INTERNATIONAL STUDIES Courses

IS 600. Research Methods in International Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Interdisciplinary quantitative techniques applicable to the study of international phenomena.

IS 601. Seminar in International Relations Theory. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Surveys major theoretical approaches to international relations and foreign policy. A systematic introduction designed to lay a foundation for advanced graduate study.

IS 606. American Foreign Policy and World Order. 3 Credits.

This course deals with the adaptation of US foreign policies to the changing structure of the international system after WWII and in the Cold War, and since Reagan. It is designed to review, analyze, and discuss the global rise of the US role in the world. It will also assess the transformation of US interests since 1945, through the Cold War and since the events of September 11, 2001.

IS 620. Advanced Statistical Techniques for International Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: IS 600. Multivariate regression, causal analysis, and advanced statistical applications.

IS 655. International History. 3 Credits.

Course explores how different societies in the 20th century were shaped by similar practices, ideas, and pressures. Course themes may include colonialism, the global history of World War II, the cold war ethnic distortion and the consumer revolution among others.

IS 668. Internship in International Studies. 1-6 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisite: approval of the director. Individually arranged internship at local, state, national or international level.

IS 695. Topics in International Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The advanced study of selected (titled) topics not offered on a regular basis.

IS 696. Seminar Topics in International Studies. 3 Credits.

3 credits. The advanced study of selected topics in an interdisciplinary manner which permits small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest. Due to their specialized nature, seminar topics may not be offered regularly.

IS 697. Independent Research in International Studies. 3 Credits.

Independent research on a topic from an interdisciplinary perspective. Students must receive prior approval from the faculty supervisor and the director.

IS 698. Directed Research. 3 Credits.

Methodological and theoretical preparation designed to assist students in writing a thesis. Prerequisites: approval of director or instructor.

IS 699. Thesis. 1-9 Credits.

1-9 credits. Writing of the thesis.

IS 701. Global Change and American Foreign Policy. 3 Credits.

Seminar, 3 hours. 3 credits. This research seminar examines the transformation of the U.S. role in the world in the global context of the 20th Century and since September 2001.

IS 702. Approaches to Collective Security. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This seminar explores the origins of the idea of collective security, examines the attempts to organize international security collectively and assesses possibilities and opportunities for collective security arrangements after the Cold War.

IS 703. Ethics and International Relations. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The focus of this research seminar will be on the role of normative ideas in international relations. Students will be introduced to the growing literature on normative approaches to international relations as well as the traditional literature on the practical and philosophical problems of ethical action in the relations of states. Although a number of policy applications will be considered, the primary focus will be on the theoretical incorporation of normative ideas into our understanding of state action in the anarchic international environment.

IS 704. Latin American Politics. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. This course examines Latin American politics from comparative and historical perspectives. Particular focus is placed on various manifestations of political authority in the region and the major societal challenges to state power. The course reviews and critiques alternative theoretical approaches to the study of state-societal relations in Latin America.

IS 705. The Euro-Atlantic Community. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. An examination of the Euro-Atlantic area as a partial international system since World War II; alignments and patterns within and between the members of the European "community" and the role and attitudes of the United States and leading European states to preserve and strengthen their sovereign prerogatives and influence; and the prospects for a true Euro-Atlantic community that would link the U.S. and Europe.

IS 706. The Causes of War. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This research seminar will explore the theoretical and empirical literature on the causes of violent conflict between states.

IS 707. Interdependence, Power, and Transnationalism. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. This course covers the fundamental concepts, ideas, and approaches to the study of interdependence and transnationalism. It seeks to expose students to the nature, role, and impact of economic, technological, strategic, and cultural interdependence. Cases of interdependence and transnationalism are explored in the post-Cold War era. Some focus is placed on how interdependence and transnationalism are impacting the power of the state.

IS 709. Chinese Foreign Policy. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. This seminar includes an advanced survey of theoretical approaches to the study of Chinese foreign policy and in-depth analyses of the domestic/international environ-ment, ideological principles, political/economic goals, military/diplomatic instruments, decision-making processes, and global/regional consequences of Chinese foreign policy.

IS 710. Global Environmental Policy. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This seminar examines the institutions and political actors involved in global environmental policy making with emphasis on the role of the United States. In doing so, it addresses the scientific and political debate concerning the causes, consequences, and proposed solutions of selected worldwide ecological problems, including global climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, and loss of biodiversity among others.

