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Old Dominion University

2013-2014 Catalog

Communication and Theatre Arts

http://www.odu.edu/al/theatre

Stephen Pullen, Chair

The Department of Communication and Theatre Arts offers two Bachelor of Arts majors, one in communication with emphasis areas in life span communication: relationships and groups; intercultural/international communication; public relations, advocacy, and persuasion; media studies; film studies; and communication foundations and one in theatre/dance with emphasis areas in either theatre, theatre-digital film making,  theatre-performance, theatre-design technology, theatre education, dance or dance education. A Bachelor of Science in communication is offered with emphasis areas in life span communication: relationships and groups, intercultural/international communication; public relations, advocacy, and persuasion; media studies; film studies; and communication foundations as well as a concentration in professional communication (also available via distance learning). Minors are offered in communication, theatre/dance with a theatre specialization, and theatre/dance with a dance specialization. Students must receive a grade of C (2.00) or better in all courses that count toward these majors and minors. All majors must fulfill the requirements of the College of Arts and Letters.

Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science—Communication Major

Carla Harrell, Chief Departmental Advisor for Communication

Lower Division General Education

Written Communication *6
English Composition
   and English Composition (must pass with C or better)
Oral Communication3
Public Speaking **
Mathematics3
Elementary Statistics (Required for BS)
Language and Culture ***0-12
Information Literacy and Research3
Human Creativity ****3
Interpreting the Past3
Literature3
Philosophy and Ethics3
The Nature of Science8
Impact of Technology *****0-3
Human Behavior ******3
Total Hours38-53

*

 Grade of C required in ENGL 110C before declaring major.

**

COMM 101R required in the communication core.

***

 Proficiency through 202 level for BA only and not met by associate degree; competence at the 102 level for BS students.

****

 COMM 270A/THEA 270A may not be used to satisfy this requirement.

*****

Can be met by COMM 372T.

******

COMM 200S may not be used to satisfy this requirement.

Departmental Requirements

Majors must have a C or better in all courses counted toward the major. Majors must also complete at least one writing intensive course in the major from the following courses:

Select one of the following3
Communication Between the Sexes
Rhetorical Criticism
Intercultural Communication
Interpersonal Communication Theory and Research
Electronic Media Law and Policy
International Film History
American Film History
Total Hours3

Communication Core—(B.A. 9 hours; B.S. 15 hours – see later section for core requirements in professional communication)

COMM 200SIntroduction to Human Communication3
COMM 260Understanding Media3
Total Hours6

In addition, B.A. Only:

COMM 301Critical Methodologies3
or
Rhetorical Criticism
or
Communication Analysis and Criticism
Total Hours3

In addition, B.S. Only:

COMM 302Communication Research Methods I3
Six hours of approved 300/400-level social science courses6
Total Hours9

Additional Communication Hours:

30 hours total for B.A. and 30 hours total for B.S., 24 of which must be at the 300-400 level selected from the following emphasis areas and electives.  Both the B.A. and B.S. degree seeking student is required to take 10 COMM classes beyond the core course requirements.  Eight of those 10 courses (24 hours) must be in the student's selected emphasis area (see options below).  Two courses (6 hours) may be 100-200 level and/or from any emphasis area.

Emphasis Areas (24 hours minimum)

Eight of the ten courses required for the degree must be in an emphasis area. Students may apply two 100/200 level courses to those 30 hours and can take two electives from any emphasis area.  

Lifespan Communication: Relationships and Groups  

Choose eight courses (24 hours): two courses (6 hours) from Foundations and six courses (18 hours) from Applied Theories 

Foundations (select two of the following)6
Nonverbal Communication
Foundations of Group Communication
Interpersonal Communication Theory and Research
Applied Theories (select six of the following)18
Communication Between the Sexes
Leadership and Events Management
Interpersonal Communication in Organizations
Organizational Communication
Internship
Communication Theory
Communication and Conflict Management
Nonviolent Communication and Peace
Family Communication Theory and Research
Group Communication Theory and Research
Children's Communication Theory and Research
Organizations and Social Influence
Total Hours24

Intercultural/International Communication

Choose eight courses (24 hours):  two courses (6 hours) from Foundations and six courses (18 hours) from Applied Theories 

Foundations (select two of the following)6
International Sojourning
Diplomatic Communication
Nonverbal Communication
Model League of Arab States
Intercultural Communication
Communication and Culture in the Middle East
Communication and Culture in Asia
African-American Rhetoric Voices of Liberation
Applied Theories (select six of the following)18
Understanding European Film
Media and Popular Culture
Public Journalism in the Digital Age
Internship
Reporting News for Television and Digital Media
Hispanic Film
German Cinema
German Cinema
Electronic Media Law and Policy
Transnational Media Systems
International Film History
New Media Topics: Theories and Practices
Television and Society
The Documentary Tradition
Total Hours24

Media Studies

Choose eight courses (24 hours):  two courses (6 hours) from Foundations and six courses (18 hours) from Applied Theories 

Foundations (select two of the following)6
Introduction to Public Relations
Understanding European Film
Production Management for Television and Stage
The Short Script
Media and Popular Culture
Screenwriting I
Radio
Electronic News
Public Journalism in the Digital Age
History of Animation
Introduction to New Media Technologies
Reporting News for Television and Digital Media
Applied Theories (select six of the following)18
Internship
The Music Industry and Communication
Hispanic Film
German Cinema
German Cinema
Electronic Media Law and Policy
Transnational Media Systems
Critical Analysis of Journalism
Mass Media and the National Elections
Media, Politics and Civic Engagement
Communication and Political Symbolism
International Film History
New Media Topics: Theories and Practices
Television and Society
Principles of Media Marketing and Promotion
American Film History
The Documentary Tradition
Screenwriting II
Film and Television Genres
Total Hours24

Film Studies

Choose eight courses (24 hours):  two courses (6 hours) from Foundations and six courses (18 hours) from Applied Theories 

Foundations (select two of the following)6
Screenwriting I
The Video Project
International Film History
American Film History
Applied Theories (select six of the following)18
The Short Script
Internship
History of Animation
The Video Documentary I
Hispanic Film
German Cinema
The Video Documentary II
The Documentary Tradition
Screenwriting II
Advanced Video Project
Film and Television Genres
Total Hours24

Public Relations, Advocacy, and Persuasion

Choose eight courses (24 hours):  two courses (6 hours) from Foundations and six courses (18 hours) from Applied Theories 

Foundations (select two of the following)6
Introduction to Public Relations
Advanced Public Speaking
Public Relations Writing
Nonverbal Communication
Leadership and Events Management
Foundations of Group Communication
Persuasion
Rhetorical Criticism
Interpersonal Communication in Organizations
Organizational Communication
Radio
Electronic News
Public Journalism in the Digital Age
Reporting News for Television and Digital Media
Applied Theories (select six of the following)18
Internship
Intercultural Communication
Public Relations and Crisis Communications
Interpersonal Communication Theory and Research
Communication and Conflict Management
Group Communication Theory and Research
Electronic Media Law and Policy
Transnational Media Systems
Critical Analysis of Journalism
Organizations and Social Influence
Mass Media and the National Elections
Media, Politics and Civic Engagement
Communication and Political Symbolism
New Media Topics: Theories and Practices
Television and Society
Principles of Media Marketing and Promotion
Total Hours24

Communication Foundations

Students will take two courses in each of the five emphasis areas.  Students cannot major in this emphasis without making an application and gaining the approval of a departmental advisor.

Communication electives (students may choose two courses (6 hours) from options below to apply to their chosen emphasis area.)

COMM 103RVoice and Diction3
COMM 112RIntroduction to Interpersonal Communication3
COMM 302Communication Research Methods I3
COMM 368Internship3
COMM 369Research Practicum3
COMM 401Communication Theory3
COMM 469Communication Education Practicum3

Please note that COMM 305 will not count in any of the emphasis areas in the B.A. or B.S. in communication. This course is a requirement in the professional communication concentration and is only for students in that concentration.

Internships, Practica, and Special Topics Classes

Students may apply only three credit hours of COMM 368 Internship toward the major in communication. In addition, students may apply only six credits total from the following classes toward the major:

Internship
Research Practicum
Communication Education Practicum

Special Topics in Communication courses and Communication Tutorials courses may be included in a given emphasis when and where appropriate:

COMM 395Topics in Communication1-3
COMM 396Topics in Communication1-3
COMM 495Topics in Communication1-3
COMM 496Topics in Communication1-3
COMM 497Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Communication1-3

 

B.S. in communication with a concentration in professional communication

Fran Hassencahl, Chief Departmental Advisor for Professional Communication Concentration

The professional communication concentration is also available through distance learning. Distant students who have completed a university parallel associate degree can complete two additional years of course work at the University's distance learning sites in order to earn a B.S. Distant students without a university parallel associate degree must complete the lower-division general education requirements.

Professional Communication Core12
Interdisciplinary Theory and Concepts
Communication Research Methods I
Professional Communication
Advanced Composition
Organizational Foundations - select four from the following *12
Computers in Society
Legal Environment of Business
Contemporary Organizations and Management
Human Resources Management
Employee Relations Problems and Practices
Organizational Behavior
Marketing Principles and Problems
Consumer Behavior
Advertising Strategy
Multi-National Marketing
Business Ethics
Industrial/Organizational Psychology
Social Psychology
Personnel Psychology
Human Factors
Organizational Psychology
Theories of Personality
Additional Hours in Communication - select five from the following15
Understanding Media
Introduction to Public Relations
Advanced Public Speaking
Nonverbal Communication
Communication Between the Sexes
Foundations of Group Communication
Persuasion
Interpersonal Communication in Organizations
Organizational Communication
Internship
Introduction to New Media Technologies
Topics in Communication
Intercultural Communication
Interpersonal Communication Theory and Research
Communication and Conflict Management
Electronic Media Law and Policy
Transnational Media Systems
Organizations and Social Influence
Media, Politics and Civic Engagement
Communication and Political Symbolism
Principles of Media Marketing and Promotion
The Documentary Tradition
Topics in Communication
Additional Hours in English - select two from the following6
Digital Writing
Technical Writing
Introduction to Rhetorical Studies
Public Journalism in the Digital Age
Editing and Document Design
Writing Internship
Introduction to Journalism and News Writing
Public Relations
Reporting News for Television and Digital Media
Topics in English
Topics in English
Writing in the Disciplines
Management Writing
Writing in Digital Spaces
Advanced Writing Internship
Language, Gender and Power
Advanced Public Relations
Sports Journalism
Feature Story Writing
Editorial and Persuasive Writing
Media Law and Ethics
Topics in English
Topics in English
Total Hours45

*

Meets the upper-division general education requirement

Elective Credit

Elective credit will be needed to meet the minimum requirement of 120 credit hours.

