http://www.odu.edu/artdept

Peter Eudenbach, Chair
Elliott Jones, Chief Departmental Advisor (ejones@odu.edu)
Office Telephone: (757) 683-4047

Bachelor of Arts–Art History Major

Anne Muraoka, Program Director

Lower-Division General Education

Written Communication Skills *
ENGL 110CEnglish Composition3
Select one of the following courses: 3
English Composition
Introduction to Writing in Business, Education and Social Sciences
or
Introduction to Technical Writing
Oral Communication Skills3
Mathematical Skills3
Language and Culture **0-12
Information Literacy and Research3
Human Creativity ***3
Select one of the following courses:
Film Appreciation
Dance and Its Audience
Music in History and Culture
The Theatre Experience
Interpreting the Past3
Literature3
Philosophy and Ethics3
The Nature of Science8
The Impact of Technology ****0-3
Human Behavior3
Total Hours38-53

Major Courses

ARTH 150Global Survey of Art History3
Select one of the following Art History (ARTH) 200-level Survey courses:3
Classical Art
Renaissance Art in Europe
Twentieth Century Modern Art
ARTH 260Asian Art3
ARTH 351WResearch Methods in Art History3
Major Electives
Select one additional 200-level ARTH Survey course in each of the areas not selected previously: Ancient and Medieval, Early Modern, or Modern and Contemporary.6
Select one 300-level ARTH course from each of the following areas: Ancient and Medieval, Early Modern, or Modern and Contemporary.9
Select three 400-level ARTH courses.9
Select one of the following courses:3
Capstone
Senior Thesis
Select two ARTS electives.6
Total Hours45

Students pursuing graduate work leading to teaching, museology, art criticism or dealing in works of art will be counseled on course selection. ­For students considering graduate work in art history, 18 hours of German or French are strongly recommended. Students who wish to distinguish themselves in the major may opt for the thesis elective, ARTH 480, in their final year of study.

Upper-Division General Education

  • Option A. Approved Minor, 12-24 credit hours; also second degree or second major
  • Option B. Interdisciplinary Minor; 12 credit hours, (3 credit hours may be in the major area of study)
  • Option C. International business and regional courses or an approved certification program, such as teaching licensure (hours vary)
  • Option D. Two Upper-Division Courses (6 credit hours) from outside the College of Arts and Letters or from the Social Science Component within the College of Arts and Letters that are not required by the major.

Requirements for Graduation

Requirements for graduation include a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 overall and in the major, no less than a grade of C in major courses, a minimum of 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours of upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, and completion of Senior Assessment.

Electives

Completion of requirements for lower-division general education, upper-division general education and the major would entail 89 to 104 credits toward the 120 credits required for graduation. The remaining credit hours may be met with any university course the student is qualified to take, including additional courses in art.

Minor in Art History

A student who chooses to complete a minor in art history must receive the approval of the chief departmental advisor and the art history program director. ARTH 150 and ARTH 203, ARTH 210 or ARTH 230 are prerequisite courses for the minor and are not included in the calculation of the grade point average for the minor. A reading knowledge of French, German, Italian or Spanish is strongly advised. The requirement for the minor for BA and BS students comprises 12 hours selected from ARTH 300- and 400-level courses. BFA students must complete the following:

Select one of the following courses: 3
History of Graphic Design
Art Criticism
Research Methods in Art History
Modern Architecture
ARTH 300- and 400-level courses12
Total Hours15

For completion of the minor a student must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 and no grade lower than a C in all courses required for the minor exclusive of prerequisite courses. Transfer students must complete a minimum of six hours in ARTH 300- and 400-level courses through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Interdisciplinary Minor - The Designed World

Agnieszka Whelan, Department of Art, Coordinator

This interdisciplinary minor explores the interwoven historical, cultural, aesthetic, perceptual, and technical domains of the designed world. That virtually all aspects of the human-built world are designed is a generally accepted belief. Creative planning and critical analysis of design dynamics are emphasized within these disciplinary course subjects.
The designed world interdisciplinary minor requires 12 credit hours of 300/400-level courses selected from at least two different disciplines with a maximum of six credits from any one discipline. For completion of the interdisciplinary minor, students must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the minor exclusive of lower-level courses and prerequisite courses. At least six hours of 300/400 upper-level courses must be taken through courses offered by Old Dominion University. Three credit hours may be in the major, if a major course is listed as an option for the interdisciplinary minor. As such, it will be credited toward both the major and the interdisciplinary minor.

Course options are as follows:

ARTH 320WHistory of Graphic Design3
ARTH 327History of Photography3
ARTH 435WModern Architecture3
ARTS 455Letterpress Printmaking3
COMM 341Lighting Design for Stage and Film3
COMM 349Costume Design for Stage and Camera3
COMM 370The Video Project3
ENGL 371WCommunication Across Cultures3
ENGL 382Reporting News for Television and Digital Media3
ENGL 477Language, Gender and Power3
GEOG 310Geography of the City3
GEOG 412Cities of the World3
PSYC 344Human Factors3
PSYC 413Sensation and Perception3
SEPS 303Social Aspects of Clothing3
SEPS 422Fashion Product Development3
SEPS 423Visual Merchandising and Display3
STEM 382Industrial Design3
STEM 386Architecture3
STEM 417Exploring Technology and Modern Industry3

Bachelor of Arts–Art Education Major

Admission

All students must apply for and be admitted into the approved art education program. Students must meet the required criteria for admission by passing the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments and earn the minimum required grade point averages (GPA).  Application forms for admission to teacher education programs are available on the Teacher Education Services website, http://odu.edu/tes, and are to be submitted to the art education program director or Art Department chair before being submitted to Teacher Education Services.

Prescribed Virginia Board of Education Assessment for Admission to an Approved Teacher Education Program

Old Dominion University students seeking admission to an approved teacher education program must satisfy the Virginia Board of Education Required Assessment for Admission to an Approved Teacher Education Program. This requirement can be satisfied by meeting a passing score in one of the selected criteria below:

  1. Passing Praxis I composite score of 532 by December 31, 2013; or
  2. Passing Praxis Core Academic Skills Tests beginning January 1, 2014:
    Reading Score of 156, Writing Score of 162, and Mathematics Score of 150; or
  3. Approved substitute test scores:
    1. SAT score of 1000 with at least 450 verbal and 510 mathematics taken prior to April 1, 1995; or
    2. SAT score of 1100 with at least 530 verbal and 530 mathematics taken after April 1, 1995 and before March 2016; or
    3. SAT score of 1170 with at least 580 evidence-based reading and writing and 560 mathematics taken after March 1, 2016; or
    4. ACT composite score of 21 with ACT mathematics score of at least 21, and ACT English plus Reading score of at least 37, taken prior to April 1, 1995; or
    5. ACT composite score of 24 with ACT mathematics score of at least 22, and ACT English plus Reading score of at least 46, taken after April 1, 1995; or
    6. Praxis I Math test score of 178 by December 31, 2013 and a composite Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (hereafter referred to as the VCLA) score of 470; or
    7. Praxis Core Academic Skills Mathematics test score of 150 beginning January 1, 2014 and a VCLA score of 470; or
    8. SAT Mathematics test score of at least 510 taken prior to April 1, 1995 and a VCLA score of 470; or
    9. SAT Mathematics test score of at least 530 taken after April 1, 1995 and a composite VCLA score of 470; or
    10. SAT Mathematics test score of at least 560 taken after March 1, 2016 and a composite VCLA score of 470; or
    11. ACT Mathematics test score of at least 21 taken prior to April 1, 1995 and a composite VCLA score of 470; or
    12. ACT Mathematics test score of at least 22 taken after April 1, 1995 and a composite VCLA score of 470.
      Note:  ACT scores taken prior to 1989 are not valid.

For the most current information on the prescribed Virginia Board of Education admission assessment, visit the Teacher Education Services website, http://odu.edu/tes and review the Teacher Education Handbook.

Required grade point averages (GPA):

  • A cumulative GPA of 2.75 is required.
  • A major/content GPA of 2.75 is required – all Art courses must be passed with a grade of C or higher.
  • A professional education GPA of 2.75 is required – all professional education courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Although students may enroll in a limited number of education courses, students must be admitted into the approved art education program prior to enrolling in any instructional strategies practicum education course. Students must also meet with an education advisor in the Office of Teacher Education Services.

Continuance

Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.75, a major/content GPA of 2.75 and a professional education GPA of 2.75. Art courses must be passed with a grade of C or higher. The professional education core must be completed with a grade of C- or higher for continuance. A professional education GPA of 2.75 is required for continuance. Students must take and pass the Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) and the Praxis Subject assessment (formerly Praxis II) art content knowledge test prior to or while enrolled in the instructional strategies course. All assessments must be passed prior to the start of the Teacher Candidate Internship Orientation session.

Background Clearance Requirement

Old Dominion University requires a background clearance check of candidates interested in many of the  professional education programs.  Professional education programs have several field experiences that are required for continuance and graduation from the program.  The background clearance must be successfully completed prior to a field experience placement. Students will be provided a field experience placement when the background check process is completed with resolution of any issues. The process to complete the ODU clearance background check is located at:  http://www.odu.edu/success/academic/teacher-education/placement/background-checks.  The ODU clearance process includes the FBI fingerprint SP-24 form, the child protective service/social service  check, and the sexual offender registry check. Candidates interested in the professional education programs are advised to complete this clearance process immediately upon entry into the program since the clearance process takes a minimum of eight weeks to complete. Please contact Teacher Education Services at 757-683-3348 if you have any questions.

Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments:

  • Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) – a passing composite score of 470 is required on this reading and writing assessment.
  • Praxis Subject assessment (formerly Praxis II) art content knowledge (test code 5134), passing score of 158 required

To review more information on the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments, visit the Teacher Education Services website, http://odu.edu/tes.

Graduation

Requirements for graduation include completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, completion of the Senior Assessment; a minimum cumulative 2.75 GPA in the major area and in the professional education core with no grade less than a C in the major/content and with no grade less than a C- in the professional education core; successful completion of the Teacher Candidate Internship; and a minimum of 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours of upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University.

