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Old Dominion University

2014-2015 Catalog

Strome College of Business

www.odu.edu/business

2004 Constant Hall
Old Dominion University
Norfolk , VA 23529

(757) 683-3520

Vinod Agarwal, Interim Dean
Ali Ardalan, Associate Dean for Internal Affairs
Kiran Karande, Associate Dean for Executive Programs and External Affairs

Ph.D:

  • Business Administration
  • Public Administration and Urban Policy

Master’s:

  • Accounting (M.S.)
  • Business Administration (M.B.A.)
  • Computer Science (M.S.)
  • Economics (M.A.)
  • Public Administration (M.P.A.)

Certificates:

  • Maritime, Ports and Logistics Management (Also available online)
  • Advanced Certificate in Public Administration and Policy
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Public Procurement and Contract Management(Also available online)

Overview

Old Dominion University’s Strome College of Business has as its principal objective the preparation of liberally educated specialists who will enter the challenging world of business or public administration. All programs in the college are designed to promote the following: professional competence; facility in the communication arts; analytical skills; leadership abilities; an understanding of social, political, and economic forces; and, a strong sense of business ethics and public purpose. This foundation enables graduates of these programs to advance in a broad range of careers in the public and private sectors.

The Strome College of Business is one of approximately 469 schools in the world to have achieved accreditation for business programs on the graduate and undergraduate levels by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business - International (AACSB). The Master of Science in accounting program has received its own accreditation through the same agency. In addition, the Master of Public Administration program is one of approximately 164 graduate programs certified as meeting the standards of the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA).

The college offers master’s degrees in accounting, business administration, economics, and public administration. Also, the college offers a joint master’s degree in computer information science with the Computer Science Department. The college also offers a Ph.D. program in business administration and a Ph.D. program in public administration and urban policy.

Also housed within the college is the Department of Military Science and Leadership. The mission of this department is to provide professional instruction and leadership development for selected students who desire to serve in the active or reserve components of the U.S. Army. Additional information about this program may be obtained through the Military Science and Leadership Department.

Vision Statement

The vision of the Strome College of Business is to be recognized as an innovative leader in business and public administration education and to become a valued center of excellence in the mid-Atlantic coast region.

Mission Statement

The college’s mission is to develop students, within a global and ethical context, for successful careers in business and government; to perform basic, applied and pedagogical research; and to offer services to the community; all of which support the economic development of Hampton Roads and beyond.

Graduate School of Business and Public Administration

Gilbert R. Yochum, Dean
Ali Ardalan, Associate Dean for Internal Affairs

Kiran Karande, Associate Dean for Executive Programs and External Affairs

The Graduate School of Business and Public Administration offers six degree programs: Master of Arts in Economics; Master of Business Administration; Master of Public Administration; Master of Science in Accounting; Ph.D. in Business Administration—finance, information technology, management, or marketing tracks; and Ph.D. in Public Administration and Urban Policy. In addition, the school offers a master’s in computer information science option jointly with the Computer Science Department.

Graduate courses are taught during the day and in the evening facilitating flexible combinations of formal learning and full- or part-time employment. Students come from a variety of backgrounds with undergraduate degrees from many different colleges and universities.

All graduate students are advised to check specific program requirements before enrolling in 400/500 level courses. Nondegree graduate students must satisfy the admission index for graduate study or receive special permission from the graduate program director in the Strome College of Business in order to enroll for graduate credit.

Graduate Certificate in Public Procurement and Contract Management

Stephen B. Gordon, Program Director

This certificate program is designed for students to satisfy their elective requirements or it can be taken as a stand alone certificate program. This certificate program is designed for Public Administration graduate students, however, business administration students, engineering students, and students from other disciplines would also be eligible to participate in the program. The program consists of four required courses and one elective (15 credits total).

Admission Requirements

Admission to the certificate program will require a bachelor’s degree (or equivalent).

