COMMUNICATIONS Courses

COMM 101R. Public Speaking. 3 Credits.

Preparation, delivery, and analysis of types of speeches with emphasis on extemporaneous speaking.

COMM 103R. Voice and Diction. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the analysis and practice of effective voice and articulation. Applications across various communication contexts, such as public communication, media, and social communication.

COMM 112R. Introduction to Interpersonal Communication. 3 Credits.

An introduction to concepts, processes, and effects of communication in personal and social relationships. Emphasis on fundamental communication skills necessary for the formation and maintenance of relationships.

COMM 126R. Honors: Public Speaking. 3 Credits.

Open only to students in the Honors College. A study of the theory, strategies, and techniques of public speaking with emphasis on its application to effective conflict resolution.

COMM 195. Topics in Communication. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for non-majors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in a booklet distributed to all academic advisors.

COMM 196. Topics in Communication. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for non-majors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in a booklet distributed to all academic advisors.

COMM 200S. Introduction to Human Communication. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the discipline and methods of human communication. Survey of the major approaches to studying communication across the range of human communication contexts and functions.

COMM 225. Introduction to Production Technology. 3 Credits.

Fundamentals of construction, lighting, and production techniques in contemporary theatre and film. Students will apply acquired skills to active productions for ODU Theatre and Film productions.

COMM 226S. Honors: Introduction to Human Communication. 3 Credits.

Open only to students in the Honors College. An introduction to the discipline and methods of human communication. Survey of the major approaches to studying communication across the range of human communication contexts and functions.

COMM 227A. Honors: Film Appreciation. 3 Credits.

Open only to students in the Honors College. This class will focus on both contextual and close text analysis of masterworks as they have influenced film art and industry. Students in this course are expected to develop basic research, communication, viewing and critical thinking skills as they apply their knowledge to the analysis of the film experience.

COMM 260. Understanding Media. 3 Credits.

An examination of mass communication--books, newspapers, magazines, radio, TV, film, sound recordings, and the Internet--as a global institution, industry, and social force. Media literacy skills are emphasized, as are matters of technology, content, economics, history and impact.

COMM 270A. Film Appreciation. 3 Credits.

This class focuses on both contextual and close text analysis of masterworks as they have influenced film art and industry. Students in this course are expected to develop basic research, communication, viewing and critical thinking skills as they apply their knowledge to the analysis of the film experience.

COMM 271. Introduction to Filmmaking. 3 Credits.

This course will introduce the beginning student to making movies. Students will learn the basics of working with cameras, lights, sound recording, video editing and post production. This is a hands-on production course.

COMM 300. International Sojourning. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to prepare ODU study-abroad students for successful international sojourns. Topics to be covered include culture, culture shock, reverse culture shock and strategies for a successful study-abroad experience. Prerequisites: junior standing or permission of instructor.

COMM 301. Critical Methodologies. 3 Credits.

This survey course introduces students to critical methodologies utilized in the study of media texts. Through case studies and hands-on exercises, students will learn how to study the production, consumption, and engagement with popular culture and how to decode its meanings. Prerequisites: COMM 260.

COMM 302. Communication Research Methods I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to communication research from a social science perspective. Experiment, survey, content analysis and observational approaches are covered. Students learn statistical data collection and data analysis techniques. Prerequisites: STAT 130M, COMM 200S and six hours of 300-400 level communication courses or permission of instructor.

COMM 303. Introduction to Public Relations. 3 Credits.

A study of interactions within and among communication workplaces and the public. Attention is given to the media, promotions, community relations, and public information. Prerequisites: COMM 200S or permission of the instructor.

COMM 304. Advanced Public Speaking. 3 Credits.

An analysis and expression of professional speeches, delivered in public, business and special occasion contexts. Attention is given to audience analysis, library research, development of arguments/evidence as content, creation and use of professional visual aids, expression of appropriate verbal and nonverbal speech cues, speaker credibility, and extemporaneous delivery skills. Prerequisites: COMM 101R.

COMM 305. Professional Communication. 3 Credits.

An examination of both the theory and practice of communication in the professional setting. Content includes communication theory, as well as the roles of interpersonal, small group, organizational, and mass media communication as related to the workplace. A student receiving credit for COMM 305 cannot receive credit toward the Communication major for COMM 200S. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

COMM 306. Diplomatic Communication. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic elements of diplomatic communication by providing them with an overview of the language, the protocol, contact practices, and administrative policies of the Diplomatic Corps. Students will be trained in the technical aspects of diplomatic discourse from resolution writing to mission briefings, and the ever-evolving use of computers and other electronic modes of communication in carrying out government business. Prerequisites: COMM 300 or COMM 400W.

COMM 307. Understanding European Film. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with an historic overview of films from a variety of European countries. Students gain the vocabulary necessary to analyze individual films and for the comparative analysis of films from different cultural and historical contexts. The course will focus on issues such as national and individual identity, film as aesthetic form, gender and sexuality, and popular culture. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

COMM 308. Public Relations Writing. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic elements of public relations writing. Through an examination of scholarly texts, case studies and media coverage of public relations scenarios, students will develop an understanding of the crucial role that writing plays in effective public relations. Students will also be required to complete several writing assignments that relate to actual public relations scenarios. Prerequisites: COMM 303 or permission of the instructor.

COMM 314. Nonverbal Communication. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the theories, processes and effects of communication in nonverbal codes. Topics include kinesics, proxemics and paralanguage. Critical analysis and contemporary research emphasized. Prerequisites: Junior standing and COMM 200S, or permission of the instructor.

COMM 315W. Communication Between the Sexes. 3 Credits.

An overview of communication theory and research examining verbal and nonverbal communication between men and women. Topics include communication differences as a function of gender, theories that seek to explain these differences, and prescriptions for change: "the hope of androgyny." (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: Junior standing, COMM 200S, and a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, or permission of the instructor.