IS 711. International Migration and Refugee Movement. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. A review of current literature and empirical issues concerning transnational migration and refugees.

IS 712. The New Germany in the New Europe. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. The unification of Germany and the end of the East-West conflict have changed the context within which policy is made in Europe. What kind of Europe will emerge? What kind of hierarchies will determine direction and pace of European politics? The purpose of this course is to explore the role played by Germany in the development of post-Cold War European politics.

IS 713. Global Political Economy. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. Analysis of the forces shaping national and transnational economic institutions and their policies on a range of contemporary issues, including North-South relations.

IS 714. Law in the International System. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An introduction to the principles of international law and to the political and institutional role of law in the relations of states.

IS 715. France and New Europe. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. Emphasis will be placed on the transformation of French-American relations from the idyllic beginnings of the American nation to the complexities of the Cold War, to the new alignments of the new Europe and the European Union.

IS 716. Theories of Comparative Sociopolitical Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The fundamental goal of the course is to provide the theoretical basis for subsequent coursework and research in the comparative and regional studies track. To achieve this goal, this seminar examines major theories and debates in comparative social and political studies based on extensive and intensive literature review.

IS 717. World Population and Development. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. This seminar discusses population processes and their connections to socioeconomic development. A nontechnical course, the goal is to introduce students to the major concerns and issues in population and current debates over the role of population in sustainable development. It will provide students with a systematic but critical review of research findings and issues in various areas of population and development.

IS 718. Mao’s China. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This reading seminar will focus on the changes of the Chinese society since the beginning of the 20th century. It will examine the pivotal historical events that led to the Chinese revolution, which put Mao's Communist regime in power and has changed the Chinese society ever since. While studying the history chronologically, students will identify issues and factors that affect the Chinese political system and society, and examine the legacies of Mao's revolution from social and individual perspectives. The course will also focus on political formation and transformation of the government, social structure and upheavals, economic reforms, and foreign policies. (cross listed with HIST 718).

IS 719. Chinese Politics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This seminar focuses on post-Mao China. It examines the fundamental rules, prominent players, and major issues in contemporary Chinese politics. The course reviews and critiques alternative theoretical approaches to the study of Chinese politics.

IS 720. Research Seminar in Global Security. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. The research seminar investigates the profound changes in international security brought about by the end of the Cold War with a specific focus on the role of nuclear weapons. The primary purpose of the seminar is to promote research into the global aspects of the nuclear issue and to enhance understanding of the relationship between nuclear control and the New World Order.

IS 721. New World Order: Chaos and Coherence. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. The end of the Cold War has ushered tremendous political changes and an equally broad intellectual debate on the meaning of these changes. What will be the basic rules of international politics? Will the future resemble the past or follow new rules of its own? What countries, what groups, and what issues will dominate the future of world politics?.

IS 722. Democracy and International Relations. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An examination of the relationship between democratic politics, democratic ideals, and international relations. Subjects covered will include trends and processes of democratization and their implications for international relations, the distinctiveness of democratic states in their international behavior, the impact of the international environment on the internal politics of democratic states, and the problems of democracy in global governance.

IS 725. Politics of the Middle East. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Explores the international relations of the Middle East from World War I to the present. Examines the origins of the Arab-Israeli and Persian Gulf Wars and their modern dimensions. Examines the role of oil, outside powers and religion.

IS 730. The Rise and Fall of the Socialist Bloc. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This reading seminar will feature occasional lectures and extensive discussion about topics such as the consolidation of Soviet power in East Europe, the road to the Cold War, socialist economic practices, Soviet 'imperialism' within the bloc, Soviet support for 'national-liberation' movements in Asia and Africa, the building of the wall, the Sino-Soviet alliance, the events of 1989, and post-socialist nostalgia.

IS 732. National Identity in a Global Age. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. This course will focus on narratives of national identity in the age of globalization. Seminal works of cultural criticism, philosophy, and political philosophy will shed light on the complex nature of national identity construction in the contemporary world.

