Office of the University Registrar

The Office of the University Registrar provides a wide variety of student services, including registration, verification of enrollment, maintenance of student records and academic history, transcripts, degree certification and diplomas. A calendar of important dates, the examination schedule, and information about various policies and procedures is available at http://www.odu.edu/registrar.

The Office of the University Registrar also is responsible for determining in-state tuition status, athletic eligibility and registration of students enrolling through the Virginia Tidewater Consortium and the Interinstitutional Study Program with Norfolk State University.

Finally, the Office of the University Registrar provides service to military veterans who are attending the University by processing Veterans Affairs paperwork. Complete information is available to veterans on the Registrar’s Office website as well as on the Veterans Administration website http://www.gibill.va.gov/.

Self-service is available for most processes online at https://my.odu.edu. On the Norfolk campus, walk-up services are available at the office in 1009 Rollins Hall. Additionally, many services are available at the higher education centers and the distance learning sites located throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia. The office is open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. and can be reached at 757-683-4425.

Academic Calendar and Course Scheduling

The academic calendar includes the fall and spring semesters, as well as a summer and winter term. The fall semester begins one or two weeks prior to Labor Day Weekend and ends 16 weeks later. Classes will be held on Saturday and Sunday of Labor Day weekend, but classes are canceled for the Labor Day holiday. A Fall Break is scheduled for mid-October (Columbus Day Weekend) and runs from Saturday through Tuesday of that weekend. Thanksgiving break begins after classes on Tuesday prior to the holiday, and classes resume on the following Monday. Commencement is scheduled on the Saturday after exams have been administered.

Spring semester includes a Winter term that begins after fall commencement and ends before spring semester classes begin.

Spring semester begins one week prior to the Martin Luther King (MLK) holiday weekend. Classes are canceled for MLK weekend (Saturday-Monday) and resume on Tuesday following the holiday. Spring Break is scheduled eight weeks after the start of classes, from Monday through Saturday. Classes resume on the following Sunday and continue until Monday of week 15 into the semester.  A reading day is held the Tuesday after classes end, with exams beginning on Wednesday and continuing to the following Wednesday. Commencement is scheduled on the Friday and Saturday after exams have been administered; Saturday is the degree conferral date.

Summer term includes a three-week Maymester, along with one 12-week and two six-week sessions.

Note: Asynchronous courses may or may not follow these terms. The University will determine the duration of each course, and students may opt for self-paced study when enrolling in this online format.

Authorization to Enroll in Graduate Courses

Degree Seeking Students

All students who have been admitted in regular or provisional status to graduate degree programs must have the advisor block updated prior to registration each semester. Students should consult with their advisors to discuss their program of study and to schedule appropriate courses in advance of registration whenever possible.

Nondegree Seeking Students

Nondegree graduate students should seek advice from the department/school offering the course, or, if registering for engineering or business courses, obtain permission of the department/school.

All nondegree graduate students who have completed six credit hours of graduate courses will receive an “advisory” notice upon attempting to register for additional graduate courses. This notice will advise the student to contact The Graduate School to obtain counseling and recommendations. This “advisory” notice will not prevent registration.

All nondegree graduate students who have completed or will exceed 12 credit hours will be blocked from registering or attempting to register for additional graduate courses. To remove this registration block, a student must contact The Graduate School for advice on gaining admission into a graduate program or to receive written permission to take additional hours as a nondegree student.

Students taking graduate courses for licensure, certification or professional development (e.g., Virginia Department of Education “endorsements”) will not receive the advisory notice and will be exempt from the registration block. Contact the department offering the program for specific registration information and procedures.

Students should consult the Registrar’s Office website at http://www.odu.edu/registrar each semester for the most current advising and registration policies.

Audit Status

The audit grading status is available for students who would like to enroll in a course for the knowledge gained or personal satisfaction, not for academic credit. Any course that is elected to be carried as an audit will be subject to the normal fees and regulations of the University. Regular attendance is expected, but neither tests nor examinations are required. No grade will be recorded, except that an instructor may assign a grade of W& to a student who misses an appreciable portion of the classes. The student’s record will be marked “audit” by the course so elected. A student may not audit a course and subsequently seek advanced placement credit for the same course. A student may audit a course and register for the same course for credit in a subsequent semester. Registration for the audit option must be selected by the end of the drop/add period in the given semester. Any course elected for audit cannot be changed to that of credit status after the end of the “add” registration period. Students receiving financial aid should be aware that registering for audit status may affect their financial aid eligibility. Selection of the audit status is accomplished through the normal registration procedures.

Graduate Numbering (Graduate Level)

Courses at the 500, 600, 700, and 800 levels are generally for graduate credit.

Courses at the 500 level are cross-listed to undergraduate 400-level courses, with a separate syllabus and additional work and higher-level outcomes are required for 500-level courses. Except in cases where topical content changes by each semester, cross-listed courses taken previously at the 400 level may not be retaken at the 500 level. A limited number of 500-level courses may be used to satisfy the requirements for a master’s degree, education specialist degree, or a doctoral degree.

Courses at the 600 level form the core of master's programs, including those taken in connection with a thesis, and they are not cross-listed with numbers at other levels.  A limited number of 600-level courses may be used to satisfy requirements for an education specialist degree or a doctoral degree.

700- and 800-level courses are generally, but not always, cross-listed. 700-level courses are reserved for master’s students, and 800-level courses are for education specialist and doctoral students. When 700- and 800-level courses are cross-listed, a separate syllabus and additional work and higher level outcomes are required for 800-level courses.  Except in cases where topical content changes, cross-listed courses taken previously at the 700 level may not be retaken at the 800 level.

Cooperative Education course numbers are generally 667 and 867.

Internship course numbers are generally 668 and 868.

Practicum course numbers are generally 669 and 869.

Seminar, Colloquium, and Capstone course numbers include 690, 691, 692, 693, 790, 791, 792, 793, 890, 891, 892, and 893.

Topics course numbers include 595, 596, 695, 696, 795, 796, 895, and 896. These numbers are generally to be used to designate topics courses taught as a class. The course title should be modified to include the particular topic for that semester when the course is scheduled. If a particular topic is offered more than three times, it should be submitted for approval as a regular course offering and assigned a course number.

