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Old Dominion University

2013-2014 Catalog

College of Arts and Letters

http://al.odu.edu

Charles E. Wilson, Jr., Dean
Janet E. Katz, Associate Dean
Robert Wojtowicz, Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies

Mission

The College of Arts and Letters is committed to the ideals of the liberal arts. Its curriculum is designed to introduce students to the full range of human experiences through the study of cultural heritage, forms of artistic and literary expression, patterns of social and political behavior, and methods of critical inquiry.

The mission of the College of Arts and Letters is to prepare students for rigorous, intellectual and creative inquiry leading to their full development as human beings and to their responsible engagement with society. We accomplish this mission by:

  1. Developing the essential skills of critical reading and thinking, effective oral and written communication, and proficient use of technology
  2. Providing foundational knowledge in the arts, humanities and social sciences for all undergraduates
  3. Offering excellent disciplinary and interdisciplinary programs of study and training that expose students to accumulated knowledge, scholarly debate, and innovations in the field
  4. Fostering global awareness and sensitivity to the breadth and diversity of the human condition, which includes acquiring an understanding of the roles of gender, race, ethnicity, and culture
  5. Providing an atmosphere for the free exchange of ideas among faculty and students and by vigorously defending academic and intellectual freedom
  6. Promoting challenging internship opportunities, research projects, and collaborative learning experiences that connect our students to the community and prepare them for the world of work
  7. Supporting a broad array of cultural experiences that enrich the lives of students, the University, and the community

Overview

Undergraduate programs in the College of Arts and Letters are structured to make possible close personal contact between students and faculty and thus to meet the needs of individual students. Arts and Letters faculty members are dedicated to good teaching, proud of their achievements in research, and committed to enhancing in every way possible the exciting and stimulating environment that is Old Dominion University.

The College of Arts and Letters comprises the Departments of Art, Communication and Theatre Arts, English, Foreign Languages and Literatures, History, Music, Philosophy and Religious Studies, Political Science and Geography, Sociology and Criminal Justice, and Women's Studies; Interdisciplinary Studies; the Institute of Humanities; the Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity; the Institute of Asian Studies; the Institute for Ethics and Public Affairs; the Institute for the Advancement of Community Justice; Community Dance Programs; the Old Dominion University Community Music Division; the Social Science Research Center; and the Filipino American Center.

The College offers undergraduate degrees in Acting, African American and African Studies, Art History, Asian Studies, Communication, Criminal Justice, English, Foreign Languages, Geography, History, ­Interdisciplinary Studies, International Studies, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, Sociology, Studio Art, Theatre and Dance, and Women's Studies.

In addition to the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Music, and Bachelor of Science degrees offered by the above departments, the College of Arts and Letters offers a variety of accelerated and graduate degree programs. Accelerated programs allow students to count up to 12 hours of graduate courses toward both an undergraduate and graduate degree making it possible to earn both a B.A. or B.S. and an M.A. in five years. Accelerated programs are available in applied linguistics, English, history, international studies, and humanities; concentrations in humanities are available in communication, individualized interdisciplinary studies, philosophy, and women's studies.

The College offers graduate degrees in Applied Linguistics, Applied Sociology, Creative Writing, Criminology and Criminal Justice, English, History, Humanities, International Studies, Lifespan and Digital Communication, and Music Education. Please refer to the Graduate Catalog for more information.

Undergraduate Degree Requirements

Arts and Letters requirements for all undergraduate degrees include all of the General Education Requirements. In addition, all Arts and Letters majors must obtain a minimum grade of C in ENGL 110C English Composition before declaring a major and in order to graduate. Arts and Letters majors must also attain a minimum grade of C in the second composition course and the writing intensive (W) course in the major in order to graduate.

Students earning a Bachelor of Arts degree must also complete the following foreign language requirement: Proficiency established at the fourth-semester level through one of the following:

  1. Successful completion of the 202 or 212 course at Old Dominion University (or equivalent at another institution). American Sign Language is accepted to meet this requirement in all Bachelor of Arts programs in the college except Asian Studies, foreign languages and international studies.
  2. Exemption through fourth semester granted for acceptable scores on achievement tests.
  3. Advanced placement with up to nine hours credit at the 300 level for acceptable scores on the advanced placement test taken at the conclusion of advanced placement courses in high school.
  4. Students whose native language is not English are exempt from taking a foreign language for General Education. Students pursuing degrees that require proficiency beyond the 100 level must be certified by the Foreign Languages and Literatures Department to obtain a waiver of the 200-400 level courses.