Upper Division General Education

  • Option A. Approved Minor, 12-24 hours; also second degree or second major
  • Option B. Interdisciplinary Minor, 12 hours specified by the department, 3 of which may be in the major area of study
  • Option C. International business and regional courses or an approved certification program, such as teaching licensure
  • Option D. Two Upper-Division Courses from outside the College of Arts and Letters or from the Arts and Humanities Component within the College of Arts and Letters that are not required by the major (6 hours).

Requirements for graduation include a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 overall and in the major, 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours of upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, and completion of Senior Assessment.

Accelerated B.A./B.S. in Communication and M.A. in Lifespan and Digital Communication

The accelerated bachelor’s/master’s degree in communication/lifespan and digital communication is administered by the Communication and Theatre Arts Department.  The purpose of this accelerated option is to allow exceptional majors in communication to count up to 12 hours of 500-level graduate coursework towards both the B.S. or B.A. in communication and, if accepted, the M.A. in lifespan and digital communication.

Accelerated B.A./B.S. in Communication and M.A. in Humanities

Please refer to the Humanities section of this Catalog for information on the accelerated program leading to a B.A. or B.S. in communication and an M.A. in humanities.

Minor in Communication

COMM 101R or COMM 103R and COMM 200S are prerequisite courses for the minor and are not included in the calculation of the GPA for the minor. The requirements for a minor in communication are twelve hours of communication courses at the 300- and 400-level excluding the following courses:  COMM 305COMM 367, COMM 375, and COMM 368 (may only be used once).

For completion of a minor, a student must have a grade of C (2.00) or better in all 300- and 400-level courses taken for the minor. Students must complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Bachelor of Arts–Theatre and Dance Major

Marilyn Marloff, Chief Departmental Advisor for Dance
Jenifer Alonzo, Chief Departmental Advisor for Theatre

Lower Division General Education Credits

Written Communication *6
Oral Communication **0-3
Mathematics3
Language and Culture ***0-12
Information Literacy and Research3
Human Creativity ****3
Interpreting the Past3
Literature3
Philosophy and Ethics3
The Nature of Science8
Impact of Technology *****0-3
Human Behavior ******3
Total Hours35-53

*

Grade of C or better required in both courses and in ENGL 110C before declaring major.

**

Satisfied by THEA 230 for theatre, theatre performance emphasis, theatre design technology emphasis and theatre education majors.

***

Proficiency through 202 level; proficiency not met by completion of an associate degree.

****

 Theatre majors may not use THEA 241A or  COMM 270A/THEA 270A; dance majors may not use DANC 185A.

*****

 Satisfied by TLED 430 for dance education and theatre education majors.

******

COMM 200S preferred.

Departmental Requirements

(students must select one concentration)

Majors must have a C or better in all courses counted toward the major.

Upper Division General Education

  • Option A. Approved Minor, 12-24 hours; also second degree or second major

  • Option B. Interdisciplinary Minor, 12 hours specified by the department, 3 of which may be in the major area of study

  • Option C. International business and regional courses or an approved certification program, such as teaching licensure

  • Option D. Two Upper-Division Courses from outside the College of Arts and Letters or from the Social Science Component within the College of Arts and Letters that are not required by the major (6 hours).

Theatre and dance majors: Requirements for graduation include a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 overall and in the major, 120-132 credit hours (depending on foreign language proficiency), which must include both a minimum of 25% of the total number of credit hours required for the degree and a minimum of 12 credit hours of upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, and completion of Senior Assessment.

Major in Theatre and Dance – Dance Specialization

Marilyn Marloff, Chief Departmental Advisor for Dance

Dance Concentration

DANC 350Dance Improvisation2
DANC 360Rhythmic Analysis1
DANC 370Dance Composition 12
DANC 389WDance History from 1900 until the Present3
DANC 393Anatomy and Kinesiology for Dance3
DANC 470Dance Composition 22
DANC 489Principles of Teaching Dance2
DANC 499Senior Project1
Select 12 credits from the following: 12
Ballet Technique 1
Ballet Technique 2
Ballet Technique 3
Ballet Technique 4
Ballet Technique 5
Ballet Technique 6
Select 12 credits from the following: 12
Modern Dance Technique 1
Modern Dance Technique 2
Modern Dance Technique 3
Modern Dance Technique 4
Modern Dance Technique 5
Modern Dance Technique 6
Two credits from ballet, modern, or jazz2
Select two credits from the following: 2
Dance Repertory and Performance 1
Dance Repertory and Performance 2
Advanced Repertory and Performance
DANC/THEA electives8
Total Hours52

Minimum of 26 credits of technique to include 12 credits of ballet, 12 credits of modern dance and 2 credits of additional ballet, modern or jazz.

Minimum of 3 credits of practicum experience to include 2 credits of repertory and performance and 1 credit of senior project.

Minimum of 8 credits of theatre and dance electives.

As a requirement to graduate, dance majors must achieve 400-level proficiency in ballet technique and modern technique. (Specifically, dance majors must achieve a C or better in DANC 404 or higher and DANC 414 or higher.) The continued maintenance of technical proficiency is required.

Dance Education Concentration

Admission

All students must apply for and be admitted into the approved dance education program. Students must meet the required criteria for admission by passing the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments and earn the minimum required grade point averages (GPA).

Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments:
  • A passing PRAXIS I composite score of 532 or
  • Qualifying SAT or ACT test scores or
  • PRAXIS I Math test score of 178 and a composite Virginia Communication and Literacy (VCLA) score of 470 or
  • SAT Mathematics test score of 530 and a composite Virginia Communication and Literacy (VCLA) score or 470 or
  • ACT Mathematics test score of 22 and a composite Virginia Communication and Literacy (VCLA) score of 470.

To view more information on the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments, visit the Teacher Education website, www.odu.edu/tes.

Required grade point averages (GPA):

  • A cumulative GPA of 2.75 is required.
  • A major/content GPA of 2.75 is required – all Dance courses must be passed with a grade of C or higher.
  • A professional education GPA of 2.75 is required – all professional education courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Although students may enroll in a limited number of education courses, students must be admitted into the approved dance education program prior to enrolling in any instructional strategies practicum education course. Students must also meet with an education advisor in the Office of Teacher Education Services.

Continuance

Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.75, a major/content GPA of 2.75 and a professional education GPA of 2.75. Dance courses must be passed with a grade of C or higher. The professional education core must be completed with a grade of C- or higher for continuance. A professional education GPA of 2.75 is required for continuance. Students must take and pass the Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA). There is not currently a PRAXIS II Dance content knowledge examination. If a Dance PRAXIS II assessment is established prior to the student applying for the teaching license, it will be required. All assessments must be passed prior to the start of the Teacher Candidate Internship Orientation session.

Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments:
  • Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) – a passing composite score of 470 is required on this reading and writing assessment.

To view more information on the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments, visit the Teacher Education Services website, www.odu.edu/tes.

Graduation

Requirements for graduation include completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better; completion of the Senior Assessment; a minimum cumulative 2.75 GPA in the major area and in the professional education core with no grade less than a C in the major/content and with no grade less than a C- in the professional education core; successful completion of the Teacher Candidate Internship, and a minimum of 120-132 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 25% of the total number of credit hours required for the degree and a minimum of 12 credit hours of upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University.

Due to changing University requirements, national accreditation standards, and the Virginia Board of Education licensure regulations, the teacher education programs in the College of Arts and Letters are under constant revision. Any changes resulting from these factors supersede the program requirements described in this Catalog. Students are encouraged to obtain current program information from their advisors and from the Teacher Education Services website at www.odu.edu/tes.

The curriculum is as follows:

Select 12 credits from the following:12
Ballet Technique 1
Ballet Technique 2
Ballet Technique 3
Ballet Technique 4
Ballet Technique 5
Ballet Technique 6
Select 10 credits from the following:10
Modern Dance Technique 1
Modern Dance Technique 2
Modern Dance Technique 3
Modern Dance Technique 4
Modern Dance Technique 5
Modern Dance Technique 6
Select one credit from the following:1
Jazz Dance 1
Jazz Dance 2
Jazz Dance 3
Jazz Dance 4
DANC 350Dance Improvisation2
DANC 360Rhythmic Analysis1
DANC 370Dance Composition 12
DANC 389WDance History from 1900 until the Present3
DANC 393Anatomy and Kinesiology for Dance3
DANC 490Pedagogy for Dance Educators3
Select two credits from the following:2
Dance Repertory and Performance 1
Dance Repertory and Performance 2
Advanced Repertory and Performance
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to Production Design
Introduction to Stage Makeup
PE 217Fundamental Movement Skills and Dance (or equivalent)2
EXSC 340Prevention and Care of Injuries Related to Physical Activity3
Total Hours47

As a requirement to graduate, dance majors must achieve 400-level proficiency in ballet technique and modern technique. (Specifically, dance majors must achieve a C or better in DANC 404 or higher and DANC 414 or higher.) The continued maintenance of technical proficiency is required.

Professional Education Core

TLED 301Foundations and Introduction to Assessment of Education3
TLED 360Classroom Management and Discipline2
TLED 408Reading and Writing in Content Areas3
TLED 430PK-12 Instructional Technology3
TLED 485Teacher Candidate Internship12
SPED 313Fundamentals of Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence3
SPED 406Students with Diverse Learning Needs in the General Education Classroom3
Total Hours29

Dance Education Post-Baccalaureate Endorsement Program

Candidates who have already earned an undergraduate degree in dance may seek a post-baccalaureate endorsement. Information on applying for this endorsement can be obtained from the Darden College of Education or the dance education program advisor. Students must have completed or must complete equivalencies for all course work required for the theatre and dance major, as well as complete all Professional Education core classes required for undergraduate dance education majors. The dance advisor will determine which transferable courses will meet the cognate program requirements and which dance and professional courses must be completed for the endorsement. All content area courses must be completed with a grade of C or better, and all professional education courses must be completed with a grade of C- or better. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 overall, in the major and in the professional education core is required for continuance and endorsement. Although students may enroll in a limited number of education courses, passing Praxis I scores or State Board of Education-approved SAT or ACT scores must be on file with the Office of Teacher Education Services prior to enrollment in any education practicum course or courses in developing instructional strategies. It is recommended that students take the Praxis I exam prior to, or during, enrollment in TLED 301.