IS 735. International Relations of the Middle East. 3 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to help the student understand, evaluate and analyze key features of the international relations of the Middle East. Major issues covered include the historical background of the Middle East, primarily from World War I; Islam and Islamism; Zionism and Israel; Arab nationalism and pan-Arabism; the Arab-Israeli conflict in its historical and contemporary context; the Persian Gulf wars; global oil dynamics; the foreign policy of key regional states; the role of outside powers in the region, especially the United States; and major issues including democratization, WMD, and the Arab Spring. Prerequisite: Instructor or Director approval.

IS 740. Political Economy of Development. 3 Credits.

This seminar examines alternate theoretical perspectives on development. These perspectives are then employed to understand contemporary political and economic changes in the developing world, including the consolidation of democratic governance and the liberalization of domestic economics.

IS 741. Globalization and Social Change in the World System. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. This course is intended to first identify the distinguishing characteristics of globalization. It then attempts to examine its implications on a number of critical issues, including the future of democracy, income distribution and ethnic, class, and gender relations.

IS 742. Contested Territories. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Using case studies of Europe since 1918, this course examines the contours of territorial disputes. The ways in which territorial contests are presented and represented through the lenses of geopolitics, ethnicity and race, nationalism, gender, violence, international authority and diplomatic and institutional influence will be explored.

IS 745. Social Movements and Revolution in Latin American History. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Interpretations of the three major social revolutions in modern Latin America (Mexico 1910, Cuba 1959 and Nicaragua 1979) and of a variety of social movements (agrarian, labor, urban, religious and so on) are studied from a continental perspective. The relevant theoretical literature and the economic, cultural and political background receive special attention. A broad knowledge of modern Latin American history is assumed.

IS 748. Gender and Globalization. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. Studies systems of global restructuring as they impact women throughout the globe. Migration, international development, and transnational activism will be focal themes, explored across a variety of national contexts.

IS 750. France's Decolonized Legacy: Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Quebec. 3 Credits.

An analysis of France's ex-colonies as they moved from colonization and decolonization to independence. An overview of political, historical, cinematic, and literary texts with a focus on France’s relationship with its ex-colonies, and its ex-colonies’ struggles in a post-decolonized world. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor or director.

IS 751. Ethnic Conflict in the Emerging Global Order. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Using different case studies, this course investigates the most important internal and external factors that cause ethnic conflicts. It also examines different mechanisms that help resolve or mitigate such conflicts.

IS 752. Research Seminar in International Studies: Refugees. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. This is a graduate-level seminar focusing on the refugee movement from a global perspective. The goals are to provide a critical and realistic understanding of the refugee phenomenon and to explain why the refugees tend to follow some identifiable paths, and why they sometimes return and sometimes do not. Discussion will be centered on the causes and consequences of refugee flow, and the roles the more developed countries can play in helping solve the problem.

IS 755. Conflict and Violence in Modern Africa. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course will confront the theme of conflict and violence in Africa since the mid-20th century. It will explore the reasons behind the level of violent conflicts in the continent today, seek to understand their larger significance, and explore ideas for conflict resolution and prevention. (cross listed with HIST 755).

IS 760. International Cultural Studies: History, Theory and Application. 3 Credits.

3 Cr. Course analyzes culture in the context of material conditions in which it is produced, disseminated, controlled and practiced. Theoretical application of cultural studies will include developing familiarity with key foundational theories, terminologies, and critical thinking.

IS 762. Game Theory. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Game theory uses mathematical models, empirical investigation, and simulations in an effort to explain simple and complex strategic interactions among individuals, states, groups, and species. This course teaches the tools of game theory, with a focus on applications in international relations and political science.

IS 765. Agent-Based Modeling and Simulation for International Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. An introduction to complex systems theory and to the application of agent-based modeling technologies to a variety of social systems.

IS 770. Transnational Media Practices. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. Course examines the key roles played by media technologies in implementing and promoting international development programs, as well as some of the concerns these initiatives have raised in terms of media literacy, cultural sovereignty, and information access.

IS 772. Modeling Global Events. 3 Credits.

This course introduces modeling and simulation as a tool for expanding one’s understanding of events that have shaped the global environment of the 21st century. The course will first provide a broad look at international politics through a review of select international incidents, military interventions, and homeland security issues. Second, select topics from these categories will serve as case studies to facilitate representing those events with the application of modeling, simulation, and visualization. Understanding how modeling and simulation can provide another method of analysis allows students to delve deeper into their understanding of "what happened" and to explore their conception of "what if." Prerequisite: Approval of instructor or director.