COMM 321. Production Management for Television and Stage. 3 Credits.

This course assists students in understanding the elements of production management both in television and on stage. The course emphasizes organizational and communication skills; technical production knowledge; professional rehearsal and performance protocol according to the rules of AEA, AFTRA and SAG as well as basic production budgeting and scheduling. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

COMM 323. Leadership and Events Management. 3 Credits.

The course covers the systematic process of organizational assessment from basic communication channels (verbal, printed, and electronic modes of communication), to interpersonal and group communication, to the management of events and staff. This course examines the importance of leadership roles within organizations in planning any event as well as the communication dynamics between management and those being supervised. Prerequisites: COMM 200S or permission of the instructor.

COMM 325. Sound Design for Stage and Camera. 3 Credits.

This class introduces the concepts and techniques of sound design and sound effects for the stage and camera. Students learn design of sound elements in both a live and recorded environment as well as learn the current equipment and software in digital sound reproduction. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

COMM 326. Foundations of Group Communication. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the study of communication in task groups. Course reviews foundational literature and emphasizes communication competencies relevant to optimizing group outcomes including group observation, participation, assessment, and leadership. Prerequisites: Junior standing and COMM 200S or permission of the instructor.

COMM 330. The Short Script. 3 Credits.

This course introduces the principles of screenwriting using the short script as a basis for the exploration. The intent of the course is to introduce concepts of format, characterization, plot, dialogue and narrative style for the short script. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

COMM 331. Argumentation and Debate. 3 Credits.

Study of the principles of argumentation; frequent practice in debating current public problems. Prerequisites: COMM 101R or permission of the instructor.

COMM 332. Making African-American Cinema. 3 Credits.

This introductory course on African-American cinema will focus on a variety of contemporary films, media clips, and video presentations concerning issues and topics that reflect the diversity within the African-American community of young adults between the ages of 18 to 25. The main goal of the class is to review historical films produced for African-Americans and utilize that data to conduct research and develop projects that represent the cultural diaspora of this audience, which is often not reflected in mainstream media, in Hollywood or major independent media outlets such as HBO or Showtime. Cross-listed with THEA 332. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

COMM 333. Persuasion. 3 Credits.

An overview of the rhetorical and social scientific theories and research about persuasion and applications in speeches and campaigns. Prerequisites: COMM 200S or permission of the instructor.

COMM 335W. Rhetorical Criticism. 3 Credits.

With the goal of being able to critique a communication event, students study a variety of rhetorical approaches that may include neo-Aristotelian, generic, feminist, metaphoric, fantasy theme, and pentadic approaches to rhetorical criticism. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: COMM 101R and a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, or permission of the instructor.

COMM 337. Model League of Arab States. 3 Credits.

A study of the basic principles of negotiation and diplomacy through the vehicle of a simulation. Students study political, economic and social issues that impact upon the Middle East, research and prepare issue positions and debate/discuss these positions in a model. Prerequisites: COMM 101R.

COMM 340. Media and Popular Culture. 3 Credits.

This course examines the basic ways in which the mass media intersect with the currents of contemporary culture. Both historical and critical approaches to the study of mass communication and popular culture trace the full implications of their mutual determination and interdependence. Prerequisites: COMM 260.

COMM 341. Lighting Design for Stage and Film. 3 Credits.

This is a production course introducing students to the world of light and shadow, mood and composition by surveying lighting design, its technologies for stage and camera, and such principles as basic electrical theory and stage/studio/location design aesthetics. Prerequisites: COMM 225/THEA 225 and COMM 271/THEA 271 or permission of instructor.

COMM 346. Screenwriting I. 3 Credits.

A course that exposes the student to the fundamental narrative screenwriting principles taught through text reading, film viewing and analysis, class discussions, and writing assignments. Prerequisites: Junior standing.

COMM 348. Acting for the Camera. 3 Credits.

This course examines the process of building characters for the camera, and the ways in which the conventions of the stage are adapted for the film or video audience. Prerequisites: THEA 152.

COMM 349. Costume Design for Stage and Camera. 3 Credits.

This course explores the design aesthetic, historical context, and contemporary impact on performance of the costume garment and its accessories. Students explore the application of design principles in a practical experience. Prerequisites: THEA 244.

COMM 351. Interpersonal Communication in Organizations. 3 Credits.

Focuses on communication theory, research, and applications of a variety of forms of communication in organizational relationships. Topics include superior-subordinate communication, interviewing, and presentations with an emphasis on a diversity of perspectives and types of organizations. Prerequisites: Junior standing and COMM 200S or permission of the instructor.

COMM 353. Animation. 3 Credits.

This is a project oriented, studio class that will focus on the art of animated storytelling from the traditional perspective of stop motion animation. Students will engage in individual research, writing, storyboarding, editing, and sound creation to produce original short animations. Crosslisted with THEA 353. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

COMM 354. Drafting and Rendering for Stage and Screen. 3 Credits.

This course is an intermediate level course designed to introduce the student to the fundementals of graphic skills necessary for the implementation of a scenic design on either the stage or in front of a lens. Techinques and skills will be demonstrated in drafting (hand and computer generated) and perspective sketching and rendering. Crosslisted with THEA 354. Prerequisites: THEA 225/COMM 225.

COMM 355. Organizational Communication. 3 Credits.

Focuses on critical analysis of theory and research organizations as functional communication systems at the individual, dyadic, small group, and organizational levels. Topics include information processing, problem solving, impression management, compliance gaining, and network analysis. Prerequisites: COMM 200S or permission of instructor.

COMM 364. Radio. 3 Credits.

Focuses on programming, station practices, ownership, and operations of radio stations in the context of past, present, and future market and regulatory restrictions. Demonstration audio tapes and station visits required. Prerequisites: COMM 260 or permission of the instructor.

COMM 365. Electronic News. 3 Credits.