Program Requirements

The award of this certificate is based upon the student’s successful completion of 15 credit hours of graduate level courses in Public Administration:

PPCM/PADM 718Public Sector Contract Administration3
PPCM/PADM 726Introduction to Public Procurement3
PPCM/PADM 728Public Sector Contract Planning and Formation3
PPCM/PADM 731Public Sector Procurement Law and Ethics3
Select one from the following:3
Public Financial Management
Methods of Public Program Evaluation
Public-Private Partnerships
Leadership
Public Procurement and Project Management
Negotiation and Dispute Resolution
Intergovernmental Management
Total Hours15

Maritime, Ports and Logistics Management Certificate

This certificate program is designed to help working maritime and port professionals develop and sharpen their maritime and port management skills. The program consists of four graduate courses that expose students to international shipping, port management, maritime law, port operations and planning and port economics.

Admission Requirements

Admission to the certificate program will require a bachelor’s degree (or equivalent).

Program Requirements

The certificate is awarded based upon the student’s successful completion of 12 credit hours of graduate level courses in Ports and Maritime Management:

PORT 611International Maritime Transport3
PORT 612Port Operations and Management3
PORT 613International Maritime and Admiralty Law3
PORT 614Port Planning and Economics3
Total Hours12

Doctor of Philosophy in Business Administration (Ph.D.)

John Ford, Graduate Program Director

The Doctor of Philosophy degree in business administration (Ph.D.) is a scholarly, research-based program with a professional orientation. The objective of the program is to prepare individuals of superior promise and potential for careers in higher education as faculty members engaged in teaching and research and for high level administrative and research careers in the private and public sectors. Persons completing the degree program must have demonstrated an in-depth knowledge of international business, research methods, and high potential for making significant contributions to their field of specialization in business.

The Ph.D. degree requires competence in basic disciplines of international business, research tools, and in one of the following functional areas of business: finance, information technology, marketing, or strategic management.

Requirements for Admission

Work for the doctoral degree is usually preceded by the successful completion of the a Master’s degree in a business related field (i.e., MBA) from a recognized AACSB-accredited college or university. The applicant must submit an application, official transcripts of all college or university-level work, provide scores on the Graduate Management Admission Test taken within the last five years, and provide three letters of recommendation, two from academic references, which attest to the individual’s academic potential and ability for achievement. The applicant must also submit a personal statement of goals, approximately two to three pages, on how the completion of the doctoral program will assist in achieving personal and professional career goals.

The completed application materials will be reviewed by the graduate program director and faculty in the major area of study. They will evaluate the individual’s abilities and motivation to succeed in the doctoral program. A personal interview may be required before the admission decision can be reached. A recommendation is made by the faculty and a final decision on admission is made by the graduate program director.

Requirements of the Ph.D. Degree

The following are the minimum requirements for the Ph.D. degree and must be considered in preparing the student’s plan of study:

  1. Satisfactory completion of at least 57 semester hours of course work including the dissertation for finance curriculum and at least 58 semester hours of course work including the dissertation for information technology, marketing or strategic management curriculums. (At least 48 hours of post-master’s course work (including dissertation) is a University requirement);
  2. Demonstrated competency in the following areas: international business, research methods and techniques, and the chosen functional field of business. Passage of a comprehensive examination covering international coursework is required.
  3. Acceptable performance on a written and oral candidacy examination in the major field of study. A student may retake the candidacy examinations only one time;
  4. Completion of a dissertation representing the candidate’s ability to conduct scholarly, original research. The quality of this research should be such that it would be worthy of publication in a refereed, scholarly journal; and,
  5. Successful oral defense of the dissertation.

Retention Standards

To remain in good standing after admission to the program, students must maintain a minimum, cumulative grade point average of 3.20 in all course work attempted at the University. Students who fall below this minimum standard will have one semester to remedy this deficiency. Further, students may earn no more than three credit hours with the grade of C. Any student receiving a grade lower than C– in course work will be removed from the program.