IS 794. Seminar in Thesis and Dissertation Preparation. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the director. Prepares students to research, formulate and write thesis and dissertation prospectuses.

IS 795. Topics in International Studies. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. The advanced study and discussion of selected (titled) topics not offered on a regular basis.

IS 796. Selected Topics in International Studies. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. The advanced study of selected topics in an interdisciplinary manner which will permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest. Due to their specialized nature, the course may not be offered regularly.

IS 801. Global Change and American Foreign Policy. 3 Credits.

Seminar, 3 hours. 3 credits. This research seminar examines the transformation of the U.S. role in the world in the global context of the 20th Century and since September 2001.

IS 802. Approaches to Collective Security. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This seminar explores the origins of the idea of collective security, examines the attempts to organize international security collectively and assesses possibilities and opportunities for collective security arrangements after the Cold War.

IS 803. Ethics and International Relations. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The focus of this research seminar will be on the role of normative ideas in international relations. Students will be introduced to the growing literature on normative approaches to international relations as well as the traditional literature on the practical and philosophical problems of ethical action in the relations of states. Although a number of policy applications will be considered, the primary focus will be on the theoretical incorporation of normative ideas into our understanding of state action in the anarchic international environment.

IS 804. Latin American Politics. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. This course examines Latin American politics from comparative and historical perspectives. Particular focus is placed on various manifestations of political authority in the region and the major societal challenges to state power. The course reviews and critiques alternative theoretical approaches to the study of state-societal relations in Latin America.

IS 805. The Euro-Atlantic Community. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. An examination of the Euro-Atlantic area as a partial international system since World War II; alignments and patterns within and between the members of the European "community" and the role and attitudes of the United States and leading European states to preserve and strengthen their sovereign prerogatives and influence; and the prospects for a true Euro-Atlantic community that would link the U.S. and Europe.

IS 806. The Causes of War. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This research seminar will explore the theoretical and empirical literature on the causes of violent conflict between states.

IS 807. Interdependence, Power, and Transnationalism. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. This course covers the fundamental concepts, ideas, and approaches to the study of interdependence and transnationalism. It seeks to expose students to the nature, role, and impact of economic, technological, strategic, and cultural interdependence. Cases of interdependence and transnationalism are explored in the post-Cold War era. Some focus is placed on how interdependence and transnationalism are impacting the power of the state.

IS 809. Chinese Foreign Policy. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. This seminar includes an advanced survey of theoretical approaches to the study of Chinese foreign policy and in-depth analyses of the domestic/international environ-ment, ideological principles, political/economic goals, military/diplomatic instruments, decision-making processes, and global/regional consequences of Chinese foreign policy.

IS 810. Global Environmental Policy. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This seminar examines the institutions and political actors involved in global environmental policy making with emphasis on the role of the United States. In doing so, it addresses the scientific and political debate concerning the causes, consequences, and proposed solutions of selected worldwide ecological problems, including global climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, and loss of biodiversity among others.

IS 811. International Migration and Refugee Movement. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. A review of current literature and empirical issues concerning transnational migration and refugees.

IS 812. The New Germany in the New Europe. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. The unification of Germany and the end of the East-West conflict have changed the context within which policy is made in Europe. What kind of Europe will emerge? What kind of hierarchies will determine direction and pace of European politics? The purpose of this course is to explore the role played by Germany in the development of post-Cold War European politics.

IS 813. Global Political Economy. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. Analysis of the forces shaping national and transnational economic institutions and their policies on a range of contemporary issues, including North-South relations.

IS 814. Law in the International System. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An introduction to the principles of international law and to the political and institutional role of law in the relations of states.

IS 815. France and New Europe. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. Emphasis will be placed on the transformation of French-American relations from the idyllic beginnings of the American nation to the complexities of the Cold War, to the new alignments of the new Europe and the European Union.

IS 816. Theories of Comparative Sociopolitical Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The fundamental goal of the course is to provide the theoretical basis for subsequent coursework and research in the comparative and regional studies track. To achieve this goal, this seminar examines major theories and debates in comparative social and political studies based on extensive and intensive literature review.

IS 817. World Population and Development. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. This seminar discusses population processes and their connections to socioeconomic development. A nontechnical course, the goal is to introduce students to the major concerns and issues in population and current debates over the role of population in sustainable development. It will provide students with a systematic but critical review of research findings and issues in various areas of population and development.