Students who have taken three or more years of a foreign language in high school but have not been granted advanced placement as explained in item c above must take the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) achievement test before continuing in the same language at Old Dominion University. An achievement test score of under 481 normally requires that such students begin with the 121F course in Spanish or the 102F course in other foreign languages.

Additional major requirements are listed under the various departments. The requirements for the Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Music degrees are listed under art and music respectively. The requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in communication, criminal justice, geography, political science, sociology, interdisciplinary studies and women's studies will be found under political science and geography, sociology and criminal justice, communication and theatre arts, interdisciplinary studies, and women's studies.

Students wishing to take a major or minor in the College of Arts and Letters must register with the appropriate department. The College of Arts and Letters allows a maximum of six hours of activity credit. Activity credit beyond the established maximum may be given in unusual circumstances only and will require the approval of the dean of the College of Arts and Letters. Activity credit required by a student's major department will not be counted against the credit limitation.

Center for Family Violence Education and Research

The Old Dominion University Center for Family Violence Education and Research (CFAVER) is an interdisciplinary group of professionals with a common interest in empowering communities with education and information concerning family violence. The center's aim is to educate and promote an understanding of the various forms of family violence, including child abuse, sibling abuse, partner abuse, and elder abuse. Strategies to increase awareness about these problems include conducting interdisciplinary research focusing on different types of family violence, developing public awareness campaigns to educate members of the public about family violence, evaluating programs and processes used with family violence victims and offenders, and building relationships with various agencies responsible for family violence case care.

Institute for the Advancement of Community Justice

The Institute for the Advancement of Community Justice brings together an interdisciplinary group of scholars from the University who are interested in community justice issues. The mission of the Institute is to create and sponsor activities and research that promote well-being and quality of life in the community. This is done through the examination of social problems and their contributors and consequences. Issues of interest include: public safety and criminal justice, mental illness, substance use and abuse, education, health care, and economic disadvantage. The Institute's goals are to facilitate discussion and interdisciplinary research among scholars, community leaders, and local agencies, to ensure that the research accurately addresses issues that are important and relevant to the community, and to share knowledge on community justice issues with local agencies, community leaders, and citizens.

Institute for Ethics and Public Affairs

The Institute for Ethics and Public Affairs seeks to raise awareness and stimulate discussion of the ethical dimension of matters of public concern within the campus community and the larger Hampton Roads community; to strengthen moral community and foster a commitment to ethical ideals in public life; to facilitate reflection on the ethical standards that govern the professions; and to highlight the unique and valuable contribution that philosophical reasoning can make to practical decision making.

Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity (ISRE)

The Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity (ISRE) seeks to develop, promote and implement academic, research and public service programs that focus on the study of race and ethnicity in Hampton Roads, Virginia, the nation, and throughout the African Diaspora. The political, social, economic, cultural and historical experiences of African Americans and other communities of color are important dimensions emphasized in the work of the institute. As such, the institute seeks to establish itself as a major archive and research center in the southeast United States focusing on the experiences of African Americans.

The institute promotes high quality teaching and rigorous policy-oriented research emphasizing interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches, as well as the methods of the traditional social sciences and humanities disciplines. New and improved facilities such as a mini-archive, library, reading and meeting areas and a research/resource center for faculty and students are available.

Minor in American Studies

American studies offers a unique opportunity to explore the culture and society of the United States from a perspective that is inherently interdisciplinary. A minor in American studies provides a structured program to encourage students to cross traditional academic boundaries and to integrate the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

The minor in American studies is an effective program complement for those majoring in the related fields of art, music, dance and theatre; communication, English, and foreign languages; history, geography, and political science; philosophy; sociology, and criminal justice; as well as interdisciplinary majors in women's studies, African American and African studies, and international studies. The minor is also effective for international students, who may wish either to better understand American culture or to acquire an expertise useful in their home countries.

All students minoring in American studies must take AMST 300, crosslisted as ENGL 396 Topics in English and HIST 396 Topics in History (Topics: The American Dream), and 12 hours of designated courses divided into two fields (the arts and the humanities, and the social sciences), for a total of 15 hours. Please note that some courses listed below require prerequisites. Students may not use more than one course from the minor to satisfy program requirements in another major or minor.