Time Limitation and Residency

The Ph.D. program assumes that a well qualified and highly motivated student can complete all degree requirements in four years of full-time work. If a student is unable to pursue the degree on a full-time basis, or if the major field is different from previous academic training, more time to complete the degree is usually required. The maximum time allowed to complete all degree requirements is eight calendar years from the date of initial enrollment in the program.

Each student is required to complete at least four regular semesters in full-time residency. These need not be consecutive. Full-time residency is defined as a minimum of nine credit hours per semester.

Transfer Credit

A maximum of 12 semester-hour credits (or equivalent) may be transferred from another university (including six hours earned through experiential learning credit options) and applied toward the Ph.D. course requirements. Transfer credit is approved at the discretion of the program director in consultation with the faculty in the student’s major field of study.

Waivers Using Previous Graduate Work

A maximum of nine semester hours of master’s-level graduate work may be applied toward completion of the requirements for the doctoral degree. The previous course work must have been of B letter-grade quality or better, and must have been completed within the five years immediately preceding entry into the doctoral program.

Candidacy Examination

The examination qualifying the doctoral student for candidacy for the Ph.D. in business administration is comprehensive in nature and designed to test the student’s knowledge of subject matter in the major field, international business, and the ability to engage in independent research. These examinations are given in two parts:

  1. international business and
  2. field of study.

The International Business Exam is a written exam scheduled for the third week of May and may be taken by a student in good standing after the student has completed BUSN 800, FIN 862, MGMT 821, and  MKTG 826. The candidacy examination in the field of study is scheduled at the beginning of fall semester classes. Students in good standing may take the Field of Study Examination after completing all courses in their field which are to be taken during the first two years of the program. See Curriculum. The Field examination contains both a written and oral component. The written portion is administered first. After successful completion of the written examination, the student sits for an oral examination, which includes topics discussed in the written examination and any additional materials that the advisory committee feels are appropriate. The student will be expected to perform well on both the written and oral components of the examination. Rather than being merely pro forma, the oral examination is a serious and integral part of the qualifying procedure for candidacy. A student must pass both the written and oral sections. The candidacy examinations are prepared and evaluated by the examination committees composed of the graduate faculty who are primarily responsible for teaching doctoral courses in international business and the field of study. The results of all examinations are reported to the student and program director.

Dissertation

The dissertation represents the final stage in obtaining the doctoral degree and provides evidence of the student’s ability to conduct independent scholarly research. To effectively initiate, conduct, and conclude the dissertation phase of the program, the candidate must:

  1. form a dissertation committee;
  2. develop and defend a dissertation proposal;
  3. complete the dissertation research and report the results in writing; and
  4. orally defend the dissertation.

Dissertation Committee

The dissertation committee is formed by the student with the approval of the program director. The committee’s purpose is to supervise the selection of the dissertation topic, constructively critique the research methodology, and serve as a guidance body until its completion. The committee should have at least three members, one of whom is from outside the department of the major field of study. The chair of the committee will be from the candidate’s major field and be an authority in the field of specialization chosen for the dissertation research. The proposal, dissertation, and the final oral defense of the dissertation must have the majority approval of the members of the dissertation committee and subsequent approval by the program director and dean of the college.

Dissertation Proposal Defense

A candidate will select a topic for dissertation research under the guidance of his/her committee. The candidate will defend a proposal for the dissertation demonstrating the originality of the research, requisite literature review, and the methodology that will be used in conducting the research. The committee will judge the merits of the proposal, making any suggestions and/or additions as deemed necessary, and approve the proposal in writing, providing copies to the program director.

Dissertation Research and Preparation

Progress on the dissertation should be reported on a periodic basis to the chair of the dissertation committee and the appropriate members. In most instances, research results, drafts of the manuscript, and guidance will be forthcoming between the committee and the candidate during the research phase. While preparing the dissertation, candidates must be continuously enrolled for a minimum of one credit hour per semester. The total number of credit hours for the dissertation shall be no less than 18 and no more than 24 credit hours. Advice or assistance from committee members should not be expected unless the candidate is officially enrolled. General regulations and procedures governing the submission of the doctoral dissertation are provided in the University Guide for Preparation of Theses and Dissertations available from the Office of the University Registrar.