Individual and Tutorial course numbers include 597, 697, 797, and 897. These numbers are generally to be used to designate courses involving individual or tutorial study within a discipline. These individually arranged courses will require prior approval by the department chair and/or instructor.

Research/Project course numbers are generally 698 for the master’s level and 898 for the doctoral level.

The Thesis course number is 699 and is reserved for the master’s thesis.

The Dissertation course number is 899 and is reserved for doctoral dissertation courses.

The Continuous Enrollment course number 999 is available for the purpose of maintaining active status at the doctoral level. This may be a discipline-specific 999 course or GRAD 999.

The Continuous Enrollment course number 998 is available for the purpose of maintaining active status at the master's level.  This may be a discipline-specific 998 course or GRAD 998.

System of Grading

Grade Grade Points Undergraduate Graduate
A 4.00 Superior Excellent
A- 3.70 Superior Excellent
B+ 3.30 Good Good
B 3.00 Good Good
B- 2.70 Good Fair
C+ 2.30 Satisfactory Poor
C 2.00 Satisfactory Poor
C- 1.70 Passing Poor
D+ 1.30 Passing Not Used
D 1.00 Passing Not Used
D- 0.70 Passing Not Used
F 0.00 Failing Unsatisfactory
WF 0.00 Unofficial Withdrawal Unofficial Withdrawal
P None Pass
F (P/F) None Fail
O None Audit
I None Incomplete
II None Incomplete not Subject to Time Limit
W None Official Withdrawal
Q None Progress but not Proficiency
Z None No Grade Reported

The use of plus and minus grades is at the discretion of the instructor.

The grade point average is calculated by dividing the accumulated number of grade points earned by the accumulated number of credit hours attempted. Grades of F and WF and repeats are included, but official withdrawals, audits, and grades on noncredit courses, nondegree credit courses, and pass/fail degree courses are not included.

For graduation, an undergraduate student must have a minimum grade average of C (grade point average of 2.00) in all courses taken and a grade point average of at least 2.00 in the major except for those programs requiring grade point averages above a 2.00.

A 3.00 average will be required for the awarding of a graduate degree or certificate. A student whose average falls below 3.00 following six or more graduate hours attempted shall be placed on probation or suspended in accordance with the continuance regulations for graduate students.

Grades in courses accepted for transfer credit are not counted in the computation of grade point averages.

Grades are available to students through the secure website. Grades are mailed to students only if a written request is submitted to the Office of the University Registrar.

WF and W Grades. The grades of WF and W indicate withdrawal from a course only under those conditions described in the sections entitled Class Schedule Change Procedure and Grading Policy for Withdrawal From Classes.

Incomplete Grades. A grade of I indicates assigned work yet to be completed in a given course or absence from the final examination and is assigned only upon instructor approval of a student request. The I grade may be awarded only in exceptional circumstances beyond the student’s control, such as illness, and only after 80% of the time allocated for the course has elapsed and substantial progress has been made toward completion of course requirements with the exception of courses that do not fit within the traditional semester calendar. In cases of exceptional circumstances beyond the student’s control, it is the responsibility of the student to approach the instructor to request an I grade and to provide documentation, including a written statement of when the work will be completed, to support the request. The authority to award an I grade rests with the instructor whose decision is final. Students whose requests for I grades are approved must not re-register for the class until the I grade has been resolved. The I grade becomes an F if not removed through the last day of classes of the following term (excluding the exam period) according to the following schedule: I grades from the fall semester become F’s if not removed by the last day of classes of the spring semester; I grades from the spring semester and the summer session become F’s if not removed by the last day of classes of the fall semester. An I grade may be changed to a W only in very unusual circumstances and when the student’s situation has changed since the I grade was awarded. In these cases, the request for a change to a W must be in writing, documented, and approved by the instructor, department chair and dean. Students will not be allowed to graduate until all grades of I have been resolved.

In the case of courses that do not fit within the traditional semester calendar, the faculty member assigns the I grade. The time periods for the removal of I grades before they become grades of F are the same as those stated in the previous paragraph.

Extension of the I time limitation normally will not be approved except for reasons beyond the student’s control and only if the supervising faculty member is available and willing to supervise the work beyond the normal time limit. Students should submit the request to the instructor, who should submit approval, via the chair, to the University Registrar in order to retain the I. The approval from the instructor should designate the expiration date of the extension.

A grade of II indicates incomplete work not subject to the time limits described above for I grades. The II grade can be used only in those courses directly related to the research for and preparation of the graduate thesis/dissertation.

Z Grades. A grade of Z indicates that no grade has been reported by the instructor and will convert to a grade of F if not removed through the last day of classes of the following term (excluding the exam period) according to the following schedule: Z grades from the fall semester become F’s if not removed by the last day of classes of the spring semester; Z grades from the spring semester and the summer session become F’s if not removed by the last day of classes of the fall semester. Students will not be allowed to graduate until all grades of Z have been resolved.

Interim Academic Evaluation. Faculty teaching 100- and 200-level undergraduate courses will provide specific feedback regarding progress in the course by posting an interim grade via Leo Online by the beginning of the fifth week of classes in the fall and spring semesters. Providing timely information to students on graded work makes students aware of their performance so they can determine whether to seek additional help from the faculty member, tutorial services when available, their academic advisor and/or withdraw from the course prior to the established deadline for withdrawal.

Mid-Semester Feedback. The University believes that regular assessment of students and feedback to them is essential to effective teaching and learning. Therefore, faculty members will provide all students with evaluation of their progress in a course prior to midsemester (or equivalent in a nonsemester course) so that students have information about their progress before the withdrawal deadline, which is the end of the tenth week of classes.

Registration

There are several registration options available to students: registration via the web at my.odu.edu, click LEO online, in person, on-campus registration, and off-campus registration.

Eligible students are encouraged to preregister in order to improve the likelihood of obtaining satisfactory schedules of classes. Preregistration is reserved for currently enrolled degree-seeking students. Eligible students will be assigned a “time ticket” four to six weeks prior to preregistration. Open registration begins immediately following the preregistration period.

Complete registration information, important deadlines and the final examination schedule can be found at www.odu.edu/registrar. The course schedule is available at www.leoonline.odu.edu by March 7 for summer and fall semester classes and by October 7 for spring semester classes.