Theory and techniques of preparing news for the electronic media, including evaluation of newscasts and news reports for radio, television, and cable. Electronic news on the local, national, and international levels is analyzed as an institution and as a social force. Prerequisites: COMM 260 or permission of instructor.

COMM 366. Public Journalism in the Digital Age. 3 Credits.

This course exposes students to conventional and alternative approaches to reporting in public journalism. Students use a combination of conventional and alternative approaches as they research, interview, and construct a story on a local community issue or concern. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C; ENGL 380 or ENGL 382 or COMM 260; or permission of the instructor.

COMM 367. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits.

Available for pass/fail grading only. Student participation for credit based on the academic relevance of the work experience, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and Career Development Services prior to the semester in which the work experience takes place. May be repeated for credit. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: Approval of the department and Career Development Services, in accordance with the policy for granting credit for Cooperative Education programs.

COMM 368. Internship. 3,6 Credits.

A structured work experience with or without remuneration, in a communication-related field. An ePortfolio, 150 hours of site work, plus satisfactory evaluations by supervisor and cooperating faculty member are required. Available for pass/fail grading only. Available to Communication majors and minors only. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: Approval of Departmental Internship Director prior to registration.

COMM 369. Research Practicum. 3 Credits.

A structured research experience, under the supervision of communication faculty member. A paper evaluating/analyzing the research, a log of research progress, and satisfactory evaluation by the supervising faculty are required. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: Completion of core courses and 6 hours of upper-level major courses; approval of supervising faculty and department chair prior to registration.

COMM 370. The Video Project. 3 Credits.

A studio course that presents an opportunity for the student to produce digital video content. This is a hands-on course which is organized to allow the student to experience the entire process of developing a project for the camera from scripting through filming to editing and finishing detail. Prerequisites: THEA 271 or COMM 271 and junior standing or permission of the instructor.

COMM 371. History of Animation. 3 Credits.

This course traces the evolution of the animated film worldwide, from the silent to the modern era. The purpose of the course is to provide students with a broad chronological and international overview of animated film masterworks. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

COMM 372T. Introduction to New Media Technologies. 3 Credits.

Introduction to new media practices and theories. Focuses upon the powers of composition, networked communities, information management, social networking and identification in digital environments. Students will examine practical applications such as blogging, online mapping and tagging, online collaborative work such as wikis and self composition in online social networks. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

COMM 375. Television Production. 3 Credits.

This course explores the basic process of producing television from script to presentation. Prerequisites: COMM 271 or THEA 271 or permission of the instructor.

COMM 380. Documentary Production I. 3 Credits.

This course offers the student an opportunity to explore the world of documentary filmmaking. Students will perform research to develop evidence in support of a thesis, then utilize the camera to capture a narrative story based on the thesis. Through this process, the student is better able to understand documentary filmmaking. Students will develop and deliver short documentary films by the end of the semester. Prerequisites: COMM 271 or THEA 271.

COMM 382. Reporting News for Television and Digital Media. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on writing for television news and producing online news reports. Students will strengthen their journalistic skills and learn the importance of writing clearly for a viewing audience while working under newsroom deadlines. By the end of the course, students should feel confident in producing accurate, detailed reports for television news and online news sites. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C.

COMM 383. Directing Movies. 3 Credits.

A Director provides a movie's vision. This class will help students learn how to develop and articulate that vision. It will also explore the process of casting, working with actors, and collaborating with the other principle players on a movie, such as the Cinematographer, Production Designer, and Editor. Prerequisites: THEA 271 or COMM 271.

COMM 385. Cinematography. 3 Credits.

Introduces students to cinematography. The course explores camera technique, blocking actors, lighting, and cinematography fundamentals. The concepts of the course are applied to fiction and nonfiction cinema. This is a production class. Prerequisites: THEA 271 or COMM 271.

COMM 386. Video and Audio Editing. 3 Credits.

This course will cover post-production techniques, including: video editing utilizing Avid Media Composer, audio editing utilizing ProTools, and color correction utilizing DaVinci Resolve. Students will also learn how to properly import and organize material, move it between applications, and output deliverables. Prerequisites: THEA 271 or COMM 271.

COMM 387. TV News Production. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the reporting, writing, and production aspects of a television news program. Students will learn how to create 15- and 30-minute news broadcasts by developing story ideas and news gathering. Students will also learn the intricacies of shooting and editing video along with the production process involved in recording a live news broadcast. Each student will spend time both in front of and behind the television studio cameras. The goal of this course is to produce weekly news programs worthy of broadcast on local television. Students will assume the roles of reporter, writer, producer, floor director, photojournalist, videographer, technician, and more. Prerequisites: COMM 271 or THEA 271 or COMM 382 or ENGL 382.

COMM 388. Motion Picture Aesthetics. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to develop within students a heightened and multifaceted awareness and appreciation for aesthetics of a particular type - motion picture aesthetics. Aesthetic considerations impact us intellectually, emotionally, psychologically, and viscerally. Professionals most definitely employ a language to filmmaking. One must learn the language of motion picture production and aesthetic design in order to convey concepts to their audiences. Prerequisite: COMM 270A or THEA 270A.

COMM 395. Topics in Communication. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for non-majors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors. Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of the instructor.

COMM 396. Topics in Communication. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors. Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of the instructor.

COMM 400W/500. Intercultural Communication. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce students to the study of communication in cultural contexts, the purpose of which is to prepare one to live and work within an increasingly multicultural world. This is accomplished by defining and critically analyzing concepts of culture. Throughout the semester, the course will investigate theories of culture and communication that address the development of cultural identity, intercultural communication competence, the role of verbal and nonverbal communication across cultures, the cultural composition of the U.S., and ethical communication and challenge in a globalized era. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: COMM 200S and a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, or permission of instructor.

COMM 401/501. Communication Theory. 3 Credits.