Oral Dissertation Defense

The objective of the oral defense of the dissertation is to explore with the candidate the methodological and substantive contributions of the dissertation. Through this process, the examiners and the candidate reach a common understanding of the research area and can mutually agree upon its merits for publication. Majority approval by the examiners constitutes successful completion of the defense of the dissertation. The Doctor of Philosophy in business administration will be awarded upon successful completion of this examination and all other program requirements within the eight-year time limit.

Finance Curriculum

First Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
BUSN 8003ECON 8073
ECON 8013FIN 864*3
ECON 8063MKTG 8263
 9 9
Second Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
ECON 8083FIN 8613
FIN 8603FIN 8633
FIN 8623MGMT 8213
 9 9
Third Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
FIN 8999ECON 8523
 FIN 8999
 9 12
Total credit hours: 57
*

Advanced doctoral level statistical/research methods course (3 hours) can substitute for FIN 864.

Information Technology Curriculum

First Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
BNAL 7001BNAL 7123
BNAL 7113IT 8503
BUSN 8003MKTG 8263
IT 8003 
 10 9
Second Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
FIN 8623IT 8923
IT 8903IT 8933
IT 8913MGMT 8213
 9 9
Third Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
IT 895*3IT 8999
IT 8999 
 12 9
Total credit hours: 58
*

Or other (3 HRS) research methodology courses at the approval of PhD Area Coordinator.

Marketing Curriculum

First Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
BNAL 7001BNAL 7123
BNAL 7113MKTG 8023
BUSN 8003MKTG 8263
MKTG 8013 
 10 9
Second Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MKTG 8033MKTG 8143
MKTG 8133MGMT 8213
FIN 8623MKTG 8273
 9 9
Third Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MKTG 895*3MKTG 8999
MKTG 8999 
 12 9
Total credit hours: 58
*

Advanced doctoral level statistical/research methods course (3 hours) can substitute for MKTG 895.

Strategic Management Curriculum

First Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
BNAL 7001BNAL 7123
BNAL 7113MGMT 8353
BUSN 800*3MGMT 8961
MGMT 8403MKTG 826*3
 10 10
Second Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
ECON 8951BNAL 7961
FIN 862*3MGMT 821*3
MGMT 8423MGMT 8453
MGMT 8383MKTG 8143
 10 10
Third Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MGMT 8999MGMT 8999
 9 9
Total credit hours: 58
*

 Information Technology, Finance, Management, and Marketing track students take this course.

International Business Comprehensive Examination to be taken in May after the completion of coursework in the second year of the program.

Field Comprehensive Examination to be taken in August after the completion of coursework in the second year of the program.

Master of Business Administration

Kiran Karande, Graduate Program Director
Shanna Wood, Associate Director

The Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) program at Old Dominion University is designed to present broad but thorough insights into issues relevant for effective business management.  The Old Dominion University M.B.A. is structured to provide students flexibility in both delivery and time to completion.  Students gain the skills necessary to become effective business professionals in an ever changing and increasingly global environment.

The program requires a minimum of 40 credit hours to earn a general M.B.A. degree.  Students can choose from flexible completion schedules. The program may be completed as a full-time or part-time student in as little as 21 months and is distance friendly. Students may choose to pursue the general M.B.A. (40 credit hours) or may elect to pursue a dual credential such as a graduate certificate in addition to the core (48-51 credit hours depending on certificate) or a complementing graduate degree (66 + credits depending on degree selected).

The program is designed for both business and non-business undergraduates.  Non-business undergraduates will be required to take and pass a set of five, one credit hour pre-core courses before moving on to the M.B.A. core courses.  These courses will prepare students for the rigor involved in the core coursework.  No other pre-requisites are required for non-business majors.

Students will have the option to complete the degree face-to-face at the main campus in Norfolk, online, or a combination of both.  The program is accredited by AACSB – International.

