PSYCHOLOGY Courses

PSYC 201S. Introduction to Psychology. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the scientific study of psychology, including the methods used to gather and interpret data. The student is introduced to fundamental terms, theories, and concepts dealing with the biological bases of behavior; learning; perception; cognition and intelligence; personality; psychological disorders; human development; and social processes. An emphasis is placed on application of concepts and critical thinking.

PSYC 203S. Lifespan Development. 3 Credits.

A broad contemporary view of the processes of development. The influences of biological and environmental factors in the development of personality and cognitive functioning are explored.

PSYC 226S. Honors: Introduction to Psychology. 3 Credits.

Open only to students in the Honors College. A special honors section of PSYC 201S.

PSYC 227S. Honors: Lifespan Development. 3 Credits.

Open only to students in the Honors College. A special honors section of PSYC 203S.

PSYC 303. Industrial/Organizational Psychology. 3 Credits.

An application of psychological principles and research to human behavior in work settings. Among the topics covered are personnel selection, training, and evaluation; employee motivation and job satisfaction; and organizational leadership and theory. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 304. Social Psychology. 3 Credits.

The behavior of the individual as affected by other people and groups. Interpersonal attraction, attitude change, group dynamics, and the application of psychology to social problems are among the topics covered. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 306. Health Psychology. 3 Credits.

Course examines how psychological states (e.g., anxiety, stress) influence physical health. The course also examines how physical states (e.g., illness, pain, injury) influence psychological health. Topics include the impact of stress on health and proneness to illness; coping with illness, injury and trauma; and the role of health-enhancing behaviors in maintaining physical health. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 308. Positive Psychology. 3 Credits.

This course examines and discusses psychological theories and research that focus on human strengths and potential. Factors that contribute to happiness and a fulfilling life are emphasized. Lectures, self-assessments and experiential exercises are used to understand how to cultivate a meaningful life. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 311. Psychology of Criminal Behavior. 3 Credits.

The study of crime from a psychological perspective. Topics include theories of criminal behavior, violent and non-violent crime, sexual offenses, insanity, addiction, white collar crime, and other criminal behaviors. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 317. Quantitative Methods. 4 Credits.

The application of statistical principles to psychological research problems, including an introduction to the principles of experimental design. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, completion of MATH 102M or higher, and STAT 130M or higher with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 318W. Research Methods in Psychology. 4 Credits.

An examination of the principles of psychological research. Experimental design and interpretation are stressed. The student learns to locate and read technical articles and to report his or her own research in the style of the American Psychological Association. Prerequisites: Completion of ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C and PSYC 317 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher. (This is a writing intensive course.).

PSYC 321. Psychology of the Exceptional Child. 3 Credits.

A study of the psychological development of the child with physical, emotional, social, intellectual, and educational disabilities. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S or PSYC 203S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 322. The Psychology of Adolescence. 3 Credits.

A survey of the processes of development during adolescence. Covers topics such as the influences of biological, emotional, social, and cognitive factors on personality development and adjustment of the adolescent. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S or PSYC 203S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 323. Psychology of Women. 3 Credits.

An examination of the major determinants of the psychology of women from theoretical, biological, interpersonal and sociocultural perspectives. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 325. Drugs and Behavior. 3 Credits.

An examination of the effects of psychoactive drugs on behavior and the factors involved in drug use. Current research literature is discussed. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 334. Social Development. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with theories and research on the development of social processes from birth to adolescence. Major theories of social development and research are examined. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 203S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 343. Personnel Psychology. 3 Credits.

The application of psychological principles and research to the development and improvement of personnel subsystems in business and industry. Emphasis is placed on the assessment, selection and training of workers and manager. While not required, PSYC 317 is recommended. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 303 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 344. Human Factors. 3 Credits.

The application and evaluation of psychological principles and research relating human behavior to the design of tools, technology, and the work environment. Prerequisites: PSYC 201S.

PSYC 345. Organizational Psychology. 3 Credits.

This course emphasizes the study of human behavior in organizations. Topics include leadership, motivation, group behavior, communications, power and politics, and organization change. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 303 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 351. Child Psychology. 3 Credits.

The development of children within their diverse environments is examined. A focus is on the methods used to understand how children experience their world. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 203S or PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 352. Cognitive Development During Childhood. 3 Credits.

The course will acquaint the student with theories and research on the development of cognitive processes from birth to adolescence. Major theories of cognitive development and research on the various cognitive processes will be reviewed. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 203S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 353. The Psychology of Adulthood and Aging. 3 Credits.

The study of adults with emphasis on aging. Current theories and research as well as the characteristics, lifestyles, and activities of adulthood and aging will be discussed. Prerequisites: PSYC 201S or PSYC 203S.

PSYC 363. Psychology of Sex. 3 Credits.

A study of critical issues in human sexuality; gender and sexual identity, sexual arousal and erotic behavior, relationship development, and sexual dysfunction and deviation disorders. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 368. Internship in Psychology. 3 Credits.