An overview of general and contextual theories of communication. Focus is on the nature of communication theory, the role of theory in communication inquiry, and the relationships among theory, research, and practice. Prerequisites: COMM 200S or permission of the instructor.

COMM 403/503. Public Relations and Crisis Communications. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the basic elements of public relations as it pertains to assisting organizations avoid, mitigate and recover from crisis situations. Students will have the opportunity to both observe and participate in crisis communications situations. Prerequisites: COMM 303 or permission of instructor.

COMM 405/505. Communication and Culture in the Middle East. 3 Credits.

The course examines the tensions between modernity and tradition in the context of Middle East culture. Cultural variables for study include myth and religion, family structures and the use of science and technology. Prerequisites: Six hours of lower-level social science course work.

COMM 407/507. Communication and Culture in Asia. 3 Credits.

Course provides theoretical models for examining the values, communication patterns and cultural perspectives of the peoples of Asia. Films, folklore, newspapers and literature from Asia are investigated. Prerequisites: Six hours of lower level social science course work.

COMM 412W/512. Interpersonal Communication Theory and Research. 3 Credits.

A survey of classic and contemporary theories and research of communication in personal and social relationships across the lifespan. Emphasizes communication as a means to facilitate conditions for development of positive relational outcomes. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: COMM 200S and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C with a grade of C or better.

COMM 421/521. Communication and Conflict Management. 3 Credits.

Focus on theory and research of communication processes in conflict episodes across social and personal relational contexts. Applications of communication approaches to conflict management emphasized. Prerequisites: Junior standing and COMM 200S or permission of the instructor.

COMM 422. Listening to Self, Others, Nature and the Divine. 3 Credits.

The listening course introduces students to: 1) Practices for exploring and developing listening competencies, 2) Theoretical perspectives and models of listening, and 3) Research on listening. Practice, theory, and research are all integrated across the contexts of self, others, nature, and the divine. Prerequisite: Junior Standing.

COMM 423/523. Nonviolent Communication and Peace. 3 Credits.

Perspectives on nonviolent communication and peace are covered from the micro level (e.g., individual beliefs and worldviews) to interpersonal relationships (e.g., conflict management), groups (e.g., tribes, gangs), organizational systems (e.g., businesses, governments), and macro or global level (e.g., political relationships between nations). Prerequisites: Junior standing.

COMM 425/525. Family Communication Theory and Research. 3 Credits.

A survey of classic and contemporary theories and research of communication in family units, family relationships, and family interfacings with society. The course emphasizes communication in the social construction of evolving 'family' realities as well as communication as means to facilitate conditions for development of positive domestic outcomes. Prerequisites: Junior standing and COMM 200S or permission of the instructor.

COMM 426. Group Communication Theory and Research. 3 Credits.

A survey of classic and contemporary theories and research of communication in task groups as well as the interconnections of task groups with societal institutions such as the family, government, and health care. Communication factors that facilitate conditions for creating and maintaining optimally functioning groups are emphasized. Prerequisites: COMM 200S and COMM 326.

COMM 427/527. Children's Communication Theory and Research. 3 Credits.

A survey of theories and research of communication during childhood. Emphasis is on children as developing communicators, their relationships, and their interactions with media. Factors affecting optimal development of children's communication and development of applications to enhance children's communication development are emphasized. Prerequisites: COMM 200S or permission of instructor.

COMM 434/534. African-American Rhetoric Voices of Liberation. 3 Credits.

With the goals of examining the rhetorical strategies and their historical context, students will study and critique original speeches and various forms of discourse by African-American speakers. Prerequisites: COMM 200S or permission of the instructor.

COMM 441. The Music Industry and Communication. 3 Credits.

This course will seek to better understand the music industry. To do this, the organization and operation of the modern music industry will be examined. Issues of publishing, copyright and intellectual property and technology will also be examined. Prerequisites: COMM 260 or permission of instructor.

COMM 443/543. Hispanic Film. 3 Credits.

A topical study of the major works of Spanish and Latin American film from Buneul to the present. The course will explore many issues, including those related to gender, race, symbolism, and class struggle. Prerequisites: COMM 270A or THEA 270A or permission of the instructor.

COMM 444/544. German Cinema. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the German cinema from perspectives such as fascism and its legacy, film as historical critique, and Weimar cinema. Prerequisites: COMM 270A or permission of the instructor.

COMM 445/545. Communication Analysis and Criticism. 3 Credits.

A survey of the key methods used in critiquing various forms of human and mediated communication for the purpose of becoming more discerning consumers of public and mass mediated messages. Analysis will include films, television, and radio programs, advertisements, newspapers, public discourses, speeches, and conversations. Prerequisites: COMM 200S or permission of the instructor.

COMM 446. Directing for the Camera. 3 Credits.

This course seeks to provide students with fundamental principles and practical techniques of directing the narrative fiction film: script development and analysis, production planning, shot composition and framing, and working with actors and crew. Prerequisites: COMM 271 or THEA 271 and COMM 370 or THEA 370.

COMM 447W/547. Electronic Media Law and Policy. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on legal and policy issues related to modern media systems and technologies, with an emphasis on legal considerations of electronic media. Topics include First Amendment issues concerning news, programming, and advertising; station licensing; and challenges to traditional legal thought brought about by new technologies. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: COMM 260 and a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, or permission of the instructor.

COMM 448/548. Transnational Media Systems. 3 Credits.

An examination of the rise of broadcast technology and world flow of information and entertainment. Theory and policy issues of systems of broadcast ownership, access, regulation, programming, transborder, broadcasting and cultural imperialism and dominance of Western programming will be addressed. Prerequisites: COMM 260 or permission of the instructor.

COMM 453. Voice Over. 3 Credits.

