 602.

HUM 699. Thesis. 3,6 Credits.

3 or 6 credits. Course requirement for thesis option.

HUM 707. Creative Medicine. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to give students an overview of contemporary scholarship on the intersection of the fine and performing arts with healthcare, wellness, and medicine.

HUM 708. Race, Gender, and Sexuality and Health. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to give students an overview of contemporary scholarship on the intersections of race, gender, sexuality with healthcare, wellness, and medicine.

HUM 709. Mediating Medicine. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to give students an overview of contemporary scholarship on the representation of healthcare, wellness, and medicine on film, television, and in digital media.

HUM 795. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Appropriate advanced study of small groups on special topics selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate.

HUM 796. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Appropriate advanced study of small groups on special topics selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate.

HUM 797. Tutorial Work in the Humanities. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Independent reading and study under the direction of an instructor on a topic to be selected.

HUM 895. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Appropriate advanced study of small groups on special topics selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate.

HUM 896. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Appropriate advanced study of small groups on special topics selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate.

HUM 897. Tutorial Work in the Humanities. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Independent reading and study under the direction of an instructor on a topic to be selected.

HUM 999. Doctoral Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course doctoral students may take to maintain active status after successfully passing the candidacy examination. All doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour every semester until their graduation.