Minor in Theatre and Dance–Dance Specialization


For a minor in theatre arts with a dance specialization, the student must complete 15 DANC hours AND the prerequisite course DANC 185A (which must be completed with a grade of C or better before declaring the minor). Courses must include:

  1. DANC 185A, which is a prerequisite course for the minor and is not included in the calculation of the GPA for the minor.
  2. Minimum of 12 hours at the 300 and 400 levels, with prior agreement by the department.
  3. Three additional DANC hours at any level; 100/200-level courses selected will not be included in the calculation of the GPA for the minor.

Students must have a grade of C (2.00) or better in all courses taken for the minor, including the prerequisite course DANC 185A, and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Major in Theatre and Dance-Theatre Specialization

Jenifer Alonzo, Chief Departmental Advisor for Theatre

Majors must have a grade of C or better in all courses counted toward the major.

Theatre Concentration - General

THEA 173+Theatre Activities1
THEA 174+Theatre Activities1
THEA 152Acting One3
THEA 225Introduction to Production Technology3
THEA 230Drama for Production *3
THEA 244Introduction to Production Design3
THEA 343History of Theatre: Beginnings to the Renaissance3
THEA 344History of Theatre: Classic Baroque to the Present3
THEA 442Principles of Directing3
THEA 449WScript and Performance Analysis3
THEA Activities **2
THEA/DANC Electives19
Total Hours47

*

 Meets oral communication requirement.

**

 THEA Activities required 2 hours in addition to 173+ and 174+; hours must be earned through off-stage participation.

Theatre Concentration – Digital Film Making Emphasis

THEA 225Introduction to Production Technology3
THEA 244Introduction to Production Design3
THEA 270AFilm Appreciation3
THEA 271Introduction to Digital Filmmaking3
THEA 330The Short Script3
THEA 346Screenwriting I3
THEA 370The Video Project3
THEA 446Directing for the Camera3
THEA 471WInternational Film History3
THEA 479WAmerican Film History3
THEA Electives17
Total Hours47

If a film studies minor is elected, students may not use the same film courses to fulfill requirements for the major and minor.

Theatre Concentration – Performance Emphasis

Admission

The performance emphasis is intended for students who wish to pursue performance as a career. Students will be admitted to the performance concentration through an audition and interview process administered by the faculty each spring. No student is guaranteed admittance or continuance in the performance concentration. Students may decide at any time to return to the general theatre concentration.

Continuance

Students must pass a proficiency audition administered by the faculty every spring. Students must abide by the theatre student handbook regulations for the performance concentration.

Requirements

THEA 173+Theatre Activities1
THEA 174+Theatre Activities1
THEA 152Acting One3
THEA 225Introduction to Production Technology3
THEA 230Drama for Production *3
THEA 252Acting Two3
THEA 320Auditioning Technique3
THEA 343History of Theatre: Beginnings to the Renaissance3
THEA 344History of Theatre: Classic Baroque to the Present3
THEA 347Movement for the Actor3
THEA 360Voice for the Stage I3
THEA 442Principles of Directing3
THEA 449WScript and Performance Analysis3
THEA Activites **2
THEA/DANC Electives10
Total Hours47

*

Meets oral communication requirement.

**

THEA Activities required 2 hours in addition to 173+ and 174+; hours must be earned through on-stage participation.

Theatre Concentration – Design Technology Emphasis

Admission

The design technology theatre emphasis is intended for students who wish to pursue theatre design technology as a career. Students will be admitted to the design technology emphasis through a portfolio review and interview process administered by the faculty in the spring. No student is guaranteed admittance or continuance in the design technology concentration. Students may decide at any time to return to the general theatre concentration.

Continuance

Students must pass a screening portfolio review and interview administered by the faculty every spring. Additionally students must maintain a C average and abide by the theatre student handbook regulations for the design technology concentration.

Requirements

THEA 173+Theatre Activities1
THEA 174+Theatre Activities1
THEA 152Acting One3
THEA 225Introduction to Production Technology3
THEA 230Drama for Production *3
THEA 244Introduction to Production Design3
THEA 271Introduction to Digital Filmmaking3
THEA 343History of Theatre: Beginnings to the Renaissance3
THEA 344History of Theatre: Classic Baroque to the Present3
THEA 442Principles of Directing3
THEA 449WScript and Performance Analysis3
THEA Activites **2
THEA/DANC Electives16
Total Hours47

*

Meets oral communication requirement.

**

THEA Activities required 2 hours in addition to 173+ and 174+; hours must be earned through off-stage participation.

Theatre Education Concentration

All students must apply for and be admitted into the approved teacher education program. Students must meet the required criteria for admission by passing the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments and earn the minimum required grade point averages (GPA).

Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments:
  • A passing PRAXIS I composite score of 532 or
  • Qualifying SAT or ACT test scores or
  • PRAXIS I Math test score of 178 and a composite Virginia Communication and Literacy (VCLA) score of 470 or
  • SAT Mathematics test score of 530 and a composite Virginia Communication and Literacy (VCLA) score or 470 or
  • ACT Mathematics test score of 22 and a composite Virginia Communication and Literacy (VCLA) score of 470

To review more information on the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments, visit the Teacher Education website, www.odu.edu/tes.

Required grade point averages (GPA):
  • A cumulative GPA of 2.75 is required.
  • A major/content GPA of 2.75 is required – all Theatre courses must be passed with a grade of C or higher.
  • A professional education GPA of 2.75 is required – all professional education courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Although students may enroll in a limited number of education courses, students must be admitted into the approved theatre education program prior to enrolling in any instructional strategies practicum education course. Students must also meet with an education advisor in the Office of Teacher Education Services.

Continuance

Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.75, a major/content GPA of 2.75 and a professional education GPA of 2.75. Theatre courses must be passed with a grade of C or higher. The professional education core must be completed with a grade of C- or higher for continuance. A professional education GPA of 2.75 is required for continuance. Students must take and pass the Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA). There is not currently a PRAXIS II Theatre content knowledge examination. If a Theatre PRAXIS II assessment is established prior to the student applying for the teaching license, it will be required. All assessments must be passed prior to the start of the Teacher Candidate Internship Orientation session.

Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments:
  • Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) – a passing composite score of 470 is required on this reading and writing assessment.

To review more information on the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments, visit the Teacher Education Services website, www.odu.edu/tes.

Graduation

Requirements for graduation include completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better; completion of the Senior Assessment; a minimum cumulative 2.75 GPA in the major area and in the professional education core with no grade less than a C in the major/content and with no grade less than a C- in the professional education core; successful completion of the Teacher Candidate Internship, and a minimum of 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours of upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University.

Due to changing University requirements, national accreditation standards, and the Virginia Board of Education licensure regulations, the teacher education programs in the College of Arts and Letters are under constant revision. Any changes resulting from these factors supersede the program requirements described in this Catalog. Students are encouraged to obtain current program information from their advisors and from the Teacher Education Services website at www.odu.edu/tes.

The curriculum is as follows:

THEA 152Acting One3
THEA 230Drama for Production *3
THEA 241AThe Theatre Experience3
THEA 244Introduction to Production Design3
THEA 248Introduction to Stage Makeup3
THEA 343History of Theatre: Beginnings to the Renaissance3
THEA 344History of Theatre: Classic Baroque to the Present3
THEA 442Principles of Directing3
THEA 449WScript and Performance Analysis3
THEA 489Methods of Teaching Theatre3
THEA 490Theatre Education Practicum1
THEA Activites **3
THEA/DANC electives ***6
Total Hours40

*

Meets oral communication requirement.

**

THEA Activities 3 hours required: 2 hours must be earned through off stage production participation.

***

THEA/DANC electives: at least three elective hours should be at the 300-400 level and focus on performance or design/theatre technology.

Professional Education Core

TLED 301Foundations and Introduction to Assessment of Education3
TLED 360Classroom Management and Discipline2
TLED 408Reading and Writing in Content Areas3
TLED 430PK-12 Instructional Technology *3
TLED 485Teacher Candidate Internship **12
SPED 313Fundamentals of Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence3
SPED 406Students with Diverse Learning Needs in the General Education Classroom3
Total Hours29

*

Meets impact of technology requirement.

**

Student teaching.

Theatre Education Post-Baccalaureate Endorsement Program

Candidates who have already earned an undergraduate degree in theatre may seek licensure only. Information on applying for licensure can be obtained from the Darden College of Education or the theatre education program advisor. Students must have completed or must complete equivalencies for all course work required for the theatre and dance major, as well as complete all Professional Education core classes required for undergraduate theatre education majors. The theatre advisor will determine which transferable courses will meet the cognate program requirements and which theatre and professional courses must be completed for licensure. All content area courses must be completed with a grade of C or better, and all professional education courses must be completed with a grade of C- or better. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 overall, in the major and in the professional education core is required for continuance and licensure. Although students may enroll in a limited number of education courses, passing Praxis I scores or State Board of Education-approved SAT or ACT scores must be on file with the Office of Teacher Education Services prior to enrollment in any education practicum course or courses in developing instructional strategies. It is recommended that students take the Praxis I exam prior to, or during, enrollment in TLED 301.

Performance Attendance Requirements for Theatre

All theatre majors and intended theatre majors, as part of their degree programs, are required to attend department-sponsored events each semester as follows: students taking 12 or more credits in one semester–five Performances/ Encounters/Strikes per semester; less than 12 credits in one semester–three Performances/Encounters/Strikes per semester. Theatre minor attendance requirements are two Performances/Encounters/Strikes per semester. Deficiencies must be made up before graduation.

To become a well rounded theatre artist, each theatre major MUST obtain 40 theatre events tickets to graduate. Deficiencies must be made up before graduation. These should be logged in the student's Production Record held with the departmental advisor.

Minor in Theatre and Dance - Theatre Specialization

For a minor in theatre arts with a theatre specialization, the student must complete 15 THEA hours AND the prerequisite course THEA 241A (which must be completed with a grade of C or better before declaring the minor). Courses must include:

  1. THEA 241A is a prerequisite course for the minor and is not included in the calculation of the GPA for the minor.
  2. Minimum of 12 hours at the 300 and 400 levels, with prior agreement by the department.
  3. Three additional THEA hours at any level; 100/200 level courses selected will not be included in the calculation of the GPA for the minor.

Students must have a grade of C (2.00) or better in all courses taken for the minor, including the prerequisite course THEA 241A, and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Bachelor of Fine Arts—Acting Major

The Bachelor of Fine Arts in acting is planned for deactivation. Please contact the department for information.