Priority Preregistration for Active Duty, Veterans, Reservists and Virginia National Guard Service Members

The 2012 General Assembly established Virginia code 23-9.2:3.7 C, which states:

The governing boards of each public institution of higher education shall, in accordance with guidelines developed by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, implement policies that recognize the scheduling difficulties and obligations encountered by active duty members of the United States armed forces.

The State Council of Higher Education for Virginia in consultation with the Military Education Advisory Committee (MEAC) has issued guidelines that require state colleges and universities to establish course registration policies that provide reasonable accommodation to students who are active-duty military members, veterans, reservists and Virginia National Guard members. 

Old Dominion University wishes to facilitate priority preregistration for currently enrolled, degree-seeking military students according to the following procedures:

  • Priority preregistration will begin no sooner than Monday of the first week of preregistration provided documentation has been received and approved in the Office of the University Registrar.
  • Preregistration will be based on the student’s class standing (senior, junior, sophomore, freshman) and will permit the student to participate during the earliest registration time slot for his or her class. Time tickets will be assigned using rules to assign the appropriate time slot. All graduate students are invited to register on the first day of preregistration.

To qualify for priority preregistration:

  • Active Duty, Reservist and National Guard students must provide proof of current active duty status to the Office of the University Registrar prior to preregistration each semester. With valid Military ID, students will be granted a priority registration time slot. 
  • Veterans receiving federal VA educational benefits to include but not limited to Chapter 30, Chapter 31, Chapter 32, Chapter 33, Chapter 1606 and Chapter 1607 will automatically receive priority preregistration if benefits have been received at Old Dominion University during the current semester (for example, priority preregistration will be granted if the student has submitted the benefits certification form for the spring semester and wishes to preregister for the fall semester).
  • Veterans who do not use federal VA educational benefits must provide a copy of the DD214, retired military identification card or the DMV issued veteran card.
  • In order to participate in  priority preregistration, students who are qualified must self-identify as indicated and provide requested documentation by the following deadlines:
    • Fall preregistration: March 15
      • Generally fall preregistration will begin no later than the second week of April for currently enrolled degree seeking students.
    • Spring/Summer preregistration: October 15
      • Generally, spring preregistration will begin no later than the second week of November for currently enrolled degree seeking students. Summer preregistration is ongoing and concurrent with spring preregistration.

All students must have been advised, have no restrictive holds on the student account and be otherwise eligible to register in order to participate in preregistration. Entering freshman students may register during their Preview orientation date.

Each semester all documents should be mailed or delivered to the Veterans Certifying Officer, Office of the University Registrar, 1009 Rollins Hall, Norfolk, VA 23529 or faxed to 757-683-5357. The VA Certifying Officer is responsible for all requests regarding priority preregistration.

Communication about the priority preregistration process will be published in the University Catalogs, available online on the Veterans Services pages http://www.odu.edu/military/students/veterans-services, and through direct communication via email to the ODU email address to all currently qualified and enrolled students.

Staff in the Office of the University Registrar, Military Connections and the Office of Admissions will be trained to communicate the policy to students who may be qualified for this benefit.

-Approved by the Board of Visitors

Dropping, Adding, and Withdrawing From Classes

See the academic calendar in this Catalog or the Registrar’s Office website at http://www.odu.edu/registrar for deadlines for adding or dropping classes. For information regarding the refund schedule, see the chapter on Financial Information or go to the Office of Finance’s web page at http://www.odu.edu/finance.

Class Schedule Changes and Drop/Add Procedures

During the fall and spring semesters, students may drop classes within the first 11 calendar days after the first day of classes for the semester and may add classes up to 11 calendar days after the first day of classes for the semester (for full semester classes). This is normally the Tuesday following Labor Day for the fall semester and the Tuesday following the Martin Luther King holiday for the spring semester.

Once registered, a student must drop or add classes via the secure website at my.odu.edu, click LEO online or submit a completed drop/add form to the Office of the University Registrar or to the distance site office (for distance students). The date the form is received in the Office of the University Registrar, the distance site office or processed via LEO determines tuition adjustments, if applicable. If needed, drop/add forms can be downloaded from the Registrar’s Office website: www.odu.edu/registrar.

Freshmen are strongly encouraged to seek advising before dropping or adding any class. Students enrolled in degree programs in which sequencing is critical are urged to consult their academic advisors before scheduling changes. In such programs, dropping of courses without prior consultation with academic advisors may necessitate additional time to complete University and/or departmental degree requirements.

See the academic calendar in this Catalog or www.odu.edu/registrar and click on the link to “calendars” for the dates for adding or dropping classes. For information regarding the refund schedule, see the chapter on Tuition, Fees and Financial Information or go to the Office of Finance’s web page www.odu.edu/af/finance.

Summer and Winter Terms

Old Dominion University offers a summer program that includes a three-week Maymester, along with one 12-week and two six-week sessions.   More than 1,550 graduate and undergraduate courses are offered on campus, off campus and online during the summer months.

The University also offers select classes during winter term, which is between the December graduation and the start of spring semester classes.

The exact dates for the summer and winter terms are listed on the Registrar’s Office website at www.odu.edu/registrar.

Withdrawal From Classes or From the University

Policy for Dropping and Withdrawing From Classes

Dropping Classes

Prior to the start of and during the first 11 calendar days of the semester, a student may drop a course; this means no grade will be assigned and no reference entered on the student’s permanent academic record. Please refer to www.odu.edu/registrar and click on the link to “calendars” for the dates to drop classes in non-semester courses.

Withdrawal from Classes

After the first 11 calendar days of the semester, a student may withdraw from any course through the end of the tenth week of a regular semester. Please refer to www.odu.edu/registrar and click on the link to “calendars” for the dates to withdraw from classes in non-semester courses. A grade of W will be assigned during this period. Students who withdraw through the end of the tenth week are encouraged to contact their instructor, advisor, Student Success Coach (for online students), and financial aid counselor to discuss the implications of withdrawing.

