HISTORY Courses

HIST 100H. Interpreting the World Past Since 1500. 3 Credits.

The course offers students a critical approach to interpreting World history. A fast-paced survey of World history from 1500 to the present, it focuses on the major intellectual, religious, social, cultural, political, environmental and scientific developments that have influenced the course of World history. It looks at cross-cultural relations in the form of economic exchange, technology transfer, war and conquest, and international organizations.

HIST 101H. Interpreting the Asian Past. 3 Credits.

The course is a fast-paced survey of Asian civilization in a global context from the emergence of Indian and Chinese civilizations to the events unfolding today. It follows the courses of political, social, cultural, religious, and economic development in East, South, and Southease Asia.

HIST 102H. Interpreting the European Past. 3 Credits.

The course is a fast-paced survey of European civilization. It focuses on the major intellectual, religious, social, cultural, political, environmental, and scientific developments that have influenced the course of European history.

HIST 103H. Interpreting the Latin America Past. 3 Credits.

This fast-paced survey covers the last 600 years in the political, social, economic, and cultural histories of Latin America. Special attention will be paid to the global context of this multi-ethnic and multi-lingual region.

HIST 104H. Interpreting the American Past. 3 Credits.

This course offers students a critical approach to interpreting the history of the United States. A fast-paced survey of American history from the era of colonization to the present, it focuses on the major intellectual, religious, social, cultural, political, environmental, and scientific developments that have influenced the development of the United States.

HIST 105H. Interpreting the African Past. 3 Credits.

This course offers students a critical approach to interpreting the history of Africa. A fast-paced survey of African history, it affords students a grounding in the major themes of African history. The course focuses on the major economic, social, and political institutions of Africa, past and present, and explores how historical developments assist comprehension of present-day Africa.

HIST 126H. Honors: Interpreting the American Past. 3 Credits.

The course is open only to students in the Honors College. Special honors section of HIST 104H.

HIST 127H. Honors: Interpreting the European Past. 3 Credits.

The course is open only to students in the Honors College. Special honors section of HIST 102H.

HIST 201. Introduction to Historical Methods. 3 Credits.

Required of all history and secondary education social studies majors. Recommended prior to upper-division course work. Examines methods of historical research and primary and secondary source analysis, inclusive of internet usage. Explores historiography and historical writing. Introduces students to issues in the philosophy of history. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H.

HIST 300T. The History of Sex and Sexual and Reproductive Technologies. 3 Credits.

The course explores the many ways sex, gender, sexuality and sexual identities have been constructed in Western thought from 1250 to the present. The medicalization of sex and sexual practices will be examined. Sexual perversions such as prostitution, pornography, and sexual violence will be explored. The course will also focus on the technology of sexual enhancement and reproductive technologies and the ethics involved in these areas. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 302. Perspectives in Teaching World History to 1500. 3 Credits.

The course gives students a critical perspective on world civilizations from prehistory to 1500. It focuses on the major cultural, intellectual, scientific, geographic/environmental and religious developments of the world. The course emphasizes the critical assessment of primary documents and artifacts and the utilization of that material in the classroom. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 304T. History of Medicine, Disease, and Health Technology. 3 Credits.

Examines the history of medicine and epidemiology from ancient times through the twenty-first century. The course takes a comparative look at medical practices in Europe and around the globe and focuses heavily on the complex relationship between human societies and disease. The development of medical technologies and their impact are examined. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 305. Ancient Greece. 3 Credits.

The history of Greece from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic era. Special attention will be paid to the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars, the Golden Age of Athens, and the life of Alexander the Great. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 306. Ancient Rome. 3 Credits.

The history of Rome from its foundation in 753 B.C. down to its fall in 476 A.D. Special attention will be placed on constitutional developments in the Republican period, the career of Augustus, and the strengths and failings of the Empire. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 307. The Early Middle Ages. 3 Credits.

Examines late Roman and barbarian Europe from the time of the Hunnic migrations through the Carolingian era. Primary emphasis will be on the social, cultural, economic, and political development of the various continental barbarian states. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 308. The High Middle Ages. 3 Credits.

This is a study of continental Medieval Europe from the later Carolingians through Dante. Primary emphasis will be placed on the social, cultural, economic, and religious aspects of medieval society. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 309. The Crusades. 3 Credits.

This course examines the series of conflicts between Western Europe and the Middle East from the 11th to the 14th century. It investigates the motives, process and outcomes of the invasion of the Middle East by European armies. It also addresses how this phenomenon has been understood in the past. Prerequisite: HIST 100H, HIST 101H, HIST 102H, HIST 103H, HIST 104H, HIST 105H, HIST 126H, or HIST 127H.

HIST 310. Renaissance Europe. 3 Credits.

This is an examination of the Renaissance in both Italy and Northern Europe from the 14th to the 16th centuries emphasizing the new learning, humanism and the place of the individual as well as the political and artistic new achievements of the age. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 311. Early Modern Europe. 3 Credits.

The course covers the period between the late Middle Ages and the beginning of the modern era, roughly 1350-1715, exploring the Renaissance, the Reformation, and the Age of Exploration. There is emphasis on the culture of the period as contemporaries coped with depression, plague, religious change, and cultural encounters outside Europe. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 314T. Towers, Tanks and Time: Technology on the Eve of WWI. 3 Credits.

The course traces the intellectual, technical, mechanical, and scientific developments that had a profound effect on the ways in which Europeans and Americans saw and understood their world 1890-1914. Course readings and materials will reflect on the process and progress of technological change and the ways in which this manifested in literature, arts, politics, and culture. Prerequisites: HIST 100H, HIST 101H, HIST 102H, HIST 103H, HIST 104H, HIST 105H, HIST 126H OR HIST 127H.

HIST 316. Cold War in History. 3 Credits.

The course explores changes in the international system which arose in the wake of World War II and focuses on conflict and cooperation in selected regions of the developed and developing world. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H.

HIST 322. Ancient and Medieval England. 3 Credits.

This course explores the social and political history of early England, with an emphasis on the fall of the Romans, the Anglo-Saxon and Norman invasions, medieval social and cultural life, the evolution of feudal relationships, and the development of the English monarchy. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H.

HIST 323. Modern Britain. 3 Credits.

This course explores the development of Britain in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. Key themes include the evolution of English democracy, the rise and decline of the British empire, Britain’s role in international affairs, and England’s tenuous relationship with Ireland, Scotland, and Wales. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H.

HIST 324. Europe in the Twentieth Century. 3 Credits.

This course explores the evolution and development of European states, institutions and cultures over the course of the twentieth century. Relations among European states--large and small--and their peoples are examined. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H (HIST 102H recommended).

HIST 327. Russia: Culture and Civilization. 3 Credits.

The course is a survey of Russian history from the ninth to the end of the nineteenth century stressing the distinctiveness of Russian culture and institutions, the influence of the West, the multi-national character of the Empire, and the decline of the old regime. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H.

HIST 328. USSR and Contemporary Russia. 3 Credits.

The course is a survey of the formation and development of the USSR in the twentieth century from the fall of the Russian monarchy and the revolutions of 1917 to the present. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 331. Colonialism and Nationalism in Southeast Asia. 3 Credits.

The course is a study of Southeast Asia between 1750 and 1950. The focus will be on Indonesia, Vietnam, the Philippines, Burma, Malaysia and Thailand. Topics examined will include major theoretical frameworks used to understand colonialism and nationalism, the differential impact of colonial rule, and the impact of religions and 'western' ideologies on nationalist movements. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 332. South Asia Since Independence. 3 Credits.

This is a comparative study of the main political, economic and social developments in the major countries of South Asia. Themes will include democratization, problems of economic development, the role of caste and religion, the causes of intrastate conflict and interstate conflict and the influence of global forces on the region. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 336. The Emergence of New China. 3 Credits.

The course is the history of China covering late Imperial China, the impact of Western imperialism, the Republican Period, and the establishment of the People's Republic. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 338. Japan's Era of Transformation. 3 Credits.

This is the history of Japan since 1800. It covers the decline of the Tokugawa Shogunate, modern nation building in the Meiji period, domestic conflicts and war in the twentieth century, and the roots of Japan's economic prominence today. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 345. Native American History. 3 Credits.

The course examines the history and culture of Native American peoples from early contact with Europeans to present day. There is particular focus on ways that cultural interactions affected and transformed native peoples - their beliefs, societies, and political structures. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H.

HIST 346. Colonial and Revolutionary America. 3 Credits.

The course examines social, cultural, economic and political developments in North America from 1492 to the ratification of the Constitution of 1787. Course explores the role of class, gender, and race in the creation of an American culture. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 348. The Early Republic, 1787-1850. 3 Credits.

The course explores America's transformation from a republic to a democracy by examining the political, economic, social and intellectual history of the United States' first half century. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 349. American Naval History. 3 Credits.

This course examines American naval history and American naval theory from the colonial period to the present day. It analyzes the importance of American naval conflicts, developments in naval technology, and the social and political changes that shaped the U.S. Navy. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 350. History of the Old South. 3 Credits.

The course is a study of the Old South civilization from the colonial era to the Civil War, with particular emphasis on the frontier, slavery, the cotton kingdom, and southern cultural contributions. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 351. The Civil War and Reconstruction. 3 Credits.

The course is a study of the origins of the idea of secession and of the war, of the military, political, and economic contest between the Confederate and Federal governments, and finally of the long-range effects of the war as revealed in the failure of Reconstruction. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 352. The Immigrant Experience in U.S. History. 3 Credits.

This class examines the history of U.S. immigration during the 19th and 20th centuries. The course strives to complicate the "Melting Pot" metaphor in U.S. history by exploring the transnational quality of immigrants' lives, the way class, race, gender, and nationality have shaped the immigrant experience, and the role nation-states have played in managing immigration. Prerequisite: HIST 100H, HIST 101H, HIST 102H, HIST 103H, HIST 104H, HIST 105H, HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 353. Robber Barons, Reformers, and Radicals: The US Gilded Age and Progressive Era. 3 Credits.

This course covers the Gilded Age and Progressive Era of U.S. history (1870s-1920s), a dynamic period characterized by industrialization, imperialism, international and internal migration, World War I, and a variety of social and political movements. This course explores these and other topics from an international perspective to consider how global processes influenced the U.S., and how the U.S. influenced the rest of the world in the late 19th and early 20th century. Prerequisite: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 354. From the Jazz Age to the Atomic Age: US, 1920-1945. 3 Credits.

The course covers the domestic and international history of the U.S. during the Roaring Twenties, The Great Depression, World War II. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 355. The United States, 1945-1991. 3 Credits.

The course is the history of the United States from the end of World War II to the end of the Cold War. The course focuses on domestic politics, social change, economic developments and international relations. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 356. Virginia History. 3 Credits.

The course is an examination of Virginia's past from Jamestown to the present. The course emphasizes the colonial experience, Virginia's role in the new nation, the post-Civil War era and Virginia in the twentieth century. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 357. The United States in the 1960s. 3 Credits.

The course examines the political, social and cultural revolutions which occurred in the United States from 1960 to 1974. Topics include the reforms of JFK and LBJ; the rise of conservatism; the impact of the baby boom generation; the civil rights, anti-war, and women's movements; the war in Indochina; and Watergate and the fall of Richard Nixon. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 358. The U.S. in the Second World War. 3 Credits.

The course is designed to familiarize students with important concepts in the history of America's involvement in the Second World War. It surveys the significant events, personalities, and changes that occurred between 1941 and 1945, heavily focusing on America's three "fronts": the European, the Pacific and the home front. Prerequisite: HIST 100H, HIST 101H, HIST 102H, HIST 103H, HIST 104H, HIST 105H, HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 359. American Maritime History. 3 Credits.

The course explores the various maritime influences in American history. Topics discussed include ocean exploration, navies and maritime conflicts, shipping and shipbuilding, marine resource extraction, rivers and canal transportation, maritime migration, water use, and other issues in maritime history from exploration to the present. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 360. American Military History. 3 Credits.

The course is a study of American military policy, 1763 to the present, in relation to its political, economic, and social implications. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 361. African-American History to 1865. 3 Credits.

The course examines African-American history from the African background through the Civil War. Emphasis is placed on an analysis of African-Americans' role in the political, economic, social and cultural life of the United States. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 362. African-American History Since 1865. 3 Credits.

This course examines African-American history from Reconstruction to the present. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of African-Americans' role in the political, economic, social and cultural life of the United States. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 363. Women in U.S. History. 3 Credits.

The course examines the experiences of women in U.S. history from 1607 to the present, paying particular attention to influences of race, class, ethnicity and changing conceptions of gender. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 364. African American Genealogy. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce students to the historical and methodological approaches to genealogical research, both traditional and scientific. Prerequisite: HIST 100H, HIST 101H, HIST 102H, HIST 103H, HIST 104H, HIST 105H, HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 368. Internship. 3 Credits.

The content varies according to the internship. Qualifies as a CAP experience. Prerequisites: Permission of the department and one or more Interpreting the Past courses.

HIST 369. Practicum. 3 Credits.

The content varies according to practicum. Qualifies as a CAP experience. Prerequisites: Permission of the department and one or more Interpreting the Past courses.

HIST 370. Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade. 3 Credits.

This course examines political, commercial and cultural developments in Africa from 1400 to 1900 in the context of the Atlantic slave trade. It provides students a basic understanding of the historical slave trade and the role that Europeans, Americans and Africans played in it, and asks what influence the slave trade had on African economies and societies. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 371. Modern Mexico. 3 Credits.

This survey of Mexico's history since independence highlights the social, cultural and economic changes that accompanied four turning points in the political history of Mexico: the independence movement, the wars of the reform, the Revolution of 1910, and the trend toward democratization that began in the 1980s. Attention will be paid to the changing scope of Mexico's relations with the United States, and to comparisons of Mexico's experience with that of other Latin American countries. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 372. Central America and the Caribbean Since 1800. 3 Credits.

This course surveys socio-economic and political change after about 1800 in the Caribbean Basin (Central America and the insular Caribbean), a region whose diverse colonial, ethnic, labor and migratory experiences will provide rich opportunities for comparative study. Plantation slavery and its legacies, independence movements, export-led economic growth, nationalism, social movements, revolution and great-power rivalries will be the major themes. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 373. U.S.-Latin American Relations. 3 Credits.

This survey of Latin America's relations with the United States since the early nineteenth century will seek to identify and account for changing patterns in what has been a highly asymmetrical power relationship. The emphasis will be on the outcomes of U.S. policy in the region, combining the study of broad trends (especially in economic and security policy since the 1890s) with a close analysis of three cases: Mexico, Cuba and Central America. The influence of the larger international environment on those relations will be considered. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 379. The Ottoman Empire. 3 Credits.

The course examines topically and chronologically the state, society and culture of the Ottoman Empire, which spread over Asia, Europe, and Africa from the 14th through the early 20th Century and ruled over religiously, ethnically, and linguistically diverse populations. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 380. Women and Gender in the Middle East. 3 Credits.

The course examines the history of women and gender relations in the early modern and modern Middle East. The course traces how changing conceptions of the family and gender roles have shaped women's lives. The course also deals with the impact of colonialism and nation-building on women as well as on ideas of femininity and masculinity in the modern Middle East. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 386T. The Evolution of Modern Science. 3 Credits.

The course traces the development of modern science from the ancient Greeks to the 21st Century. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 388T. Discovering Earth's History. 3 Credits.

Geology and paleontology as technological systems during the industrial revolution of the nineteenth century, including global & local exploration, competing interpretations of empirical data, and the discovery that the earth itself had a history whose sources were inscribed in the very ground on which they walked. Readings include Darwin, Lyell, Humboldt, and others. Prerequisites: HIST 100H, HIST 101H, HIST 102H, HIST 103H, HIST 104H, or HIST 105H.

HIST 389T. Technology and Civilization. 3 Credits.

This course examines the role of technology and relevant science. Students examine the interaction between society and technology and investigate why technology is both a reflection of, and a shaping influence upon, "modern" culture and beyond. Prerequisites: Three hours of history.

HIST 391. Paris/Auschwitz Study Abroad. 3 Credits.

This course explores the history of the Holocaust in France and Poland by taking students to key sites tied to the Holocaust in Europe. Students visit Paris and explore the history of pre-war Jewry and sites of deportation. Students travel to Poland and juxtapose the French and Polish experience and denial of the Holocaust. Public history in the museum setting is explored. Prerequisite: HIST 100H, HIST 101H, HIST 102H, HIST 103H, HIST 104H, HIST 105H, HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 392. The Holocaust and Vichy France. 3 Credits.

This course surveys French history during World War II, focusing on the fall of France, the German occupation, and the establishment of the Vichy collaborationist government. It explores the fate of French and foreign-born Jews under Vichy, deportation and resistance, and the issues of post-war memory and denial. Prerequisites: HIST 100H, HIST 101H, HIST 102H, HIST 103H, HIST 104H, HIST 105H, HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 393. Studies in Jewish History. 3 Credits.

This course examines specific topics, eras, and themes of Jewish history. Specific titles will be listed in the on-line course schedule. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 396. Topics in History. 1-3 Credits.

The course is a study of selected topics. These courses are open to both majors and nonmajors. History majors may take these courses to satisfy history concentration requirements. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 402W. Senior Seminar in History. 3 Credits.

The course is an advanced study of selected topics leading to production of a research paper. It is required of all history and secondary education social studies majors. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: HIST 201 and a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

HIST 404. Magic and Witchcraft in Europe. 3 Credits.

This course examines magic and witchcraft in Europe from 1300-1700, focusing on the religious, social, economic and cultural factors associated with these beliefs. It attempts to explain why persecution intensified at a certain point as well as why it eventually subsided. Prerequisite: HIST 100H, HIST 101H, HIST 102H, HIST 103H, HIST 104H, HIST 105H, HIST 126H, or HIST 127H.

HIST 408/508. War and American Society in the Twentieth Century. 3 Credits.

The course is an exploration of the content and meaning of wartime experiences within American society between 1898 and 1975. Emphasis is on comparing the levels of national, institutional and personal experiences of war as they affected people at home and in battle, and on considering the relationships between warmaking and social development at particular times. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 409/509. History of US-Mexico Borderlands. 3 Credits.

The course examines the history of the region straddling the U.S. - Mexico border from the Spanish Conquest to the present day, focusing on issues of immigration, economic and political integration and the complicated nature of state-building in a transnational environment. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 411. Muslims, Christians, and Jews in the Middle East. 3 Credits.

The course examines the status and relations of the three major religious communities in the Middle East in the early modern and modern periods. The course addresses questions such as: Did coexistence or conflict mark the encounters between Muslims, Christians, and Jews? What was the legal status of non-Muslims? How did the Ottoman Empire deal with nationalism? Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 412. From Empire to Nation: Nation-Building in the Balkans and the Middle East. 3 Credits.

The course traces the last turbulent century of the Ottoman Empire and its disintegration into nation-states in the Middle East and the Balkans up until the mid-20th Century. The course examines how the new states employed nationalsim and modernization to build state, society and national culture. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 414. Freedom, Rights and Revolution: Evolution of the State System 1648-1815. 3 Credits.

The course examines the social, cultural, political, legal and diplomatic history of Old Regime Europe, the rise of the territorial state, and challenges to its authority. In addition to events and sources contemporary to that age, students will be introduced to the most important interpretive theories that have emerged in the past generation on the Continent as well as in Britain and America. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 415. Empire, Nations, and Industrialization: Evolution of the State System, 1815-1914. 3 Credits.

The course focuses on the evolution of international politics, diplomacy, and social, cultural and economic structures in the development of empires, nations and industrialization in the evolution of the modern state system from 1815 to 1914. Explores the relationship among European powers and their relations with smaller states in Europe and spheres of influence throughout the world. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 416. States, Territories and International Organization: Evolution of the State System Since 1914. 3 Credits.

The course focuses on the evolution of international politics, diplomacy and social, cultural and economic structures in states territories, and international organizations since 1914. Emphasis on shifting European alingments since 1914, the two World Wars, the development of the bi-polar world and the development and evolution of international organizations. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 417. World War I: The Great World War on All Fronts. 3 Credits.

This course will examine "The Great War" from its origins in the late nineteenth century to the Paris Peace Conference and from a variety of perspectives from battlefields and trenches to the home-front. It will also consider the impact of the war on society and its relevance to the contemporary world. Prerequisites: HIST 100H, HIST 101H, HIST 102H, HIST 103H, HIST 104H or HIST 105H.

HIST 420/520. Fascism in Europe. 3 Credits.

The course explores the genesis and development of fascism in Europe between World Wars I and II. Particular emphasis on Fascism in Italy and National Socialism in Germany. Appeal of fascist movements to populations across the socio-economic spectrum, fluidities of ideology and practice, fascism's impact on political, economic, social, and cultural life in the interwar period are explored. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 439/539. Politics and Society in East Asia Since 1945. 3 Credits.

The course explores the political and social developments in Japan, China, and Korea since the end of World War II. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 447. U.S. Foreign Relations, 1776-1914. 3 Credits.

The course explores the foreign relations of the United States from the revolutionary period to 1914 with particular emphasis on the ideological and domestic roots of American foreign policy. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 448. U.S. Foreign Relations Since 1914. 3 Credits.

The course explores the foreign relations of the United States from the First World War to the present, with particular emphasis on the ideological and domestic roots of American foreign policy. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 450. American Revolution and Historical Memory. 3 Credits.

This seminar style course will introduce the principal writings and interpretations of the era of the American Revolution from the mid-eighteenth century to the ratification of the federal constitution of 1787. Besides exploring the relationship between the British Empire and its colonies, the course will look at the role of historical memory in understanding of the past. Prerequisites: HIST 100H, HIST 101H, HIST 102H, HIST 103H, HIST 104H, HIST 105H, HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 451. The Atlantic World and Early America. 3 Credits.

During the early modern period, global processes of imperial, economic, and demographic expansion drew British North America into transnational networks that spanned the Atlantic Ocean and brought Europeans, Africans, and Americans together. This course will explore the Atlantic World as a place, a process, and a new field of historical inquiry. Prerequisite: HIST 100H, HIST 101H, HIST 102H, HIST 103H, HIST 104H, HIST 105H, HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 455/555. African-American Historiography. 3 Credits.

The course is an examination of the ways historians have addressed specific issues in African-American history. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 456/556. Research in Local History. 3 Credits.

The course explores the history of Hampton Roads through student use of research materials. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 470/570. Democracy and Development in Modern Latin America. 3 Credits.

This course analyzes, from a historical perspective, two core problems in Latin America's modern (since c. 1880) history: political authoritarianism and economic underdevelopment. The temporal and spatial dimensions of change are highlighted in discussions of patron-client political systems, military autonomy and impunity, social movements and revolution, export-oriented economic growth, industrialization, and the roles of national, ethnic and gender identities. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 475/575. History of Modern Africa. 3 Credits.

The course is designed to enrich students' understanding of the intersections of political, economic, social and cultural forces that shaped Africa in the last 150 years and continue to affect the lives of peoples throughout the continent. It will focus on a series of major historical transitions that have shaped the development of modern Africa, including the end of the Atlantic slave trade, European imperial conquest and colonial rule, African resistance to European rule, social and cultural transformations, the end of colonial rule and post-colonial challenges. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 477. Africa and the West from the Era of the Slave Trade through Modern Times. 3 Credits.

This course analyzes African perceptions of the West from the moment the continent was connected with the Atlantic world in the era of the slave trade, through the colonial period, to the late twentieth century. The course specifically looks at how Africans have dealt intellectually with large historical processes such as Atlantic commerce, Christianity, and colonialism. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 480W. Senior Seminar in International Studies. 3 Credits.

This writing-intensive course for advanced undergraduates explores the international dimensions of historical problems selected by the instructor. It fulfills the Senior Seminar requirement for International Studies majors, who are expected to have senior standing.(This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: A grade or C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, senior standing in the BAIS degree program or permission of the instructor and the director of the BAIS program.

HIST 481. Museums and Museology. 3 Credits.

The course examines the history of the public museum. It introduces museology, the profession of museum organization and management, focusing on design, outreach, artifact acquisition and preservation, and international museum standards. Museums as sites of historical research and teaching will receive special attention. Prerequisite: HIST 100H, HIST 101H, HIST 102H, HIST 103H, HIST 104H, HIST 105H, HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 493. Holocaust and Film: Representing the Unimaginable in the Visual Turn. 3 Credits.

The course explores the history of the Holocaust through the medium of film as document, testimony, propaganda, artifact, artistic representation and projection of collective memory. Special attention is given to considering the medium of film from the viewpoint of the historian. Prerequisite: HIST 100H, HIST 101H, HIST 102H, HIST 103H, HIST 104H, HIST 105H, HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 495/595. Topics in History. 1-3 Credits.

The course is an advanced study of selected topics designed for small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which may not be offered regularly. These courses appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H or HIST 126H or HIST 127H.

HIST 497. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in History. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the department chair.

HIST 498/598. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in History. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the department chair.

HIST 508. War and American Society in the Twentieth Century. 3 Credits.

This course is an exploration of the content and meaning of wartime experiences within American society between 1898 and 1975. Emphasis is on comparing the levels of national, institutional and personal experiences of war as they affected people at home and in battle, and on considering the relationships between warmaking and social development at particular times.

HIST 509. History of US-Mexico Borderlands. 3 Credits.

The course examines the history of the region straddling the U.S.-Mexico Border from the Spanish Conquest to the present day, focusing on issues of immigration, economic and political integration and the complicated nature of state-building in a transnational environment.

HIST 520. Fascism in Europe. 3 Credits.

This course explores the genesis and development of fascism in Europe between World Wars I and II. Particular emphasis on Fascism in Italy and National Socialism in Germany. Appeal of fascist movements to populations across the socioeconomic spectrum, fluidities of ideology and practice, fascism’s impact on political, economic, social, and cultural life in the interwar period are explored.

HIST 539. Politics and Society in East Asia Since 1945. 3 Credits.

This course explores the political and social developments in Japan, China, and Korea since the end of World War II.

HIST 555. African-American Historiography. 3 Credits.

This course is an examination of the ways historians have addressed specific issues in African-American history.

HIST 556. Research in Local History. 3 Credits.

The course explores the history of Hampton Roads through student use of research materials.

HIST 570. Democracy and Development in Modern Latin America. 3 Credits.

This course analyzes, from a historical perspective, two core problems in Latin America’s modern (since c. 1880) history: political authoritarianism and economic underdevelopment. The temporal and spatial dimensions of change are highlighted in discussions of patron-client political systems, military autonomy and impunity, social movements and revolution, export-oriented economic growth, industrialization, and the roles of national, ethnic and gender identities.

HIST 575. History of Modern Africa. 3 Credits.

The course is designed to enrich students’ understanding of the intersections of political, economic, social and cultural forces that shaped Africa in the last 150 years and continue to affect the lives of peoples throughout the continent. It will focus on a series of major historical transitions that have shaped the development of modern Africa, including the end of the Atlantic slave trade, European imperial conquest and colonial rule, African resistance to European rule, social and cultural transformations, the end of colonial rule and post-colonial challenges.

HIST 595. Topics in History. 1-3 Credits.

The course is an advanced study of selected topics designed for small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which may not be offered regularly. These courses appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors.

HIST 598. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in History. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate.

HIST 600. Historical Theory and Practice. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the development of historical theories, principles and methods and their application to historical research and writing. Required of all graduate students in history.

HIST 602. Readings in Early American History. 3 Credits.

This course offers an introduction to the principal writings and interpretations of American history from the period of European colonization of America to the beginning of the American Revolution. Readings and discussions focus on the development of American cultures and identities and on the formation of American social, political, and economic life.

HIST 603. The American Revolution and Historical Memory. 3 Credits.

This course introduces the principal interpretations of the American Revolution era from the mid-18th century to the 1787 ratification of the federal constitution. Readings and discussions focus on themes including Britain's relations with the colonies, the independence movement, women, African Americans, Native Americans as well as historical memory of the Revolution.

HIST 607. A People's Contest: Civil War and Reconstruction. 3 Credits.

An advanced course designed to familiarize students with the principal historiographical problems besetting the field of studies of the American Civil War and Reconstruction.

HIST 609. Melting Pot? Readings in Immigration History. 3 Credits.

This course examines the history of immigration to the U.S., focusing particularly on the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It critiques the "melting pot" metaphor through key themes, including transnationalism; the influences of class, race, gender, and nationality; working class and race relations; formal and informal economies; and popular and consumer culture.

HIST 610. Edible History: Food and Drink in the U.S. and Global History. 3 Credits.

This course explores the history of food and drink in the U.S. and the world as a way to examine the cultural, social, and political meanings about and consequences of producing and consuming food. This course will explore an array of topics including food as an essential element of identities and power relations, commodity chains, eating trends, and global security.

HIST 611. The Military in America. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to familiarize students with the principal historiographical problems besetting the field of U.S. military history from the pre-Revolutionary period to the present day.

HIST 617. The Long Civil Rights Movement. 3 Credits.

This course examines the historiography of the Long Civil Rights Movement, the struggle for civil rights stretching from the nineteenth century to the present day and encompassing multiple movements that sought to achieve the basic rights of citizenship for a number of different groups.

HIST 619. United States Labor and Working Class History. 3 Credits.

This course provides a historiographical survey of U.S. labor and working class history, focusing on the period after the Civil War. Work as a reflection of everyday life, class formation and class consciousness and the development of unions and other labor organizations are examined through a variety of different methodologies and in the contexts of citizenship and civil rights.

HIST 621. The Atlantic World and Early America. 3 Credits.

This course explores the Atlantic World as a place, a process, and a new field of historical inquiry. It examines the global processes of imperial, economic, and demographic expansion that drew British North America into transnational networks that spanned the Atlantic Ocean and brought European, African, and American inhabitants together.

HIST 622. The Atlantic Slave Trade. 3 Credits.

The course explores the trans-Atlantic slave trade from its beginnings in the 15th century to its suppression in the 19th century. It examines the historical literature on Africa, the Atlantic slave trade and the New World to provide students with a general orientation to the broad context of the Atlantic slave trade.

HIST 627. Cuba and Its Revolution. 3 Credits.

This course examines diverse interpretations of the origins of the 1959 Cuban Revolution led by Fidel Castro, its national and international repercussions, and relevant global contexts. Cuba's colonial status as a sugar plantation society based on African slave labor, the Cuban independence movement, the U.S. war with Spain, U.S.-Cuban relations, and the Cuban Revolution and its Cold War context are considered.

HIST 628. History of the U.S. Mexico Borderlands. 3 Credits.

This course examines the historiography of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. Key themes include the slow, uneven and often unsuccessful integration of the region into centralizing states in Mexico and the United States; the changing nature of migration and commerce across the international boundary; and the importance of violence and social conflict in shaping the region.

HIST 630. Democracy and Development in Modern Latin America. 3 Credits.

From a world-historical perspective and moving from a broad focus on continental change to national contexts, this seminar analyzes two core problems in Latin America's history: political tensions (conceptualized as authoritarianism versus democracy) and economic change (underdevelopment versus development).

HIST 631. The Rise of the Hispanic World: Spain and Its Empire. 3 Credits.

The interaction of Spain and its overseas territories is the overarching theme of this seminar, which traces the rise of today's Hispanic world from its emergence in the Iberian peninsula in the 15th century, through the 19th century, when the Spanish Monarchy lost its American and Asian realms. Comparisons with other contemporary world empires will be considered.

HIST 632. Political Order and Social Change in Mexico Since 1919. 3 Credits.

This course traces the roots of current disorder in Mexico by analyzing the 1910 revolution, subsequent authoritarian rule, and the democratization process in the context of social forces that enabled the revolution and then brought it to a close in 2000. Themes include state formation, rule of law, democratization, economic development, U.S.-Mexico relations, and violence.

HIST 635. Modern British History. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the social and cultural history of 19th- and 20th-century Britain. It explores broad themes of social conflict, class divisions, and racial construct, and gender roles presented in recent historiography at the intersections of social and cultural history. Topics include politics, culture, leisure, entertainment, arts, and sciences.

HIST 636. The British Empire. 3 Credits.

This course explores British imperialism and colonialism in the early modern and modern periods, from the Caribbean to Australia with emphasis on the "second British empire" of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Key themes will include: webs of power and communication, labor, gender, race, and colony/metropole relations.

HIST 638. European Transnational & International Histories of the 20th Century. 3 Credits.

This course explores conceptions of the nation, transnationalism and international movements through the lens of Western perspectives on international diplomacy and social movements from the late 19th century to the present. It emphasizes the role of transnational phenomena, including non-government organizations and human rights organizations and feminist, anti-racial, and anti-colonial movements.

HIST 640. Studies in East Asian History. 3 Credits.

Seminar.

HIST 641. Individual & Society in Ancient Greece. 3 Credits.

This seminar delves into literary and archaeological sources to examine the development of ancient Greece in the archaic, classical and Hellenistic periods. It traces the development of Greece's vibrant culture, the struggles between Athens and Sparta, and the subsequent alliances forced by Phillip II and Alexander the Great.

HIST 642. Ancient Rome: Text and Artifact. 3 Credits.

Using historical texts and archaeological remains as sources, this course considers Ancient Rome from the city's mythological foundation stories to its decline in late Antiquity. It will study Roman history and historiography exploring topics including the economy, the military, women's roles, religion, art and architecture in the Republic and the Principate.

HIST 643. Religion, Culture, and Empire in Greco-Roman Palestine. 3 Credits.

This seminar focuses on the development of Greco-Roman Palestine, from its encounter with Hellenism to its conquest by Rome, and ultimately to its transformation into the Christian Holy Land under the patronage of Constantine and Helen.

HIST 646. Studies in Russian History. 3 Credits.

Research in Soviet archives in the past decade has enriched and enlarged the study of Stalin’s era (1924-1953). This reading seminar samples new literature on traditional topics, such as Stalin’s rise to power, methods of rule, and foreign policies, as well as scholarship in newly emerging fields. These areas include social history, gender and the family, cinema and popular culture, nationalities, patron-client relations, and the history of science.

HIST 647. Studies in Maritime History. 3 Credits.

The seminar explores recent maritime historiography and demonstrates how maritime history presents unique understandings of human history and also works within or redefines broader historical constructs. Students will analyze sources related to specific topics of maritime history.

HIST 648. France and the Sea. 3 Credits.

This course examines the complex ways in which the French viewed the Atlantic Ocean and other bodies of water and the opportunities water travel provided them from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries. Emphasis is placed on the Atlantic as a zone of interaction and on the French global trading networks and the development of overseas empires.

HIST 653. Life on the Margins in Medieval Europe. 3 Credits.

This course will examine the process by which Western Europe shared and understood its identity post-1000, focusing in particular on its understanding of itself as first and foremost Christian. It will seek to understand how the intellectual violence employed by Church leaders transformed into political violence and how the discourse of "Order and Exclusion" developed.

HIST 655. Early Modern Europe: Religion, Reform, and Violence. 3 Credits.

This course examines the religious, political and civil strife as well as the ramifications of social change in sixteenth and seventeenth century Europe. Emphasis will be on religiosity and how early modern peoples understood and experienced religious life and how the "reformations" altered gender relations, sexual dynamics, everyday life, and intellectual thought in Western Europe.

HIST 657. Old Regime and French Revolution. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the interpretive methodologies of questions of "Enlightenment" and the French Revolution that drive much of the historiography in European intellectual history today.

HIST 658. Studies in European History from 1815-1914. 3 Credits.

Seminar.

HIST 662. North Atlantic Resources. 3 Credits.

This class examines how coastal societies around the North Atlantic have developed their use of fish stocks and other marine resources since the late medieval period and analyzes how and why over-fishing of nearly all major species took place and how international agreements sought to address the issue of sustainable, biological oceanic resources.

HIST 668. Internships in History. 3 Credits.

Students work to gain field experience with professionals in such areas as museum management, archives administration, historical editing, historical preservation, electronic records management, archaeology, or oral history. Students are supervised by graduate faculty members who assign academic reading and written work to contextualize and enhance the field experience. Individually arranged. Minimum of 120 hours.

HIST 670. Fin-De-Siecle Europe. 3 Credits.

This course examines the intersections of politics and economy with culture and society in Europe from 1880 to 1914 with an emphasis on continental trends. It explores political ideologies relating to nationhood, race, ethnicity, class, and gender and their articulation in the arts, cultural production, technological innovation, and intellectual development at the turn of the century.

HIST 671. World War I in Europe. 3 Credits.

This seminar examines the "Great War" from its origins in the late nineteenth century to the postwar settlements of the Paris Peace Conference. It explores the war in the trenches and on the homefronts, from Britain and France to Turkey and Russia. It also considers the historiography of the war and memory and commemoration of the conflict 100 years on.

HIST 672. Fascism and Nazism. 3 Credits.

This seminar examines the rise and development of the Fascist and Nazi regimes in Europe from the end of World War I to the outbreak of World War II. Topics include fascist takeovers and leadership; the impact of violence and terror; the position of women; ethnic and racial minorities; and the role of internal and external political opponents and resistance to the regimes.

HIST 674. Holocaust History and Memory. 3 Credits.

This course examines the complex history of the Holocaust, beginning with the rise of anti-Semitism in the 1930s. It will explore issues of resistance and collaboration as well as ambivalence. It will also examine aspects of postwar Holocaust denial and the memory of the Holocaust as well as its representation in the historiography to the present.

HIST 675. M.A. Exam Preparation and Research. 3 Credits.

This advanced seminar integrates the skills needed to pass the M.A. exam in history. Exercises include designing examination reading lists, learning the historiography of the exam fields, preparing for orals, and writing and evaluating a practice exam. This course is not open to students pursuing the thesis option. Prerequisite: permission of the graduate program director.

HIST 676. Examination Preparation Transition. 1 Credit.

This course prepares students transitioning from the thesis option to the examination option for the comprehensive examinations. Prerequisites: HIST 698 and HIST 699.

HIST 683. History of the Global 1960s. 3 Credits.

Through the work of historians around the world, this course examines the nature of events in the 1960s. It explores global commonalities and local particularities, focusing on the simultaneous and interrelated phenomena of anti-colonial struggle, youth activism, and culture of dissent. It also looks at the countervailing pressures and groups that emerged in opposition.

HIST 695. Topics in History. 1-3 Credits.

The course is an advanced study of selected topics designed for small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which may not be offered regularly.

HIST 696. Tutorial in Maritime History. 3 Credits.

Individually arranged with appropriate professor and with permission of the graduate program director. Prerequisite: HIST 647.

HIST 697. Tutorials in History. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Individually arranged with appropriate professor and with the permission of the graduate program director.

HIST 698. Thesis. 3 Credits.

3 credits.

HIST 699. Thesis. 3-9 Credits.

3-9 credits.

HIST 718. Mao’s China. 3 Credits.

This reading seminar will focus on the changes of the Chinese society since the beginning of the 20th century. It will examine the pivotal historical events that led to the Chinese revolution, which put Mao’s Communist regime in power and has changed Chinese society ever since. While studying the history chronologically, students will identify issues and factors that affect the Chinese political system and society, and examine the legacies of Mao’s revolution from social and individual perspectives. The course will also focus on political formation and transformation of the government, social structure and upheavals, economic reforms, and foreign policies. (cross listed with IS 718 and IS 818).

HIST 755. Conflict and Violence in Modern Africa. 3 Credits.

This course will confront the theme of conflict and violence in Africa since the mid-20th century. It will explore the reasons behind the level of violent conflicts in the continent today, seek to understand their larger significance, and explore ideas for conflict resolution and prevention. (cross listed with IS 755 and IS 855).

HIST 795. Selected Topics in International Studies. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced historical study of selected topics in international studies.

HIST 998. Master’s Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course for master’s students in their final semester. It may be taken to fulfill the registration requirement necessary for graduation. All master’s students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour in the semester of their graduation.

HIST 999. Doctoral Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course doctoral students may take to maintain active status after successfully passing the candidacy examination. All doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour every semester until their graduation.