COMMUNICATIONS Courses

COMM 101R. Public Speaking. 3 Credits.

Preparation, delivery, and analysis of types of speeches with emphasis on extemporaneous speaking.

COMM 103R. Voice and Diction. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the analysis and practice of effective voice and articulation. Applications across various communication contexts, such as public communication, media, and social communication.

COMM 112R. Introduction to Interpersonal Communication. 3 Credits.

An introduction to concepts, processes, and effects of communication in personal and social relationships. Emphasis on fundamental communication skills necessary for the formation and maintenance of relationships.

COMM 126R. Honors: Public Speaking. 3 Credits.

Open only to students in the Honors College. A study of the theory, strategies, and techniques of public speaking with emphasis on its application to effective conflict resolution.

COMM 195. Topics in Communication. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for non-majors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in a booklet distributed to all academic advisors.

COMM 196. Topics in Communication. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for non-majors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in a booklet distributed to all academic advisors.

COMM 200S. Introduction to Human Communication. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the discipline and methods of human communication. Survey of the major approaches to studying communication across the range of human communication contexts and functions.

COMM 225. Introduction to Production Technology. 3 Credits.

Fundamentals of construction, lighting, and production techniques in contemporary theatre and film. Students will apply acquired skills to active productions for ODU Theatre and Film productions.

COMM 226S. Honors: Introduction to Human Communication. 3 Credits.

Open only to students in the Honors College. An introduction to the discipline and methods of human communication. Survey of the major approaches to studying communication across the range of human communication contexts and functions.

COMM 227A. Honors: Film Appreciation. 3 Credits.

Open only to students in the Honors College. This class will focus on both contextual and close text analysis of masterworks as they have influenced film art and industry. Students in this course are expected to develop basic research, communication, viewing and critical thinking skills as they apply their knowledge to the analysis of the film experience.

COMM 260. Understanding Media. 3 Credits.

An examination of mass communication--books, newspapers, magazines, radio, TV, film, sound recordings, and the Internet--as a global institution, industry, and social force. Media literacy skills are emphasized, as are matters of technology, content, economics, history and impact.

COMM 270A. Film Appreciation. 3 Credits.

This class focuses on both contextual and close text analysis of masterworks as they have influenced film art and industry. Students in this course are expected to develop basic research, communication, viewing and critical thinking skills as they apply their knowledge to the analysis of the film experience.

COMM 271. Introduction to Digital Filmmaking. 3 Credits.

This course introduces the beginning filmmaking student to the elements of digital filmmaking. Students will learn the basics of cameras, lights, sound, editing and post production. This is a hands-on production course.

COMM 300. International Sojourning. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to prepare ODU study-abroad students for successful international sojourns. Topics to be covered include culture, culture shock, reverse culture shock and strategies for a successful study-abroad experience. Prerequisites: junior standing or permission of instructor.

COMM 301. Critical Methodologies. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 260. This survey course introduces students to critical methodologies utilized in the study of media texts. Through case studies and hands-on exercises, students will learn how to study the production, consumption, and engagement with popular culture and how to decode its meanings.

COMM 302. Communication Research Methods I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to communication research from a social science perspective. Experiment, survey, content analysis and observational approaches are covered. Students learn statistical data collection and data analysis techniques. Prerequisites: STAT 130M, COMM 200S and six hours of 300-400 level communication courses or permission of instructor.

COMM 303. Introduction to Public Relations. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 200S or permission of the instructor. A study of interactions within and among communication workplaces and the public. Attention is given to the media, promotions, community relations, and public information.

COMM 304. Advanced Public Speaking. 3 Credits.

An analysis and expression of professional speeches, delivered in public, business and special occasion contexts. Attention is given to audience analysis, library research, development of arguments/evidence as content, creation and use of professional visual aids, expression of appropriate verbal and nonverbal speech cues, speaker credibility, and extemporaneous delivery skills. Prerequisites: COMM 101R.

COMM 305. Professional Communication. 3 Credits.

An examination of both the theory and practice of communication in the professional setting. Content includes communication theory, as well as the roles of interpersonal, small group, organizational, and mass media communication as related to the workplace. A student receiving credit for COMM 305 cannot receive credit toward the Communication major for COMM 200S. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

COMM 306. Diplomatic Communication. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic elements of diplomatic communication by providing them with an overview of the language, the protocol, contact practices, and administrative policies of the Diplomatic Corps. Students will be trained in the technical aspects of diplomatic discourse from resolution writing to mission briefings, and the ever-evolving use of computers and other electronic modes of communication in carrying out government business. Prerequisites: COMM 300 or COMM 400W.

COMM 307. Understanding European Film. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with an historic overview of films from a variety of European countries. Students gain the vocabulary necessary to analyze individual films and for the comparative analysis of films from different cultural and historical contexts. The course will focus on issues such as national and individual identity, film as aesthetic form, gender and sexuality, and popular culture. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

COMM 308. Public Relations Writing. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 303 or permission of the instructor. This course is designed to introduce students to the basic elements of public relations writing. Through an examination of scholarly texts, case studies and media coverage of public relations scenarios, students will develop an understanding of the crucial role that writing plays in effective public relations. Students will also be required to complete several writing assignments that relate to actual public relations scenarios.

COMM 314. Nonverbal Communication. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the theories, processes and effects of communication in nonverbal codes. Topics include kinesics, proxemics and paralanguage. Critical analysis and contemporary research emphasized. Prerequisites: Junior standing and COMM 200S, or permission of the instructor.

COMM 315W. Communication Between the Sexes. 3 Credits.

An overview of communication theory and research examining verbal and nonverbal communication between men and women. Topics include communication differences as a function of gender, theories that seek to explain these differences, and prescriptions for change: "the hope of androgyny." (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: Junior standing, COMM 200S, and a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, or permission of the instructor.

COMM 321. Production Management for Television and Stage. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor. This course assists students in understanding the elements of production management both in television and on stage. The course emphasizes organizational and communication skills; technical production knowledge; professional rehearsal and performance protocol according to the rules of AEA, AFTRA and SAG as well as basic production budgeting and scheduling.

COMM 323. Leadership and Events Management. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 200S or permission of the instructor. The course covers the systematic process of organizational assessment from basic communication channels (verbal, printed, and electronic modes of communication), to interpersonal and group communication, to the management of events and staff. This course examines the importance of leadership roles within organizations in planning any event as well as the communication dynamics between management and those being supervised.

COMM 325. Sound Design for Stage and Camera. 3 Credits.

This class introduces the concepts and techniques of sound design and sound effects for the stage and camera. Students learn design of sound elements in both a live and recorded environment as well as learn the current equipment and software in digital sound reproduction. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

COMM 326. Foundations of Group Communication. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and COMM 200S or permission of the instructor. An introduction to the study of communication in task groups. Course reviews foundational literature and emphasizes communication competencies relevant to optimizing group outcomes including group observation, participation, assessment, and leadership.

COMM 330. The Short Script. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor. This course introduces the principles of screenwriting using the short script as a basis for the exploration. The intent of the course is to introduce concepts of format, characterization, plot, dialogue and narrative style for the short script.

COMM 331. Argumentation and Debate. 3 Credits.

Study of the principles of argumentation; frequent practice in debating current public problems. Prerequisites: COMM 101R or permission of the instructor.

COMM 333. Persuasion. 3 Credits.

An overview of the rhetorical and social scientific theories and research about persuasion and applications in speeches and campaigns. Prerequisites: COMM 200S or permission of the instructor.

COMM 335W. Rhetorical Criticism. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 101R and a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, or permission of the instructor. With the goal of being able to critique a communication event, students study a variety of rhetorical approaches that may include neo-Aristotelian, generic, feminist, metaphoric, fantasy theme, and pentadic approaches to rhetorical criticism. (This is a writing intensive course.).

COMM 337. Model League of Arab States. 3 Credits.

A study of the basic principles of negotiation and diplomacy through the vehicle of a simulation. Students study political, economic and social issues that impact upon the Middle East, research and prepare issue positions and debate/discuss these positions in a model. Prerequisites: COMM 101R.

COMM 340. Media and Popular Culture. 3 Credits.

This course examines the basic ways in which the mass media intersect with the currents of contemporary culture. Both historical and critical approaches to the study of mass communication and popular culture trace the full implications of their mutual determination and interdependence. Prerequisites: COMM 260.

COMM 341. Lighting Design for Stage and Film. 3 Credits.

This is a production course introducing students to the world of light and shadow, mood and composition by surveying lighting design, its technologies for stage and camera, and such principles as basic electrical theory and stage/studio/location design aesthetics. Prerequisites: COMM 370 or THEA 370 or permission of instructor.

COMM 346. Screenwriting I. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Junior standing. A course that exposes the student to the fundamental narrative screenwriting principles taught through text reading, film viewing and analysis, class discussions, and writing assignments.

COMM 348. Acting for the Camera. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: THEA 152. This course examines the process of building characters for the camera, and the ways in which the conventions of the stage are adapted for the film or video audience.

COMM 349. Costume Design for Stage and Camera. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: THEA 244. This course explores the design aesthetic, historical context, and contemporary impact on performance of the costume garment and its accessories. Students explore the application of design principles in a practical experience.

COMM 351. Interpersonal Communication in Organizations. 3 Credits.

Focuses on communication theory, research, and applications of a variety of forms of communication in organizational relationships. Topics include superior-subordinate communication, interviewing, and presentations with an emphasis on a diversity of perspectives and types of organizations. Prerequisites: Junior standing and COMM 200S or permission of the instructor.

COMM 355. Organizational Communication. 3 Credits.

Focuses on critical analysis of theory and research organizations as functional communication systems at the individual, dyadic, small group, and organizational levels. Topics include information processing, problem solving, impression management, compliance gaining, and network analysis. Prerequisites: COMM 200S or permission of instructor.

COMM 364. Radio. 3 Credits.

Focuses on programming, station practices, ownership, and operations of radio stations in the context of past, present, and future market and regulatory restrictions. Demonstration audio tapes and station visits required. Prerequisites: COMM 260 or permission of the instructor.

COMM 365. Electronic News. 3 Credits.

Theory and techniques of preparing news for the electronic media, including evaluation of newscasts and news reports for radio, television, and cable. Electronic news on the local, national, and international levels is analyzed as an institution and as a social force. Prerequisites: COMM 260 or permission of instructor.

COMM 366. Public Journalism in the Digital Age. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C; ENGL 380 or ENGL 382 or COMM 260; or permission of the instructor. This course exposes students to conventional and alternative approaches to reporting in public journalism. Students use a combination of conventional and alternative approaches as they research, interview, and construct a story on a local community issue or concern.