Admission

Prospective students may apply for entrance into the program for the fall and spring semesters. The Strome College of Business welcomes applicants who have earned bachelor’s degrees from regionally accredited institutions. Admission to the program is competitive and is granted only to those who show high ability and likely success in graduate business study. Evidence of ability means that successful applicants will stand well above average in most criteria used to measure graduate promise.

Criteria used for admission include the candidate’s score on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) for students pursuing dual degrees, undergraduate grade averages and the trend of the grades during undergraduate work, letters of reference, a goals statement, and work experience.

The application procedure is as follows: submit to the Graduate Admissions Office

  1. application forms for graduate study in business,
  2. official transcripts of all previous college work,
  3. one letter of recommendation,
  4. an essay on personal and professional goals,
  5. resume; and
  6. scores on the GMAT or GRE.

Applicants whose native language is not English are also required to submit an acceptable score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) .

Application deadlines for U.S. citizens and permanent residents are June 1 for fall admission and November 1 for spring admission. International student deadlines are April 1 (fall semester) and October 1 (spring semester).

Program of Study

Pre-Core (Required Non-Business Majors)
MBA 600Introduction to Statistics1
MBA 601Introduction to Managerial Economics1
MBA 602Introduction to Finance1
MBA 603Introduction to Accounting1
MBA 604Introduction to Information Management1
Core
MGMT 605Essentials of Leadership2
BNAL 606Statistics for Managers2
ECON 607Managerial Economics2
MKTG 608Fundamentals of Contemporary Marketing2
ACCT 609Managerial Accounting2
BNAL 610Fundamentals of Business Analytics2
ACCT 611Financial Accounting2
MGMT 612Organizational Behavior2
FIN 613Financial Management2
IT 614Information and Knowledge Management2
OPMT 615Operations & Supply Chain Management2
FIN 616Investments and Portfolio Management2
MKTG 617Marketing Strategy2
ECON 618Global Macroeconomics2
FIN 619Business Law and Ethics2
Electives
General Electives4
Capstone
INBU 620International Business Issues2
MGMT 621Business Policy and Strategy4
Total Hours40

MBA Electives

Each student must select a minimum of 4 credit hours of electives from the wide range of electives offered in each of the functional areas in the Strome College of Business: accounting, business analytics, economics, finance, information technology, management, marketing, operations management, and public administration as well as the one-hour MBA modules. Students have the flexibility to choose among the electives those that provide them with the educational background they desire.

Alternatively, students may choose to enhance their learning experience by adding a certificate from those offered. Certificates are offered in a wide variety of business and public administration areas at Old Dominion University.  Generally they are 12 credit hours in length but can be more depending on subject area. 

Students may apply a maximum of 6 credits earned through any combination of Experiential Learning, Internship, or Independent Study (only 3 credits are allowed in any one) as elective credits and the maximum number of credits students can earn through a combination of transfer and experiential learning is 12.

Continuance Policy

To remain in good standing after admission to the program, students must maintain a minimum, cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in all graduate course work attempted at the University. Students who fall below this minimum standard will have one semester to remedy this deficiency.

Further, students may earn no more than 2 courses with the grade of C.  Any student receiving a failing grade (F) in course work will be removed from the program.

MARITIME PORTS LOGISTICS MGMT Courses

PORT 610. International Shipping and Supply Chain Management. 3 Credits.

Examines international freight transportation and terms for movement of international trade; focuses on improving supply chain relationships in the movement of international trade/directing the flow of information, materials and products. (cross-listed with MSCM 610).

PORT 611. International Maritime Transport. 3 Credits.

Examines the international business of shipping, commercial processes, maritime-related organizations, shipbuilding and repair, ship types and fleets, and commodity movement. Prerequisites: an undergraduate course in the international field such as MGMT 361, MGMT 462, or a similar graduate course.

PORT 612. Port Operations and Management. 3 Credits.

Covers role, functions, and types of international terminals and ports, including design and operation of general and specialized cargo handling facilities and offshore systems, port authorities, operational structures, and labor. Prerequisites: a graduate course in management such as MGMT 602 and a course in operations management.