This course is for students who are interested in the field of voice over for commercials, narration, industrials, animation, Internet, and gaming. Students will practice voicing copy using acting techniques, vocal techniques, building characters, and analyzing copy. Students will learn to select, edit and prepare copy for a future demo and learn to perform cold voice over auditions. This is a performance-oriented course that is a workout session each day. Crosslisted with THEA 453. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

COMM 455/555. Critical Analysis of Journalism. 3 Credits.

A critical examination of the news industry as practiced in the printed press, network and cable television, magazines, the Internet, and alternative press. Class examines the political economy of journalism, the sociology of journalistic practice, international news flows, ideological/political control of news, and mythological narrative forms within news. Prerequisites: COMM 260 or permission of instructor.

COMM 456/556. Organizations and Social Influence. 3 Credits.

Focuses on theories, research and applications of the social influence function of communication in a variety of organizational contexts. Examines traditional and nontraditional social influence theories and research as applied to organizational change. Prerequisites: COMM 333 or COMM 355 or permission of the instructor.

COMM 465/565. Mass Media and the National Elections. 3 Credits.

Focuses on use of media in presidential elections from 1952 to the present. Topics include image creation and management, and the relationship between media and voting behavior. Prerequisites: COMM 260, junior standing, or permission of the instructor.

COMM 467/567. Media, Politics and Civic Engagement. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the ways in which citizens develop knowledge of, engage with, and practice politics through mass media and personal media forms. Students examine historical and contemporary practices of civic engagement and political organizing via media such as the alternative press, talk radio, rebel radio, letters-to-the-editor, the Internet, cinematic representations, public access television, and others. Students seek to understand the power available to citizens for political engagement via mediated communication forms. Prerequisites: COMM 260 or permission of instructor.

COMM 468/568. Communication and Political Symbolism. 3 Credits.

The persistent communication and display of symbols and rituals of political meaning are central to how political power is built and legitimately exercised. This course examines such symbols and rituals by focusing on public rituals such as elections, the State of the Union address, and wars; political symbols such as the American and Confederate flag, Statue of Liberty, and television news; and institutions and practices related to public memory, such as war memorials, historical reenactments, museum and theme park displays, and firm narratives. Prerequisites: COMM 260 or permission of instructor.

COMM 469. Communication Education Practicum. 3 Credits.

An examination of communication education theory and methodology via structured experiences and readings. Students taking this course serve as teaching assistants for COMM 200S, which serves as a lab for practicing skills and techniques. Prerequisites: Completion of core courses and 6 hours of upper-level major courses, and approval of supervising faculty and department chair.

COMM 471W/571. International Film History. 3 Credits.

An examination of world cinema as a technology, a business, an institution, and an art form from its inception to the present. Emphasis is on the narrative fiction film, its technological and aesthetic development, economic organization, and socio-cultural context. Representative classic and contemporary works will be screened and analyzed. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: COMM 270A or THEA 270A, a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, and junior standing or permission of the instructor.

COMM 472/572. New Media Topics: Theories and Practices. 3 Credits.

This upper-division seminar investigates one or two particular emergent new media practices and theories. The topics will be chosen at the discretion of the instructor but may include issues such as "mobile media," "micro media and audiences," and "social media." Prerequisites: COMM 372T or permission of the instructor.

COMM 473/573. Television and Society. 3 Credits.

The role of television in the cultural, psychological, and economic life of America. The structure and design of television programs; and the history and function of television in reinforcing or altering public perceptions of ideas, events, and people. Major critical approaches are employed in examining television's social impact and global reach. Prerequisites: Junior standing and COMM 260.

COMM 478/578. Principles of Media Marketing and Promotion. 3 Credits.

Course introduces students to the ways in which different media forms are used for advertising and marketing purposes. Emphasis is on electronic media, though other approaches, such as direct marketing techniques and the increasing use of new media technologies for marketing, are also examined. Prerequisites: Junior standing and COMM 260 or permission of the instructor.

COMM 479W/579. American Film History. 3 Credits.

An examination of American motion pictures as an art form, a business and an institution from inception to the present. Primary attention is accorded to the narrative fiction film, its aesthetic and technological development, economic organization and social impact. This course highlights the many connections between film history and American culture. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: COMM 270A or THEA 270A, a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, and junior standing or permission of the instructor.

COMM 480/580. Documentary Production II. 3 Credits.

Students will continue the work performed in COMM 380 with more advanced proposals, research, and production work. Prerequisites: COMM 380 or THEA 380.

COMM 481/581. The Documentary Tradition. 3 Credits.

An in-depth investigation of the history and theory of the documentary tradition in film, television, and radio. Examining both American and international examples, the course will look at major schools, movements, goals, and styles of documentary production. Representative texts will be studied for their socio-political influences, persuasive techniques, and aesthetic formulas. Prerequisites: COMM 260 or permission of instructor.

COMM 482. Screenwriting II. 3 Credits.

Students explore visual storytelling through the theories guiding character development, narrative construction, thematic layers, scene analysis, and many more. Students participate in a variety of critical and writing exercises to enhance their knowledge of the craft of screenwriting. Prerequisites: COMM 346 or THEA 346.

COMM 483. Advanced Video Project. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the processes and techniques of a narrative film production. Students experience pre-production, production, and post-production phases in creating a product to be entered in regional and national competitions. Prerequisites: COMM 370 or THEA 370.

COMM 485/585. Film and Television Genres. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to examine the conventions and meanings of various film and television genres within their broader aesthetic, socio-historical, cultural, and political contexts. Each time the class is offered it will focus in depth on a different genre, such as the gangster, the Western, the musical, the comedy, science fiction, among others. Class may be repeated for credit as long as the genres are different. Prerequisites: COMM 270A or THEA 270A or COMM 260.

COMM 486/586. Advanced Filmmaking. 3 Credits.

This course offers students an opportunity to collaborate on a project beyond the scope of previous classroom projects. Students will execute an assigned duty for the duration of the semester. Prerequisites: three of the following: COMM 346 or THEA 346, COMM 383 or THEA 383, COMM 385 or THEA 385, and COMM 386 or THEA 386.

COMM 487. Advanced TV News Production. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide students with advanced instruction in reporting, writing, and production for a television news program. Students will take on important roles in 15- and 30-minute news broadcasts and refine their skills in shooting and editing video. The goal of this course is to produce weekly news programs worthy of broadcast on local television. Students will receive significant experience in front of the camera as news, sports, and entertainment anchors/reporters as well as leadership positions in the television studio during the live broadcasts. Prerequisites: COMM 387, THEA 387 or ENGL 387.

COMM 495/595. Topics in Communication. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors. Prerequisites: Appropriate survey course or permission of the instructor.

COMM 496/596. Topics in Communication. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors. Prerequisites: Appropriate survey course or permission of the instructor.

COMM 497/597. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Communication. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the department chair.

COMM 498/598. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Communication. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the department chair.

COMM 500. Intercultural Communication. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce students to the study of communication in cultural contexts, the purpose of which is to prepare students to live and work within an increasingly multicultural world. This is accomplished by first defining and critically analyzing concepts of culture. Throughout the semester, the course will investigate theories of culture and communication that address the development of cultural identity, intercultural communication competence, the role of verbal and nonverbal communication across cultures, the cultural composition of the U.S., and finally ethical communication and challenges in a globalized era. (This is a writing intensive course.).

COMM 501. Communication Theory. 3 Credits.

An overview of general and contextual theories of communication. Focus is on the nature of communication theory, the role of theory in communication inquiry, and the relationships among theory, research, and practice.

COMM 503. Public Relations and Crisis Communications. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the basic elements of public relations as it pertains to assisting organizations avoid, mitigate and recover from crisis situations. Students will have the opportunity to both observe and participate in crisis communications situations.

COMM 505. Communication and Culture in the Middle East. 3 Credits.

The course examines the tensions between modernity and tradition in the context of Middle East culture. Cultural variables for study include myth and religion, family structures and the use of science and technology.

COMM 507. Communication and Culture in Asia. 3 Credits.

This course provides theoretical models for examining the values, communication patterns and cultural perspectives of the peoples of Asia. Films, folklore, newspapers and literature from Asia are investigated.

COMM 512. Interpersonal Communication Theory and Research. 3 Credits.

A survey of classic and contemporary theories and research of communication in personal and social relationships across the lifespan. Emphasizes communication as a means to facilitate conditions for development of positive relational outcomes. (This is a writing intensive course.).

COMM 521. Communication and Conflict Management. 3 Credits.

Focus on theory and research of communication processes in conflict episodes across social and personal relational contexts. Applications of communication approaches to conflict management are emphasized.

COMM 523. Nonviolent Communication and Peace. 3 Credits.

Perspectives on nonviolent communication and peace are covered from the micro level (e.g., individual beliefs and worldviews) to interpersonal relationships (e.g., conflict management), groups (e.g., tribes, gangs), organizational systems (e.g., businesses, governments), and macro or global level (e.g., political relationships between nations).

COMM 525. Family Communication Theory and Research. 3 Credits.

A survey of classic and contemporary theories and research of communication in family units, family relationships, and family interfacings with society. The course emphasizes communication in the social construction of evolving “family” realities as well as communication as means to facilitate conditions for development of positive domestic outcomes.

COMM 527. Children's Communication Theory and Research. 3 Credits.

A survey of theories and research of communication during childhood. Emphasis is on children as developing communicators, their relationships, and their interactions with media. Factors affecting optimal development of children’s communication and development of applications to enhance children’s communication development are emphasized.

COMM 534. African-American Rhetoric Voices of Liberation. 3 Credits.

With the goals of examining the rhetorical strategies and their historical context, students will study and critique original speeches and various forms of discourse by African-American speakers.

COMM 543. Hispanic Film. 3 Credits.

A topical study of the major works of Spanish and Latin American film from Buneul to the present. The course explores many issues, including those related to gender, race, symbolism, and class struggle. Prerequisites: COMM 270A or THEA 270A or permission of instructor.

COMM 544. German Cinema. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the German cinema from perspectives such as fascism and its legacy, film as historical critique, and Weimar cinema.

COMM 545. Communication Analysis and Criticism. 3 Credits.

A survey of the key methods used in critiquing various forms of human and mediated communication for the purpose of becoming more discerning consumers of public and mass mediated messages. Analysis will include films, television, and radio programs, advertisements, newspapers, public discourses, speeches, and conversations.

COMM 547. Electronic Media Law and Policy. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on legal and policy issues related to modern media systems and technologies, with an emphasis on legal considerations of electronic media. Subjects include First Amendment issues concerning news, programming, and advertising; station licensing; and challenges to traditional legal thought brought about by new technologies.

COMM 548. Transnational Media Systems. 3 Credits.

An examination of the rise of broadcast technology and world flow of information and entertainment. Theory and policy issues of systems of broadcast ownership, access, regulation, programming, transborder, broadcasting and cultural imperialism and dominance of Western programming will be addressed.

COMM 555. Critical Analysis of Journalism. 3 Credits.

A critical examination of the news industry as practiced in the printed press, network and cable television, magazines, the Internet, and alternative press. Class examines the political economy of journalism, the sociology of journalistic practice, international news flows, ideological/political control of news, and mythological narrative forms within news.

COMM 556. Organizations and Social Influence. 3 Credits.

Focuses on theories, research and applications of the social influence function of communication in a variety of organizational contexts. Examines traditional and nontraditional social influence theories and research as applied to organizational change.

COMM 565. Mass Media and the National Elections. 3 Credits.

Focuses on use of media in presidential elections from 1952 to the present. Topics include image creation and management, and the relationship between media and voting behavior.