Designated course listings for the minor in American studies are as follows:

AMST 300Perspectives in American Studies3
Select at least one course in the arts or the humanities from the following: *
American Art Before 1865
American Art Since 1865
American Drama
Southern Literature
American Literature to 1860
American Literature Since 1860
Studies in American Drama
The American Novel to 1920
The American Novel 1920 to Present
African American Literature
Asian American Literature
America in Vietnam: The Government and the Media in Conflict
History of Jazz
American Theatre
Select at least one course in the social sciences from the following: *
Media and Popular Culture
African-American Rhetoric Voices of Liberation
Television and Society
American Film History
The Documentary Tradition
Geography of the United States and Canada
Native American History
Colonial and Revolutionary America
The Early Republic, 1787-1850
The Civil War and Reconstruction
The Populist and Progressive Eras in United States History
The United States
The United States in the 1960s
African-American History to 1865
African-American History Since 1865
Women in U.S. History
American Political Thought
American Presidency
American Constitutional Law and Politics I
American Constitutional Law and Politics II
African American Politics
Politics of the Civil Rights Movement
Women and Politics in America
Social Inequality
Sociology of Women
Dimensions of Diversity: Intersectionality Among Women

*

No more than two from any single department.

The director of American studies can approve other courses not listed above to fulfill the minor, including 400-level topics courses, provided they substantively address some aspect of the creation or perpetuation of an American identity.

For completion of a minor, a student must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the minor exclusive of lower-level courses and prerequisite courses and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

For further information, contact the director of the American studies minor program, Dr. Joseph Cosco, at 683-5473.
 

Minors in Chinese Studies, European Studies, Japanese Studies, Latin American Studies, and World Cultures: Values and Visions

See the Minors section of the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures.

Minor in Middle Eastern Studies

The minor in Middle Eastern studies focuses upon the study of several aspects of Middle Eastern culture, language, politics, geography, and history. The minor consists of 15 hours of course work. Students can elect Track I which would include as a prerequisite three hours of 202-level Arabic, French, Hebrew, Farsi or any other language used in research in the region; this course is not included in the grade point average for the minor. Languages such as Armenian and Turkish could meet this requirement upon the taking of a proficiency examination. Students can also choose Track II, which is a non-language option.

All students must take one core course from the following: GEOG 455 The Middle East or POLS 466 Politics of the Middle East.

The remaining nine hours for Track I or 12 hours for Track II can be taken from the following list of courses:

COMM 337Model League of Arab States3
COMM/MIDE 405Communication and Culture in the Middle East3
HIST 379The Ottoman Empire3
HIST 380Women and Gender in the Middle East3
HIST 411Muslims, Christians, and Jews in the Ottoman Empire3
HIST 412From Empire to Nation: Nation-Building in the Balkans and the Middle East3
MIDE 395Topics in Middle Eastern Studies3
MIDE 495Topics in Middle Eastern Studies3
SOC 353Sociology of the Middle East3
ARAB 311Advanced Arabic Language and Culture I3
ARAB 312Advanced Arabic Language and Culture II3
ARAB 395Topics in Arabic1-6
REL 311Hebrew Bible/Old Testament3
REL 312New Testament3
REL 350Judaism3
REL 351Christianity3
REL 352Islam3
HIST 396Topics in History1-3

Courses not taken to satisfy the core requirement, topics courses offered in addition to the courses listed above, which focus upon the Middle East, and credit earned by studying abroad in the Middle East may also be included in the minor requirements. An internship taken in the Middle East or related to organizations that focus on the Middle East may also count within the minor.

For completion of the minor, a student must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the minor exclusive of lower-level courses and prerequisite courses and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University. For further information, contact the director of the Middle Eastern Studies minor at 683-3835 or at fhassenc@odu.edu.

Minor in Film and Video Studies

A minor in film and video studies consists of 15 hours of course work taken from a minimum of two academic fields. Courses taken for the minor cannot be used to fulfill other degree requirements. The requirements are as follows.