Withdrawal from a course after the tenth week of a regular session (or its equivalent in a non-semester course) is usually not permitted. However, in the event of an illness or other severe hardship beyond the student’s control, the student should submit, no later than the last day of classes, a written petition for permission to withdraw to the instructor and the chair of the department offering the course. If permission is granted by both, a grade of W will be recorded. If permission is not granted by both, the student will not be allowed to withdraw from the course. Any appeal of decisions should be brought to the dean of the college offering the course.

Students who have a financial hold on their record are not able to withdraw from classes using the online process.  However, they may withdraw by the published deadline at the Registrar’s Office between 8:00 a.m. and  5:00 p.m. Monday-Friday.  The office is located at 1009 Rollins Hall.

A student who stops attending classes without withdrawing from the course will receive a grade of WF, except if the student’s performance was an F at the time the student stopped attending class, in which case a grade of F will be assigned. The grade of WF will carry no grade points, and will be computed in the grade point average as a grade of F.

Prior to withdrawing from any course, students receiving financial aid should consult the Office of Financial Aid counselor. Course withdrawal may adversely impact satisfactory academic progress for financial aid purposes and limit the student's ability to continue receiving financial aid.

Drop and Withdrawal Deadlines

Specific deadline dates for dropping and withdrawing from classes are found at the Registrar’s Office website, www.odu.edu/registrar, by clicking on the link to “calendars.”

Administrative Withdrawal From the University

During the course of any semester, there will be situations, such as severe illness, death in the immediate family, or disciplinary actions, which will require that the University initiate an administrative withdrawal from the University to assist a student or to implement a University-imposed sanction. The following procedures will be used.

  1. The request for withdrawal is initiated either by the student because of an extenuating personal situation or by the University because of a disciplinary situation.
  2. This action will normally be handled by the Vice President for Student Engagement and Enrollment Services or designee. If the student initiates the withdrawal, the Office of the Vice President for Student Engagement and Enrollment Services will determine what verification is necessary and document the situation.
  3. A request will be submitted to the Office of the University Registrar to withdraw the student from all classes.
  4. The student’s instructors will be notified. If the student is withdrawing after the last day to withdraw from classes without penalty, part of this notification will include the opportunity for the faculty member to raise objections if the student’s classroom performance is such that a withdrawal (W) would not be appropriate. If a faculty member objects, the faculty member will inform the University Registrar and the student will receive an “F” in the class.
  5. The request for withdrawal must be initiated by the student within one calendar year counting from the first day of classes of the term for which administrative withdrawal is sought. Requests for withdrawal that have the necessary documentation but are received after the one-year deadline may be reviewed by an appeals committee consisting of at least three members and including both faculty and administrators, to be convened by the Director of Student Outreach and Support in Student Engagement and Enrollment Services. These requests must include clear and convincing evidence explaining the student’s inability to submit the request within one calendar year.
  6. Tuition refund appeals are handled separately and must be submitted to the Office of Finance. Students submitting requests after the one-year deadline are not eligible for a tuition appeal.
  7. Students receiving financial aid should consult their financial aid counselor prior to submitting a tuition refund appeal.

Sudden Withdrawal and Prolonged Absence Due to Military Mobilization

The following guidelines are provided for students whose service in the uniformed services has required their sudden withdrawal or prolonged absence from enrollment at Old Dominion University.

The following definitions are provided in connection with these guidelines:

  • “Service in the uniformed services” means service (whether voluntary or involuntary) on active duty in the Armed Forces, including such service by a member of the National Guard or Reserve, for a period of more than 30 days under call or order to active duty of more than 30 days.
  • “Tuition” means the actual price of education charged to a student for the term in which service in the uniformed services caused his or her sudden withdrawal or prolonged absence from enrollment at a Virginia institution of higher education.
  • “Reinstatement” means the readmittance and reenrollment of a student whose service in the uniformed services has caused his or her sudden withdrawal or prolonged absence from enrollment.
  • “Sudden withdrawal” means leaving an institution after a semester has begun or after the tuition and required fees for a term have already been billed to or paid by the student.

Policies and Procedures

All active duty military students who are unable to complete course requirements due to change in employment duties, work schedule or deployment to a duty assignment may be administratively withdrawn from current semester courses. Students are required to furnish a copy of their military orders to the Office of the University Registrar. Upon receipt of the copy of military orders, the student will be withdrawn from all courses and refund of tuition will be processed following an audit of the student’s account and returned to the appropriate party. In addition, the University Registrar will notify the following offices so that additional refunds can be processed as appropriate: Housing and Residence Life, University Card Center, Parking and Transportation Services, and the University Village Bookstore. Students who are deployed while actively attending the University should make an effort to notify the University Registrar as soon as possible so that records can be updated, providing a copy of military orders or verification of a new duty assignment.

University Housing and Dining Services

Upon notification by the University Registrar, the Executive Director of  Housing and Residence Life will authorize a refund based on prorated charges for the semester calculated on the days in residence. If the student is deployed prior to the start of the semester, but has made a formal commitment for University housing, the student will be released from the housing agreement without penalty and the deposit will be fully refunded.

Dining/Monarch Plus Card/Parking Services

Upon notification by the University Registrar, prorated refunds will be made for partially used meal plans. Funds remaining on the Monarch Plus card will be refunded to the student. Refund of payment for a parking decal will be prorated based on percentage of use.

Textbooks

Upon notification by the University Registrar, the University Village Bookstore will allow for full refunds/and or exchanges of textbooks for any student called to official active military duty as long as the book is in resaleable condition.

Deposits for Admission

Freshman students who are new applicants for admission to the University but who have not registered for classes may receive either a refund of the admission deposit or defer admission up to one year by submitting a request to the Office of Admissions.

Preview Fee

Students who have paid but have not attended Preview will receive full refund of the fee.

Academic Credit

If the student has begun attending classes and sufficient time has passed in the semester, the incomplete grade policy may apply.