COMM 367. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits.

Available for pass/fail grading only. Student participation for credit based on the academic relevance of the work experience, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and Career Management prior to the semester in which the work experience takes place. May be repeated for credit. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: Approval of the department and Career Management, in accordance with the policy for granting credit for Cooperative Education programs.

COMM 368. Internship. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Approval of department chair prior to registration. A structured work experience with or without remuneration, in a communication-related field. A paper, a log and portfolio of work time plus satisfactory evaluations by supervisor and cooperating faculty member are required. Available for pass/fail grading only. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.).

COMM 369. Research Practicum. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Completion of core courses and 6 hours of upper-level major courses; approval of supervising faculty and department chair prior to registration. A structured research experience, under the supervision of communication faculty member. A paper evaluating/analyzing the research, a log of research progress, and satisfactory evaluation by the supervising faculty are required. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.).

COMM 370. The Video Project. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: THEA 271 or COMM 271 and junior standing or permission of the instructor. A studio course that presents an opportunity for the student to produce digital video content. This is a hands-on course which is organized to allow the student to experience the entire process of developing a project for the camera from scripting through filming to editing and finishing detail.

COMM 371. History of Animation. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor. This course traces the evolution of the animated film worldwide, from the silent to the modern era. The purpose of the course is to provide students with a broad chronological and international overview of animated film masterworks.

COMM 372T. Introduction to New Media Technologies. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor. Introduction to new media practices and theories. Focuses upon the powers of composition, networked communities, information management, social networking and identification in digital environments. Students will examine practical applications such as blogging, online mapping and tagging, online collaborative work such as wikis and self composition in online social networks.

COMM 375. Television Production. 3 Credits.

This course explores the basic process of producing television from script to presentation. Prerequisites: COMM 271 or THEA 271 or permission of the instructor.

COMM 380. The Video Documentary I. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 271 or THEA 271. This course offers the student an opportunity to explore the world of documentary filmmaking. By using the camera as a research tool in developing evidence in support of a thesis, the student is better able to understand documentary filmmaking. Students will develop projects leading towards the completion of a short documentary film or video.

COMM 382. Reporting News for Television and Digital Media. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C. This course focuses on writing for television news and producing online news reports. Students will strengthen their journalistic skills and learn the importance of writing clearly for a viewing audience while working under newsroom deadlines. By the end of the course, students should feel confident in producing accurate, detailed reports for television news and online news sites.

COMM 385. Cinematography. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 370 or THEA 370. Introduces students to the fundamentals of the videographed digital image. The course explores live-action photography, compositing, filters, digital formats, motion control, and grip equipment. The concepts of the course are applied to fiction and nonfiction cinema.

COMM 395. Topics in Communication. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for non-majors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors. Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of the instructor.

COMM 396. Topics in Communication. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors. Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of the instructor.

COMM 400W/500. Intercultural Communication. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 200S and a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, or permission of instructor. This course is designed to introduce students to the study of communication in cultural contexts, the purpose of which is to prepare one to live and work within an increasingly multicultural world. This is accomplished by defining and critically analyzing concepts of culture. Throughout the semester, the course will investigate theories of culture and communication that address the development of cultural identity, intercultural communication competence, the role of verbal and nonverbal communication across cultures, the cultural composition of the U.S., and ethical communication and challenge in a globalized era. (This is a writing intensive course.).

COMM 401/501. Communication Theory. 3 Credits.

An overview of general and contextual theories of communication. Focus is on the nature of communication theory, the role of theory in communication inquiry, and the relationships among theory, research, and practice. Prerequisites: COMM 200S or permission of the instructor.

COMM 403/503. Public Relations and Crisis Communications. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 303 or permission of instructor. This course introduces students to the basic elements of public relations as it pertains to assisting organizations avoid, mitigate and recover from crisis situations. Students will have the opportunity to both observe and participate in crisis communications situations.

COMM 405/505. Communication and Culture in the Middle East. 3 Credits.

The course examines the tensions between modernity and tradition in the context of Middle East culture. Cultural variables for study include myth and religion, family structures and the use of science and technology. Prerequisites: Six hours of lower-level social science course work.

COMM 407/507. Communication and Culture in Asia. 3 Credits.

Course provides theoretical models for examining the values, communication patterns and cultural perspectives of the peoples of Asia. Films, folklore, newspapers and literature from Asia are investigated. Prerequisites: Six hours of lower level social science course work.

COMM 412W/512. Interpersonal Communication Theory and Research. 3 Credits.

A survey of classic and contemporary theories and research of communication in personal and social relationships across the lifespan. Emphasizes communication as a means to facilitate conditions for development of positive relational outcomes. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: COMM 200S and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C with a grade of C or better.

COMM 421/521. Communication and Conflict Management. 3 Credits.

Focus on theory and research of communication processes in conflict episodes across social and personal relational contexts. Applications of communication approaches to conflict management emphasized. Prerequisites: Junior standing and COMM 200S or permission of the instructor.

COMM 423. Nonviolent Communication and Peace. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Junior standing. Perspectives on nonviolent communication and peace are covered from the micro level (e.g., individual beliefs and worldviews) to interpersonal relationships (e.g., conflict management), groups (e.g., tribes, gangs), organizational systems (e.g., businesses, governments), and macro or global level (e.g., political relationships between nations).

COMM 425/525. Family Communication Theory and Research. 3 Credits.

A survey of classic and contemporary theories and research of communication in family units, family relationships, and family interfacings with society. The course emphasizes communication in the social construction of evolving 'family' realities as well as communication as means to facilitate conditions for development of positive domestic outcomes. Prerequisites: Junior standing and COMM 200S or permission of the instructor.

COMM 426. Group Communication Theory and Research. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 200S and COMM 326. A survey of classic and contemporary theories and research of communication in task groups as well as the interconnections of task groups with societal institutions such as the family, government, and health care. Communication factors that facilitate conditions for creating and maintaining optimally functioning groups are emphasized.

COMM 427/527. Children's Communication Theory and Research. 3 Credits.

A survey of theories and research of communication during childhood. Emphasis is on children as developing communicators, their relationships, and their interactions with media. Factors affecting optimal development of children's communication and development of applications to enhance children's communication development are emphasized. Prerequisites: COMM 200S or permission of instructor.

COMM 434/534. African-American Rhetoric Voices of Liberation. 3 Credits.

With the goals of examining the rhetorical strategies and their historical context, students will study and critique original speeches and various forms of discourse by African-American speakers. Prerequisites: COMM 200S or permission of the instructor.

COMM 441. The Music Industry and Communication. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 260 or permission of instructor. This course will seek to better understand the music industry. To do this, the organization and operation of the modern music industry will be examined. Issues of publishing, copyright and intellectual property and technology will also be examined.

COMM 443/543. Hispanic Film. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 270A or THEA 270A or permission of the instructor. A topical study of the major works of Spanish and Latin American film from Buneul to the present. The course will explore many issues, including those related to gender, race, symbolism, and class struggle.

COMM 444/544. German Cinema. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the German cinema from perspectives such as fascism and its legacy, film as historical critique, and Weimar cinema. Prerequisites: COMM 270A or permission of the instructor.

COMM 445/545. Communication Analysis and Criticism. 3 Credits.

A survey of the key methods used in critiquing various forms of human and mediated communication for the purpose of becoming more discerning consumers of public and mass mediated messages. Analysis will include films, television, and radio programs, advertisements, newspapers, public discourses, speeches, and conversations. Prerequisites: COMM 200S or permission of the instructor.

COMM 446. Directing for the Camera. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 271 or THEA 271 and COMM 370 or THEA 370. This course seeks to provide students with fundamental principles and practical techniques of directing the narrative fiction film: script development and analysis, production planning, shot composition and framing, and working with actors and crew.

COMM 447W/547. Electronic Media Law and Policy. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on legal and policy issues related to modern media systems and technologies, with an emphasis on legal considerations of electronic media. Topics include First Amendment issues concerning news, programming, and advertising; station licensing; and challenges to traditional legal thought brought about by new technologies. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: COMM 260 and a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, or permission of the instructor.

COMM 448/548. Transnational Media Systems. 3 Credits.

An examination of the rise of broadcast technology and world flow of information and entertainment. Theory and policy issues of systems of broadcast ownership, access, regulation, programming, transborder, broadcasting and cultural imperialism and dominance of Western programming will be addressed. Prerequisites: COMM 260 or permission of the instructor.

COMM 455/555. Critical Analysis of Journalism. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 260 or permission of instructor. A critical examination of the news industry as practiced in the printed press, network and cable television, magazines, the Internet, and alternative press. Class examines the political economy of journalism, the sociology of journalistic practice, international news flows, ideological/political control of news, and mythological narrative forms within news.

COMM 456/556. Organizations and Social Influence. 3 Credits.

Focuses on theories, research and applications of the social influence function of communication in a variety of organizational contexts. Examines traditional and nontraditional social influence theories and research as applied to organizational change. Prerequisites: COMM 333 or COMM 355 or permission of the instructor.

COMM 465/565. Mass Media and the National Elections. 3 Credits.

Focuses on use of media in presidential elections from 1952 to the present. Topics include image creation and management, and the relationship between media and voting behavior. Prerequisites: COMM 260, junior standing, or permission of the instructor.

COMM 467/567. Media, Politics and Civic Engagement. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the ways in which citizens develop knowledge of, engage with, and practice politics through mass media and personal media forms. Students examine historical and contemporary practices of civic engagement and political organizing via media such as the alternative press, talk radio, rebel radio, letters-to-the-editor, the Internet, cinematic representations, public access television, and others. Students seek to understand the power available to citizens for political engagement via mediated communication forms. Prerequisites: COMM 260 or permission of instructor.

COMM 468/568. Communication and Political Symbolism. 3 Credits.

The persistent communication and display of symbols and rituals of political meaning are central to how political power is built and legitimately exercised. This course examines such symbols and rituals by focusing on public rituals such as elections, the State of the Union address, and wars; political symbols such as the American and Confederate flag, Statue of Liberty, and television news; and institutions and practices related to public memory, such as war memorials, historical reenactments, museum and theme park displays, and firm narratives. Prerequisites: COMM 260 or permission of instructor.

COMM 469. Communication Education Practicum. 3 Credits.

An examination of communication education theory and methodology via structured experiences and readings. Students taking this course serve as teaching assistants for COMM 200S, which serves as a lab for practicing skills and techniques. Prerequisites: Completion of core courses and 6 hours of upper-level major courses, and approval of supervising faculty and department chair.