Due to changing University requirements, national accreditation standards, and the Virginia Board of Education licensure regulations, the teacher education programs in the College of Arts and Letters are under constant revision. Any changes resulting from these factors supersede the program requirements described in this Catalog. Students are encouraged to obtain current program information from their advisors and from the Teacher Education Services website at http://odu.edu/tes.

Lower-Division General Education

Written Communication Skills *
ENGL 110CEnglish Composition3
Select one of the following courses:3
English Composition
Introduction to Writing in Business, Education and Social Sciences
Introduction to Technical Writing
Oral Communications Skills3
Mathematical Skills3
Language and Culture **0-12
Information Literacy and Research3
Human Creativity ***3
Select one of the following courses:
Film Appreciation
Dance and Its Audience
Music in History and Culture
The Theatre Experience
Interpreting The Past3
Literature3
Philosophy and Ethics3
The Nature and Science8
Impact of Technology ****0-3
Human Behavior3
Total Hours38-53

Art History Requirements

ARTH 150Global Survey of Art History3
Select one of the following Art History (ARTH) 200-level Survey courses:3
Classical Art
Renaissance Art in Europe
Twentieth Century Modern Art
ARTH 260Asian Art3
ARTH 350WArt Criticism3
Total Hours12

Studio Art Requirements

ARTS 202Two-Dimensional Design and Color Theory3
ARTS 203Three-Dimensional Design3
ARTS 204Foundational Concepts in Studio Art3
ARTS 231Drawing I: Fundamentals of Drawing3
ARTS 279Digital Basics3
ARTS 211Introduction to Digital Photography3
ARTS 241Fundamentals of Painting3
ARTS 263Introduction to Ceramics3
ARTS 331Drawing II3
Select one of the following: 3
Print I: Intaglio and Relief
Print I: Screenprint and Lithography
Print I: Letterpress and Book Arts
Select one of the following: 3
Introduction to Sculpture
Weaving and Fibers: Introduction
Metalsmithing and Jewelry: Introduction
Crafts: Blacksmithing
Total Hours33

Professional Education

ARTS 305Elementary Art Education Methods and Classroom Management3
ARTS 406Secondary Art Education Methods and Classroom Management3
ARTS 407Art Education Practicum2
ARTS 408Student Teaching Seminar1
SPED 313Fundamentals of Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence3
SPED 406Students with Diverse Learning Needs in the General Education Classroom3
TLED 301Foundations and Introduction to Assessment of Education3
TLED 408Reading and Writing in Content Areas +3
TLED 485Teacher Candidate Internship12
Total Hours33

Upper-Division General Education

Satisfied through the professional education sequence.

Elective Credit

Elective credit may be needed to meet the minimum requirement of 120 credit hours.

Post-Baccalaureate Endorsement Program

Candidates who have previously earned a BFA degree in fine arts may seek licensure only. Information on applying for licensure can be obtained from the Darden College of Education or the art education program director. A minimum of 36 hours of art and professional courses (including 12 hours of student teaching) from Old Dominion University is required. Before registering for classes candidates must present a portfolio for review by the art education director or the Art Department chief departmental advisor who will determine which transferable courses will meet the cognate program requirements and which art and professional courses must be completed for licensure. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 is required for continuance and licensure.  Those candidates already possessing a B.A. degree in either studio art or art history will meet the qualifications for a second B.A. degree in art education upon completing all additional teaching licensure requirements.

Bachelor of Arts–Studio Art Major

Lower-Division General Education

Written Communication Skills
ENGL 110CEnglish Composition *3
Select one of the following courses: 3
English Composition
Introduction to Writing in Business, Education and Social Sciences
Introduction to Technical Writing
Oral Communication Skills3
Mathematical Skills3
Language and Culture **0-12
Information Literacy and Research 3
Human Creativity ***3
Select one of the following courses:
Film Appreciation
Film Appreciation
Dance and Its Audience
Music in History and Culture
The Theatre Experience
Interpreting the Past3
Literature3
Philosophy and Ethics3
The Nature of Science8
Impact of Technology ****0-3
Human Behavior3
Total Hours38-53

Major Requirements
Art History

ARTH 150Global Survey of Art History3
Select one of the following Art History 200 Level Survey courses:3
Classical Art
Renaissance Art in Europe
Twentieth Century Modern Art
ARTH 260Asian Art3
Select one of the following: *****3
History of Graphic Design
Art Criticism
Research Methods in Art History
Modern Architecture
Total Hours12

Studio Art

ARTS 202Two-Dimensional Design and Color Theory3
ARTS 203Three-Dimensional Design3
ARTS 204Foundational Concepts in Studio Art3
ARTS 231Drawing I: Fundamentals of Drawing3
ARTS 279Digital Basics3
ARTS 211Introduction to Digital Photography3
ARTS 241Fundamentals of Painting3
Select one of the following: 3
Print I: Intaglio and Relief
Print I: Screenprint and Lithography
Print I: Letterpress and Book Arts
Select one of the following: 3
Introduction to Sculpture
Introduction to Ceramics
Weaving and Fibers: Introduction
Metalsmithing and Jewelry: Introduction
Crafts: Blacksmithing
ARTS 331Drawing II3
ARTS 300- or 400-level elective course3
Total Hours33

Upper-Division General Education (minimum 6 credit hours)

  • Option A. Approved Minor, 12-24 credit hours; also second degree or second major
  • Option B. Interdisciplinary Minor, 12 credit hours (3 credit hours may be in the major area of study)
  • Option C. International business and regional courses or an approved certification program, such as teaching licensure (hours vary)
  • Option D. Two Upper-Division Courses (6 credit hours) from outside the College of Arts and Letters or from the Social Science Component within the College of Arts and Letters that are not required by the major.

Requirements for Graduation

Requirements for graduation include a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 overall and in the major, no less than a grade of C in major courses, a minimum of 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours of upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, and completion of Senior Assessment.

Electives

Completion of requirements for lower-division general education, upper-division general education and the major would entail 89 to 104 credits toward the 120 credits required for graduation. The remaining credit hours may be met with any university course the student is qualified to take, including additional courses in art.

Minor in Studio Arts

A student who chooses to complete a minor in studio arts must receive the approval of the chief departmental advisor. A total of 12 hours in studio art 300- and 400-level courses is required. These courses have prerequisites that must be met by lower-level studio art courses chosen as electives. Normally the total number of prerequisite electives should not exceed nine hours. Students who choose a minor in studio arts should consult with the chief departmental advisor before their sophomore year to determine the specific courses and prerequisites that must be met to complete the minor. There are no specific minors in concentration areas such as painting, photo and print media, and graphic design. However, course selection will be done on an individual basis and may be focused upon a specific area of interest.

For completion of the minor a student must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 and no grade lower than a C in all courses required for the minor exclusive of prerequisite courses. Transfer students must complete a minimum of six credit hours in ARTS 300- and 400-level courses through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Bachelor of Fine Arts

Admission

The Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) is a professional degree that focuses on intensive work in the following visual arts majors: 3D Media and Material Studies, Graphic Design, Painting and Drawing, and Photography and Print Media. The B.F.A. does not have a freshman entrance portfolio review for admission. Students who are pursuing the B.F.A. degree must consult with the Art Department’s Chief Departmental Advisor before or during their first semester at ODU. Students are expected to begin their art studio foundations coursework in their first year of study.

Continuance

Students seeking continuance into any of the B.F.A. majors must first successfully complete the art studio foundations coursework with a minimum grade of C. Students must then submit a portfolio of their work for evaluation by departmental faculty. After successfully completing the portfolio review, all B.F.A. students must select one of the major options listed below. Students seeking continuance into the graphic design major must submit to a separate continuance review as listed under the graphic design program description below.

Lower-Division General Education

Written Communication Skills *
ENGL 110CEnglish Composition3
Select one of the following:3
English Composition
Introduction to Writing in Business, Education and Social Sciences
Introduction to Technical Writing
Oral Communication Skills3
Mathematical Skills3
Language and Culture0-6
Information Literacy and Research 3
Human Behavior3
Human Creativity **3
Select one of the following:
Film Appreciation
Dance and Its Audience
Music in History and Culture
The Theatre Experience
Interpreting the Past3
Literature3
The Nature of Science8
Philosophy and Ethics3
Impact of Technology ***0-3
Total Hours38-47

Upper-Division General Education

  • Option A: Approved Minor (minimum 12 hours), second degree, or second major
  • Option B: Interdisciplinary Minor (specifically 12 hours; 3 credit hours may be in the major area of study)
  • Option C: International Business and Regional Courses or an approved certification program, such as Teaching Licensure (hours vary)
  • Option D: Two 300/400 upper level courses (6 hours) from outside the College of Arts and Letters or from the Social Science Component within the College of Arts and Letters that are not required by the major.

A student may take a double major, but no more than two courses may be used for both majors. Note that a second major fulfills the upper-division general education requirements.

Graduation

Requirements for graduation include completion of a minimum of 120 credit hours to include a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours of upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110CENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, completion of the Senior Assessment, and a minimum grade point average of 2.00 with a grade of C or better in all courses required for the major, including prerequisite courses.

3D Media and Material Studies Major

In keeping with the Art Department’s mission of empowering students to become visually critical thinkers through their creative practice, the 3D Media and Material Studies major focuses on making as a form of thinking through technical mastery of both traditional craftsmanship and emerging technologies. Students are also exposed to the expanding range of working three-dimensional studio practice, including performance and installation and time-based art. Through immersion in a research and process-oriented curriculum, students develop a range of transferable skills and a body of work reflecting artistic maturity, material proficiency, and conceptual development.