For ODU psychology majors only. Students engage in academically relevant work related activities in non-clinical settings. Available for pass/fail grading only. Students should work with Career Development Services to identify their placement in the semester prior to enrollment. A maximum of 6 credits of PSYC 368 and/or PSYC 369 can be counted towards the major in Psychology. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 317 with a grade of C (2.0) or higher and permission of the instructor. Pre- or corequisites: Completion of PSYC 318W with a grade of C or higher.

PSYC 369. Practicum in Clinical Psychology. 3 Credits.

For ODU psychology majors only. Students engage in academically relevant work activities in clinical settings. Available for pass/fail grading only. Students should work with the Career Development Services to identify their placement in the semester prior to enrollment. Instructor approval is required prior to registration. A maximum of 6 credits of PSYC 368 and/or PSYC 369 can be counted towards the major in Psychology. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Corequisite: PSYC 371. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 317 and PSYC 318W with a grade of C (2.0) or higher; at least 80 earned credits hours; at least 14 hours in Psychology at the 300/400 level; and permission of the instructor.

PSYC 371. Clinical Supervision in Psychology. 1 Credit.

Students doing practica at designated clinical placements must also enroll in this course taught by a clinical faculty member. This seminar addresses the special issues in the areas of safety, confidentiality, and professionalism that arise in clinical settings. Students doing non-clinical internships may also enroll in the course. A maximum of 2 credits of PSYC 371 can be counted towards the major in psychology. Corequisite: PSYC 369.

PSYC 395. Topics in Psychology. 1-3 Credits.

The department offers selected topics that may not be offered on a regular basis. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

PSYC 396. Topics in Psychology. 1-3 Credits.

The department offers selected topics that may not be offered on a regular basis. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

PSYC 400. Senior Seminar. 1 Credit.

Discussion of current research, theoretical, and professional topics in psychology. Prerequisites: senior standing and minimum GPA of 3.25.

PSYC 403. History of Psychology. 2,3 Credits.

A survey of the historical development of modern psychology. The major systems and their influences on contemporary American psychology are studied. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 405. Abnormal Psychology. 3 Credits.

A study of psychopathology, covering various behavior disorders, their descriptions, characteristics, and causation. Methods of therapeutic technique are reviewed. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 408. Theories of Personality. 3 Credits.

A study of the structure of personality and the dimensions along which individuals differ. The contributions of major personality theorists and the implications of current research are considered. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 410. Human Cognition. 3 Credits.

An investigation of the ways in which people learn and think. Current models of human memory and cognition are considered in relation to the evidence on human thinking capabilities. The role of language in thought and knowledge acquisition is also explored. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 412. Psychological Tests. 3 Credits.

An examination of the history, theory and applications of psychological testing. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 413. Sensation and Perception. 3 Credits.

An analysis of the processes by which humans obtain information about the environment through the eyes, ears, and other sensory systems. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 414. Principles of Learning. 3 Credits.

Course focuses on basic learning principles and processes; classical conditioning, instrumental conditioning, discrimination, attention, appetitive and aversive conditioning. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 417. Advanced Statistics and Computer Applications. 3 Credits.

The course covers advanced statistical methods and computer applications that build on knowledge and skills acquired in PSYC 317 and PSYC 318W. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 317 and PSYC 318W with a grade of C (2.0) or higher, or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 420. Cross-Cultural Psychology. 3 Credits.

A wide variety of psychological research and theory relevant to human behavior in different cultures is examined and the impact of culture on human behavior is discussed. The course examines cross-cultural research conducted by scholars around the world. In addition to factual knowledge, emphasis is placed on critical thinking and problem solving. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor.

PSYC 424. Physiological Psychology. 3 Credits.

An investigation of the biological bases of behavior including mental illness, motivation, learning, memory and language. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 430. Animal Behavior. 3 Credits.

This course explores the environmental and social factors that affect the behavior of animals. Special attention is given to the mechanisms of behavior and the evolutionary context of behavior. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 431. Community Psychology. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on behavioral prevention and intervention efforts targeting social problems. The goal is to understand how to design and evaluate such programs. Topics vary, but include an emphasis on public health and safety issues. Individual and group behavior change, and cultural design, are each considered when targeting problems. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 460. Psychology of African Americans. 3 Credits.

This course examines the issues and perspectives related to the psychological evolution of African Americans in the United States. Particular emphasis is placed on exploring the discipline of psychology from an Afrocentric focus. Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 461. Drug Abuse and Dependence. 3 Credits.

This course offers an intensive review and clinical analysis of the issues and problems associated with addictive behavior with an emphasis on alcohol abuse and dependency. Prerequisite: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.

PSYC 487. Honors Program in Psychology. 3 Credits.

For ODU psychology majors only. With psychology faculty supervision, student develops an honors thesis proposal for approval by the Psychology Honors Program committee. See section on Honors Program in Psychology in this Catalog. Prerequisites: PSYC 497; cumulative GPA of 3.25 or higher and psychology GPA of 3.50 or higher; permission of the departmental Honors Program chair.

PSYC 488. Honors Program in Psychology. 3 Credits.

For ODU psychology majors only. With psychology faculty supervision, student conducts the supervised honors research and documents it in a thesis for approval by the Psychology Honors Program committee. Student also participates in a required seminar to discuss and present the research. See section on Honors Program in Psychology in this Catalog. Prerequisites: PSYC 497; cumulative GPA of 3.25 or higher and psychology GPA of 3.50 or higher; permission of the departmental Honors Program chair.

PSYC 489. Readings in Psychology. 3 Credits.

The course may be taken only once. An individualized course in which the student does library research and writes a paper. Prerequisite: approval by supervisory faculty member and department.

PSYC 490. Readings in Psychology. 3 Credits.

The course may be taken only once. An individualized course in which the student does library research and writes a paper. Prerequisite: approval by supervisory faculty member and department.

PSYC 495. Topics in Psychology. 1-3 Credits.

The department offers selected topics that may not be offered regularly. These special topics will appear in the course listing each semester. Prerequisite: PSYC 201S or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 496. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

The department offers selected topics that may not be offered regularly. These special topics will appear in the course listing each semester. Prerequisite: Completion of PSYC 201S with a grade of C (2.0) or higher or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 497. Supervised Research. 3 Credits.

For ODU psychology majors only. Student and faculty supervisor develop and approve a contract of required research activities for the semester, such as attending research lab meetings, data collection, coding and/or analysis, library research, etc. Prerequisites: PSYC 317 and PSYC 318W, GPA of 2.5, pre-approval by psychology faculty supervisor.

PSYC 498. Supervised Research. 3 Credits.

For ODU psychology majors only. Student and faculty supervisor develop and approve a contract of required research activities for the semester, such as attending research lab meetings, data collection, coding and/or analysis, library research, etc. Prerequisites: PSYC 317 and PSYC 318W, GPA of 2.5, pre-approval by psychology faculty supervisor.

PSYC 651. Developmental Psychology. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. This course covers topics related to the physical, cognitive, social and emotional aspects of growth, from conception to death. It focuses on human growth and development, but other organisms are also considered.

PSYC 653. Personality Psychology: Theory and Research. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. The course deals with basic issues and contemporary topics in personality research. The basic issues covered include personality measurement, heredity, biological approaches, personality development, and motives. Current topics in personality research that are covered include the unconscious, personal efficacy, sex and gender, control, self-concept, stress and illness, sexuality, and disorders of personality.

PSYC 661. Psychopathology. 3 Credits.

The course provides a conceptual basis for the study of abnormal behavior. Students conduct an in-depth review of the literature related to the classification, etiology, and treatment of mental disorders.

PSYC 662. Human-Computer Interface Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of the instructor. Course introduces students to the fundamental principles of human-computer interaction. Exposes students to basic psychological concepts and shows how they are used to create effective interface designs. Covers both theoretical and practical aspects of interface design.

PSYC 663. Intellectual Assessment. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. Primary focus is on intellectual assessment for children and adults. Basic instruction in administration and interpretation of standard tests of intelligence will be provided. Additional topics include tests of achievement and memory function.

PSYC 664. Personality Assessment. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. Course covers major methods of personality assessment including objective and projective instruments. Emphasis is on current theory and applications of personality assessment.

PSYC 667. Practicum in Psychology. 2-5 Credits.

2-5 credits. Prerequisites: 15 graduate course hours (including PSYC 663) and permission of the instructor. Students will receive supervised training in an applied setting in the area of clinical or industrial psychology.

PSYC 696. Topics in Psychology. 3 Credits.

PSYC 697. Selected Topics in Psychology. 1-4 Credits.

1-3 credits. Prerequisites: permission of the instructor and graduate program director. This course provides opportunities for advanced investigations of selected topics in psychology. May be taken by students beyond the first year of graduate study who wish to pursue topics not covered by regularly scheduled courses.

PSYC 698. Research in Psychology. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Individual project under guidance of a research advisor. Required for students choosing thesis option. Limited to a total of 3 hours of credit.

PSYC 699. Thesis. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 698. Individual project under guidance of a research advisor. Required for students choosing thesis option.

PSYC 712. History and Systems of Psychology. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. A survey of the historical roots of modern psychology.

PSYC 713. Research Fundamentals. 2 Credits.

Lecture 2 hourS; 2 credit. This course will cover Responsible Conduct of Research, including completion of CITI course, protection of human subjects, University Human Subjects Committee and IRB, APA Style, paper structure, references, tables, figures, etc., research proposal writing, including searching for sources, writing, oral presentation, data collection and management issues, (e.g., Inquisite, SONA, data cleaning). Students are required to complete a Research Proposal with Introduction and Methods and Data Analysis Plan. Oral presentation of research proposal.

PSYC 722. Occupational Health Psychology. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 763/863 and PSYC 850. This course examines multidisciplinary research and theories on issues related to individual and organizational well-being and health. Occupational health psychology (OHP) emphasizes the promotion of wellness and the prevention of injuries and illnesses in the workplace. Through lectures/presentations, discussions, and research activities, students will learn about OHP theory and practice.

PSYC 727. Analysis of Variance and Experimental Design. 4 Credits.

4 credits; 3 Lecture hours; 2 Lab hours. Prerequisite: admission into the psychology M.S. or Ph.D. program or permission of the instructor. Review of the basic descriptive and inferential statistical procedures with a heavy emphasis on fundamental and advanced analysis of variance techniques. Topics include contrasts, factorial designs, within-subject and mixed designs, and analysis of covariance. Course materials are covered in the context of classical experimental and quasi-experimental design.

PSYC 728. Regressional and Correlational Design. 4 Credits.

Course covers correlation with heavy emphasis on regression analysis in the context of the general linear model. Topics include partial correlations, categorical and continuous interactions, non-linear regression, and multivariate statistics. Course materials are covered in the context of correlational designs and survey research. Prerequisites: Admission into the psychology M.S. or Ph.D. program or permission of the instructor and PSYC 727/PSYC 827 or equivalent.

PSYC 730. Teaching Statistics and Research Practicum. 1,3 Credit.

Advanced graduate students in Psychology will have the opportunity to direct statistics and research methods labs for graduate statistics courses. Students’ main role will be acting as peer mentors for the new graduate students. Other possible responsibilities may include grading, creating lab activities and assignments, and supervising students’ research projects. Students will be evaluated on their teaching effectiveness and performance. Prerequisites: PSYC 727/PSYC 827 or PSYC 824 and PSYC 728/PSYC 828 or PSYC 825.

PSYC 731. Human Cognition. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: admission into the psychology M.S. or Ph.D. program or permission of the instructor. An investigation of the ways in which people process and retain information, make decisions, and solve problems. Current models of structures and processes of human memory and cognition are discussed with particular emphasis on neurocognitive evidence of the brain mechanisms involved in cognition.

PSYC 735. Health Psychology. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course focuses on contemporary theory and research topics in health psychology. The course examines psychological and behavioral issues affecting health maintenance, coping with life-threatening illnesses and chronic diseases, and health promotion. The course uses the biopsychosocial (mind-body) model as an organizing framework, emphasizing the dynamic interactions among biological, social, personality, and behavioral factors jointly in influencing people’s health. The course is conducted as a seminar.

PSYC 736. Multilevel Models: HLM. 3 Credits.

Social science data frequently have a hierarchical or multilevel structure as a consequence of sampling designs or repeated measures. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the basic principles and applications of hierarchical linear modeling in social science research. Topics covered include an introduction to multilevel analyses, random intercept models, random slope models, hypotheses testing, hierarchical models for limited dependent variables, model fitting, three-level models, and repeated-measures applications. Prerequisites: PSYC 728 or PSYC 828 or equivalent.

PSYC 740. Quasi-Experimental Methods. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. Quasi-experimental methods is a course to teach techniques for research designs not conducive to randomized-control trials. The philosophy of these techniques, issues of validity, and analyses are discussed. Comparisons with randomized-control trials as well as means to strengthen quasi-methodologies for better general causal inferences are presented.

PSYC 741. Sensation and Perception. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. A survey of human sensation and perception emphasizing historical contributions, recent theoretical and methodological developments, and empirical findings.

PSYC 744. Program Evaluation. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of program evaluation as well as to give students practical experience conducting a program evaluation. Students will get experience creating and conducting qualitative and quantitative assessments. A course goal is to work in small groups to conduct a program evaluation. Prerequisites: PSYC 727/PSYC 827 and PSYC 728/PSYC 828 (or current enrollment).

PSYC 745. Psychometric Theory. 3 Credits.

This course introduces classical test theory, including definitions and formulas for test reliability, standard error of measurement, and related statistics. Additional topics include scaling, test validity, item statistics useful in test constructions, and norms commonly used in educational and psychological testing. Generalizability Theory, factor analysis, and Item Response Theory (IRT) are introduced. Prerequisites: PSYC 728 or PSYC 828 or equivalent.

PSYC 746. Structural Equation Modeling. 3 Credits.

This course covers the topics of linear structural equation modeling and focuses on estimation, measurement models, confirmatory and hierarchical factor analysis, structural equations, longitudinal models, multisample analyses, and mean structures. Prerequisites: PSYC 745 or PSYC 845 or equivalent.

PSYC 747. Multivariate Methods for the Social/Behavioral Sciences. 3 Credits.

The course is focused on methods and techniques for analyzing multivariate data. Emphasis includes both conceptual and computational aspects of the most commonly used analytical tools when experimental units have multiple measures. A goal of the course is to avoid the extremes of “plug n chug” analyses on the one hand and theorems and proofs on the other to provide generalizable working knowledge of multivariate statistics. Featured techniques are MANOVA, MANCOVA, profile analysis, discriminant analysis, canonical correlation, principal components analysis, and exploratory factor analysis. Prerequisites: PSYC 728 or PSYC 828 or equivalent.

PSYC 748. Categorical Methods for the Social/Behavioral Sciences. 3 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to review the linear regression model and move into categorical methods. Featured methods are inference using proportions and odds ratios, multi-way contingency tables, logistic regression, and loglinear models. The generalized linear model is also introduced. Prerequisites: PSYC 727/PSYC 827 or PSYC 728/PSYC 828.

PSYC 749. Advanced Social Psychology. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. This course discusses the behavior of the human as a member of a group. Topics include attitude theory and change, interpersonal attraction, group dynamics, and related theory and applied research techniques.

PSYC 750. Organizational Psychology. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. This course provides an overview of organizational behavior and theory. Topics include leadership, motivation, teams, social processes at work, workplace relationships, organization structure and environments, and organizational development and change.

PSYC 763. Personnel Psychology. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. This course provides an overview of personnel psychology. Topics include reliability and validity, job analysis, performance criteria, performance appraisal, employee recruitment, employee selection, and training and development.

PSYC 770. Human Factors Psychology. 3 Credits.

The application and evaluation of psychological principles and research relating human behavior to the design of tools, technology, and the work environment. Theory, methods, and application are emphasized. Prerequisites: PSYC 731/PSYC 831 and PSYC 741/PSYC 841 or equivalents or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 771. Ergonomics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Basic overview and application of anthropometry, biomechanics, functional anatomy, mechanics, and human physiology for the design of industrial tools, equipment, and workstations.

PSYC 780. Ethics, Professional Standards, and Responsible Conduct. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. Ethical principles, APA codes, laws, policies and approaches to ethical decision making will be applied to case studies involving dilemmas and issues in several areas of the professional activities of psychologists. Students will prepare an ethical and/or professional issue paper and a self-reflection on acculturation into professional ethics and standards.

PSYC 781. Advanced Ergonomics. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. Basic overview of the application of anthropometry, biomechanics, ergonomics, cognition and perception within workplace environments. Particular focus on the analysis and prevention of accidents at work. Course requires considerable practice in technical writing.

PSYC 792. Advanced Seminar in Physiological Psychology. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Students will investigate the biological underpinnings of behavior and explore what is currently known about their role in movement, emotions, mental illness, sexual behavior, memory, states of consciousness, sensory perception, thought and language, and several neuro-psychiatric disorders. Through active learning exercises, i.e., class discussion, reports, critiques, oral presentations, and a final research paper or proposal, students will apply and demonstrate their acquired knowledge and critical thinking skills to the biological basis of human behavior.

PSYC 795. Topics in Psychology I. 1-4 Credits.

PSYC 796. Topics in Psychology II. 1-4 Credits.

PSYC 801. Empirically-Supported Therapies. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. Empirically-Supported Therapies is designed to foster the integration of clinical science and the practice of psychotherapy. Course objectives include learning how to identify, evaluate, and implement empirically supported interventions for various psychological disorders.

PSYC 810. Seminar in Professional Aspects of Industrial/Organizational Psychology. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: admission into the I/O Ph.D. program. Topics covered include standards of professional behavior of I/O psychologists, the governance of psychology, I/O psychology professional associations, and professional opportunities for I/O psychologists.

PSYC 812. History and Systems of Psychology. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. A survey of the historical roots of modern psychology.

PSYC 813. Research Fundamentals. 2 Credits.

This course focuses on the responsible conduct of research, including the completion of the University-required CITI course, the protection of human subjects, the protocols of the University's human subjects committee and IRB, the specifics of APA Style (paper structure, references, tables, figures, etc.), and the mechanics of research proposal writing, including searching for sources, writing, oral presentation, data collection and management issues (e.g., Inquisite, SONA, data cleaning). Students are required to complete a research proposal with an introduction, methods section, and data analysis plan. The course concludes with an oral presentation of the research proposal.

PSYC 815. Teaching Psychology. 1 Credit.

Lecture and discussion 1 hour; 1 credit. Seminar on the pedagogy of teaching as applied to the discipline of psychology. Topics include syllabus preparation, lecture and discussion methods, assessment and grading, and teaching portfolio development.

PSYC 822. Occupational Health Psychology. 3 Credits.

This course examines multidisciplinary research and theories on issues related to individual and organizational well-being and health. Occupational health psychology (OHP) emphasizes the promotion of wellness and the prevention of injuries and illnesses in the workplace. Through lectures/presentations, discussions, and research activities, students will learn about OHP theory and practice. Prerequisites: PSYC 763/PSYC 863 and PSYC 850.

PSYC 824. ODU-Research Methods I-Analysis of Variance and Experimental Design. 4 Credits.

Review of basic descriptive and inferential statistical procedures with a heavy emphasis on fundamental and advanced analysis of variance techniques. Topics include contrasts, factorial designs, within-subject and mixed designs, and analysis of covariance. Course materials are covered in the context of classical experimental and quasi-experimental design. Prerequisites: admission into Virginia Consortium PhD in Clinical Psychology program or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 825. ODU Research Methods II: Regression and Correlational Design. 4 Credits.

Course covers correlation with heavy emphasis on regression analysis in the context of the general linear model. Topics include partial correlations, categorical and continuous interactions, non-linear regression, and multivariate statistics. Course materials are covered in the context of correlational designs and survey research. Prerequisites: admission into Virginia Consortium PhD in Clinical Psychology or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 827. Analysis of Variance and Experimental Design. 4 Credits.

4 credits; 3 Lecture hours; 2 Lab hours. Prerequisite: admission into the psychology M.S. or Ph.D. program or permission of the instructor. Review of the basic descriptive and inferential statistical procedures with a heavy emphasis on fundamental and advanced analysis of variance techniques. Topics include contrasts, factorial designs, within-subject and mixed designs, and analysis of covariance. Course materials are covered in the context of classical experimental and quasi-experimental design.

PSYC 828. Regressional and Correlational Design. 4 Credits.

Course covers correlation with heavy emphasis on regression analysis in the context of the general linear model. Topics include partial correlations, categorical and continuous interactions, non-linear regression, and multivariate statistics. Course materials are covered in the context of correlational designs and survey research. Prerequisites: Admission into the psychology M.S. or Ph.D. program or permission of the instructor and PSYC 727/PSYC 827 or equivalent.

PSYC 830. Teaching Statistics and Research Practicum. 1,3 Credit.

Advanced graduate students in Psychology will have the opportunity to direct statistics and research methods labs for graduate statistics courses. Students’ main role will be acting as peer mentors for the new graduate students. Other possible responsibilities may include grading, creating lab activities and assignments, and supervising students’ research projects. Students will be evaluated on their teaching effectiveness and performance. Prerequisites: PSYC 727/PSYC 827 or PSYC 824 and PSYC 728/PSYC 828 or PSYC 825.

PSYC 831. Human Cognition. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: admission into the psychology M.S. or Ph.D. program or permission of the instructor. An investigation of the ways in which people process and retain information, make decisions, and solve problems. Current models of structures and processes of human memory and cognition are discussed with particular emphasis on neurocognitive evidence of the brain mechanisms involved in cognition.

PSYC 833. Grant and Manuscript Writing. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: admission to the doctoral program in psychology and completion of master’s thesis, or permission of instructor. The course is designed: (1) to teach students to write article-length scholarly manuscripts in APA format of publishable quality, and (2) to teach students the critical components of grant applications. By the end of this course, each student will have prepared a manuscript that is ready for submission to a peer-reviewed journal and have completed sections of a federal grant application.

PSYC 835. Health Psychology. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course focuses on contemporary theory and research topics in health psychology. The course examines psychological and behavioral issues affecting health maintenance, coping with life-threatening illnesses and chronic diseases, and health promotion. The course uses the biopsychosocial (mind-body) model as an organizing framework, emphasizing the dynamic interactions among biological, social, personality, and behavioral factors jointly in influencing people’s health. The course is conducted as a seminar.

PSYC 836. Multilevel Models: HLM. 3 Credits.

Social science data frequently have a hierarchical or multilevel structure as a consequence of sampling designs or repeated measures. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the basic principles and applications of hierarchical linear modeling in social science research. Topics covered include an introduction to multilevel analyses, random intercept models, random slope models, hypotheses testing, hierarchical models for limited dependent variables, model fitting, three-level models, and repeated-measures applications. Prerequisites: PSYC 728 or PSYC 828 or equivalent.

PSYC 840. Quasi-Experimental Methods. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. Quasi-experimental methods is a course to teach techniques for research designs not conducive to randomized-control trials. The philosophy of these techniques, issues of validity, and analyses are discussed. Comparisons with randomized-control trials as well as means to strengthen quasi-methodologies for better general causal inferences are presented.

PSYC 841. Sensation and Perception. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. A survey of human sensation and perception emphasizing historical contributions, recent theoretical and methodological developments, and empirical findings.

PSYC 844. Program Evaluation. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of program evaluation as well as to give students practical experience conducting a program evaluation. Students will get experience creating and conducting qualitative and quantitative assessments. A course goal is to work in small groups to conduct a program evaluation. Prerequisites: PSYC 727/PSYC 827 and PSYC 728/PSYC 828 (or current enrollment).

PSYC 845. Psychometric Theory. 3 Credits.

This course introduces classical test theory, including definitions and formulas for test reliability, standard error of measurement, and related statistics. Additional topics include scaling, test validity, item statistics useful in test constructions, and norms commonly used in educational and psychological testing. Generalizability Theory, factor analysis, and Item Response Theory (IRT) are introduced. Prerequisites: PSYC 728 or PSYC 828 or equivalent.

PSYC 846. Structural Equation Modeling. 3 Credits.

This course covers the topics of linear structural equation modeling and focuses on estimation, measurement models, confirmatory and hierarchical factor analysis, structural equations, longitudinal models, multisample analyses, and mean structures. Prerequisites: PSYC 745 or PSYC 845 or equivalent.

PSYC 847. Multivariate Methods for the Social/Behavioral Sciences. 3 Credits.

The course is focused on methods and techniques for analyzing multivariate data. Emphasis includes both conceptual and computational aspects of the most commonly used analytical tools when experimental units have multiple measures. A goal of the course is to avoid the extremes of “plug n chug” analyses on the one hand and theorems and proofs on the other to provide generalizable working knowledge of multivariate statistics. Featured techniques are MANOVA, MANCOVA, profile analysis, discriminant analysis, canonical correlation, principal components analysis, and exploratory factor analysis. Prerequisites: PSYC 728 or PSYC 828 or equivalent.

PSYC 848. Categorical Methods for the Social/Behavioral Sciences. 3 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to review the linear regression model and move into categorical methods. Featured methods are inference using proportions and odds ratios, multi-way contingency tables, logistic regression, and loglinear models. The generalized linear model is also introduced. Prerequisites: PSYC 727/PSYC 827 or PSYC 728/PSYC 828.

PSYC 849. Advanced Social Psychology. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. This course discusses the behavior of the human as a member of a group. Topics include attitude theory and change, interpersonal attraction, group dynamics, and related theory and applied research techniques.

PSYC 850. Organizational Psychology. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. This course provides an overview of organizational behavior and theory. Topics include leadership, motivation, teams, social processes at work, workplace relationships, organization structure and environments, and organizational development and change.

PSYC 851. Micro Organizational Psychology. 3 Credits.

The study of individual and group behavior in organizations. Emphasis is placed on classic and contemporary leadership and motivation theory and research. Prerequisites: PSYC 750/PSYC 850 or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 853. Macro Organizational Psychology. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. This class uses a multilevel perspective to provide a foundation in organization theory. Students develop a theory of organizing that incorporates variables at the individual, dyad group, unit organization, and organization network levels of analysis.

PSYC 854. Organizational Development and Change. 3 Credits.

This seminar discusses models and theories of organizational change and interventions that are commonly used to foster organizational development and effectiveness. Students participate in an organizational consulting project to apply lessons learned in the classroom. Prerequisites: PSYC 851 and PSYC 853 or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 855. Field Research Methods in Organizational Psychology. 3 Credits.

Lecture, discussion, and field research project; 3 credits. Prerequisite: admission into the I/O Ph.D. program or permission of the instructor. This seminar discusses the design and analysis of surveys, quasi-experiments, questionnaires, interviews and other methods for studying organizational processes. Both quantitative and qualitative research methods are discussed.

PSYC 858. ODU Clinical and Ethical Issues. 1 Credit.

Lecture 1 hour; 1 credit. Weekly seminars address professional and ethical issues in the practice of clinical psychology.

PSYC 859. ODU-Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Covers theory and techniques of cognitive and behavioral approaches. Applications for the assessment and treatment of adults, children, couples, and families are discussed. Students gain practical experience in these techniques as well as case conceptualizational skills.

PSYC 860. ODU Practicum in Clinical Psychology. 3 Credits.

PSYC 861. ODU Advanced Practicum in Clinical Psychology. 3-6 Credits.

PSYC 862. ODU Psychodynamic Therapy. 3 Credits.

PSYC 863. Personnel Psychology. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. This course provides an overview of personnel psychology. Topics include reliability and validity, job analysis, performance criteria, performance appraisal, employee recruitment, employee selection, and training and development.

PSYC 864. Human Resource Development. 3 Credits.

This course covers research findings, methodologies, and evaluation designs for the training and development of personnel in organizations. Specific topics include needs assessment, learning principles and system design. Prerequisites: PSYC 763/PSYC 863 or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 865. Psychology of Personnel Selection. 3 Credits.

This course covers the topics of recruitment, job performance, interviews, internet-based testing, and psychological constructs for use in employee selection (e.g., intelligence, personality). Prerequisite: PSYC 763/PSYC 863 or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 866. Advanced Personnel Psychology II. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 865 or permission of the instructor. This course covers statistical and theoretical issues related to the research and practice of personnel psychology, including meta-analysis, significance testing, aggregation issues, scale development and validation, utility, the fairness and bias of tests, and the legal context of selection.

PSYC 867. Human Performance Assessment. 3 Credits.

This course covers the job analysis and performance appraisal/management (PA/MA). Specific topics include job analysis methods; use of job analysis results for various HR functions; performance assessment/appraisal methods; multi-source feedback; employee reactions to and use of PA/MA information; rater cognitive processes and affect; rater goals, bias, and accuracy; and organizational practical and legal issues surrounding job analysis and PA/PM. Prerequisites: PSYC 763/PSYC 863 or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 868. Internship. 1 Credit.

The course is designed to provide individual students with advanced on-the-job professional experience. Internship assignments must be approved by the student's program of study. Direct supervision is given by an experienced professional at the internship setting.

PSYC 870. Human Factors Psychology. 3 Credits.

The application and evaluation of psychological principles and research relating human behavior to the design of tools, technology, and the work environment. Theory, methods, and application are emphasized. Prerequisites: PSYC 731/PSYC 831 and PSYC 741/PSYC 841 or equivalents or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 871. Ergonomics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Basic overview and application of anthropometry, biomechanics, functional anatomy, mechanics, and human physiology for the design of industrial tools, equipment, and workstations.

PSYC 872. Methods, Measures, Techniques, and Tools in Human Factors. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Experiential survey of methods, measures, techniques, and prototyping tools available for human factors investigations in laboratory and field settings. The design and execution of experimental investigations utilizing the measures and tools are emphasized.

PSYC 873. ODU Biological Bases of Behavior. 3 Credits.

PSYC 874. ODU Biological Bases III: Drugs and Behavior. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course deals with substance abuse disorders, identification/diagnosis, etiology, treatment and recovery. It also covers the proper use of and desired effects and side effects of medications used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders.

PSYC 875. Advanced Visual Perception and Visual Displays. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Detailed review of the physiological bases of visual perception, the capabilities and limitations of the visual systems, and the metrics involved in vision research. A survey of current advanced visual displays is presented, stressing the interaction of the characteristics of these displays with the capabilities and limitations of the human visual system.

PSYC 876. Human-Computer Interaction. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Review of the physical, cognitive, and performance capabilities and limitations of humans as they interact with modern computer systems. Emphasis is placed on the tools, techniques and procedures for the assessment and effective design of computer hardware, software and displays of information.

PSYC 877. Theories, Models and Simulations in Human Factors. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Survey of the historical and philosophical bases for the use of theories, models, and simulations in human factors applications with a critical evaluation of existing theories, mathematical and cognitive models, and simulations in terms of actual and potential contributions to the field.

PSYC 878. Advanced Cognition and Information Processing. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Historical survey of human information processing literature, detailed review of recent developments in cognitive psychology, and examination of the purposes, role and scope of cognitive engineering.

PSYC 879. Careers. 3 Credits.

This course covers the developmental processes, facilitators, and barriers individuals encounter in their work lives. It provides a theoretical foundation in the careers literature and introduces contemporary research in the area. Work-family conflict, mentoring, organizational socialization, and career success are among the topics covered. Prerequisites: PSYC 750/PSYC 850 and PSYC 851 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 880. Ethics, Professional Standards, and Responsible Conduct. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. Ethical principles, APA codes, laws, policies and approaches to ethical decision making will be applied to case studies involving dilemmas and issues in several areas of the professional activities of psychologists. Students will prepare an ethical and/or professional issue paper and a self-reflection on acculturation into professional ethics and standards.

PSYC 881. Advanced Ergonomics. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. Basic overview of the application of anthropometry, biomechanics, ergonomics, cognition and perception within workplace environments. Particular focus on the analysis and prevention of accidents at work. Course requires considerable practice in technical writing.

PSYC 882. Attention and Human Performance. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 870. Survey of theories of attentiion, factors that influence human performance, and human performance assessment in human-machine systems. Topics include dual-task performance, vigilance, workload, arousal, fatigue, stress, human error, psychophysiology, and neuroergonomics.

PSYC 883. Research in Clinical Psychology. 1-4 Credits.

Individual project under guidance of a research advisor.

PSYC 890. ODU Internship in Clinical/Community Psychology. 4 Credits.

4 credits each semester for 3 semesters. Prerequisite: Permission of the clinical director. Must be enrolled in psychology doctorate program.

PSYC 891. Industrial/Organizational Internship. 1 Credit.

PSYC 892. Advanced Seminar in Physiological Psychology. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Students will investigate the biological underpinnings of behavior and explore what is currently known about their role in movement, emotions, mental illness, sexual behavior, memory, states of consciousness, sensory perception, thought and language, and several neuro-psychiatric disorders. Through active learning exercises, i.e., class discussion, reports, critiques, oral presentations, and a final research paper or proposal, students will apply and demonstrate their acquired knowledge and critical thinking skills to the biological basis of human behavior.

PSYC 894. ODU Clinical Dissertation. 1-6 Credits.

1-6 credits each semester for variable credit.

PSYC 895. Topics in Psychology I. 1-4 Credits.

PSYC 896. Topics in Psychology II. 1-4 Credits.

PSYC 897. Individual Study (Readings). 1-4 Credits.

PSYC 898. Research. 3 Credits.

PSYC 899. Dissertation. 1-9 Credits.

1-9 credits per semester with limitation of a total of 24 credits.The following courses are Clinical Psychology Doctorate courses and require enrollment in that program or permission of the clinical director.

PSYC 998. Master's Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course for master's students in their final semester. It may be taken to fulfill the registration requirement necessary for graduation. All master's students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour in the semester of their graduation.

PSYC 999. Doctoral Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course doctoral students may take to maintain active status after successfully passing the candidacy examination. All doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour every semester until their graduation.