COMM 471W/571. International Film History. 3 Credits.

An examination of world cinema as a technology, a business, an institution, and an art form from its inception to the present. Emphasis is on the narrative fiction film, its technological and aesthetic development, economic organization, and socio-cultural context. Representative classic and contemporary works will be screened and analyzed. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: COMM 270A or THEA 270A, a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, and junior standing or permission of the instructor.

COMM 472/572. New Media Topics: Theories and Practices. 3 Credits.

This upper-division seminar investigates one or two particular emergent new media practices and theories. The topics will be chosen at the discretion of the instructor but may include issues such as "mobile media," "micro media and audiences," and "social media." Prerequisites: COMM 372T or permission of the instructor.

COMM 473/573. Television and Society. 3 Credits.

The role of television in the cultural, psychological, and economic life of America. The structure and design of television programs; and the history and function of television in reinforcing or altering public perceptions of ideas, events, and people. Major critical approaches are employed in examining television's social impact and global reach. Prerequisites: Junior standing and COMM 260.

COMM 478/578. Principles of Media Marketing and Promotion. 3 Credits.

Course introduces students to the ways in which different media forms are used for advertising and marketing purposes. Emphasis is on electronic media, though other approaches, such as direct marketing techniques and the increasing use of new media technologies for marketing, are also examined. Prerequisites: Junior standing and COMM 260 or permission of the instructor.

COMM 479W/579. American Film History. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 270A or THEA 270A, a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, and junior standing or permission of the instructor. An examination of American motion pictures as an art form, a business and an institution from inception to the present. Primary attention is accorded to the narrative fiction film, its aesthetic and technological development, economic organization and social impact. This course highlights the many connections between film history and American culture. (This is a writing intensive course.).

COMM 480/580. The Video Documentary II. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 380 or THEA 380. This is a production/studio course designed to complete the preparatory work developed in THEA 380: The Video Documentary I. Discussion/presentation topics range from production field work to post-production editing. The final third of the semester will be devoted to compiling the rough footage in post production.

COMM 481/581. The Documentary Tradition. 3 Credits.

An in-depth investigation of the history and theory of the documentary tradition in film, television, and radio. Examining both American and international examples, the course will look at major schools, movements, goals, and styles of documentary production. Representative texts will be studied for their socio-political influences, persuasive techniques, and aesthetic formulas. Prerequisites: COMM 260 or permission of instructor.

COMM 482. Screenwriting II. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 346 or THEA 346. Students explore visual storytelling through the theories guiding character development, narrative construction, thematic layers, scene analysis, and many more. Students participate in a variety of critical and writing exercises to enhance their knowledge of the craft of screenwriting.

COMM 483. Advanced Video Project. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 370 or THEA 370. This course introduces students to the processes and techniques of a narrative film production. Students experience pre-production, production, and post-production phases in creating a product to be entered in regional and national competitions.

COMM 485/585. Film and Television Genres. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 270A or THEA 270A or COMM 260. This course is designed to examine the conventions and meanings of various film and television genres within their broader aesthetic, socio-historical, cultural, and political contexts. Each time the class is offered it will focus in depth on a different genre, such as the gangster, the Western, the musical, the comedy, science fiction, among others.

COMM 486/586. Advanced Filmmaking. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 346 or THEA 346 and COMM 370 or THEA 370 and COMM 385 or THEA 385 and COMM 446 or THEA 446 and COMM 483 or THEA 483. Offers the advanced film/video maker an opportunity to produce a project beyond the scope of previous classroom projects. Students come to the course in production teams (typically 5 members), with each member assigned a specific duty (cinematography, editing, directing, etc.). Students are permitted into the course solely by instructor approval and only after demonstration of superior skills in subordinate courses and acceptance of a submitted screenplay.

COMM 495/595. Topics in Communication. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors. Prerequisites: Appropriate survey course or permission of the instructor.

COMM 496/596. Topics in Communication. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors. Prerequisites: Appropriate survey course or permission of the instructor.

COMM 497/597. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Communication. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the department chair.

COMM 498/598. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Communication. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the department chair.

DANCE Courses

DANC 185A. Dance and Its Audience. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to acquaint students with the components of theatrical dance performance, its historical and ethnic origins, its role as a creative expression of peoples and societies and its relationship to other art forms. Through films, videos, live performances, guest speakers, readings and discussions, students consider philosophical approaches to language, communication, aesthetics and style of choreography.

DANC 195. Topics in Dance. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in a booklet distributed to academic advisors.

DANC 196. Topics in Dance. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in a booklet distributed to academic advisors.

DANC 201. Ballet Technique 1. 2 Credits.

Introduction to classical ballet technique.

DANC 211. Modern Dance Technique 1. 2 Credits.

Introduction to modern dance technique.

DANC 231. Ballroom Dance 1. 1 Credit.

This class introduces students to basic American and Latin ballroom dance. Basic steps of the foxtrot, waltz, swing, tango, cha cha and rumba will be covered. Focus on rhythm, technique, leading and following is also included. This class is open to single students and couples.

DANC 232. Ballroom Dance 2. 1 Credit.

This class is a continuation of basic American and Latin ballroom dance. Basic steps of the foxtrot, waltz, swing, tango, cha cha and rumba will be covered. Focus is on rhythm, technique, leading and following. The class is open to single students and couples.

DANC 233. Ballroom Dance 3. 1 Credit.

This class is a continuation of American and Latin ballroom dance 2. Basic steps of the foxtrot, waltz, swing, tango, cha cha and rumba are covered. Focus is on rhythm, technique, leading and following. This class is open to single students and couples. Prerequisites: DANC 231 or DANC 232 or permission of the instructor.

DANC 234. Ballroom Dance 4. 1 Credit.

This class is a continuation of American and Latin ballroom dance 3. Basic steps of the foxtrot, waltz, swing, tango, cha cha and rumba are covered. Focus is on rhythm, technique, leading and following. This class is open to single students and couples. Prerequisites: DANC 231, DANC 232 or DANC 233 or permission of the instructor.

DANC 235. Yoga 1. 2 Credits.

An introduction to yoga postures, breathing exercises, and relaxation techniques that promote health, alleviate stress, improve skeletal alignment, and increase muscular strength and flexibility. Students are also introduced to the history and philosophy of yoga.

DANC 236. Yoga 2. 2 Credits.

A continuation of the study of yoga postures, breathing exercises, and relaxation techniques that promote health, alleviate stress, improve skeletal alignment, and increase muscular strength and flexibility. Students also continue the study of the history and philosophy of yoga. Prerequisites: DANC 235 or permission of the instructor.

DANC 241. Pilates Mat Class I. 1 Credit.

The Pilates method of body conditioning is an exercise system focused on improving flexibility and strength for the total body without building bulk. It is a series of controlled movements engaging the body and mind supervised by an extensively trained teacher. It promotes physical harmony and balance while providing a refreshing and energizing workout. Currently the Pilates method is used internationally by individuals at all levels of fitness as well as by dance companies, sports teams, fitness enthusiasts and physical therapists.

DANC 242. Pilates Mat Class 2. 1 Credit.

The Pilates method of body conditioning is an exercise system focused on improving flexibility and strength for the total body without building bulk. It is a series of controlled movements engaging the body and mind supervised by an extensively trained teacher. It promotes physical harmony and balance while providing a refreshing and energizing workout. Currently the Pilates Method is used internationally by individuals at all levels of fitness as well as by dance companies, sports teams, fitness enthusiasts and physical therapists. This course continues the concepts introduced in Pilates Mat Class 1. Prerequisites: DANC 241 or permission of the instructor.

DANC 251. Tap Dance I. 1 Credit.

Introduction to tap dance styles including classic, hoof and rhythm. Fundamental movements such as time steps, grab-offs, riffs, etc. are incorporated using counterpoint rhythms and challenges. Students gain an understanding of tap dance as an American art form.

DANC 252. Tap Dance II. 1 Credit.

Continuation of tap dance styles including classic, hoof and rhythm. Fundamental movements such as time steps, grab-offs, riffs, etc. will be incorporated and developed using counterpoint rhythms and challenges. Students gain an understanding of tap dance as an American art form. Prerequisites: DANC 251 or permission of the instructor.

DANC 260. Introduction to Dance Technique. 1 Credit.

This serves as an elective course for students interested in beginning their dance training in the spring semester. The class focuses on basic universal dance vocabulary and prepares students both physically and mentally to enter Ballet I, Modern Dance 1 or Jazz Dance 1 in the fall semester.

DANC 295. Topics in Dance. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses appear in the course schedule, and are fully described in a booklet distributed to academic advisors.

DANC 296. Topics in Dance. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses appear in the course schedule, and are fully described in a booklet distributed to academic advisors.

DANC 302. Ballet Technique 2. 2 Credits.

Continuation of classical ballet technique. Prerequisites: DANC 201 or permission of the instructor.

DANC 303. Ballet Technique 3. 1-4 Credits.

Continuation of ballet technique at an intermediate level. Prerequisites: DANC 302 or permission of the instructor.

DANC 312. Modern Dance Technique 2. 2 Credits.

Continuation of modern dance technique. Prerequisites: DANC 211 or permission of the instructor.

DANC 313. Modern Dance Technique 3. 1-4 Credits.

Continuation of modern dance technique at an intermediate level. Prerequisites: DANC 312 or permission of the instructor.

DANC 321. Jazz Dance 1. 1 Credit.

Prerequisites: DANC 201 or DANC 211 or DANC 260 or permission of instructor. Introduction to jazz dance technique.

DANC 322. Jazz Dance 2. 1 Credit.

Prerequisites: DANC 321 or permission of the instructor. Continuation of jazz dance technique.

DANC 350. Dance Improvisation. 2 Credits.

An exploration of movement through structured exercises, games and problems. Students participate in movement studies that explore improvisational approaches, devices and elements to gain skills in the art of improvisation. This course also includes group discussions of reading assignments and feedback sessions following the improvisations performed in class. Through readings, journal writings, and in-class exercises, students develop the skills to articulate what they see, feel and respond to as performers and observers. Prerequisites: DANC 201 or DANC 211 or permission of the instructor.

DANC 360. Rhythmic Analysis. 1 Credit.

A study of basic music theory specifically designed for the dancer. Emphasis is on score reading, accompaniment for dance, note values and rhythms as they directly relate to choreography in a classroom as well as in the rehearsal studio. Students perform movement studies based on rhythmic structures. Prerequisites: DANC 201 or DANC 211 or permission of the instructor.