IS 818. Mao’s China. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This reading seminar will focus on the changes of the Chinese society since the beginning of the 20th century. It will examine the pivotal historical events that led to the Chinese revolution, which put Mao's Communist regime in power and has changed the Chinese society ever since. While studying the history chronologically, students will identify issues and factors that affect the Chinese political system and society, and examine the legacies of Mao's revolution from social and individual perspectives. The course will also focus on political formation and transformation of the government, social structure and upheavals, economic reforms, and foreign policies. (cross listed with HIST 718).

IS 819. Chinese Politics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This seminar focuses on post-Mao China. It examines the fundamental rules, prominent players, and major issues in contemporary Chinese politics. The course reviews and critiques alternative theoretical approaches to the study of Chinese politics.

IS 820. Research Seminar in Global Security. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. The research seminar investigates the profound changes in international security brought about by the end of the Cold War with a specific focus on the role of nuclear weapons. The primary purpose of the seminar is to promote research into the global aspects of the nuclear issue and to enhance understanding of the relationship between nuclear control and the New World Order.

IS 821. New World Order: Chaos and Coherence. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. The end of the Cold War has ushered tremendous political changes and an equally broad intellectual debate on the meaning of these changes. What will be the basic rules of international politics? Will the future resemble the past or follow new rules of its own? What countries, what groups, and what issues will dominate the future of world politics?.

IS 822. Democracy and International Relations. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An examination of the relationship between democratic politics, democratic ideals, and international relations. Subjects covered will include trends and processes of democratization and their implications for international relations, the distinctiveness of democratic states in their international behavior, the impact of the international environment on the internal politics of democratic states, and the problems of democracy in global governance.

IS 825. Politics of the Middle East. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Explores the international relations of the Middle East from World War I to the present. Examines the origins of the Arab-Israeli and Persian Gulf Wars and their modern dimensions. Examines the role of oil, outside powers and religion.

IS 830. The Rise and Fall of the Socialist Bloc. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This reading seminar will feature occasional lectures and extensive discussion about topics such as the consolidation of Soviet power in East Europe, the road to the Cold War, socialist economic practices, Soviet 'imperialism' within the bloc, Soviet support for 'national-liberation' movements in Asia and Africa, the building of the wall, the Sino-Soviet alliance, the events of 1989, and post-socialist nostalgia.

IS 832. National Identity in a Global Age. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. This course will focus on narratives of national identity in the age of globalization. Seminal works of cultural criticism, philosophy, and political philosophy will shed light on the complex nature of national identity construction in the contemporary world.

IS 835. International Relations of the Middle East. 3 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to help the student understand, evaluate and analyze key features of the international relations of the Middle East. Major issues covered include the historical background of the Middle East, primarily from World War I; Islam and Islamism; Zionism and Israel; Arab nationalism and pan-Arabism; the Arab-Israeli conflict in its historical and contemporary context; the Persian Gulf wars; global oil dynamics; the foreign policy of key regional states; the role of outside powers in the region, especially the United States; and major issues including democratization, WMD, and the Arab Spring. Prerequisite: Instructor or Director approval.

IS 840. Political Economy of Development. 3 Credits.

This seminar examines alternate theoretical perspectives on development. These perspectives are then employed to understand contemporary political and economic changes in the developing world, including the consolidation of democratic governance and the liberalization of domestic economics.

IS 841. Globalization and Social Change in the World System. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. This course is intended to first identify the distinguishing characteristics of globalization. It then attempts to examine its implications on a number of critical issues, including the future of democracy, income distribution and ethnic, class, and gender relations.

IS 842. Contested Territories. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Using case studies of Europe since 1918, this course examines the contours of territorial disputes. The ways in which territorial contests are presented and represented through the lenses of geopolitics, ethnicity and race, nationalism, gender, violence, international authority and diplomatic and institutional influence will be explored.

IS 845. Social Movements and Revolution in Latin American History. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Interpretations of the three major social revolutions in modern Latin America (Mexico 1910, Cuba 1959 and Nicaragua 1979) and of a variety of social movements (agrarian, labor, urban, religious and so on) are studied from a continental perspective. The relevant theoretical literature and the economic, cultural and political background receive special attention. A broad knowledge of modern Latin American history is assumed.