PORT 613. International Maritime and Admiralty Law. 3 Credits.

International law of the sea, maritime jurisdiction, regulation of shipping, carriage of goods, marine insurance, salvage, marine environmental law, safety at sea, and the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 are covered, along with other maritime laws. Prerequisites: a basic law course.

PORT 614. Port Planning and Economics. 3 Credits.

Port planning and competition, ports and ocean container shipping, port impacts, port users in theory, port operator costing and pricing, port carriers and shippers, government and maritime institutions, dockworkers, port environment and port performance evaluation. Prerequisites: a course in microeconomics such as ECON 604.

PORT 615. Maritime Security and Risk Analysis. 3 Credits.

An overview of international and U.S initiatives to ensure the security of vessels, cargo, people, and infrastructure within the maritime domain. In addition to the impacts of regulatory requirements on maritime commerce, the course also addresses maritime threats to the international economy (including maritime piracy and maritime terrorism), maritime coalitions , and state-of-the-art techniques and tools for safeguarding ocean0borne commerce. (cross-listed with MSCM 615).

PORT 616. Supply Chain and Reverse Logistics. 3 Credits.

This course explores theories of global Supply Chain and Reverse Logistics systems as well as the practices, risks and opportunities found in today's systems. Fundamental tools and techniques will be used to provide insights on how to best organize, manage, and optimize such systems.(cross-listed with MSCM 616).

PORT 617. Transportation Intermediaries. 3 Credits.

An overview of the document, role and functions of transportation intermediaries. The relationships between intermediaries, carriers and shippers are discussed as well as the major intermediaries and their competitive strategies. The customers of various international trade and supply chains of intermediaries are also discussed. (cross-listed with MSCM 617).

PORT 618. Shipbuilding and Ship Repair Business Management. 3 Credits.

Examines the shipbuilding and ship repair industry from the perspective of industry economics, industry financial management and repair operations and acquisition processes. Provides industry professionals with business management practices that shape the industry.

PORT 619. Marine Insurance. 3 Credits.

Examines the rise of Lloyd's and the London Insurance Market, the current maritime insurance market, priciples of insurance and law, Hull Insurance Law, cargo insurance, general average and salvage insurance.

PORT 668. Directed Research/Port Internship. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Prerequisites: PORT 611, 612, 613, and 614. Practical field experience in international maritime, ports and logistics related challenges through supervised investigation and analysis of a problem or a working internship within the port-related arena.

PORT 695. Selected Topics in Maritime and Port Management. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisites: PORT 611 or 612. The advanced study of selected topics not offered on a regular basis.

PORT 697. Independent Study. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Designed to provide the opportunity for independent study under the guidance of a member of the faculty.

MARITIME AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT Courses

MSCM 530. Strategic Sourcing and Purchasing Management. 3 Credits.

An overview of the strategic sourcing of materials and services in the organization and its role in the supply chain. Topics include sourcing decisions, price/cost analysis, quality issues, purchasing, supplier selection, legal and ethical issues, third party logistics, freight forwarding, and acquisition of services and capital assets. Prerequisites: ACCT 601 and OPMT 611.

MSCM 568. Distribution Center and Material Handling Management. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to investigate the strategic role of distribution center and material management in the supply chain. Course content includes the analysis of distribution center operations through the study of design, system selection, and layout configuration as well as the evaluation of material handling and inventory management options. Pre- or corequisite: MSCM 441 or BNAL 441 or permission of the instructor.

MSCM 595. Topics in Maritime and Supply Chain Management. 3 Credits.

A study of selected topics within maritime and supply chain management designed to provide an in-depth exploration of current issues. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

MSCM 610. International Shipping and Supply Chain Management. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Examines international freight transportation and terms for movement of international trade; focuses on improving supply chain relationships in the movement of international trade/directing the flow of information, materials and products. (cross-listed with PORT 610).