DANC 367. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits.

Student participation for credit based on the academic relevance of the work experience, criteria and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and Career Management prior to the semester in which the work experience takes place. Available for pass/fail grading only. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: Approval of the department and Career Management.

DANC 368. Internship. 3 Credits.

A structured work experience with or without remuneration; a paper, a log and portfolio of work time plus satisfactory evaluations by supervisor and cooperating faculty member are required. Available for pass/fail grading only. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: Approval of department chair and Career Management.

DANC 369. Practicum. 1-3 Credits.

Field experience in dance. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

DANC 370. Dance Composition 1. 2 Credits.

Designed for dance majors or minors, this course is a study of the elements and craft of choreography through practical and written experience. Time, space and dynamics are explored through assigned movement studies. Projects are designed for the creative development of personal movement repertoire and compositional skills for the dancer, choreographer and dance educator. Prerequisites: DANC 211 and DANC 350 or equivalent (DANC 312, DANC 313, DANC 414, DANC 415, DANC 416).

DANC 387. Dance Repertory and Performance 1. 1 Credit.

Dance performance. Additional fees may be charged. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

DANC 388. Dance Repertory and Performance 2. 1 Credit.

Continuation of dance performance. Additional fees may be charged. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: DANC 387 or permission of the instructor.

DANC 389W. Dance History from 1900 until the Present. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or equivalent. Designed for dance majors or minors, this course focuses on the lives and contributions of dance artists who have most influenced the history of dance as art since the turn of the 20th century. The class explores the many facets of dance and its relationship to other art forms. Also included is a major research project and presentation focusing on a specific dance history topic. (This is a writing intensive course.).

DANC 391. African-American Perspectives in Dance. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the contributions of African-Americans to the world of American dance and concert dance. The influence of African dance and dances of the Caribbean Islands will also be explored. Prerequisites: DANC 185A or permission of the instructor.

DANC 393. Anatomy and Kinesiology for Dance. 3 Credits.

Designed for dance majors or minors, this course is an analysis of human motion through a study of anatomy and principles of kinesiology in relation to dance techniques. Prerequisites: DANC 201 and DANC 211 or permission of the instructor and concurrent enrollment in a dance technique class.

DANC 395. Topics in Dance. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses appear in the course schedule, and are more fully described in a booklet distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

DANC 396. Topics in Dance. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses appear in the course schedule, and and are more fully described in a booklet distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

DANC 404. Ballet Technique 4. 1-4 Credits.

Continuation of ballet technique at an intermediate level. Prerequisites: DANC 303 or permission of the instructor.

DANC 405. Ballet Technique 5. 1-4 Credits.

Continuation of ballet technique at an advanced level. Prerequisites: DANC 404 or permission of the instructor.

DANC 406. Ballet Technique 6. 1-4 Credits.

Continuation of ballet technique at an advanced level. Prerequisites: DANC 405 or permission of the instructor.

DANC 414. Modern Dance Technique 4. 1-4 Credits.

Continuation of modern dance technique at an intermediate level. Prerequisites: DANC 313 or permission of the instructor.

DANC 415. Modern Dance Technique 5. 1-4 Credits.

Continuation of modern dance technique at an advanced level. Prerequisites: DANC 414 or permission of the instructor.

DANC 416. Modern Dance Technique 6. 1-4 Credits.

Continuation of modern dance technique at an advanced level. Prerequisites: DANC 415 or permission of the instructor.

DANC 423. Jazz Dance 3. 1 Credit.

Prerequisites: DANC 322 or permission of the instructor. Continuation of jazz dance technique at an intermediate/advanced level.

DANC 424. Jazz Dance 4. 1 Credit.

Prerequisites: DANC 423 or permission of the instructor. Continuation of jazz dance technique at an intermediate/advanced level.

DANC 470. Dance Composition 2. 2 Credits.

This course builds on the skills developed in Dance Composition 1, including the exploration of time, space and dynamics, with a focus on constructing fully realized group and solo dance compositions. Prerequisites: DANC 370 and permission of the instructor.

DANC 488. Advanced Repertory and Performance. 1 Credit.

Advanced performance. Additional fees may be charged. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: DANC 388 or permission of the instructor.

DANC 489. Principles of Teaching Dance. 2 Credits.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. This course covers basic methods of movement education as applied to the teaching of ballet, modern dance, jazz, and movement for children. An understanding of anatomical structure and mechanics is utilized in the analysis of student performance in dance class. Specific objectives for dance exercises are explored. Practical experiences in the planning, organization and structure of technique classes of various styles are designed to prepare students as dance educators. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.).

DANC 490. Pedagogy for Dance Educators. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: A passing score on the Praxis I or equivalent instrument and admittance into the Teacher Education program. Methods and instructional theories and strategies of movement education as applied to the teaching of ballet, modern dance, jazz, and movement for children. Practical experience in the structure, organization and assessment of dance arts programs for the K-12 public school setting.

DANC 495/595. Topics in Dance. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses appear in the course schedule, and are more fully described in a booklet distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: Appropriate survey course or permission of the instructor.

DANC 496/596. Topics in Dance. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses appear in the course schedule, and are more fully described in a booklet distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: Appropriate survey course or permission of the instructor.

DANC 497/597. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Dance. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the department chair.

DANC 498/598. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Dance. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the department chair.

DANC 499. Senior Project. 1 Credit.

Completion of a major research project during one's senior year on a topic of particular interest to the student. Topics to be selected under the direction of an instructor with conferences as appropriate. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the department chair.

THEATRE Courses

THEA 152. Acting One. 3 Credits.

Develops and explores creative potential through exercises, improvisations, performance games, and original performances created by class. Emphasis is on qualities of spontaneity, concentration, ensemble awareness, imagination, and rhythmic and spatial form.

THEA 173+. Theatre Activities. 1 Credit.

This course is an activity course in which the students participate in University Theatre Activities such as set building, costume construction or running crew for season productions. This qualifies as a CAP experience.

THEA 174+. Theatre Activities. 1 Credit.

This is an activity course in which the students participate in University Theatre Activities such as set building, costume construction or running crew for season productions. This qualifies as a CAP experience.

THEA 195. Topics in Theatre. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in a booklet distributed to academic advisors.

THEA 196. Topics in Theatre. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in a booklet distributed to academic advisors.

THEA 225. Introduction to Production Technology. 3 Credits.

Fundamentals of construction, lighting, and production techniques in contemporary theatre and film. Students will apply acquired skills to active productions for ODU Theatre and Film productions.

THEA 227A. Honors: Film Appreciation. 3 Credits.

This class will focus on both contextual and close text analysis of masterworks as they have influenced film art and industry. Students in this course are expected to develop basic research, communication, viewing and critical thinking skills as they apply their knowledge to the analysis of the film experience. Open to students in the Honors Program only.

THEA 230. Drama for Production. 3 Credits.

A practitioner-oriented examination of drama from its origins to the present. Particular emphasis is placed on plays from around the world that are associated with changes in theatre practice.

THEA 241A. The Theatre Experience. 3 Credits.

An introductory audience-oriented examination of the elements of theatre and their historical development through study of plays and performances; emphasis will be directed to actually experiencing live theatre. Attendance at performances is required.

THEA 244. Introduction to Production Design. 3 Credits.

An introduction to principles, methods, and materials used in designing stage and film productions.

THEA 246. Introduction to Stage Combat. 3 Credits.

This course trains performers in techniques for creating believable and safe stage combat. Techniques will involve falling, landing, hand-to-hand combat and various weapons, resulting in fully staged fights by the end of the course.

THEA 248. Introduction to Stage Makeup. 3 Credits.

Develops skills and techniques for design and application of stage makeup.

THEA 252. Acting Two. 3 Credits.

Basic introduction to principles of acting which may be applied to stage and media and application of various techniques through exercises, improvisations, and performances of short scenes. Prerequisites: THEA 152.

THEA 270A. Film Appreciation. 3 Credits.

This class will focus on both contextual and close text analysis of masterworks as they have influenced film art and industry. Students in this course are expected to develop basic research, communication, viewing and critical thinking skills as they apply their knowledge to the analysis of the film experience.

THEA 271. Introduction to Digital Filmmaking. 3 Credits.

This course will introduce the beginning student to the elements of digital filmmaking. Students will learn the basics of cameras, lights, sound, editing and post productions. This is a hands-on production course.

THEA 273+. Theatre Activities. 1 Credit.

This is an activity course in which the students participate in University Theatre Activities such as set building, costume construction or running crew for season productions. This qualifies as a CAP experience.

THEA 274+. Theatre Activities. 1 Credit.

This is an activity course in which the students participate in University Theatre Activities such as set building, costume construction or running crew for season productions. This qualifies as a CAP experience.

THEA 295. Topics in Theatre. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in a booklet distributed to all academic advisors.

THEA 320. Auditioning Technique. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: THEA 152 and THEA 252. Course will examine practical audition skills and provide an orientation to the tools of procuring professional auditions, including head shots and resumes. Emphasis will be placed on effectively selecting and preparing auditions for stage, film and television.

THEA 321. Production Management for Television and Stage. 3 Credits.

This course will assist students in understanding the elements of production management both in television and on stage. The course emphasizes organizational and communication skills; technical production knowledge; professional rehearsal and performance protocol according to the rules of AEA, AFTRA and SAG as well as basic production budgeting and scheduling. Prerequisite: THEA 225 or COMM 225 or permission of the instructor.

THEA 325. Sound Design for Stage and Camera. 3 Credits.

This class will introduce the concepts and techniques of sound design and sound effects for the stage and camera. Students will learn design of sound elements in both a live and recorded environment as well as learn the current equipment and software in digital sound reproduction. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

THEA 330. The Short Script. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor. This course introduces the principles of screenwriting using the short script as a basis for the exploration. The intent of the course is to introduce concepts of format, characterization, plot, dialogue and narrative style for the short script.

THEA 341. Lighting Design for Stage and Film. 3 Credits.

A production course introducing students to the world of light and shadow, mood and composition by surveying lighting design, its technologies for stage and camera, and such principles as basic electrical theory and stage/studio/location design aesthetics. Prerequisite: THEA 225/COMM 225 or THEA 271/COMM 271 or permission of instructor.

THEA 343. History of Theatre: Beginnings to the Renaissance. 3 Credits.

A cultural-epoch examination of world theatre as it developed through dramatists, directors, designers, and actors from its beginning to the eighteenth century. Prerequisites: THEA 230 or junior standing or permission of the instructor.

THEA 344. History of Theatre: Classic Baroque to the Present. 3 Credits.