IS 848. Gender and Globalization. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. Studies systems of global restructuring as they impact women throughout the globe. Migration, international development, and transnational activism will be focal themes, explored across a variety of national contexts.

IS 850. France's Decolonized Legacy: Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Quebec. 3 Credits.

An analysis of France's ex-colonies as they moved from colonization and decolonization to independence. An overview of political, historical, cinematic, and literary texts with a focus on France’s relationship with its ex-colonies, and its ex-colonies’ struggles in a post-decolonized world. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor or director.

IS 851. Ethnic Conflict in the Emerging Global Order. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Using different case studies, this course investigates the most important internal and external factors that cause ethnic conflicts. It also examines different mechanisms that help resolve or mitigate such conflicts.

IS 852. Research Seminar in International Studies: Refugees. 3 Credits.

Seminar 3 hours; 3 credits. This is a graduate-level seminar focusing on the refugee movement from a global perspective. The goals are to provide a critical and realistic understanding of the refugee phenomenon and to explain why the refugees tend to follow some identifiable paths, and why they sometimes return and sometimes do not. Discussion will be centered on the causes and consequences of refugee flow, and the roles the more developed countries can play in helping solve the problem.

IS 855. Conflict and Violence in Modern Africa. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course will confront the theme of conflict and violence in Africa since the mid-20th century. It will explore the reasons behind the level of violent conflicts in the continent today, seek to understand their larger significance, and explore ideas for conflict resolution and prevention. (cross listed with HIST 755).

IS 860. International Cultural Studies: History, Theory and Application. 3 Credits.

3 Cr. Course analyzes culture in the context of material conditions in which it is produced, disseminated, controlled and practiced. Theoretical application of cultural studies will include developing familiarity with key foundational theories, terminologies, and critical thinking.

IS 862. Game Theory. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Game theory uses mathematical models, empirical investigation, and simulations in an effort to explain simple and complex strategic interactions among individuals, states, groups, and species. This course teaches the tools of game theory, with a focus on applications in international relations and political science.

IS 865. Agent-Based Modeling and Simulation for International Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. An introduction to complex systems theory and to the application of agent-based modeling technologies to a variety of social systems.

IS 868. Internship in International Studies. 1-6 Credits.

1-6 credits. Prerequisite: approval of director. Internship individually arranged at local, state, or international level.

IS 870. Transnational Media Practices. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. Course examines the key roles played by media technologies in implementing and promoting international development programs, as well as some of the concerns these initiatives have raised in terms of media literacy, cultural sovereignty, and information access.

IS 872. Modeling Global Events. 3 Credits.

This course introduces modeling and simulation as a tool for expanding one’s understanding of events that have shaped the global environment of the 21st century. The course will first provide a broad look at international politics through a review of select international incidents, military interventions, and homeland security issues. Second, select topics from these categories will serve as case studies to facilitate representing those events with the application of modeling, simulation, and visualization. Understanding how modeling and simulation can provide another method of analysis allows students to delve deeper into their understanding of “what happened” and to explore their conception of “what if.” Prerequisite: Approval of instructor or director.

IS 894. Seminar in Thesis and Dissertation Preparation. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the director. Prepares students to research, formulate and write thesis and dissertation prospectuses.

IS 895. Topics in International Studies. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. The advanced study and discussion of selected (titled) topics not offered on a regular basis.

IS 896. Selected Topics in International Studies. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. The advanced study of selected topics in an interdisciplinary manner which will permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest. Due to their specialized nature, the course may not be offered regularly.

IS 897. Independent Research in International Studies. 3 Credits.

1-9 credits. Prerequisite: approval of the director. Independent research directed by professors.

IS 898. Directed Research. 1-9 Credits.

1-9 credits. Prerequisite: approval of director or instructor. Methodological and theoretical preparation designed to assist students in writing a dissertation.

IS 899. Dissertation. 1-9 Credits.

1-9 credits. May be repeated up to 18 credits.

IS 998. Master’s Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course for master’s students in their final semester. It may be taken to fulfill the registration requirement necessary for graduation. All master’s students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour in the semester of their graduation.

IS 999. Doctoral Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course doctoral students may take to maintain active status after successfully passing the candidacy examination. All doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour every semester until their graduation.