MSCM 615. Maritime Security and Risk Analysis. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An overview of international and U.S initiatives to ensure the security of vessels, cargo, people, and infrastructure within the maritime domain. In addition to the impacts of regulatory requirements on maritime commerce, the course also addresses maritime threats to the international economy (including maritime piracy and maritime terrorism), maritime coalitions , and state-of-the-art techniques and tools for safeguarding ocean0borne commerce. (cross-listed with PORT 615).

MSCM 616. Supply Chain and Reverse Logistics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course explores Supply Chain and Reverse Logistics concepts related to quantitative models and Modeling and Simulation (M&S) to provide solutions to common and complex problems faced by businesses and government agencies. (cross-listed with PORT 616).

MSCM 617. Transportation Intermediaries. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An overview of the document, role and functions of transportation intermediaries. The relationships between intermediaries, carriers and shippers are discussed as well as the major intermediaries and their competitive strategies. The customers of various international trade and supply chains of intermediaries are also discussed. (cross-listed with PORT 617).

MSCM 641. Supply Chain Management and Logistics. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: OPMT 611 or instructor's permission. Supply chain management integrates all activities associated with the flow of materials and information from product start to customers. Examples include order processing, warehousing, inventory management, transportation and logistics, and the costs and information systems supporting these activities. Particular application is made to global logistics systems supporting port and maritime activities. Supply chain relationships can be improved through effective integration of management and via such technologies as the World Wide Web, electronic data exchange, and enterprise resource planning (ERP). (cross-listed with DSCI 641).

MSCM 890. Seminar in Business Process and Enterprise Systems. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: IT 800 or DSCI 800. This course discusses how firms achieve business excellence through business process management (BPM), business process improvement (BPI), and business process reengineering (BPR) supported by IT. Topics include business process and workflow modeling, analysis, integration, monitoring and management.

MSCM 893. Seminar in Supply Chain in E-Business. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: IT 800. This course examines the development of information technologies related to supply chain management in a global e-business environment. Topics include managing material flow processes, maritime, logistics, procurement, inventory and distribution. (cross-listed with IT 893).

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMIN Courses

MBA 600. Introduction to Statistics. 1 Credit.

Introductory course in statistics for newly admitted non-business majors in the MBA Program.Prerequisites: Admission to the MBA Program.

MBA 601. Introduction to Managerial Economics. 1 Credit.

Introductory course in microeconomics for newly admitted non-business majors in the MBA Program. Prerequisite: Admission to the MBA Program.

MBA 602. Introduction to Finance. 1 Credit.

Introductory course in finance for newly admitted non-business majors in the MBA Program. Prerequisite: Admission to the MBA Program.

MBA 603. Introduction to Accounting. 1 Credit.

Introductory course in accounting for newly admitted non-business majors in the MBA Program. Prerequisite: Admission to the MBA Program.

MBA 604. Introduction to Information Management. 1 Credit.

Introductory course in information management for newly admitted non-business majors in the MBA Program. Prerequisite: Admission to the MBA Program.

MBA 620. New Venture Creation. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ACCT 601, BNAL 600, ECON 604, MGMT 602, and MKTG 603. This course will immerse students in the process of conceiving, developing, launching, and running a business. Students will experience the earliest stages of forming a business and learn the mechanisms and factors that lead to successful new ventures. This course will prepare students to intensively create, intelligently evaluate and insightfully manage new ventures.

MBA 621. Effective Business Writing. 1 Credit.

This course is designed to provide an understanding of communications in the management setting. Objectives include improvement of writing skills by understanding major grammar and mechanics errors, understanding the importance of audience, tone and style in professional writing and learning effective letter and memo formats used in professional writing.

MBA 622. Business Plan Development. 1 Credit.

This course is designed to provide an integration of skills needed to develop an effective business plan. Lectures plus students will be assigned clients at the discretion of the instructor. Some students may bring their own projects.

MBA 623. Essential Business Communication Skills. 1 Credit.

This course will introduce students to concepts and discussion of major communication issues that occur in the workplace and will help students to develop skills to deal with communication issues. Course skills would include how to listen effectively, understand nonverbal cues, manage conflict, and communicate non-defensively.