A grade of Incomplete (I) indicates assigned work yet to be completed in a given course or absence from the final examination and is assigned only upon instructor approval of a student request. The I grade may be awarded only in exceptional circumstances beyond the student’s control, such as illness, and only after 80% of the time allocated for the course has elapsed and substantial progress has been made toward completion of course requirements with the exception of courses that do not fit within the traditional semester calendar. In cases of exceptional circumstances beyond the student’s control, it is the responsibility of the student to approach the instructor to request an I grade and to provide documentation, including a written statement of when the work will be completed, to support the request. The authority to award an I grade rests with the instructor whose decision is final. Students whose requests for I grades are approved must not re-register for the class until the I grade has been resolved. The I grade becomes an F if not removed through the last day of classes of the following term (excluding the exam period) according to the following schedule: I grades from the fall semester become F’s if not removed by the last day of classes of the spring semester; I grades from the spring semester and the summer session become F’s if not removed by the last day of classes of the fall semester. An I grade may be changed to a W only in very unusual circumstances and when the student’s situation has changed since the I grade was awarded. In these cases, the request for a change to a W must be in writing, documented, and approved by the instructor, department chair and dean. Students will not be allowed to graduate until all grades of I have been resolved.

In the case of courses that do not fit within the traditional semester calendar, the faculty member assigns the I grade. The time periods for the removal of I grades before they become grades of F are the same as those stated in the previous paragraph.

Extension of the I time limitation normally will not be approved except for reasons beyond the student’s control and only if the supervising faculty member is available and willing to supervise the work beyond the normal time limit. Students should submit the request to the instructor, who should submit approval, via the chair, to the University Registrar in order to retain the I. The approval from the instructor should designate the expiration date of the extension.

If the student is unable to complete the incomplete grade because of prolonged deployment the student should provide justification and documentation directly to the course instructor. At the instructor’s discretion, the course instructor can authorize the University Registrar to administratively withdraw the student using this policy. The student will be withdrawn from the course, a grade W will be posted to the academic record and refund of tuition to the appropriate party will be processed. If the instructor is no longer employed at the University, the student should consult the department chair. In the event of a disagreement about a grade, the normal grade appeal process described in the University Catalogs will apply.

Students who are administratively withdrawn from the University under this policy are strongly encouraged to maintain contact with the University through the Office of Student Engagement and Enrollment Services.

Students who are called to active duty during an academic semester who have completed 75 percent of the course requirements at the time of activation and who meet other specified requirements also have the option to accept the grade earned to date. It is the responsibility of the student to provide a copy of the military orders to the Office of the University Registrar. The Registrar will provide documentation to the instructor in support of the student’s request to receive the grade earned to date. 

Reinstatement

As soon as plans are made, returning students should contact the Office of Admissions to verify their student status and to reactivate their record, if necessary, prior to re-enrolling in classes. Students who leave the University in good standing remain eligible to re-enroll. A student who has left the University for more than a year must complete a reactivation/readmission form available on the Office of Admissions web site. If the separation from the University was longer than five years, the applicant will need to resubmit all official transcripts and necessary credentials. There are no additional fees if the student has previously paid the admission fee.

Students who return following a prolonged absence due to military deployment should be aware of the time limits for Catalog election.

Undergraduate Return to Program

It is presumed the undergraduate student will remain eligible to return to the same program of study. The student should contact the chief departmental advisor for the major if returning to the same program of study. The content of some programs may require that the student repeat previously passed courses to maintain currency in the field.

If the program of study is no longer available for any reason, the student should seek the assistance of the academic advising unit in Academic Enhancement and access the degree evaluation system, available online as DegreeWorks, to determine a suitable alternative major.

Undergraduate Time Limits

Undergraduate students may choose to graduate under the Catalog in effect at the time of their first enrollment (part-time or full-time) or any subsequent Catalog provided that the students graduate within six years from the date of the first enrollment. Students who have prolonged deployment may be required to elect a more recent Catalog or the Catalog in effect at the term of re-enrollment at the University. Returning students should consult their academic advisors to verify the correct Catalog for graduation purposes. Students should refer to their “general student record” in LEO Online to verify the Catalog selected at the date of first enrollment. The Catalog “year” begins with the fall semester each year.

In all cases, students must have been duly admitted to the University and an academic program of study and meet all of the requirements for graduation in one Catalog. Students may not “tailor make” their own degree requirements by selecting partial requirements from more than one Catalog.

The Office of the University Registrar will maintain records of administrative withdrawals completed under this policy.

-Approved by the Board of Visitors

Guidelines and Procedures for Grade Adjustments for Nonacademic Reasons

  1. Errors in the assignment of grades (e.g., a C received instead of an A) must be brought to the attention of the faculty member immediately upon receipt of the grade. If confirmed, the instructor will submit a grade change through the chair to the University Registrar. An online process for grade changes is available if the grade to be changed is not older than two semesters. In these cases, the instructor of record makes the change online. The chair is notified by email of the change and may at that time deny the change of grade. If the grade to be changed is older than two semesters, then the instructor submits an Academic Record Change Form (H-1002) to the chair, who forwards it to the University Registrar if it is approved, and notifies the instructor of reasons for denial if it is not approved.
  2. Administrative errors (e.g., drop/add submitted but not processed) should be brought to the attention of the University Registrar immediately upon receipt of the grade.