COMM 567. Media, Politics and Civic Engagement. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the ways in which citizens develop knowledge of, engage with, and practice politics through mass media and personal media forms. Students examine historical and contemporary practices of civic engagement and political organizing via media such as the alternative press, talk radio, rebel radio, letters-to-the-editor, the Internet, cinematic representations, public access television, and others. Students seek to understand the power available to citizens for political engagement via mediated communication forms.

COMM 568. Communication and Political Symbolism. 3 Credits.

The persistent communication and display of symbols and rituals of political meaning are central to how political power is built and legitimately exercised. This course examines such symbols and rituals by focusing on public rituals such as elections, the State of the Union address, and wars; political symbols such as the American and Confederate flag, Statue of Liberty, and television news; and institutions and practices related to public memory, such as war memorials, historical reenactments, museum and theme park displays, and firm narratives.

COMM 571. International Film History. 3 Credits.

An examination of world cinema as a technology, a business, an institution, and an art form from inception to the present. Emphasis is on the narrative fiction film, its technological and aesthetic development, economic organization, and socio-cultural context. Representative classic and contemporary works will be screened and analyzed.

COMM 572. New Media Topics: Theories and Practices. 3 Credits.

This seminar investigates one or two particular emergent new media practices and theories. The topics will be chosen at the discretion of the instructor but may include issues such as “mobile media,” “micro media and audiences,” and “social media.”.

COMM 573. Television and Society. 3 Credits.

The role of television in the cultural, psychological, and economic life of America. The structure and design of television programs; and the history and function of television in reinforcing or altering public perceptions of ideas, events, and people. Major critical approaches are employed in examining television's social impact and global reach.

COMM 578. Principles of Media Marketing and Promotion. 3 Credits.

Course introduces students to the ways in which different media forms are used for advertising and marketing purposes. Emphasis is on electronic media, though other approaches, such as direct marketing techniques and the increasing use of new media technologies for marketing, are also examined.

COMM 579. American Film History. 3 Credits.

An examination of American motion pictures as an art form, a business and an institution from inception to the present. Primary attention is accorded to the narrative fiction film, its technological and aesthetic development, economic organization and social impact. This course highlights the many connections between film history and American culture.

COMM 580. The Video Documentary II. 3 Credits.

Discussion/presentation topics range from production field work to post-production editing. The final third of the semester will be devoted to compiling the rough footage in post production.

COMM 581. The Documentary Tradition. 3 Credits.

An in-depth investigation of the history and theory of the documentary tradition in film, television, and radio. Examining both American and international examples, the course looks at major schools, movements, goals, and styles of documentary production. Representative texts will be studied for their socio-political influences, persuasive techniques, and aesthetic formulas.

COMM 585. Film and Television Genres. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to examine the conventions and meanings of various film and television genres within their broader aesthetic, socio-historical, cultural, and political contexts. Each time the class is offered it will focus in depth on a different genre, such as the gangster, the Western, the musical, the comedy, science fiction, among others. Class may be repeated for credit as long as the genres are different.

COMM 586. Advanced Filmmaking. 3 Credits.

This course offers students an opportunity to collaborate on a project beyond the scope of previous classroom projects. Students will execute an assigned duty for the duration of the semester. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

COMM 595. Topics in Communication. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors.

COMM 596. Topics in Communication. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors.

COMM 597. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Communication. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate.

COMM 598. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Communication. 3 Credits.

Topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate.

COMM 600. Intercultural Communication: History, Theory and Application. 3 Credits.

Students begin with an overview and then cover (1) past intercultural communication research, (2) the philosophical underpinning and ethics behind intercultural communication research, and (3) current developments in intercultural communication theory. They then address the application of intercultural communication theory in specific intercultural communication contexts (e.g. business, education, health and international travel).

COMM 601. Lifespan Communication Research and Theory. 3 Credits.

This course takes a developmental approach to the study of communication by exploring the culminating effects of communication as it evolves across our lifetime. It encompasses all phases of life (birth-death) across interactions within family, work, social, health, and spiritual contexts. The focus is on foundational and contemporary lifespan theories and research.

COMM 602. Digital Communication Theory and Research. 3 Credits.

This class looks at emerging theories of new media and their transformative effects on industrial practices, news dissemination, cultural production, social interaction, and political engagement across the lifespan. Students engage in ongoing theoretical debates and participate in various online endeavors that offer real world research opportunities.

COMM 603. Social Change and Communication Systems. 3 Credits.

Examines the role of various communication systems in enacting social change involving commercial, governmental and not-for-profit contexts. Topics include persuasive techniques, community engagement, mobilizing large-scale social movements, and the political consequences of human and digital communication across the lifespan.

COMM 604. Lifespan Communication Research Methods. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 601. An overview of social scientific and qualitative methods used in lifespan development communication research. Includes survey, experiment, observations, content and conversation analyses with an emphasis on developmental methods. Approaches to studying communication of children, adolescents, and later life are included.

COMM 605. Critical Methods and Digital Communication. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 602. This class surveys the major methodological approaches available to critical communication researchers, such as semiology, structuralism, post-structuralism, neo-Marxism, and psychoanalysis, among others, within a cultural studies tradition. Special attention is paid to various digital communication technologies and how they are utilized throughout the lifespan.

COMM 607. Framing Theory. 3 Credits.

This course will investigate extant scholarship in framing theory and examine some real world applications of framing theory through case studies of how journalists cover news and the ways that “brand managers” position products and institutions.

COMM 615. Construction of the Gendered Body. 3 Credits.

This course will examine: (1) the nature-nurture controversy as reflected in current theories about gender as a significant factor in the transformation of physical bodies into social bodies, (2) cultural objects and institutions that shape our gender roles and expectations, and (3) nonverbal language and power and the status of the sexes.

COMM 623. Relational Communication Across the Lifespan. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. This course explores theories and research of communication in everyday relationships across the lifespan from early childhood relationships until relationships at the end of life. Communication in personal and social relationships, within age cohorts (early childhood, adolescence, adulthood) are highlighted.

COMM 624. Positive Communication Across the Lifespan. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. This course examines communication theories and research in light of the theories and research of positive psychology. Topics include: strengths-based communication theorizing, communication and happiness, positive communication functions, creative communication, and positive communication outcomes (health, wellness, peace, hope).

COMM 626. Lifespan Communication, Geography, and Food. 3 Credits.

This course examines the intersections of communication, geography, and food from lifespan and global perspectives. Topics to be covered include communication and cooking; dinner table talk; food and folk culture; victual rituals; the portrayals of food in media (e.g., film, television, CMC, print); the roles of race, class, and gender in food production/consumption; the commercialization of food; fast food and slow food; globalization vs. the 'locavore' movement; visualization and symbolic communication about food and nutrition; and market and supermarket geographies.

COMM 628. Mediated Human Communication in the Digital Age. 3 Credits.

This course conceptualizes the relationship established by the processes of human communication that are mediated by new media technologies. The course examines how such technologies affect social relationships, and how cultural values influence usage patterns of these technologies.

COMM 630. The Information Society. 3 Credits.

This course explores the theories, questions, claims and myths that have accompanied the rise of new communication technologies and electronically derived digital information that define the 'Electronic Revolution,' also known as the Information Society.

COMM 640. Television and Politics. 3 Credits.

This class closely examines television's role in shaping and reflecting contemporary American political culture, the conduct of foreign policy, and formal political processes, such as elections.

COMM 650. Religious Communication. 3 Credits.

The seminar surveys the relationship between communication and religion with an emphasis on theory, research and applications. Topics may include the communication of religious beliefs/values via story, ritual, ceremony, worship, prayer and mediated communications.

COMM 668. Internship. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 601 or COMM 602. A structured work experience providing both a conceptual understanding and on-the-job training in some aspect of lifespan and digital communication. A journal, a final paper, a log of hours, a portfolio of work, and a satisfactory evaluation by wok supervisor and cooperating faculty member are required.

COMM 672. New Communications Media and Social Development. 3 Credits.

Course explores the interaction between media technology deployment and social development in nations and sub-national groups. Special emphasis is placed on the paradigm of “networks” in both societies and technologies.

COMM 673. Television Histories as Collective Memory. 3 Credits.

This seminar explores the parameters and implications of “television as historian,” examines the general nature of this widespread phenomenon, and analyzes mass mediated versions of the past and how and why they were constructed.

COMM 675. Television in the Digital Era. 3 Credits.

This course examines the reinvention of television during the Digital Era (approximately 1995-Present). It identifies and analyzes the transformation of TV as a convergent technology, a viable art form, a global industry, a social catalyst, and a complex and dynamic reflection of the many audiences across the lifespan it reaches around the world.

COMM 678. Race and Television. 3 Credits.

This course examines the relationships among race, racial identity, and television. Multiple scholarly traditions are used to examine the interactions among television tests, audiences and institution, and historical and contemporary race relations.

COMM 685. Lifespan and Digital Communication Capstone Course. 3 Credits.

This is the capstone seminar for non-thesis students in their final semester to synthesize the relationships between lifespan and digital communication. Students will develop and complete a research paper or a digital communication project. Prerequisites: COMM 601, COMM 602, COMM 603, COMM 604, and COMM 605; permission of graduate program director.

COMM 689. Thesis Preparation. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 601, COMM 602, COMM 603, COMM 604, and COMM 605. This course is intended for students in the Master of Arts in Lifespan and Digital Communication program who choose the thesis option. Course topics include: developing a thesis proposal, thesis rules and regulations, the thesis committee, presenting and defending a thesis proposal, and acquiring the essential tools needed to write and successfully defend an MA thesis.

COMM 695. Topics in Communication. 1-3 Credits.

The study of selected topics designed to permit qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest in a seminar format which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly.

COMM 697. Tutorial in Special Topics in Communication. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study of a topic under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Permission of the department chair.

COMM 698. Thesis Research. 3 Credits.

This course is intended for students in the Master of Arts in Lifespan and Digital Communication program who choose the thesis option. During the time a student is working on the MA thesis they must be enrolled in COMM 698, followed by COMM 699. Pre- or corequisite: COMM 689.

COMM 699. Thesis. 3 Credits.

This course is intended for students in the Master of Arts in Lifespan and Digital Communication program who choose the thesis option. During the time a student is working on the MA thesis they must be enrolled in COMM 698 followed by COMM 699.

COMM 725. Interpersonal Health Communication. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide an overview of contemporary scholarship on phenomena within the scope of interpersonal health communication. Students will become familiar with fundamental communication processes that are involved in managing physical and mental health. Additionally, they will develop an awareness of how communication among friends, family members, professionals, and others influences people's well-being, and how, in turn, health and illness shape communication and relationship dynamics. Topics to be covered include patient identity and self-disclosure, social support, patient-provider communication, end-of-life care, and health education. Consistent with the goals of graduate education, students are expected to engage with the course content, exercise critical thinking skills, develop advanced reading and writing competencies, and develop a sense of practical applications of theory and research.

COMM 795. Selected Topics in Communication Studies. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics in communication studies will be covered in such a way as to permit small groups of qualified students to study subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

COMM 797. Independent Research in Communication Studies. 1-3 Credits.

Independent research directed by professors/faculty members examining communication topics. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

COMM 895. Selected Topics in Communication Studies. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics in communication studies are covered in such a way as to permit small groups of qualified students to study subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

COMM 897. Independent Research in Communication Studies. 1-3 Credits.

Independent research directed by professors/faculty members examining communication topics. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

COMM 998. Master's Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course for master’s students in their final semester. It may be taken to fulfill the registration requirement necessary for graduation. All master’s students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour in the semester of their graduation.