MBA 627. Corporate Compliance. 1 Credit.

This course examines the practical application of business ethics and compliance in the current business environment and the important role that it should play in the decision making process. Topics will include the evolution of business ethics and compliance as a risk mitigation tool, stakeholder expectations, and the structure of corporate compliance programs.

MBA 631. Negotiation. 1 Credit.

Designed to introduce the student to the concept of negotiation; to examine different types of negotiations, strategies and tactics; and to begin developing negotiating skills. Through lectures, class discussions, reading and practical exercises, the student will be introduced to the concepts and structures of different types of negotiations; achieve an understanding of some basic principles of conducting and participating in successful negotiations; and gain experience from participation in negotiation exercises. Prerequisites: MGMT 602 or MGMT 605.

MBA 633. Creative Thinking in Business Decisions. 1 Credit.

Develops understanding and skills in applying a complete process of creative and critical thinking, problem solving and decision making in real world business situations. Uses a disciplined process of thinking, emphasizing both divergence and convergence. Emphasis on the concept of process awareness as distinct from content involvement. Individuals will be better equipped to help their organizations, teams, and selves be more effective, adaptable and flexible in the short and long run.

MBA 634. Communicating with Stakeholders. 1 Credit.

This course is designed to introduce students to the various stakeholders with special focus on larger corporations. The course will discuss tools of communication with stockholders, customers, employees, mass media, and the public at large. It will address how communications, used effectively, can help improve the accountability demanded of today’s companies.

MBA 635. Six Sigma. 1 Credit.

Introduction to Six Sigma and its practices. Students will earn Yellow Belt status.

MBA 637. Basics of Business Valuation. 1 Credit.

The course will provide an overview of the practice of the valuation of closely held companies. It will assume a familiarity with basic accounting and finance theory. The course will be an overview of the valuation process covering the reasons for valuation, the data gathering and analysis process, the use of the asset, market and income methods and a focus on some of the key controversial areas of valuation. Prerequisites: FIN 605 or FIN 613.

MBA 638. Spreadsheet Modeling. 1 Credit.

This course introduces students to the use of spreadsheet modeling to analyze and make business decisions. Course topics include spreadsheet design, data analysis for modeling, and Monte Carlo simulation. The course is web-based providing tremendous flexibility for the students. Students will need some proficiency with Excel and must have access to Excel 2007 or higher.

MBA 639. HR Perspective to Professional Development. 1 Credit.

A human resources manager view on the individual professional development process. Topics to be covered include individual self-evaluation paired against corporate mission to develop one’s professional path. Tools used and skills developed to get down that path to include resume / portfolio development, mentor / coach skill development through network development, appropriate communications, interviewing, and personal marketing. Students will wrap up the course by reviewing the iterative performance assessment process of evaluating, communicating, and reassessing executed plans to develop next step plans.

MBA 640. Global Entrepreneurship. 1 Credit.

One of the greatest shifts of the 21st century has been the focus on competing at a global scale. The internationalization strategies are led by entrepreneurs and innovators who open new markets, launch breakthrough technologies that impact the world, and -- along the way -- improve humanity. This course investigates the global scale and scope of innovation in companies large and small. It provides a contemporary view of the process of innovation and practice tools with which to tackle change in organizations, markets, communities, and countries. Prerequisites: ECON 604, ECON 612 or ECON 607 and ECON 618, ACCT 601 or ACCT 609 and ACCT 611, MGMT 602 or MGMT 605 and MGMT 612, and MKTG 603 or MKTH 608 and MKTG 617.

MBA 695. Selected Topics for MBA Modules. 1 Credit.

The study of selected topics not offered on a regular basis.

MBA 698. Corporate Field Project. 1-3 Credits.

Students will work with regional firms and non-profits to propose solutions for a real problem facing the firm. Prerequisites: ECON 604, BNAL 600, ACCT 601, and FIN 605.

MBA 999. MBA 999. 1 Credit.