Art History Coursework 

ARTH 150Global Survey of Art History3
200-level Art History (ARTH) Survey Course3
Select one of the following Writing Intensive courses: *3
History of Graphic Design
Art Criticism
Research Methods in Art History
Modern Architecture
300-level Art History (ARTH) Elective Course3
400-level Art History (ARTH) Elective Course3
Total Hours15

Art Studio Foundations Coursework

ARTS 202Two-Dimensional Design and Color Theory3
ARTS 203Three-Dimensional Design3
ARTS 204Foundational Concepts in Studio Art3
ARTS 231Drawing I: Fundamentals of Drawing3
ARTS 279Digital Basics3
Total Hours15

Art Studio Required Coursework

ARTS 211Introduction to Digital Photography3
ARTS 241Fundamentals of Painting3
ARTS 261Introduction to Sculpture3
ARTS 263Introduction to Ceramics3
Select one of the following: 3
Weaving and Fibers: Introduction
Metalsmithing and Jewelry: Introduction
Crafts: Blacksmithing
Total Hours15

3D Media and Material Studies Major Coursework 

Select seven of the following major courses:21
Advanced Sculpture
Intermediate Ceramics
Weaving and Fibers: Intermediate
Metalsmithing and Jewelry: Intermediate
Alternative Jewelry
Sculpture Studio
Advanced Ceramics
Assemblage
Weaving and Fibers: Advanced
Metalsmithing and Jewelry: Advanced
Wood Studio/Furniture Design
Metalsmithing Studio
Internship **
Topics in Studio Art (Ceramics, Metals or Fibers) **
Topics in Studio Art (Ceramics, Metals or Fibers) **
Tutorial Work in Special Studio Topics **
Tutorial Work in Special Studio Topics **
Select two of the following elective courses:6
ARTS 200-level Print I course
Photography 2
Drawing II
Painting: Composition
Topics in Studio Art (Intro to Glass)
ARTS 400Senior Show (Capstone Course)3
Total Hours30

Graphic Design Major

The Graphic Design major is a professional program providing a sequenced curriculum structured to prepare students for successful transition to professional practice designing communications for a wide range of traditional and digital delivery. Graduating portfolios represent a rich experience in print design, branding, packaging, interactive media, advertising, typography, and image making. Students graduating from the program pursue careers in graphic design studios and advertising agencies throughout the country, or continue their education in M.F.A. programs.

The program provides a solid foundation of traditional art experiences and design practices and principles to build students’ ability to create dynamic visual designs. The core graphic design curriculum stresses essential competencies in conceptual problem solving, research, analysis and articulation, aesthetics, design theory, productivity, and the application of technology, necessary for both advanced exploration and entry into professional practice.

All graphic design students can expect a creative environment built upon the experience of a faculty of practicing designers and design educators. Limited enrollment and class sizes ensure an intense and individualized course of study. The department's dedicated state-of-the-art facilities include classroom and production spaces built and equipped to facilitate instruction and invention with traditional and digital media. The program strongly encourages and supports critical interaction with the design community through internships, professional memberships, and participation in design competitions.

Graphic Design Major Requirements

Intended students in the graphic design program are expected to successfully complete the art studio foundations coursework during the first year of study. In their second year, intended students will begin the required sequence of courses in the graphic design program. Students must register for and pass ARTS 365 Graphic Design Continuance Review in order to be admitted into the graphic design program. Since there are a limited number of reserved seats in the upper-division graphic design courses, completion of the art studio foundations and graphic design second-year courses does not guarantee acceptance into the program. Due to the sequence of the required graphic design courses, accepted students are admitted to the program only in the fall semester.

Transfer students must demonstrate equivalent preparation at another institution to receive credit for the art studio foundations coursework. In order to receive credit for ARTS 271, transfer students must submit a portfolio for review by the graphic design faculty. Upon successful completion of the art studio foundations and graphic design second-year requirements, transfer students must register for and pass ARTS 365 for admission into the graphic design program.

Graphic Design Continuance Review Requirements

Students seeking continuance into the Graphic Design program must first successfully complete art studio foundations and graphic design second-year requirements with a minimum grade of C. In the spring semester of their second year, students must register for ARTS 365 concurrently with ARTS 370. Students must pass ARTS 365 in order to be admitted into the graphic design program. Details concerning the portfolio submission and review process are available on the ODU Graphic Design website page. Students who are accepted into the graphic design program must purchase a Macintosh laptop computer and current design software. Specifications for the laptop and software can be obtained from the full-time graphic design faculty or the website. Continuance in the graphic design program requires a grade of C or better in all prerequisite courses and requirements in the graphic design sequence.

Graphic Design Senior Exit Review

All graphic design majors must present their graduating portfolio or thesis project at the exit review at the conclusion of their final semester in the program.

Art History Coursework 

ARTH 150Global Survey of Art History3
200-level Art History (ARTH) Survey Course3
Select one of the following Writing Intensive courses: *3
History of Graphic Design
Art Criticism
Research Methods in Art History
Modern Architecture
300-level Art History (ARTH) Elective Course3
400-level Art History (ARTH) Elective Course3
Total Hours15

Art Studio Foundations Coursework

ARTS 202Two-Dimensional Design and Color Theory **3
ARTS 203Three-Dimensional Design3
ARTS 204Foundational Concepts in Studio Art3
ARTS 231Drawing I: Fundamentals of Drawing **3
ARTS 279Digital Basics **3
Total Hours15

 Art Studio Required Coursework

ARTS 211Introduction to Digital Photography3
ARTS 261Introduction to Sculpture3
ARTS 331Drawing II3
Select one of the following Printmaking courses:3
Print I: Intaglio and Relief
Print I: Screenprint and Lithography
Print I: Letterpress and Book Arts
Select one of the following art studio courses: 3
Fundamentals of Painting
Introduction to Ceramics
Weaving and Fibers: Introduction
Metalsmithing and Jewelry: Introduction
Crafts: Blacksmithing
Total Hours15

Graphic Design Major Coursework 

ARTS 271Introduction to Graphic Design (Fall Only)3
ARTS 370Basic Typography (Spring Only)3
ARTS 365Graphic Design Continuance Review (Spring only)1
ARTS 371Design Concepts (Fall Only)3
ARTS 379Advanced Typography (Fall only)3
ARTS 372Design Systems (Spring Only)3
ARTS 471Design Seminar (Fall Only)3
Select three of the following graphic design electives:9
Web Design
Poster Design
Typographic Design
Illustrative Design
Brand Identity
Editorial Design
Package Design
Internship (Graphic Design) ***
Topics in Studio Art (Graphic Design) ***
Topics in Studio Art (Graphic Design) ***
Tutorial Work in Special Studio Topics ***
Tutorial Work in Special Studio Topics ***
ARTS 401Design Capstone (Spring Only)3
Total Hours31

Graphic Design Major Four-Year Curriculum Plan

The Graphic Design major curriculum is sequential; required graphic design courses must be taken in order. Students seeking to complete their entire course of study in four years must follow the sequence of Art Studio classes listed below. The Suggested Curriculum Sequence Form can be found on the Art Department website, and contains a semester-by-semester breakdown of the full sequence of courses. Elective courses vary every semester, and should be taken after acceptance into the program.

FIRST YEAR: FRESHMAN
Two-Dimensional Design and Color Theory
Drawing I: Fundamentals of Drawing
Digital Basics
These courses are prerequisites to ARTS 271 Introduction to Graphic Design, and may be taken in any order or gouping across the fall and spring semesters.
SECOND YEAR: SOPHOMORE
Fall Semester
Introduction to Graphic Design
Spring Semester
Basic Typography
Graphic Design Continuance Review
Passing the Graphic Design Continuance Review course is required to advance to ARTS 371 and ARTS 379.
THIRD YEAR: JUNIOR
Fall Semester
Design Concepts
Advanced Typography
Spring Semester
Design Systems
FOURTH YEAR: SENIOR
Fall Semester
Design Seminar
Spring Semester
Design Capstone

Painting and Drawing Major

The Painting and Drawing program supports the investigation of various methods, forms and histories of painting and drawing in addition to the spaces these modes occupy in the contemporary sphere. Students begin their studies with a thorough grounding in the skills required to successfully engage the traditions and contemporary practices of painting and drawing. Initial coursework provides students strong technical, perceptual and visualization skills through a comprehensive and rigorous Foundations and Studio Core curriculum, gaining material handling competencies of both painting and drawing media. Intermediate coursework includes a review and expansion of these competencies with exploration into the expressive potential of painting and drawing through thematically-driven projects. Advanced coursework provides students the tools to develop individual bodies of work exploring individualized preferred concepts, subject matter, techniques, and media.

Painting and Drawing students are recognized as artists and are treated as such; their individual voices are vital to the learning experience cultivated within the program. Painting and Drawing students generate artworks that position them for success in today’s competitive market. At the conclusion of their studies, painting and drawing students are capable of creating works of personal pursuit that display an understanding of the historical and contemporary contexts of art making. Additionally, students will have obtained a high level of technical facility, knowledge of professional practice standards, as well as an appreciation for the limitless possibilities of their creativity and the multitude of tools at their disposal.

Art History Coursework 

ARTH 150Global Survey of Art History3
200-level Art History (ARTH) Survey Course3
Select one of the following Writing Intensive courses: *3
History of Graphic Design
Art Criticism
Research Methods in Art History
Modern Architecture
300-level Art History (ARTH) Elective Course3
400-level Art History (ARTH) Elective Course3
Total Hours15

Art Studio Foundations Coursework

ARTS 202Two-Dimensional Design and Color Theory3
ARTS 203Three-Dimensional Design3
ARTS 204Foundational Concepts in Studio Art3
ARTS 231Drawing I: Fundamentals of Drawing3
ARTS 279Digital Basics3
Total Hours15

 Art Studio Required Coursework

ARTS 211Introduction to Digital Photography3
ARTS 241Fundamentals of Painting3
ARTS 261Introduction to Sculpture3
ARTS 331Drawing II3
Select one of the following Printmaking courses:3
Print I: Intaglio and Relief
Print I: Screenprint and Lithography
Print I: Letterpress and Book Arts
Total Hours15

 Painting and Drawing Major Coursework

ARTS 341Painting: Composition3
ARTS 343Techniques in Abstraction3
ARTS 432Figure Drawing Anatomy3
ARTS 441Advanced Painting: Special Problems3
ARTS 442Painting Studio3
ARTS 445Hybrid Approaches to Painting and Drawing3
ARTS 4562D Seminar3
Select two of the following elective courses:6
Weaving and Fibers: Introduction
Metalsmithing and Jewelry: Introduction
Crafts: Blacksmithing
Print II: The Hybrid Print
Print II: Medium Intensive
Internship **
Topics in Studio Art (Painting and/or Drawing) **
Figure Drawing/ Composition
Assemblage
The Book
Topics in Studio Art (Painting and/or Drawing) **
Tutorial Work in Special Studio Topics **
Tutorial Work in Special Studio Topics **
ARTS 400Senior Show (Capstone Course)3
Total Hours30

Photography and Print Media Major

The Photography and Print Media major is a unique combination of reproducible media and concept-driven art practice. This pairing provides students with the ability to experiment across disciplines or to concentrate mainly in photography or print media. Each student will develop an individual program of courses that meets their interests.

In photography, students will gain a broad understanding of contemporary photography and its applications in today’s world. From digital to analog, students will become well versed in technique as well as contemporary theory. Classes focus on darkroom, digital editing and studio lighting along with learning how to develop their own unique voice as a photographer and artist.

In print media, students have the opportunity to learn a wide range of print techniques and strategies. Every major image reproduction technology, from woodblock printing to large-format inkjet prints, is available to students. Print technique, history, and theory are brought together in guiding students’ creative work and artistic development.

Classes take place in the department's brand-new art building equipped with a state-of-the-art computer lab dedicated to photo students and supplied with the latest software. In addition, the photo area contains a darkroom, lighting studio, advanced print lab and general workroom. The print area is equipped for letterpress, screenprint, lithography, relief, and intaglio printmaking, in addition to a digital print lab.

At the end of the program students will take a yearlong seminar dedicated to developing a provocative senior project that will culminate in the senior exhibition at the Baron and Ellin Gordon Art Galleries.

Art History Coursework 

ARTH 150Global Survey of Art History3
200-level Art History (ARTH) Survey Course3
Select one of the following Writing Intensive courses: *3
History of Graphic Design
Art Criticism
Research Methods in Art History
Modern Architecture
300-level Art History (ARTH) Elective Course3
400-level Art History (ARTH) Elective Course3
Total Hours15

Art Studio Foundations Coursework

ARTS 202Two-Dimensional Design and Color Theory3
ARTS 203Three-Dimensional Design3
ARTS 204Foundational Concepts in Studio Art3
ARTS 231Drawing I: Fundamentals of Drawing3
ARTS 279Digital Basics3
Total Hours15

 Art Studio Required Coursework

ARTS 211Introduction to Digital Photography3
ARTS 241Fundamentals of Painting3
ARTS 261Introduction to Sculpture3
ARTS 331Drawing II3
Select one of the following Printmaking courses:3
Print I: Intaglio and Relief
Print I: Screenprint and Lithography
Print I: Letterpress and Book Arts
Total Hours15

Photography and Print Media Major Coursework

Major course work
ARTS 311Photography 23
ARTS 351Print II: The Hybrid Print3
or ARTS 352 Print II: Medium Intensive
Select one of the following concentrations:15
Photography Concentration
Darkroom Photography
Lighting for Photography
Photography 3
Photo Seminar 1
Photo Seminar 2
Print Media Concentration
ARTS 200-level Print I Course (selected from remaining electives)
ARTS 300-level Print II Course (selected from remaining electives)
Printmaking III
2D Seminar
Select Major Elective (see below)
Select two of the following elective courses:6
ARTS 200-level Print I course (selected from remaining electives)
Darkroom Photography
Lighting for Photography
Print II: The Hybrid Print
Print II: Medium Intensive
Photography 3
Photo Seminar 1
Photo Seminar 2
Printmaking III
2D Seminar
The Book
Internship **
Topics in Studio Art **
Topics in Studio Art **
Tutorial Work in Special Studio Topics **
Tutorial Work in Special Studio Topics **
ARTS 400Senior Show (Capstone Course))3
Total Hours30

BFA with Teaching Licensure

Admission

All students must apply for and be admitted into the approved BFA with teaching licensure program. Students must meet the required criteria for admission by passing the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments and earn the minimum required grade point averages (GPA).

Prescribed Virginia Board of Education Assessment for Admission to an Approved Teacher Education Program

Old Dominion University students seeking admission to an approved teacher education program must satisfy the Virginia Board of Education Required Assessment for Admission to an Approved Teacher Education Program. This requirement can be satisfied by meeting a passing score in one of the selected criteria below:

  1. Passing Praxis I composite score of 532 by December 31, 2013; or
  2. Passing Praxis Core Academic Skills Tests beginning January 1, 2014:
    Reading Score of 156, Writing Score of 162, and Mathematics Score of 150; or
  3. Approved substitute test scores:
    1. SAT score of 1000 with at least 450 verbal and 510 mathematics taken prior to April 1, 1995; or
    2. SAT score of 1100 with at least 530 verbal and 530 mathematics taken after April 1, 1995 and before March 2016; or
    3. SAT score of 1170 with at least 580 evidence-based reading and writing and 560 mathematics taken after March 1, 2016; or
    4. ACT composite score of 21 with ACT mathematics score of at least 21, and ACT English plus Reading score of at least 37, taken prior to April 1, 1995; or
    5. ACT composite score of 24 with ACT mathematics score of at least 22, and ACT English plus Reading score of at least 46, taken after April 1, 1995; or
    6. Praxis I Math test score of 178 by December 31, 2013 and a composite Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (hereafter referred to as the VCLA) score of 470; or
    7. Praxis Core Academic Skills Mathematics test score of 150 beginning January 1, 2014 and a VCLA score of 470; or
    8. SAT Mathematics test score of at least 510 taken prior to April 1, 1995 and a VCLA score of 470; or
    9. SAT Mathematics test score of at least 530 taken after April 1, 1995 and a composite VCLA score of 470; or
    10. SAT Mathematics test score of at least 560 taken after March 1, 2016 and a composite VCLA score of 470; or
    11. ACT Mathematics test score of at least 21 taken prior to April 1, 1995 and a composite VCLA score of 470; or
    12. ACT Mathematics test score of at least 22 taken after April 1, 1995 and a composite VCLA score of 470.
      Note:  ACT scores taken prior to 1989 are not valid.

For the most current information on the prescribed Virginia Board of Education admission assessment, visit the Teacher Education Services website, http://www.odu.edu/tes and review the Teacher Education Handbook.

Required grade point averages (GPA):

  • A cumulative GPA of 2.75 is required.
  • A major/content GPA of 2.75 is required – all Art courses must be passed with a grade of C or higher.
  • A professional education GPA of 2.75 is required – all professional education courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Although students may enroll in a limited number of education courses, students must be admitted into the approved BFA with teaching licensure program prior to enrolling in any instructional strategies practicum education course. Students must also meet with an education advisor in the Office of Teacher Education Services.

Continuance

Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.75, a major/content GPA of 2.75 and a professional education GPA of 2.75. Art courses must be passed with a grade of C or higher. The professional education core must be completed with a grade of C- or higher for continuance. A professional education GPA of 2.75 is required for continuance. Students must take and pass the Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) and the Praxis Subject assessment (formerly Praxis II) art content knowledge test prior to or while enrolled in the instructional strategies course. All assessments must be passed prior to the start of the Teacher Candidate Internship Orientation session.

Background Clearance Requirement

Old Dominion University requires a background clearance check of candidates interested in many of the professional education programs.  Professional education programs have several field experiences that are required for continuance and graduation from the program.  The background clearance must be successfully completed prior to a field experience placement. Candidates will be provided a field experience placement when the background check process is completed with resolution of any issues. The process to complete the ODU clearance background check is located at: http://www.odu.edu/success/academic/teacher-education/placement/background-checks.  The ODU clearance process includes:  an FBI fingerprint, a child protective service/social service review, and a Virginia State Police sex offender registry review. Candidates interested in the professional education programs are advised to complete this clearance process immediately upon entry into the program since the clearance process takes a minimum of eight weeks to complete.

Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments:

  • Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) – a passing composite score of 470 is required on this reading and writing assessment.
  • Praxis Subject assessment (formerly Praxis II) art content knowledge (test code 5132), passing score of 158 required

To review more information on the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments, visit the Teacher Education Services website, www.odu.edu/tes.

Graduation

Requirements for graduation include completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better; completion of the Senior Assessment; a minimum cumulative 2.75 GPA in the major area and in the professional education core with no grade less than a C in the major/content and with no grade less than a C- in the professional education core; successful completion of the Teacher Candidate Internship, and a minimum of 143 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 36 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours of upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University.

In addition to the requirements for the B.F.A. degree, students must complete 33 hours of professional education requirements for K-12 licensure.  These are ARTS 305, ARTS 406, ARTS 407, ARTS 408; SPED 313, SPED 406; TLED 301, TLED 408 and TLED 485 (student teaching).  The professional core is used to satisfy the Upper Division General Education requirement.

Due to changing University requirements, national accreditation standards, and the Virginia Board of Education licensure regulations, the teacher education programs in the College of Arts and Letters are under constant revision. Any changes resulting from these factors supersede the program requirements described in this Catalog. Students are encouraged to obtain current program information from their advisors and from the Teacher Education Services website at www.odu.edu/tes.

Transfer Requirements

For the B.A. degrees in studio art and art education, students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours at Old Dominion University.  These 30 credits must include a minimum of 21 studio credit hours that include 12 credit hours at the 300/400 levels.  For the B.A. degree in art history, students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours at Old Dominion University, which must include a minimum of 12 credit hours at the 300/400 levels.  Degree-holding students who are only seeking teaching licensure must complete nine hours of 300/400 level studio art or art education courses at Old Dominion University. A minimum of 36 credit hours in studio art (with 12 minimum at the 300/400 levels) from Old Dominion University is required for the B.F.A. For a minor in either art history or studio arts, transfer students must complete two elective courses in art history at the 300/400 level at Old Dominion University.

Before registering for classes, transfer students who enroll in the B.F.A or B.A. in studio art programs must submit a portfolio of work for review by the Art Department chief departmental advisor who will determine which transferable courses will meet equivalent requirements in the major.

Transfer students who enroll in the B.A. in art education program must submit a portfolio of work for review by the art education program director who will determine which transferable studio and professional courses will meet equivalent requirements in the major and those that must still be completed for licensure. Appointments for transfer portfolio evaluations must be made prior to registration for classes.

Linked Bachelor's in Art, Art Studio and Fine Arts and M.A. in Humanities

The linked bachelor's programs in art history, studio art and fine arts and the M.A. in humanities make it possible for exceptional students to count up to 12 hours of graduate courses toward both an undergraduate and graduate degree.  Students must earn a minimum of 150 credit hours (120 for the undergraduate degree and 30 for the graduate degree).  Please refer to the Humanities section of this Catalog for additional information on the linked programs.

ART HISTORY Courses

ARTH 121A. Introduction to the Visual Arts. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the various media, techniques, styles, content, and contexts in the visual arts as they are manifested in the world's cultures.

ARTH 127A. Honors: Introduction to the Visual Arts. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the various media, techniques, styles, content, and contexts in the visual arts as they are manifested in the world's cultures. Open only to students in the Honors College.

ARTH 150. Global Survey of Art History. 3 Credits.

This course provides an opportunity to discover, appreciate, and acquire broad knowledge of art history through the ages, from the Prehistoric era to contemporary times within a global perspective. Students will learn to examine and critically analyze major forms of artistic expression from diverse cultures and periods of art in order to understand their individual and collective contributions to the arts.

ARTH 195. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Special topics in art history.

ARTH 203. Classical Art. 3 Credits.

This course covers the art and architecture of the Greeks and Romans from its Bronze-Age origins to the end of antiquity, sometimes referred to as the Iron Age. Ranging from sculptures on temples to mosaics in baths, the material addressed in the course is situated in its social, political, and historical context. The objective of this course is to provide a visual and cultural literacy of ancient art of the Mediterranean basin (primarily from southern Europe and North Africa) and to familiarize students with the methods, theories, and traditions upon which ancient art history is grounded. Prerequisite: ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ARTH 210. Renaissance Art in Europe. 3 Credits.

A survey of the art and architecture of the Renaissance in Europe. The objective of this course is to provide a basis for the recognition of Renaissance art in Europe (primarily Italy, Netherlands, and Germany), techniques and stylistic devices utilized by its practitioners, and a broad understanding of the contribution of historical and cultural stimuli on style within a framework of critical analysis. Prerequisite: ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ARTH 211. Ancient and Medieval Art. 3 Credits.

A survey of the history of art from the ancient cultures of the Mediterranean world to the Gothic period of the Middle Ages. Museum visits and writing assignments will help to develop students' analytical, critical and writing skills. Students will become information literate through a combination of instruction and assignments. Together with ARTH 212, this course will fulfill the Information Literacy and Research general education requirement in the major. Prerequisites: ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ARTH 212. Renaissance and Modern Art. 3 Credits.

A survey of the art of the Renaissance and Baroque to the Modern World, culminating in an overview of contemporary art. Museum visits and writing assignments will help to develop students' analytical, critical and writing skills. Students will become information literate through a combination of instruction and assignments. Completion of ARTH 211 and ARTH 212 will fulfill the Information Literacy and Research general education requirement within the major. Prerequisites: ARTH 211.

ARTH 215. Baroque Art in Europe. 3 Credits.

A survey of the art and architecture of the Baroque in Europe. The objective of this course is to provide a basis for the recognition of Baroque art in Europe (primarily Italy, Spain, Netherlands, and France), techniques and stylistic devices utilized by its practitioners, and a broad understanding of the contribution of historical and cultural stimuli on style within a framework of critical analysis. Prerequisite: ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ARTH 222. Harlem Renaissance. 3 Credits.

A survey of art, theory, criticism, and patronage among African-Americans primarily in Harlem following the end of World War I and venturing into the 1930s. Prerequisite: ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ARTH 224. Nineteenth Century European Art. 3 Credits.

An overview of nineteenth century art primarily focused on Europe, but with reference to non-European art as it influenced and affected western trends. The class will focus on the conflicts, motives, social trends and individual personalities that informed major artistic movements, including Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Aestheticism, and Symbolism. Prerequisite: ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ARTH 225. Design and the Decorative Arts: European Renaissance to Modern. 3 Credits.

A survey of the decorative arts and material culture from the Renaissance to Modernism. The objective of this course is to provide a basis for the recognition of the Decorative Arts in Europe, techniques and stylistic devices utilized by its practitioners, and a broad understanding of the contribution of historical and cultural stimuli on style within a framework of critical analysis. Prerequisite: ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ARTH 230. Twentieth Century Modern Art. 3 Credits.

A survey of modern art in the west from the beginning of the twentieth century to about 1970 and the emergence of postmodernism. The goal of this course is to introduce students to the overarching theoretical and stylistic characteristics of modern art in the 20th century, as well as the diversity and debates within modernism, including the beginnings of postmodernism. Prerequisite: ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ARTH 233. History of Photography. 3 Credits.

This course surveys the history of photography from its beginnings in the early nineteenth century to the present. In addition to the exploration of changing technological processes and how they impact the aesthetic, social and scientific aspects of photography, this course will evaluate the complex and often contradictory nature of the medium. Prerequisite: ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ARTH 240. Contemporary Art. 3 Credits.

A survey of contemporary art in terms of its grounding in and divergence from modernity. Students will encounter globally prominent artists of the last several decades as well as art of the immediate present on display in our area. Prerequisite: ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ARTH 245. Women in the Visual Arts. 3 Credits.

The contributions of women in the various fields in the visual arts--painting, graphics, sculpture, architecture, and the crafts. Attention is given to the issues, questions, and debates surrounding the historical privilege of male artists and women's struggles for recognition. Weight is given to modern and contemporary eras. Prerequisite: ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ARTH 260. Asian Art. 3 Credits.

An overview of the arts and architecture of pre-modern India, China and Japan. Emphasis will be placed on the cultural connections between these civilizations and on the transmission of visual ideas primarily through the spread of Buddhism, the court aesthetics and the interests of scholars in painting and garden design. Prerequisite: ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ARTH 295. Topics. 3 Credits.

Topics in art history.

ARTH 310. Women in the Visual Arts. 3 Credits.

The contributions of women in the various fields in the visual arts--painting, graphics, sculpture, architecture, and the crafts. Prerequisites: ARTH 121A, ARTH 211 or ARTH 212 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 314. 15th and 16th Century Art in Northern Europe. 3 Credits.

The painting, sculpture, and graphics of the Netherlands, France and Germany from the fifteenth to the mid-sixteenth century with discussion of artists such as Jan van Eyck, Hieronymus Bosch, Pieter Bruegel, and Albrecht Durer. Prerequisites: ARTH 211 or permission of the instructor. Pre- or corequisite: ARTH 212 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 315. Early Renaissance Art in Italy. 3 Credits.

Painting, sculpture, and architecture in 14th- and 15th-century Italy from Giotto to Botticelli, among others. Prerequisites: ARTH 211 or permission of the instructor. Pre- or corequisites: ARTH 212 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 316. High Renaissance Art in Italy. 3 Credits.

This course is a survey of High Renaissance Art in Italy (roughly 1473 to 1520), focusing primarily on the recognized major artists or "masters" of the High Renaissance: Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, and Titian. Prerequisites: ARTH 211 or permission of the instructor. Pre- or corequisites: ARTH 212 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 317. Mannerism and Late Renaissance Art in Italy. 3 Credits.

The works of Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael brought the Renaissance to its height, but by 1520, two of these masters were dead. It is in this aftermath - post-1520 - that a new generation of artists arose revolutionizing the art world. This course is a survey of late sixteenth-century art in Italy. Prerequisites: ARTH 211 or permission of the instructor. Pre- or corequisites: ARTH 212 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 318. Baroque Art in Italy and Spain. 3 Credits.

This course is a survey of Baroque Art in Italy and Spain. Material includes painting, sculpture, and architecture of the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, with discussion of artists such as Caravaggio, Annibale Carracci, Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Francesco Borromini, Diego Velazquez, Jusepe de Ribera, and Francisco de Zurbaran, among others. Prerequisites: ARTH 211 or permission by instructor. Pre- or corequisites: ARTH 212 or permission by instructor.

ARTH 319. Baroque Art in Northern Europe. 3 Credits.

This course is a survey of Baroque Art in Northern Europe. Materials include painting, sculpture, and architecture of the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, with discussion of artists such as Peter Paul Rubens, Rembrandt, Vermeer, and Poussin, among others. Prerequisites: ARTH 211 or permission of the instructor. Pre- or corequisites: ARTH 212 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 320W. History of Graphic Design. 3 Credits.

A critical study of the formal, cultural, and intellectual developments of the graphic design discipline, including related activity in fine art, illustration, and industrial design. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ARTH 321. History of Decorative Arts. 3 Credits.

Examines the major historical developments in the decorative and applied arts, landscape design, and material culture from the Renaissance to the Modern period. Prerequisites: ARTH 211 AND ARTH 212.

ARTH 323. Nineteenth-Century European Art. 3 Credits.

Survey of the mainstreams of European art during the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, including discussion of architecture, sculpture, painting, and the graphic arts. Prerequisites: ARTH 212 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 325. American Art Before 1865. 3 Credits.

A survey of American art from the colonial period through the Civil War, focusing on the development of a native style in painting, sculpture, the decorative arts, and architecture. Prerequisites: ARTH 121A, ARTH 212 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 326. American Art Since 1865. 3 Credits.

A survey of American art from the Civil War to the present, focusing on the development of internationally-influenced styles in painting, sculpture, photography, printmaking, architecture, and the decorative arts. Prerequisites: ARTH 212 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 327. History of Photography. 3 Credits.

An examination of the development of photography as a scientific curiosity, a tool for artists, and as a fine art in itself from the early nineteenth century to the present day. Prerequisites: ARTH 121A , ARTH 212 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 339. Surrealism and other Utopias. 3 Credits.

A study of the international movements in visual arts and design in the interwar years from Dada to the New World's Fair. Prerequisite: ARTH 212 or permission of instructor.

ARTH 340. Abstract Expressionism and its Discontents. 3 Credits.

An intensive study of the two decades when modernist styles and theories in art, design, and architecture were codified and challenged internationally. Prerequisites: ARTH 212 or permission by instructor.

ARTH 350W. Art Criticism. 3 Credits.

A study of the analysis, theoretical approaches, methodologies, and effects of the practice of art criticism. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisites: ARTH 211, ARTH 212 or permission of the instructor; grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ARTH 351W. Research Methods in Art History. 3 Credits.

An investigation of past and present approaches to scholarship in art history. Students participate in a series of writing assignments designed to strengthen their research and writing skills, culminating with the presentation of original research in oral and written form. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: ARTH 211 or ARTH 212; grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ARTH 365. Problems in Postmodernism. 3 Credits.

Lectures and critical discussion of the development and configurations of the various styles emergent since 1960, both in America and Europe. Prerequisite: ARTH 212 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 368. Internship. 1-3 Credits.

A structured work experience in a museum, gallery, archive, or related environment, either with or without remuneration. Criteria for evaluation will be determined by work supervisor and cooperating faculty advisor. May be repeated for credit. Available for pass/fail grading only. Prerequisites: Approval of the program director and Career Development Services.

ARTH 369. Practicum. 1-3 Credits.

A specialized field activity outside of the classroom. Qualifies as a CAP experience. Prerequisites: Approval of the program director.

ARTH 377. Extracurricular Studies. 1-6 Credits.

An extracurricular activity approved for credit based on objectives, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and the student prior to the semester in which the activity is to take place. Such credit is subject to review by the provost. Prerequisites: Approval of the program director.

ARTH 378. Extracurricular Studies. 1-6 Credits.

An extracurricular activity approved for credit based on objectives, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and the student prior to the semester in which the activity is to take place. Such credit is subject to review by the provost. Prerequisites: Approval of the program director.

ARTH 395. Topics in Art History. 3 Credits.

A study of selected topics in art history to be specified in the class schedule each semester. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: ARTH 211, ARTH 212 or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 396. Topics in Art History. 3 Credits.

A study of selected topics in art history to be specified in the class schedule each semester. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: ARTH 211, ARTH 212, or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 434/534. Romantic Architecture. 3 Credits.

A survey of the aesthetic, technological, and social forces that transformed international architecture in the 18th and 19th centuries. Prerequisites: ARTH 121A or ARTH 212.

ARTH 435W/535. Modern Architecture. 3 Credits.

An examination of the architecture, planning, and related design of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries around the globe. Special emphasis is placed on the formation of the international style between the world wars and its disintegration in the recent past. This is a writing intensive course; the course also satisfies the general education impact of technology requirement. Prerequisites: ARTH 121A or ARTH 212; grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ARTH 450/550. Public Art. 3 Credits.

This course is a collaborative exploration of the problems and opportunities of national and international public art that combines the practical with the theoretical, and the studio with the art-historical. Prerequisite: ARTH 121A or ARTH 212, or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 480. Senior Thesis. 3 Credits.

The research and writing of a thesis on an advanced topic in art history to be determined by the student in concert with a faculty advisor. The thesis option is intended for students preparing for graduate study in the field, and it may be taken in place of another upper-level art history elective within the major. Prerequisites: Senior standing; 12 hours of art history electives at the 300 and 400 levels.

ARTH 481. Capstone. 3 Credits.

A seminar in advanced practices in art history that includes topical and theoretical readings. Students will refine and present a paper to the class according to professional standards. Prerequisite: Approval of the program director.

ARTH 495/595. Topics in Art History. 3 Credits.

A study of selected topics in art history to be specified in the class schedule each semester. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: ARTH 211, ARTH 212, or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 496/596. Topics in Art History. 3 Credits.

A study of selected topics in art history to be specified in the class schedule each semester. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: ARTH 211, ARTH 212, or permission of the instructor.

ARTH 497/597. Tutorial Work in Art History. 3 Credits.

Independent research on a topic to be selected under the guidance of the instructor. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

ARTH 498/598. Tutorial Work in Art History. 3 Credits.

Independent research on a topic to be selected under the guidance of the instructor. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

ART, STUDIO Courses

ARTS 122A. Visual Communication. 3 Credits.

An introduction to essential themes and means of visual communication in the fine arts with an emphasis on studio experience in techniques from the different disciplines in studio art.

ARTS 126A. Honors: Art as Experience. 3 Credits.

Open only to students in the Honors College. A special honors section of ARTS 122A.

ARTS 202. Two-Dimensional Design and Color Theory. 3 Credits.

An introduction to pictorial design via an intensive study of the elements and principles of art and design and Gestalt Theory. These fundamental ideas are reinforced as color theory principles are introduced, such as: additive and subtractive color systems, color interaction, and harmonies as well as the phenomenon of simultaneous contrast.

ARTS 203. Three-Dimensional Design. 3 Credits.

A basic course examining the relation of form and structure in a three-dimensional environment.

ARTS 204. Foundational Concepts in Studio Art. 3 Credits.

This course provides students an overview of the options, methods, and strategies by which modern and contemporary artists operate. One of the primary learning outcomes is for students to be conversant with the discourse and ideas that they have inherited as artists, designers, and scholars in the 21st century in order to enrich their own creative practices.

ARTS 211. Introduction to Digital Photography. 3 Credits.

Introduction to conceptual, technical and historical aspects of photography as a creative medium using digital technology. Technical areas covered include camera use, digital image processing, and digital printing. Class time is divided between demonstrations of applicable skills, in class work time, lectures and critiques. Prerequisites: ARTS 279 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 212. Darkroom Photography. 3 Credits.

This is an introductory darkroom course that will focus on alternative as well as conventional techniques of the black and white darkroom. The class will approach image making with a focus on experimentation. Techniques covered will include photograms, pinhole photography, Van Dyke brown and gelatin silver prints. In addition to production of images, an early history of photography, beginning with the camera obscura, will be discussed. Class sessions will be divided into lecture/slide presentations, critique of students' work, demonstrations, and open lab time. Students will create a final portfolio to be reviewed as a class at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: ARTS 211 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 231. Drawing I: Fundamentals of Drawing. 3 Credits.

An intensive studio course that fosters observational and visualization skills through a comprehensive exploration of composition, linear perspective, and sighting and measuring techniques. These principles are executed by utilizing line and value with a variety of media including graphite, charcoal, and ink. Investigations of the discipline's historic and contemporary dimensions support the course objectives.

ARTS 241. Fundamentals of Painting. 3 Credits.

An observational painting course that serves as an introduction to the fundamental concepts and competencies of oil painting. Primary emphasis is on composition, accuracy of color mixing, description of form and space as well as paint application techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 202 and ARTS 231.

ARTS 254. Printmaking: The Relief Print. 3 Credits.

An introduction to basic relief printing techniques including woodcut, linocut, letterpress, and collograph. Pre- or corequisite: ARTS 202 and ARTS 231; one or both may be taken before; one may be taken as a corequisite.

ARTS 257. Print I: Intaglio and Relief. 3 Credits.

A basic introduction to the aesthetic and conceptual possibilities of print media, focusing primarily on Intaglio and Relief printing techniques. Studio projects and demonstrations will be supplemented with lectures and readings exploring the significance of print to contemporary artists. Prerequisites: ARTS 202 and ARTS 231.

ARTS 258. Print I: Screenprint and Lithography. 3 Credits.

A basic introduction to the aesthetic and conceptual possibilities of print media, focusing primarily on Screenprinting and Lithography. Studio projects and demonstrations will be supplemented with lectures and readings exploring the significance of print to contemporary artists. Prerequisites: ARTS 202 and ARTS 231.

ARTS 259. Print I: Letterpress and Book Arts. 3 Credits.

A basic introduction to the aesthetic and conceptual possibilities of print media, focusing primarily on Letterpress and Book Arts. Studio projects and demonstrations will be supplemented with lectures and readings exploring the significance of print to contemporary artists. Prerequisites: ARTS 202 and ARTS 231.

ARTS 261. Introduction to Sculpture. 3 Credits.

Conceptual thinking in three dimensions; the development of visual capacity and spatial sense through direct experience in materials. Prerequisite: ARTS 202 and ARTS 203.

ARTS 263. Introduction to Ceramics. 3 Credits.

A studio core course designed as an introduction to ceramics. Students will explore functional and sculptural techniques through handbuilding and wheel-throwing, as well as basic claybody, glaze and firing theory. Students will also develop a basic understanding of the historical and cultural aspects of ceramics. Prerequisites: ARTS 202 and ARTS 203.

ARTS 271. Introduction to Graphic Design. 3 Credits.

This course is restricted to graphic design intended majors, and is the first course in the graphic design sequence. This course includes intensive study of the basic principles, theories and methods of graphic design, and the creation of visual communication. Topics of study include the characteristics and compositional principles applied to symbol, image, and letterform, as well as the history and practice of graphic design. Emphasis will be placed on creative process, developing visual concepts, formal values, use of materials, and craft. (Offered fall only) Prerequisites: ARTS 202 with a grade of C or higher and ARTS 231 with a grade of C or higher. Pre- or corequisite: ARTS 279 with a grade of C or higher.

ARTS 279. Digital Basics. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the Macintosh computer and operating system and its applications to visual arts project production. Includes an overview of computer hardware and software used in print multimedia and imaging for visual communications and examines the impact of digital technologies upon art and design.

ARTS 281. Weaving and Fibers: Introduction. 3 Credits.

An introduction to various looms, tools, materials and techniques used in weaving and fabric dyeing; individual design projects.

ARTS 291. Metalsmithing and Jewelry: Introduction. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the basic tools, materials and techniques used in centrifugal casting, soldering and piercing. Individual projects in silver, brass and copper.

ARTS 304. Color. 3 Credits.

A study of the underlying principles of color interaction, color selection, contrast and harmonies, relationships between light, color and vision, as well as the basics of pigments, mixing, and color terminology. An option for the interdisciplinary minor, the Designed World. Prerequisites: ARTS 202 or ARTS 231 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 305. Elementary Art Education Methods and Classroom Management. 3 Credits.

Designed for students majoring in art education and early childhood education, this course covers the conceptual foundations of art education in the early years. An exploration of art materials and teaching methods for kindergarten and elementary school teaching. It provides introduction to unit planning, lesson planning and classroom management. Demonstrations, workshops, and community service learning place special emphasis on the scope and philosophy of art in the elementary curriculum. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ARTS 311. Photography 2. 3 Credits.

This course encourages the refinement of technical skills as well as emphasizing the critical framework in which to place photographic imagery. Assignments will challenge students to think creatively and develop their unique perspective. Reading, research, and discussion introduce students to the major photographic movements that have shaped current theory. Prerequisites: ARTS 211 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 312. Lighting for Photography. 3 Credits.

This class explores controlled lighting for photography both inside and outside the studio. Emphasis is placed on exploring photographic concepts and the creative application of lighting technique and style both inside the studio and on location. Students will also investigate ways to communicate ideas through strong photographic imagery and how photography shapes and influences society through class readings and discussion. Prerequisite: ARTS 211 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 331. Drawing II. 3 Credits.

This is an intensive studio course that builds on the perceptual and technical skills developed in ARTS 231. Using a variety of media including ink, charcoal, graphite, and chalk pastels, initial coursework will act as a review of direct observational drawing skills with an introduction to the formal optics of color perception and interaction through the framework of drawing. Students will begin exploring the expressive potential of drawing through thematically-driven projects during the second half of the semester. Prerequisites: ARTS 231 and ARTS 202.

ARTS 341. Painting: Composition. 3 Credits.

Introduction to various compositional approaches as specifically applied to painting. Prerequisites: ARTS 241.

ARTS 343. Techniques in Abstraction. 3 Credits.

This course serves to expose students to various techniques in contemporary abstraction. Students explore a range of strategies for producing both objective and non-objective abstract work using drawing and/or painting media. Prerequisite: ARTS 341.

ARTS 350. Advanced Printmaking. 3 Credits.

Further investigation of chosen print technique (screenprint, lithography, relief, or intaglio) with special attention to the implementation of color. Prerequisites: ARTS 279 and any introductory printmaking course (ARTS 254, ARTS 257, ARTS 258, or ARTS 259).

ARTS 351. Print II: The Hybrid Print. 3 Credits.

Students investigate the integration of traditional print media with digital prints, photographic techniques, and rapid prototyping technologies. Readings and discussions will explore the relationship between analog and digital media. Students choose a conceptual theme that will guide their work throughout the semester. Prerequisite: ARTS 257, ARTS 258 or ARTS 259 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 352. Print II: Medium Intensive. 3 Credits.

Students focus on a single print medium from Print I (Intaglio, Relief, Screenprint, Lithography, or Letterpress) for intensive study. Use of color, registration, and alternative techniques will be emphasized within a given medium. Students choose a conceptual theme that will guide their work throughout the semester. Prerequisite: ARTS 257, ARTS 258 or ARTS 259 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 361. Advanced Sculpture. 3 Credits.

Investigation involves the combination of various materials and construction techniques. Prerequisites: ARTS 261 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 363. Intermediate Ceramics. 3 Credits.

An intermediate course in ceramics with an emphasis on more sophisticated throwing and hand-building techniques toward the development of a personal image. The class includes glaze chemistry, firing procedures, ceramic history and contemporary ceramics. Prerequisites: ARTS 263.

ARTS 365. Graphic Design Continuance Review. 1 Credit.

This course is restricted to graphic design intended majors seeking continuance into the Graphic Design program, and is the third course in the graphic design sequence. Students will document their creative work from the required courses (ARTS 202, ARTS 231, ARTS 279, ARTS 271 and ARTS 370) and prepare a portfolio and application materials for the continuance review. At the conclusion of the semester, students will submit their review materials and complete the test of digital imaging skills. Students must pass this course to be admitted into the graphic design program. (Offered spring only) Corequisite: ARTS 370. Prerequisite: ARTS 271 with a grade of C or higher.

ARTS 368. Internship. 1-3 Credits.

A structured work experience involving aspects of design or craft, filmmaking, video, museum or gallery work, either with or without remuneration. Criteria for evaluation will be determined by work supervisor and cooperating faculty advisor. Prerequisites: approval by the department chair and Career Development Services is necessary prior to registration.

ARTS 369. Practicum. 1-3 Credits.

A structured research experience, under the supervision of an art department faculty member. A paper evaluating/analyzing the research, a log of research progress, and satisfactory evaluation by the supervising faculty are required. Prerequisites: approval by the department chair.

ARTS 370. Basic Typography. 3 Credits.

This course is restricted to graphic design intended majors, and is the second course in the graphic design sequence. It includes intensive study of the history, terminology, theory, and application of typography, and the creation of visual communication with particular emphasis on typographic content. Topics of study include typographic form and meaning, hierarchy, legibility and readability, structure and composition, and the management of written content within the design process. Specialized technical instruction includes software applications for document construction, layout, and letterform manipulation, building upon the experiences of ARTS 279. (Offered spring only) Prerequisite: ARTS 271 with a grade of C or higher.

ARTS 371. Design Concepts. 3 Credits.

This course is restricted to students admitted to the graphic design program, and is the fourth course in the graphic design sequence. This course includes intensive study of the development of creative and effective ideation for application to graphic design problems from selected aspects of the field. Topics of study include project research, content development, messaging, and individual and collaborative creative processes. Emphasis will be placed on critical skills, articulation, productivity, and response to clients, audiences and contexts. (Offered fall only) Corequisite: ARTS 379. Prerequisites: ARTS 370 with a grade of C or higher and ARTS 365 with a passing grade.

ARTS 372. Design Systems. 3 Credits.

This course is restricted to students admitted to the graphic design program, and is the sixth course in the graphic design sequence. This course includes intensive study of the development of creative and effective ideation for application across coordinated graphic design campaigns. Projects will address design in series and across multiple formats and media for commercial, promotional, educational, and informational contexts. (Offered spring only) Prerequisites: ARTS 371 with a grade of C or higher and ARTS 379 with a grade of C or higher.

ARTS 374. Web Design. 3 Credits.

This advanced graphic design course is an introduction to the basic methods and techniques used to design for web-based delivery. Topics of study include: site management and organization, navigation, grid structures, hierarchy and inventory of content, appropriate use of type and graphics, and format. Emphasis will be placed on process and research, appropriateness, accessibility, and dynamic user interface experiences. Prerequisites: ARTS 371 and ARTS 379 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 375. Poster Design. 3 Credits.

This advanced graphic design course is devoted to the creation of creative and thought provoking posters for organizations, events, productions and companies. Problem solving is structured to develop conceptual skills and research methodology for the design of posters. The class will utilize analog and digital formats for production. Prerequisites: ARTS 371 and ARTS 379 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 376. Typographic Design. 3 Credits.

This advanced graphic design course continues the study of typographic form, context, and communication in graphic design. Projects will address exploration in application, letterform creation, experimentation in media, and discovery of letterform traditions outside the Western foundry tradition. The course will also explore issues pertaining to meaning, concept, legibility, and expression. Prerequisites: ARTS 371 and ARTS 379 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 377. Extracurricular Studies. 1-6 Credits.

Extracurricular activities may be approved for credit based on objectives, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and the student prior to the semester in which the activity is to take place. Such credit is subject to review by the provost. Prerequisites: approval by the department and the dean, in accordance with the policy on granting credit for extracurricular activities.

ARTS 378. Extracurricular Studies. 1-6 Credits.

Extracurricular activities may be approved for credit based on objectives, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and the student prior to the semester in which the activity is to take place. Such credit is subject to review by the provost. Prerequisites: approval by the department and the dean, in accordance with the policy on granting credit for extracurricular activities.

ARTS 379. Advanced Typography. 3 Credits.

This course is restricted to students admitted to the graphic design program, and is the fifth course in the graphic design sequence. This advanced course continues the development of typographic practice, and the creation of visual communication with an emphasis on the integration of typographic content and image. Topics of study include advanced issues in typographic hierarchies and composition, the organization, management and delivery of content, typeface selection, and typesetting. The course will also explore issues pertaining to meaning, concept, and expression. (Offered fall only) Corequisite: ARTS 371. Prerequisite: ARTS 370 with a grade of C or higher and ARTS 365 with a passing grade.

ARTS 381. Weaving and Fibers: Intermediate. 3 Credits.

An introduction to pattern drafting, advanced loom technique, off-loom weaving, and fabric painting. Prerequisites: ARTS 281.

ARTS 382. Illustrative Design. 3 Credits.

This advanced graphic design course is devoted to the study and creation of graphic illustration. Through lecture and demonstration, students will explore the particular design and conceptual characteristics and techniques that distinguish the work of notable graphic designers and illustrators. Studio exercises are structured to develop the use of advanced digital imaging tools with an emphasis upon integrating traditional drawing skills and media. Prerequisites: ARTS 371 and ARTS 379 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 383. Brand Identity. 3 Credits.

This advanced graphic design course is devoted to the study and design of coordinated systems of visual communication elements used to identify a company or cause. Projects will address project research, creative brief development, messaging, and effective ideation for application across coordinated graphic design campaigns for print and digital delivery. Prerequisites: ARTS 371 and ARTS 379 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 391. Metalsmithing and Jewelry: Intermediate. 3 Credits.

Additional techniques in casting and soldering with an introduction to basic metal-forming techniques of raising and forging. Prerequisites: ARTS 291.

ARTS 392. Crafts: Blacksmithing. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the basic tools, materials and techniques used in forging, forming, hardening and tempering steel. Exploration of form and process in working metal. Prerequisites: junior standing or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 393. Alternative Jewelry. 3 Credits.

Utilizing technology, alternative materials and alternative scale simultaneously with traditional techniques and processes, students will explore adornment beyond the typical, mainstream conception of 'jewelry.' Students will conduct research into the purposes and cultural connections that jewelry holds in society. There will be emphasis on the importance of concept, design and material when producing work. Prerequisite: ARTS 291 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 395. Topics in Studio Art. 3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for non majors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors. Prerequisite: appropriate survey or introductory course or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 400. Senior Show. 3 Credits.

This is the capstone class for all students in the BFA program (except students in the graphic design concentration take ARTS 401). Focusing on the development and articulation of aesthetic vision and studio practice, students will identify key ideas and sources for their work. They will also clarify their methods and concepts to create a finished, exhibition quality project. The class also addresses professional installation, promotion, and documentation of finished work, culminating with an exhibition. Prerequisite: Students must be in the final semester of major concentration.

ARTS 401. Design Capstone. 3 Credits.

This course is restricted to students admitted to the graphic design program, and is the eighth course in the graphic design sequence. Students in this course will prepare for transition to design practice through the creation of a portfolio of design work or the completion of a thesis project appropriate to their personal and career goals. Course topics will include career options, self-promotion, resume preparation, portfolio design and production, market selection, and interview skills. All students are required to present their work at the Graphic Design Senior Exit Review. Additional review may be required by syllabus. (Offered spring only) Prerequisites: ARTS 471 with a grade of C or higher. Pre- or corequisite: 15 hours from ARTS 368, ARTS 374, ARTS 375, ARTS 376, ARTS 382, ARTS 383, ARTS 395, ARTS 475, ARTS 482, or ARTS 497/ARTS 498.

ARTS 406. Secondary Art Education Methods and Classroom Management. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to prepare pre-service art educators for student teaching by addressing theoretical and practical aspects of lesson and unit planning, curriculum content and design, and various innovative instructional approaches to secondary visual arts education. Corequisite: ARTS 408. Prerequisite: Passing score on the Praxis Core examination or appropriate SAT score. Pre- or corequisite: ARTS 305, ARTS 407, and TLED 301 or TLED 290.

ARTS 407. Art Education Practicum. 2 Credits.

Enables students to interact with a master teacher in the classroom and practice a variety of teaching methods under supervision. Weekly seminars provide opportunities to engage in discourse related to pedagogical issues, theory, practice, and curriculum design found in current literature in art education. Corequisite: ARTS 408. Prerequisite: Passing score on the Praxis Core examination or appropriate SAT score. Pre- or corequisite: ARTS 305, ARTS 406 and TLED 301 or TLED 290.

ARTS 408. Student Teaching Seminar. 1 Credit.

This is a complement course to Art Education Practicum and must be taken at the same time. Students will create and compile required documents to develop pre-service teacher e-portfolios. Students must take and pass the Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) and the PRAXIS II Art content knowledge examination prior to or while enrolled in the instructional strategies course. All assessments must be passed prior to the start of the Teacher Candidate Internship Orientation. Corequisite: ARTS 406. Prerequisite: Passing score on the Praxis Core examination or appropriate SAT score. Pre- or corequisite: ARTS 305, ARTS 407, and TLED 301 or TLED 290.

ARTS 411. Photography 3. 3 Credits.

The course focuses on the photographic series examining reportage and contemporary narrative. Students will work on developing a fully conceived photographic series on a theme developed through guided individual research. Reading and discussion will provide students a critical framework in which to place their photographic imagery. Prerequisites: ARTS 211 and ARTS 311.

ARTS 412/512. Photo Seminar 1. 3 Credits.

The first of a two-semester sequence of concentrated individual work. Students will identify a topic and create a complete body of work culminating in the senior show, ARTS 400. Lectures, readings, discussion, critique, and field trips to develop the articulation of ideas and the clarification of purpose. Prerequisites: ARTS 211, ARTS 311 and ARTS 411 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 413/513. Photo Seminar 2. 3 Credits.

This is the second in a two-semester sequence of concentrated individual work culminating in the senior show. Through readings, discussion, critiques, field trips, and intense individual work, students will compile a body of work realizing their personal vision and articulate their ideas through the crafting of an artist statement. Prerequisites: ARTS 211, ARTS 311, ARTS 411 and ARTS 412 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 431/531. Drawing Studio. 3 Credits.

Further concentration on conceptual content and drawing skills, development of individual body of work exploring preferred concepts, subject matter, techniques, and media. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: ARTS 331.

ARTS 432/532. Figure Drawing Anatomy. 3 Credits.

A study of visually important aspects of the structural, skeletal and muscular systems of the body. Anatomical study will be related to drawing from the live model. Prerequisites: ARTS 331 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 433/533. Figure Drawing/ Composition. 3 Credits.

This course places the emphasis on advanced composition using the figure as the central theme. The figure's expressive potential, along with a study of historical responses to figure drawing, will be examined in depth. Prerequisites: ARTS 432/ARTS 532.

ARTS 441. Advanced Painting: Special Problems. 3 Credits.

Experimental use of media combined with an exploration of content through creative manipulation of popular themes. Prerequisites: ARTS 341.

ARTS 442/542. Painting Studio. 3 Credits.

Independent work in painting with focus on developing content. Frequent critiques. May be taken for repeat credit. Prerequisites: ARTS 441.

ARTS 445. Hybrid Approaches to Painting and Drawing. 3 Credits.

This course emphasizes hybrid approaches to contemporary drawing and painting including the integration of digital processes into studio practice and production. Students will be introduced to various applications and techniques regularly used in contemporary painting, including generating digital imagery, diorama construction and image compositing. Traditional and nontraditional media and subjects may be used to assist in the fulfillment of students’ analytical and expressive intentions. Prerequisite: ARTS 341.

ARTS 450/550. Printmaking III. 3 Credits.

Students create a body of personal work based on their research and interests. Readings, discussion, and presentations situate students’ practice within contemporary print discourses. Prerequisite: ARTS 351 or ARTS 352 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 455/555. Letterpress Printmaking. 3 Credits.

A visual and literary investigation of language and wordplay using foundry and wood type and a Vandercook SP-20 proofing press. Projects include expressive printed impressions of personal poetry and song lyric, political rant, and broadsides for entertainment or proselytizing. A theme group project, such as a folio or a bound book, is usually assigned. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C.

ARTS 456. 2D Seminar. 3 Credits.

This course covers both theoretical and practical concerns within contemporary 2D art (painting, drawing, print. A combination of reading, writing, and critique develop and deepen the trajectory of students' creative practice. Prerequisite: ARTS 450 or ARTS 441 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 461/561. Sculpture Studio. 3 Credits.

Experimental work reflecting individual initiative and attitude. Prerequisites: ARTS 361 or ARTS 363, and permission of the instructor.

ARTS 463/563. Advanced Ceramics. 3 Credits.

An advanced course in the science and art of ceramics. Students will engage in guided independent research, developing their own direction by investigating clay bodies, glazes, firing methods and contemporary ceramic art. Prerequisites: ARTS 263 and ARTS 363.

ARTS 469/569. Assemblage. 3 Credits.

Assemblage combines elements of various art and non-art media and materials. Lectures will be comprised of presentations about relevant artists, gallery and studio visits, and critiques. Studio time allows students to explore personal directions in the medium. Prerequisites: junior standing or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 471. Design Seminar. 3 Credits.

This course is restricted to students admitted to the graphic design program, and is the seventh course in the graphic design sequence. This course introduces students to the broader opportunities and directions present in contemporary design. Through readings, discussion, and self-directed and self-determined projects, students will explore personal directions and sensibilities in their design practice. (Offered fall only) Prerequisite: ARTS 372 with a grade of C or higher.

ARTS 472/572. Art Therapy. 3 Credits.

This class is designed to initiate students from both studio art and non-studio backgrounds to the study of art therapy. It examines the history of art therapy in the United States, introduces the Expressive Therapies Continuum (ETC), and explores the application of art therapy techniques and their underlying rationales. Prerequisite: Instructor permission required.

ARTS 473/573. The Book. 3 Credits.

The book as a work of art. Lecture will explore historical and technical aspects of book design and production. Studio work will be devoted to the production of a series of books involving page design, paper selection, printing and binding. Prerequisites: ARTS 202, ARTS 279, ARTS 304, and junior standing or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 475/575. Editorial Design. 3 Credits.

This advanced graphic design course is an examination of conceptual and design strategies associated with the layout of multi-page publications. Emphasis is placed on organizational and hierarchical systems, continuity and pacing, and the integration of image and type. Prerequisites: ARTS 371 and ARTS 379 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 476. Editorial Design. 3 Credits.

An examination of conceptual and design strategies associated with the layout of multi-page publications. Emphasis is placed on organizational and hierarchical systems, continuity and pacing, and the integration of image and type. Prerequisite: ARTS 371 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 481/581. Weaving and Fibers: Advanced. 3 Credits.

Advanced work in pattern drafting, loom techniques, off-loom weaving and fabric painting. Prerequisites: ARTS 381.

ARTS 482. Package Design. 3 Credits.

This advanced graphic design course is devoted to the study and creation of packaging, package labeling, and associated collateral materials. Problem solving is structured to develop conceptual skills and research methodology for the design of forms employed to contain, protect, preserve, transport, and display information about a product. The course utilizes traditional and digital formats. Prerequisites: ARTS 371 and ARTS 379 or permission of the instructor.

ARTS 491/591. Metalsmithing and Jewelry: Advanced. 3 Credits.

Further exploration in casting and soldering with concentration in the metal-forming techniques of raising and forging. Additional introduction to the techniques of working in steel. Prerequisites: ARTS 391.

ARTS 492. Wood Studio/Furniture Design. 3 Credits.

An exploration of concepts and techniques in wood sculpture and furniture design and fabrication. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

ARTS 493/593. Metalsmithing Studio. 3 Credits.

This course offers further exploration and concentration on metalsmithing skills and techniques. Through readings, discussions, self-directed and self-determined projects, students will explore methods and content to develop individual body of work. May be repeated for credit once. Prerequisite: ARTS 391 or ARTS 392 or ARTS 393.

ARTS 495/595. Topics in Studio Art. 3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on studio projects of mutual interest. Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.

ARTS 497/597. Tutorial Work in Special Studio Topics. 3 Credits.

Independent investigation of a subject to be selected under the advisement of the instructor. Conferences, papers, field trips, portfolios, or exhibitions as appropriate. Prerequisites: senior standing and permission of the chief departmental advisor.

ARTS 498. Tutorial Work in Special Studio Topics. 3 Credits.

Independent investigation of a subject to be selected under the advisement of the instructor. Conferences, papers, field trips, portfolios, or exhibitions as appropriate. Prerequisites: senior standing and permission of the chief departmental advisor.