A cultural-epoch examination of world theatre as it developed through dramatists, designers, and actors from the eighteenth century to the present. Prerequisites: THEA 230, junior standing, or permission of the instructor.

THEA 345. Scenographic Design. 3 Credits.

This course will explore advanced principles of design for the stage in the areas of scenery. The process will include the application of various artistic styles to stage production. Prerequisite: THEA 225 or COMM 225 or THEA 244.

THEA 346. Screenwriting I. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor. A course that exposes the student to the fundamental narrative screenwriting principles taught through text reading, film viewing and analysis, class discussions, and writing assignments.

THEA 347. Movement for the Actor. 3 Credits.

An examination through exercises and assignments of principles for developing a disciplined, flexible body for character creation. Prerequisite: THEA 152 or permission of the instructor.

THEA 348. Acting for the Camera. 3 Credits.

Course will examine the process of building characters for the camera, and the ways in which the conventions of the stage are adapted for the film or video audience. Prerequisite: THEA 152.

THEA 349. Costume Design for Stage and Camera. 3 Credits.

This course explores the design aesthetic, historical context, and contemporary impact on performance of the costume garment and its accessories. Students will explore the application of design principles in a practical experience. Prerequisite: THEA 225 or COMM 225.

THEA 350. The Spoken Text. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: THEA 152 or permission of the instructor. An introduction to the basic structures of verbal style through performance of the works of a variety of classical and contemporary writers. Students will become comfortable with linguistic techniques suitable to a range of performance situations.

THEA 352. Acting Three. 3 Credits.

Study of and experimentation with various theories concerning the preparation of roles and special performance characteristics of different styles and types of drama. Considerable attention is directed toward scene study. Prerequisites: THEA 152 and THEA 252.

THEA 360. Voice for the Stage I. 3 Credits.

This course will explore facets of vocal production, speech and expression necessary for an engaging performance on stage. Through exercises and text work, the student will learn healthy vocal production, elements of clear speech and techniques for improving vocal range and expressiveness. Prerequisite: THEA 152.

THEA 367. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits.

Available for pass/fail grading only. Student participation for credit based on the academic relevance of the work experience, criteria and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and the Cooperative Education program prior to the semester in which the work experience takes place. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: Approval of the department and the Career Management Center, in accordance with the policy for granting credit for Cooperative Education programs.

THEA 368. Internship. 3 Credits.

Practicum/field experience in professional settings for students in all areas of Theatre and Film. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisites: Approval of the Director of Theatre and major advisor.

THEA 369. Internship for the BFA. 3 Credits.

A structured work experience with or without remuneration; a paper, a log and portfolio of work time plus satisfactory evaluations by supervisor and cooperating faculty member are required. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Pass/Fail only. Prerequisites: Approval of Director of Theatre and BFA Director.

THEA 370. The Video Project. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: THEA 271 or COMM 271 or permission of the instructor. A studio course that presents an opportunity for the student to produce digital video content. This is a hands-on course which is organized to allow the student to experience the entire process of developing a project for the camera from scripting through filming to editing and finishing detail.

THEA 371. History of Animation. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor. This course traces the evolution of the animated film worldwide, from the silent to the modern era. The purpose of the course is to provide students with a broad chronological and international overview of animated film masterworks.

THEA 373+. Theatre Activities. 1 Credit.

This is an activity course in which the students participate in University Theatre Activities such as set building, costume construction or running crew for season productions. This qualifies as a CAP experience.

THEA 374+. Theatre Activities. 1 Credit.

This is an activity course in which the students participate in University Theatre Activities such as set building, costume construction or running crew for season productions. This qualifies as a CAP experience.

THEA 375. Television Production. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: THEA 271 or COMM 271 or permission of the instructor. This course explores the basic process of producing television from script to presentation.

THEA 380. The Video Documentary I. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: THEA 271 or COMM 271. This course offers the student an opportunity to explore the world of documentary filmmaking. By using the camera as a research tool in developing evidence in support of a thesis, the student is better able to understand documentary filmmaking. Students will develop projects leading toward the completion of a short documentary film or video.

THEA 385. Cinematography. 3 Credits.

Introduces students to the fundamentals of the videographed digital image. The course explores live-action photography, compositing, filters, digital formats, motion control, and grip equipment. The concepts of the course are applied to fiction and nonfiction cinema. Prerequisites: THEA 271 or COMM 271.

THEA 395. Topics in Theatre. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described to all academic advisors. Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of the instructor.

THEA 396. Topics in Theatre. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits each semester. Prerequisites: junior standing and permission of the instructor. A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in a booklet distributed to all academic advisors.

THEA 441/541. American Theatre. 3 Credits.

A study of dramatic theories and theatre practices as they relate to the development and growth of theatrical art in the United States. Prerequisites: THEA 230, junior standing, or permission of the instructor.

THEA 442/542. Principles of Directing. 3 Credits.

An examination and practical application of principles of stage direction as influenced by play script, acting talent, set and lighting design, and the technical facilities of production organizations. Prerequisites: THEA 152 and THEA 230, and THEA 244 or permission of the instructor.

THEA 445/545. Experimental Theatre. 3 Credits.

An in-depth study of avant-garde theatre scripts and performance techniques from 1900 to the present. Prerequisites: THEA 230 or permission of the instructor.

THEA 446. Directing for the Camera. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: THEA 271 or COMM 271. This course seeks to provide students with fundamental principles and practical techniques of directing the narrative fiction film: script development and analysis, production planning, shot composition and framing, and working with actors and crew.

THEA 447/547. Women in Theatre. 3 Credits.

A study of the contributions women have made to the theatre as actresses, directors/managers, designers, and playwrights, and of their creative problems and methodologies. Prerequisites: THEA 230 or permission of the instructor.

THEA 449W/549. Script and Performance Analysis. 3 Credits.

Approaches script analysis from a directorial perspective through the written examination of action, character, language, music, and spectacle, as well as the play's production history and historical context, to discover how plays might be staged for the contemporary audience. Plays in production will be examined from a critical perspective with attention to artistic interpretation in the areas of direction, design, and performance. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisite: THEA 152, THEA 230, THEA 244, and a grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, or permission of the instructor.

THEA 452/552. Acting Four. 3 Credits.

An advanced scene study class exploring issues of style and period pertinent to portraying characters on stage. Prerequisites: THEA 152, THEA 252 and THEA 352.

THEA 460. Voice for the Stage II. 3 Credits.

Course will continue the study of vocal production, speech and expression necessary for on stage performance of both classical and modern text. Techniques for producing effective dialects will be introduced as well as the application of dialect towards character development. Prerequisite: THEA 152.

THEA 471W/571. International Film History. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 270A or THEA 270A, a grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, and junior standing or permission of the instructor. An examination of world cinema as a technology, a business, an institution, and an art form from its inception to the present. Emphasis is on the narrative fiction film, its technological and aesthetic development, economic organization, and socio-cultural context. Representative classic and contemporary works will be screened and analyzed. (This is a writing intensive course.).

THEA 472. Acting Five. 3 Credits.

An examination and advanced study of techniques relevant to specialized theatre performance. This course will allow advanced students the opportunity to explore a variety of work including experimental theatre, avant garde works, mediated performance and visual based theatre. Prerequisites: THEA 152 and THEA 252 or permission of instructor.

THEA 473+. Theatre Activities. 1 Credit.

This is an activity course in which the students participate in University Theatre Activities such as set building, costume construction or running crew for season productions. This qualifies as a CAP experience.

THEA 474+. Theatre Activities: Performance. 1 Credit.

Participation in University Theatre activities as a performer. Available through audition only. Prerequisites: Audition.

THEA 479W/579. American Film History. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C; THEA 270A or COMM 270A; and junior standing or permission of the instructor. An examination of American motion pictures as an art form, a business and an institution from its inception to the present. Primary attention is accorded to the narrative fiction film, its aesthetic and technological development, economic organization and social impact. This course highlights the many connections between film history and American culture. (This is a writing intensive course.).

THEA 480/580. The Video Documentary II. 3 Credits.

A production/studio course designed to complement the work developed in Theatre 380: The Video Documentary I. Discussion/presentation topics range from production field work to post-production editing. The final third of the semester will be devoted to compiling the rough footage in post production. Prerequisites: THEA 380 or COMM 380.

THEA 482. Screenwriting II. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: COMM 346 or THEA 346. Students explore visual storytelling through the theories guiding character development, narrative construction, thematic layers, scene analysis, and many more. Students participate in a variety of critical and writing exercises to enhance their knowledge of the craft of screenwriting.

THEA 483. Advanced Video Project. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the processes and techniques of a narrative film production. Students experience pre-production, production, and post-production phases in creating a product to be entered in regional and national competitions. Prerequisite: COMM 271/THEA 271 and COMM 370/THEA 370 or permission of instructor.

THEA 485. Film and Television Genres. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to examine the conventions and meanings of various film and television genres within their broader aesthetic, socio-historical, cultural, and political contexts. Each time the class is offered it will focus in depth on a different genre, such as the gangster, the Western, the musical, the comedy, science fiction, among others. Prerequisites: COMM 270A or THEA 270A.

THEA 486/586. Advanced Filmmaking. 3 Credits.

Offers the advanced film/video maker an opportunity to produce a project beyond the scope of previous classroom projects. Prerequisites: THEA 271 or COMM 271, THEA 346 or COMM 346, THEA 370 or COMM 370, THEA 385 or COMM 385, THEA 446 or COMM 446, and THEA 483 or COMM 483 and approval of instructor only.

THEA 489. Methods of Teaching Theatre. 3 Credits.

Focuses on conceptual foundations of theatre education including its history, and on methods and materials for classroom instruction and theatrical rehearsals and performances. Prerequisites: Junior standing.

THEA 490. Theatre Education Practicum. 1 Credit.

This course provides students with an opportunity to further develop their understanding of theatre instruction by personal observation and participation in the classroom setting. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of the College of Education.

THEA 495/595. Topics in Theatre. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule. Prerequisites: Appropriate survey course or permission of the instructor.

THEA 496/596. Topics in Theatre. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule. Prerequisites: appropriate survey course or permission of the instructor.

THEA 497/597. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Theatre. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Prerequisites: Senior standing.

THEA 498/598. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Theatre. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: senior standing.

THEA 499. Senior Project. 1 Credit.

Completion of a creative project leading to a written work and a presentation during a student's senior year related to student's interest area. Topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor with conferences as appropriate. Prerequisites: Senior standing as theatre major and approval of major advisor.