  1. COMM 270A / THEA 270A is a prerequisite for the minor and is not included in the calculation of the grade point average for the minor.
  2. One internationally-oriented course from the following:
    COMM 471WInternational Film History3
    ENGL 425World Film Directors in Context3
    WMST 495Topics in Women's Studies3
    FR 469A History of French Cinema3
    SPAN 469Hispanic Film3
    GER 445German Cinema3
    Or approved topics courses3
  3. Twelve hours chosen from the courses listed above or from:
    THEA 346Screenwriting I3
    or COMM 346 Screenwriting I
    THEA 370The Video Project3
    or COMM 370 The Video Project
    THEA 380The Video Documentary I3
    or COMM 380 The Video Documentary I
    COMM 479WAmerican Film History3
    or THEA 479W American Film History
    ENGL 312The Film3
    ENGL 424Short Works in Narrative Media3
    THEA 480The Video Documentary II3
    or COMM 480 The Video Documentary II
    COMM 481The Documentary Tradition3
    Or approved additional courses3

For completion of the minor, a student must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the minor exclusive of 100- and 200-level courses and prerequisite courses and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University. For more information, contact the Department of Communication and Theatre Arts at 683-3828.

Jewish Studies Minor

The minor in Jewish Studies requires that students take REL 350 Judaism as well as a three-hour independent study (JST 497 Research Project in Jewish Studies) supervised by the coordinator of Jewish Studies, plus an additional six hours of approved course work at the 300-level or above, for a total of 12 hours. Students interested in the Jewish Studies minor are encouraged to take HEBR 111F Beginning Hebrew I to fulfill the University foreign language requirement.

For completion of a minor, a student must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the minor (exclusive of 100- and 200-level courses and prerequisite courses) and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

A list of approved courses is available from the academic director and on the website at http://www.al.odu.edu/ijiu/courses.shtml.

The Institute for Jewish Studies and Interfaith Understanding

The Institute for Jewish Studies and Interfaith Understanding (IJIU) is dedicated to the idea that interfaith understanding involves both an appreciation of Judaism's historic role in the development of western civilization and an understanding of the cross-cultural development of the world's religions. IJIU sponsors programs and activities about religious and ethnic diversity worldwide in support of the University's commitment to open dialogue and to inspire a greater understanding of the issues and challenges that confront us at the dawn of the new century. Truly a collaboration of the University and the community, the institute seeks partners and sponsors to offer a wide array of courses to complement the Jewish studies minor and the religious studies minor and to sponsor cultural programs offered at Old Dominion University.

The IJIU is housed in the College of Arts and Letters. The office is located in the Cooper Room, BAL 2024, in the Batten Arts and Letters Building.

Institute of Asian Studies

Old Dominion University seeks to promote an expanded awareness and understanding of the nations and cultures of Asia, to support and encourage research on Asia, and to make resources available to foster better understanding and more effective interaction between organizations and individuals in the Hampton Roads area and those in Asia. To achieve these goals, the Institute of Asian Studies coordinates special programs and administers a major and minor in Asian studies. It also facilitates cooperative relationships with higher education institutions and other organizations within the United States and throughout Asia. The institute director works closely with the Office of International Programs regarding scholarships and study abroad programs and opportunities.

B.A. or B.S./M.B.A. Five-Year Program

This program allows students to complete B.A. or B.S. and M.B.A. degrees in five years. Students who have been formally accepted into the program complete a business core during their senior year. The business core fulfills the upper-division General Education requirements as a minor. All students interested in pursuing the five-year program should plan their undergraduate course of study with the requirements of the program, as explained below, clearly in mind.

Entrance Requirements

A potential candidate should have:

  1. Achieved a minimum Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) score of 550.
  2. Completed all lower-level General Education requirements.
  3. Completed at least 24 credit hours at Old Dominion University with a grade point average of at least 3.00.
  4. Achieved a minimum index of 1200. The index is computed as 200 times the Old Dominion University grade point average plus the GMAT score.
  5. Achieved senior standing at Old Dominion University.
  6. Completed a calculus course, equivalent to MATH 200 Calculus for Business and Economics.

Admissions Procedure

Students interested in the program should plan to take the GMAT at least two semesters prior to the semester in which they plan to enroll. Students planning to enroll in the fall of their senior year should take the GMAT during the fall of their junior year. Applications should be submitted to the M.B.A. Program Office at the beginning of one full semester (fall, spring) prior to planned enrollment.

Students interested in the program should discuss their plans with the M.B.A. program director as early as possible. The M.B.A. program manager will act as their advisor. The M.B.A. Program Office is located in 1026 Constant Hall. The phone number is 683-3585.

