CRIMINOLOGY Courses

CRIM 700. Proseminar in Criminology and Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with a broad overview of enduring topics and emerging issues in criminology and criminal justice. It also explores the history and role of criminology as an academic discipline and criminal justice as an institutional system in American society.

CRIM 701. Criminology and Public Policy. 3 Credits.

This course covers the policy process as it relates to crime legislation, criminological theory and implications for public policy.

CRIM 702. Advanced Criminological Theory. 3 Credits.

This course is an examination of criminological theory for the advanced student. The focus is on critical analysis of both contemporary and historical criminological theories. In order to aid in the development of a critical understanding of theory, beyond understanding the content of central theories, the class focuses on discussion of theory development and testing. In addition, the class focuses on an understanding of the relationship of one theory to another as well as the state of empirical evidence surrounding each theory.

CRIM 703. Inequality, Crime and Justice. 3 Credits.

This course examines the linkages between social characteristics and crime. The course concentrates on what we know about the impact of gender, age, race and social class on crime and criminal justice.

CRIM 705. Multivariate Statistics in Criminological Research. 3 Credits.

This course teaches multivariate statistical techniques to train criminal justice researchers and policy makers to explore the causes and consequences of crime and criminal justices policies. Although the exact statistical techniques covered may vary, they will typically include multiple regression, multiple discriminate analysis, logistic regression, factor analysis, cluster analysis and path analysis.

CRIM 710. Qualitative Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

The central goal of this graduate seminar is to enable students to create and critique qualitative research designs focused on contemporary issues in criminology and criminal justice. A number of qualitative approaches will be covered including field observational research, focused interviews, case studies and content analysis. The seminar explores techniques, strengths and limitations of these varied qualitative methodologies.

CRIM 715. Advanced Quantitative Techniques in Criminology & Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

This course explores advanced statistical techniques commonly used in research on crime and justice. The major focus of the course will be hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), a diverse set of techniques that extend standard multivariate analysis to accommodate nested data. Other advanced techniques will also be covered: event history/survival models, time series, etc.

CRIM 720. Advanced Research Methods in Criminology & Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with advanced understanding of issues in criminology/criminal justice research including: history, philosophy, sociology, epistemology, politics and ethics of social science research; methodological questions of reliability, validity, conceptualization, operationalization, scale construction, data collection methodologies, sampling.

CRIM 740. Social Structures, Crime and Justice. 3 Credits.

This course examines the links between social structures and institutions, and justice at the individual, neighborhood, city, state and country levels. Students explore the ways in which structures and institutions are both agents of social control and facilitators or initiators of crime. Emphasis will be placed on theories, methodologies and empirical assessments.

CRIM 745. Crime and Communities. 3 Credits.

This course provides a foundation of the most important theories and research relating to residential communities and crime. The casual linkages between features of neighborhoods and social disorder will be explored in the context of criminological theories. Students will emerge with sufficient knowledge to develop a class or design a significant research project.

CRIM 750. Crimes of the State. 3 Credits.

This course explores crimes of the state from a sociological and criminological perspective by examining historical and current cases of governmental crime. This will cover the history, theory and method of the field; controls of and constraints on state crime; and cases of state crime.

CRIM 755. Researching the Criminal Justice System. 3 Credits.

Students will develop original research projects on the criminal justice system, police, courts and /or corrections. Projects will be designed to culminate in a publishable paper.

CRIM 760. Life Course Criminology. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to life-course perspectives for understanding crime and deviant behavior. Students discuss the various methodologies, both quantitative and qualitative, most commonly found in studies of the life course today.

CRIM 795. Topics in Criminal Justice. 1-3 Credits.

Topics vary by semester.

CRIM 797. Independent Study. 1-3 Credits.

Supervised independent study arranged with instructor and approved by graduate program director.

CRIM 800. Proseminar in Criminology and Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with a broad overview of enduring topics and emerging issues in criminology and criminal justice. It also explores the history and role of criminology as an academic discipline and criminal justice as an institutional system in American society.

CRIM 801. Criminology and Public Policy. 3 Credits.

To familiarize students with the policy process as it relates to crime legislation, criminological theory and implications for public policy.

CRIM 802. Advanced Criminological Theory. 3 Credits.

This course is an examination of criminological theory for the advanced student. The focus is on critical analysis of both contemporary and historical criminological theories. In order to aid in the development of a critical understanding of theory, beyond understanding the content of central theories, the class focuses on discussion of theory development and testing. In addition, the class focuses on an understanding of the relationship of one theory to another as well as the state of empirical evidence surrounding each theory.

CRIM 803. Inequality, Crime and Justice. 3 Credits.

This course examines the linkages between social characteristics and crime. The course concentrates on what is known about the impact of gender, age, race and social class on crime and criminal justice.

CRIM 805. Multivariate Statistics in Criminological Research. 3 Credits.

This course teaches multivariate statistical techniques to train criminal justice researchers and policy makers to explore the causes and consequences of crime and criminal justices policies. Although the exact statistical techniques covered may vary, they will typically include multiple regression, multiple discriminate analysis, logistic regression, factor analysis, cluster analysis and path analysis.

CRIM 810. Qualitative Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

The central goal of this graduate seminar is to enable students to create and critique qualitative research designs focused on contemporary issues in criminology and criminal justice. A number of qualitative approaches will be covered including field observational research, focused interviews, case studies and content analysis. The seminar explores techniques, strengths and limitations of these varied qualitative methodologies.

CRIM 815. Advanced Quantitative Techniques in Criminology & Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

This course explores advanced statistical techniques commonly used in research on crime and justice. The major focus of the course is hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), a diverse set of techniques that extend standard multivariate analysis to accommodate nested data. Other advanced techniques are also covered: event history/survival models, time series, etc.

CRIM 820. Advanced Research Methods in Criminology & Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with advanced understanding of issues in criminology/criminal justice research including: history, philosophy, sociology, epistemology, politics and ethics of social science research; methodological questions of reliability, validity, conceptualization, operationalization, scale construction, data collection methodologies, sampling.

CRIM 840. Social Structures, Crime and Justice. 3 Credits.

This course examines the links between social structures and institutions, and justice at the individual, neighborhood, city, state and country levels. Students explore the ways in which structures and institutions are both agents of social control and facilitators or initiators of crime. Emphasis will be placed on theories, methodologies and empirical assessments.

CRIM 845. Crime and Communities. 3 Credits.

This course provides a foundation of the most important theories and research relating to residential communities and crime. The casual linkages between features of neighborhoods and social disorder will be explored in the context of criminological theories. Students will emerge with sufficient knowledge to develop a class or design a significant research project.

CRIM 850. Crimes of the State. 3 Credits.

This course explores crimes of the state from a sociological and criminological perspective by examining historical and current cases of governmental crime. This course covers the history, theory and method of the field; controls of and constraints on state crime; and cases of state crime.

CRIM 855. Researching the Criminal Justice System. 3 Credits.

Students develop original research projects focusing on the criminal justice system, police, courts and/or corrections. Projects are designed to culminate in a publishable paper.

CRIM 860. Life Course Criminology. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to life-course perspectives for understanding crime and deviant behavior. Students discuss the various methodologies, both quantitative and qualitative, most commonly found in studies of the life course today.

CRIM 890. Professional Development and Dissertation Seminar. 3 Credits.

This course enhances the process of professionalization of students by supporting ongoing dissertation progress as well as preparing the student for publishing, grant writing, and the job market.

CRIM 895. Topics in Criminal Justice. 1-3 Credits.

Topics vary by semester.

CRIM 897. Independent Study. 1-3 Credits.

Supervised study arranged with an instructor and approved by the graduate program director.

CRIM 899. Dissertation. 1-9 Credits.

Dissertation hours.

CRIM 998. Master’s Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course for master’s students in their final semester. It may be taken to fulfill the registration requirement necessary for graduation. All master’s students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour in the semester of their graduation.

CRIM 999. Doctoral Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course doctoral students may take to maintain active status after successfully passing the candidacy examination. All doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour every semester until their graduation.