Grade Appeals: Policy and Procedures

  1. Policy and Purpose
    1. The purpose of the grade appeal procedure is to serve the needs of graduate and undergraduate students who believe that they were unjustly awarded a final course grade by a faculty member through prejudice or caprice. This policy applies to the final grade for the award of academic credit and does not apply to graduate and undergraduate examinations that are administered as part of the degree progression and certification processes (such as comprehensive examinations and candidacy examinations at the graduate level).
    2. The basis for a grade appeal is the student’s charge that the final grade was awarded through prejudice or caprice. The burden of proof rests with the student.
    3. Students must initiate the first review of the appeal within 45 days of the official end of the semester in which the grade was awarded. For grades awarded and appealed from fall and summer semesters, the entire appeal process must be completed before the official end of the next semester; the entire appeal process for grades awarded and appealed from the spring semester must be completed before the official end of the next fall semester.
  2. Procedure
    Prior to initiating a formal appeal, the student must attempt to consult with the instructor to request an explanation of the method of evaluation and to determine whether an error has been made. This consultation may be face to face, via e-mail, phone, or video conference if both agree, and efforts to consult with the instructor must be documented by the student.
    1. First Review of Appeal
      1. If the student is not satisfied with the results of the consultation with the instructor, or the instructor is not available as described in section IV. B, then the student may file a grade appeal. The chair of the department in which the instructor was teaching will conduct the first review of the student’s appeal, unless the instructor is the department chair. The student’s case must be presented on the Grade Appeal Form with supporting documents/explanations to the instructor’s department chair within 14 days of the consultation with the instructor.
      2. The student’s Grade Appeal Form should (1) state specific reasons and give examples of faculty prejudice or caprice, (2) show that prejudice or caprice affected the awarding of the final course grade, and (3) be presented as a complete package and include all other supporting documentation.
      3. The chair shall notify the instructor of the appeal and provide the instructor with copies of the form and other documents that were submitted. The chair or dean shall also request a response from the instructor that should include at a minimum the course syllabus, grade distribution for the course, attendance policy, the grading plan for the course, and other grading rubrics.
      4. The chair shall review all documents and may hold a hearing where both the instructor and student are present. (See section V. for guidelines for hearings.) No other persons will attend the hearing and the hearing must be recorded.
      5. If the chair concludes that there is no cause for complaint, the student and the instructor will be notified in writing of the decision within seven days of receipt of the request for an appeal and the supporting documents. The student may request a second review of the appeal (see section II.B. for details).
      6. If during the appeal process it is concluded that there may be valid cause for the complaint, the chair should consult with the instructor and student and attempt to mediate the dispute to try and arrive at a consensual grade change. Among the alternatives available for resolution of the case will be the assignment of the grade of P if the chair, the instructor, and the student express their agreement in writing. When the instructor and student agree to a grade change or to award a grade of P, the instructor will make the official grade change.
      7. If mediation fails, the chair will notify the college Grade Appeal Review Committee of the need for a review and submit all documents to the committee. The instructor and the student will be notified of this action.
      8. The chair will ask the college Grade Appeal Review Committee to appoint the reviewers within five working days. (See Section III for the composition of the committee.)
        1. The faculty and the student who form the Grade Appeal Review Committee will notify the instructor and student involved in the appeal that the review is to take place and request needed documents.
        2. The Grade Appeal Review Committee will review the documents, consult with relevant parties as needed and determine if there is sufficient evidence in the documents to support the student’s appeal, or if more information is needed in which case a hearing with the student and instructor may be held. (See Section V for details about the hearing.) The review and hearing must be scheduled within 15 days of the receipt of the materials by the committee.
        3. If the Grade Appeal Review Committee finds that there is sufficient evidence that the grade was awarded with prejudice or caprice, they may consult with the instructor to suggest a grade change and provide a rationale for that decision. The decision and rationale must be provided in writing to the instructor. The final outcome of the committee’s review will be documented and communicated to the instructor, the student and the department chair.
        4. If the committee finds on behalf of the student and recommends a change of grade and the instructor refuses to change the grade but is willing to accept a grade of P, then the committee will consult with the student about the advisability of accepting a P grade. Should the student agree to accept a grade of P, the instructor will make the official grade change. Should the student not consent to acceptance of a P grade, the original grade as assigned by the instructor will stand. The instructor will be notified.
        5. If the committee finds on behalf of the student and recommends a change of grade but the instructor refuses to change the grade, the student will be consulted about the advisability of accepting a grade of P. If the student consents to acceptance of the P grade, but the instructor is unwilling to accept a grade of P, then the committee shall submit the proposed grade change with an accompanying rationale to the Provost/designee who may decide that there is sufficient reason to change the instructor’s initial final grade to a P. The Provost/designee will submit the grade change to the Registrar. Only the Provost/designee is authorized to change an instructor’s grade to P when the instructor does not agree to the award of a P.
        6. If the committee finds on behalf of the instructor, the original grade will stand and the instructor and the student will be notified.
      9. If the instructor is the department chair, the student will submit the Grade Appeal Form and documents to the Dean and the Dean will conduct the first review following the procedures described in II.A.1-8.
      10. If the instructor is a Dean or Vice President, the student will submit the Grade Appeal Form and documents to the chair of the department in which the Dean or Vice President is teaching the course.
    2. Second Review of Appeal
      1. The student may request a second review of the appeal if the conclusion of the first review is that there is no cause for complaint. The request for a second review must be submitted within seven days of the denial of the first review. The student should request in writing that the person responsible for conducting the first review forward the grade appeal package to the person responsible for conducting the second review. The instructor is notified of this action.
      2. When the instructor is a faculty member, the Dean is responsible for conducting the second review. If the instructor is the chair and the Dean conducted the first review, the Provost/designee is responsible for conducting the second review. If the instructor is a Dean or Vice President and the chair of the department in which the Dean or Vice President is teaching conducted the first review, the Provost/designee is responsible for conducting the second review.
      3. The second review shall follow the same procedures as the first review, as described in section II.A.1­–4.
      4. If the person to whom the second review is submitted concludes that there is no cause for complaint, the student and the instructor will be notified in writing that the grade appeal process is complete. No further appeal will be allowed.
      5. If the person to whom the second review is submitted concludes that there may be valid cause for the complaint, the procedures as described in section II.A.6–8 will apply.
  3. Grade Appeal Review Committee
    1. Committee Composition and Duties
      1. Each college will create a Grade Appeal Review Committee that has one representative from each department in the college and a list of potential student members. If an appeal is heard, the Dean will select two faculty members and one student from these lists.
      2. Representatives must be full-time tenured or tenure-track faculty in an academic department elected by the department faculty. At least two committee members shall be tenured. No administrator, such as a Chief Departmental Advisor or Graduate Program Director, shall be eligible to serve on the committee.
      3. Terms of service will be for two years. Members may be re-elected for an additional two-year term.
      4. At the beginning of each academic year, each department in the college will submit a list of full-time students who are eligible and willing to serve on the committee. This list will be formulated each year. When needed, one student will serve on a review committee.
      5. The committee will select its own chair and develop guidelines for the review process and procedures.
      6. Two faculty members and one student selected from the names submitted by each department will review the appeal including documents from the student filing the appeal and the instructor of record. Neither the faculty members nor the student member shall be from the instructor’s or student’s department.
      7. Both the instructor and the student will have the right to challenge, for valid cause, any or all of the members of the committee, and in that event replacements will be appointed and no further challenge will be permitted.
  4. Instructors’ Responsibilities and Rights
    1. The following are guides for the instructor’s responsibilities and rights.
      1. Instructors have a responsibility to meet with students to explain the course grading procedure and the process for determining the final grade.
      2. When requested, instructors must provide the documents requested for a review at all levels. These documents will include at a minimum the course syllabus, grade distribution for the course, attendance policy, and grading procedures for course tasks with rubrics. Other documents may be included or requested.
      3. The instructor must assist in making arrangements for a hearing when one is needed.
      4. Instructors have the responsibility to participate in a grade appeal.
      5. No instructor shall be forced or coerced into making a grade change.
    2. Unavailable Instructors
      1. In the event a student makes documented efforts to consult with an instructor and is unable to find the instructor, or does not receive a response, the student shall seek assistance from the chair.
      2. When the chair has made reasonable efforts to contact an instructor whose final grade is being appealed and is unsuccessful, the Grade Appeal Review Committee and chair will independently review available materials and reach a consensual decision. In the event that these two reviews reach different decisions that are not reconciled, the Provost/designee will make a final decision. No other appeal can be made.
        1. If the decision is in favor of the student and the student agrees, the Provost/designee may change the grade to a P.
        2. If the decision is not in favor of the student, the original instructor’s grade will remain.
      3. In the event of an instructor’s unavailability due to death, serious illness, or any other cause that would prevent the instructor from participating in the process in time for the process to be completed during the designated semester, the procedure in II.A.1. and IV.B.2 will be followed.
  5. Procedures for Hearings
    A hearing involving the faculty member and the student may be held at any level of appeal.
    1. After the Grade Appeal Review Committee reviews the appeal form and supporting documents and the instructor’s documents, a hearing may be held to clarify issues and/or to receive further evidence. Both the student and the instructor may submit additional materials at the hearing.
    2. Hearings may be held at any level only when both the instructor and the student can participate. No other persons may attend this hearing.
    3. The conclusions, decision(s), and a rationale for these must be disseminated in writing to the instructor and to the student.
    4. If either the instructor or the student believes that the established procedures for the appeal of grades have not been followed, an appeal for an additional hearing may be made to the Dean, or when the chair or Dean is the instructor, to the Provost/designee. The only basis for an appeal will be the failure to have been provided due process as prescribed by the policy.
  6. Records
    1. The original Grade Appeal Form and all decision letters for each level of review will be kept in a secure location in the Dean’s office for a minimum of one year.
    2. Recordings of hearings will be kept in the Dean’s office for a minimum of one year.
  7. Assignment of P Grade
    A P grade established under this policy at any stage of the grade appeal process will be given irrespective of the University policy on hours permitted for P grades or restrictions on when a P grade is permissible and will not prevent progression in the degree program or courses for which this course is a prerequisite.

Transcripts

Transcripts are provided by the Office of the University Registrar and are issued only upon the written request of the student or upon submission through LEO Online. They should be requested at least five business days before the date needed to allow for processing and delivery. Students picking up transcripts must present valid identification.

Official electronic transcripts (PDF) can be ordered through the National Student Clearinghouse or Parchment.

No transcripts will be issued if the student has an outstanding debt at the University. All grades, academic standing, degrees received, and degree honors are included on the transcript.

An official transcript carries the University Seal and an authorized signature. Official transcripts are usually mailed directly to educational institutions, employers, etc. Any transcript mailed to or given directly to a student will be marked, “Issued to Student.” Partial transcripts are not issued; each transcript must include the student’s complete record at Old Dominion University. A transcript of work completed at any high school or at any college other than Old Dominion University must be obtained directly from that institution.

There is a charge of $5.00 for each transcript issued. Additional fees are charged for expedited delivery services and for those ordered through the National Student Clearinghouse or Parchment. Students may access and print unofficial transcripts for personal use through LEO Online at no charge.

Graduation Information

All students must apply for graduation during the semester prior to the expected completion of degree requirements. The deadline to file the intent to graduate is generally the last day of November, February and June for the following semester. Specific deadlines are published on the Registrar’s Office website, http://www.odu.edu/registrar.

Students can view their application and degree status in LEO Online, via https://my.odu.edu. Once the application has been processed, the student’s graduation status appears as “pending.” The status changes to “awarded” once the degree is conferred. Awarded status may take up to four weeks following the published degree conferral date.

Applications, complete instructions and deadlines regarding graduation are available on the Registrar’s Office website at http://www.odu.edu/registrar. A separate application for each degree is required if the student is pursuing more than one degree.

Students who do not complete degree requirements as expected must reapply for the next graduation date.

Application for Graduation for Graduate Students

Graduate students should apply online at https://my.odu.edu. Graduation staff members will coordinate the evaluation process with the appropriate graduate program advisor.

All outstanding work and incomplete or unreported grades must be completed or resolved before the degree will be conferred. Master’s level and doctoral students must have submitted the thesis (if required) or dissertation to the Registrar’s Office no later than the Friday one week before commencement as well as evidence of successful completion of oral, written or other degree requirements. Graduate students should confer with the graduate program director and review materials available on The Graduate School's website for complete information (http://www.odu.edu/graduateschool).

Commencement

Commencement exercises are intended for students who are eligible and reasonably expect to complete degree requirements, graduating from the University within the current or next graduation period.

Commencement ceremonies are managed through the Office of University Events. Information about requirements for participation in commencement ceremonies, the on-line application process for tickets, academic regalia, schedule of events, etc., is embedded in the application for graduation process in LEO Online. Dates specific to commencement ceremonies, events, etc., are available at www.odu.edu/commencement. To be eligible to participate in ceremonies, candidates must indicate their intent when they apply for graduation; any change must be communicated to the Office of University Events.

Participation in May commencement ceremonies is limited to candidates for May graduation and students who expect to complete studies in the upcoming August. Participation in December commencement ceremonies is limited to candidates for December graduation and graduates from the preceding August.

Students who expect to attend commencement ceremonies must have applied for graduation and identified as “pending” for graduation; otherwise, tickets will not be provided by the Commencement Office. All students participating in commencement ceremonies remain pending for graduation until the record is evaluated and the degree is conferred, which may take up to four weeks excluding University holidays, following the date of the commencement ceremony. With the exception of doctoral graduates, diplomas are not distributed at commencement.