Business Core - M.B.A. Courses

Students accepted into the five-year program must complete the following courses from the M.B.A. core during their senior year:

ACCT 601Accounting for Managers3
ECON 604Managerial Economics and International Trade3
MGMT 602Organizational Management3
MKTG 603Marketing Management3
FIN 605Financial Management3
BNAL 600Foundations of Statistics for Business and Economics3

These credit hours will count toward the undergraduate degree and will meet upper-level General Education requirements. Students must maintain a 3.00 grade point average in these courses.

Requirements for the M.B.A.

After students have satisfactorily completed their undergraduate requirements, they must complete 30 hours in the M.B.A. program to include the requirements beyond the core, electives and the capstone course. More specific information about M.B.A. requirements is available from the M.B.A. program.

Career Advantage Program

The Career Advantage Program (CAP), administered by the Career Management Center (CMC) in partnership with the academic colleges, is the Arts and Letters students' link to career assistance, resources, and experience.

CAP also encompasses a series of career-related events and services designed to include a practical work experience (Guaranteed Practicum) that is the foundation of CAP, an opportunity for students to gain major-related work experience through internships, cooperative education or class related practical experience in or out of the classroom involving real-world, hands-on projects. Classes meeting the specifications for the guaranteed practical experience are noted in the Courses of Instruction section of this catalog as "(Qualifies as a CAP Experience)."

For more information, students should visit the CMC Arts and Letters website (http://www.odu.edu/ao/cmc/al/) or contact the CMC Liaison or Co-op and Internship Coordinator in BAL 2021.

Career Management Center

Residing within the College of Arts and Letters, is a full-time, full-service Career Management Center (CMC) with staff dedicated to working with Arts and Letters students and alumni. The Arts and Letters CMC staff is available to offer a full array of career assistance, resources, and experience through the Career Advantage Program (CAP) to connect students with resources that will aid in identifying, researching and exploring possible careers and opportunities to link academic and career interests.

The CMC staff serves as a primary outreach to employers and provides coordination of employer recruitment activities for the college. The staff also provides coordination and assistance in conducting college specific seminars and events such as the Communications Alumni Panel, the Sociology and Criminal Justice Career Fair, Graduate School preparation programs, and employer panels focused on issues relevant to students in the College of Arts and Letters.

AMERICAN STUDIES Courses

AMST 300. Perspectives in American Studies. 3 Credits.

An exploration of current methodological approaches utilized in the interdisciplinary field of American Studies. Through integrative themes that cut across time, place and cultural identity, this course will allow students to build a working definition of civilization in the United States. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C or HIST 104H or permission of instructor.

AMST 495. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Rotating course content in American Studies, with interdisciplinary focus. Course can be used to fulfill a requirement in the American Studies minor. Prerequisites: ENGL 211C or ENGL 231C.

ARTS AND LETTERS Courses

AL 100. Introduction to Arts and Letters: Scholarship in the Disciplines. 1 Credit.

Through guest presentations from each major department in the college, the Career Management Center and other University resources, students will learn about majors, minors, career options, effective goal-setting, study skills, and time management strategies. Coursework includes weekly reading and journal assignments, attendance at campus events, and visits to campus resources.

AL 195. Topics. 3 Credits.

A topics course in the area of arts and letters.

AL 196. Topics. 3 Credits.

A topics course in the area of arts and letters.

AL 295. Topics. 3 Credits.

A topics course in the area of arts and letters.

AL 296. Topics. 3 Credits.

A topics course in the area of arts and letters.

AL 367. Internship in Peer Advising. 1-3 Credits.

Students receive training in communications, counseling practices and College and University resources and services, and then serve as Peer Advisors to undecided prospective Arts & Letters students. Up to 150 hours required. Weekly staff meetings, readings, and a peer advising journal are also required. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: Approval of the College Director of Academic Advising.

AL 395. Topics in Humanities. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary study of selected topics in the humanities. These courses will appear in the course schedule booklet, and will be more fully described in a booklet distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

AL 396. Topics in Social Studies. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary study of selected topics in social studies. These courses will appear in the course schedule booklet, and will be more fully described in a booklet distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

AL 495/595. Topics in Humanities. 1-3 Credits.