Participation in commencement ceremonies does not confirm that a degree has been (or will be) conferred.

Diplomas

Diplomas are available for pickup at the Registrar’s office.  Students will be contacted via email when their diploma is available.  Diplomas that are not picked up will be mailed to the student’s permanent address after the degree has been posted. Students should verify address information in LEO when applying for graduation.  Diplomas will be mailed beginning in June for May graduates, in September for August graduates and in January for December graduates.

All holds, debts or other obligations to the University must be satisfied before the diploma will be released. Information about holds can be viewed at my.odu.edu.

The student’s legal name (as maintained in the student system) and the degree title (Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, etc.,) appear on the diploma. For a complete listing of degrees, please refer to the Degree Programs listing in this catalog. Neither the major nor the minor appears on the diploma, but will appear on the transcript.

Interinstitutional Agreements and Opportunities to Fulfill the Degree

Attendance at Other Institutions

Graduate students who are enrolled at Old Dominion University may attend another institution and transfer credit earned to a degree program at Old Dominion University. While formal Old Dominion University permission is not required, students should consult the graduate program advisor to ensure that the credits to be taken at the other institution will transfer to the Old Dominion University program in which the student is enrolled.  An official transcript from the other institution must be submitted to the graduate program advisor along with any supporting materials that may be requested such as a syllabus, course description, etc. The graduate program advisor will complete an evaluation of external credits and submit the result to the Office of the University Registrar for posting to the student's academic record.

The other institution may ask the student to provide documentation of good standing or eligibility to continue at Old Dominion. These forms should be submitted to the Office of the University Registrar. Forms that require the student to demonstrate that the course(s) will be accepted for transfer credit at Old Dominion University should be submitted directly to the academic advisor.

Academic Common Market

Old Dominion University, through a number of its undergraduate and graduate programs, participates in the Southern Regional Education Board’s Academic Common Market. Eligible residents of participating states may enroll (following admission to degree status) as Academic Common Market students at in-state tuition rates. Evidence of legal domicile must be presented to the Office of the University Registrar, 1009 Rollins Hall. Information on available programs can be viewed at http://www.schev.edu/index/tuition-aid/academic-common-market.

Interinstitutional Study Program with Norfolk State University

Old Dominion University students have the opportunity to elect courses at Norfolk State University through a student exchange program agreed to by the two institutions.

The registrar of each institution will register a student for courses at the other institution if the student presents a properly signed form listing the course or courses to be taken at the other institution. The student exchange will be honored both in the regular session and in the summer session and applies to both undergraduate and graduate students. All credits earned by students will be considered as resident credit at the home institution for degree purposes. (Courses taken at NSU under this policy will be considered the same as Old Dominion University courses; all other courses are subject to transfer credit policy limitations.)

Regular bus service is provided between campuses but is not available for evening classes.

Student Exchange Policy Between the College of William and Mary and Old Dominion University

The registrars at Old Dominion University and the College of William and Mary will each register students in all departments in the College of Sciences (Old Dominion) and the School of Marine Science (William and Mary) for courses at the other institution. If the student presents a properly signed form listing the course(s) to be taken at the other institution, the exchange will be honored in both regular sessions and in summer sessions, and will apply to graduate students at the master’s, certificate of advanced study, and doctoral levels at both institutions.

The student must have completed prerequisites for the course(s) for which he/she registers. Core curriculum requirements must be met at the home institution. Elective courses and departmental requirements may be satisfied through exchange courses, but approval is required from the student’s department. If a particular course is offered at the home institution, it may not be taken for credit at the other institution. All credits earned will be considered as resident credit at the home institution for degree purposes.

The tuition and fees are determined and retained by the student’s home institution.

Student Exchange Policy Between Eastern Virginia Medical School and Old Dominion University

The registrars of Old Dominion University and Eastern Virginia Medical School (EVMS) will each register a student for courses at the other institution if the student presents a properly signed form listing the course(s) to be taken at the other institution. The exchange will be honored both in regular sessions and in summer sessions and will apply to graduate students at the master’s and doctoral levels at both institutions. The students must have completed all prerequisites of the courses for which they register. All credit so earned will be considered as resident credit at the home institution for degree purposes. (Courses taken at EVMS under this policy will be considered the same as Old Dominion University courses; all other courses are subject to transfer credit policy limitations.)

Tuition and fees applicable to the courses taken will be handled according to current interinstitutional policies regulating these.

Navy Education Consortium and Educational Agreements

A consortium of higher education institutions, located near major naval facilities, has developed a means to enhance the opportunities for active duty naval officers to participate in graduate education at the master’s level. The institutions are Old Dominion University, George Washington University, Memphis State University, The University of Rhode Island, San Diego State University and the University of West Florida. The program areas which may be offered under the auspices of the consortium include international and political studies, computer information sciences, and computer science. These higher education institutions also provide a common curriculum that satisfies competency areas as set forth by the Navy for the ETMS program. Officers participating in the program are enrolled in the Master of Science in Education degree program with a major in educational administration. For current information, contact the Office of Academic Affairs.

Virginia Tidewater Consortium Exchange Program

Old Dominion University students may also take courses at any of the following Consortium institutions: Christopher Newport University (Newport News), College of William and Mary (Williamsburg), Eastern Shore Community College (Melfa), Eastern Virginia Medical School (Norfolk), Hampton University (Hampton), Joint Forces Staff College (Norfolk), Norfolk State University, Paul D. Camp Community College (Franklin), Regent University (Virginia Beach), Thomas Nelson Community College (Hampton), Tidewater Community College (all campuses), and Virginia Wesleyan College (Norfolk).

Cross-registration is subject to the following regulations:

  1. Cross-registration is limited to degree-seeking students with cumulative grade point averages of 3.00 or better.
  2. Graduate students who opt to cross-register under the Virginia Tidewater Exchange Program may accumulate a maximum of 12 external credit hours to include any combination of transfer or consortium credit hours. Exceptions are granted to students enrolled in approved joint programs within the Virginia Consortium.
  3. Graduate students must get pre-approval from their Graduate Program Director (GPD) before registering for consortium classes.

For further information, contact the Office of the University Registrar, 1009 Rollins Hall or register@odu.edu.