An advanced study of selected topics in humanities. These courses will appear in the course schedule booklet, and will be more fully described in a booklet distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

AL 496/596. Topics in Social Studies. 3 Credits.

An advanced study of selected topics in social studies. These courses will appear in the course schedule booklet, and will be more fully described in a booklet distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

AL 497/597. Tutorial Work in Arts and Letters Topics. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

ASIAN STUDIES Courses

ASIA 332. South Asia Since Independence. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H. This is a comparative study of the main political, economic and social developments in the major countries of South Asia. Themes will include democratization, problems of economic development, the role of caste and religion, the causes of intrastate conflict and interstate conflict and the influence of global forces on the region.

ASIA 336. The Emergence of New China. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H. The history of China covering late Imperial China, the impact of Western imperialism, the Republican Period, and the establishment of the People's Republic.

ASIA 337. Japan's Era of Transformation. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: HIST 100H or HIST 101H or HIST 102H or HIST 103H or HIST 104H or HIST 105H. The history of Japan since 1800. The decline of the Tokugawa Shogunate, modern national building in the Meiji period, domestic conflicts and war in the twentieth century, and the roots of Japan's economic prominence today.

ASIA 338W. Politics of East Asia. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, six hours in human behavior, and junior standing or permission of the instructor. This course is designed for intermediate students who are interested in the theoretical and systematic study of world politics. The course first introduces students to several major theoretical approaches to the study of world politics and then applies these approaches to a number of major, contemporary issues--ranging from war and peace, conflict and cooperation, development and underdevelopment to global and national interests. (This is a writing intensive course.).

ASIA 353. Asian Religions. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and three semester hours in philosophy, or permission of the instructor. A study of religious and philosophical traditions of India, China and Japan. Primary emphasis will be given to Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism and Taoism.

ASIA 360. Asian Art. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or higher in ENGL 110C; a grade of C or higher in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C; ARTH 121A or ARTH 211 or ARTH 212 or permission of instructor. An introduction to the architecture, sculpture, calligraphy, pottery, ink, painting, miniature painting, and gardens of India, China, and Japan. Emphasis will be placed on the connections among the cultures: Buddhism and pilgrimage, the importance of the scholar painters, the role of trade routes and the emergence of native writing.

ASIA 395. Topics in Asian Studies. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: HIST 101H or permission of the instructor. A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors.

ASIA 435. Chinese Politics. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: POLS 100S or POLS 102S or permission of the instructor. A study of origins of the Chinese revolution; development and functions of the Chinese Communist Party; government institutions; the defense establishment; evolution of foreign policy; and post-Mao political and economic reforms.

ASIA 460. Major Issues in Asia. 3 Credits.

The course examines the most salient social, economic, environmental, and political issues in Asia from multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives. The course focuses on three major geographic areas of Asia--East Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia. Prerequisites: Three hours in human behavior and junior standing or permission of the instructor.

ASIA 461W. Asian Studies Capstone Seminar. 3 Credits.

As a required course for the Asian Studies major, the course helps students synthesize the knowledge they have learned from the undergraduate courses, write a capstone research paper and present the paper in class. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: HIST 101H, a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, and junior standing.

ASIA 495/595. Topics in Asian Studies. 3 Credits.

This course is designed for small groups of qualified students to conduct advanced study of selected topics on Asian Studies, topics which may not be taught in regularly scheduled classes. The description of the course for each offering will appear in the course schedule booklet that is distributed to each advisor. Prerequisites: Appropriate survey source or permission of the instructor.

JEWISH STUDIES Courses

JST 497. Research Project in Jewish Studies. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisite: junior standing, 6 hours of course work in Jewish studies (to include PHIL 350), and approval of the director of Jewish Studies. Independent reading and study of a topic to be selected in consultation with the director. Research proposal conference, research meetings and research project are required.

MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES Courses

MIDE 300. Perspectives on the Middle East. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. This course explores the Middle East from interdisciplinary perspectives.

MIDE 395. Topics in Middle Eastern Studies. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on topics of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly.

MIDE 405. Communication and Culture in the Middle East. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: three hours of lower level social science. The course examines the tensions between modernity and tradition in the context of Middle East culture. Cultural variables to be studied include myths, religion, family structures, and the use of science and technology.

MIDE 495. Topics in Middle Eastern Studies. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on topics of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly.