http://www.odu.edu/languages

Martha Daas, Chair
Peter Schulman, Chief Departmental Advisor for French
Frederick Lubich, Chief Departmental Advisor for German
Andrew Gordus, Chief Departmental Advisor for Spanish
Lee Slater, Chief Departmental Advisor for World Cultural Studies
Angelica Huizar, Director of Latin American Studies
Betty Rose Facer, Director, Language Learning Center

Foreign language in high school

Students who have studied a foreign language in high school for three or more years must take a placement exam before continuing in the same language.  Students with less than three years of foreign language study in high school may take the placement test if they wish to begin higher than 101F; otherwise, they must begin with the 101F course.  This policy does not apply to students who have advanced placement credit.  Contact the Testing Center for additional information.

Foreign language courses below the 300 level are not open to native and heritage speakers; these students should consult a foreign language faculty member for advising.

The General Education Foreign Language requirement as well as the foreign language proficiency requirement for the B.A. degree in the College of Arts and Letters may be exempted through acceptable scores in the CEEB Achievement Test in French, German or Spanish or departmentally administered examinations in other languages. Contact the Testing Center for additional information. Credit is granted for scores of 3, 4 and 5 on Advanced Placement (AP) language exams in Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, and Spanish and literature exams in French, Latin and Spanish. No more than nine credits will be awarded if both AP language and literature exams are submitted. Credit is also granted for scores of 4, 5, 6 and 7 on the A2 and B exams in French, German, Latin and Spanish of the International Baccalaureate (IB). Contact the department for additional information.

Foreign Language Requirements for Undergraduate Degrees

The College of Arts and Letters and the Strome College of Business require foreign language proficiency at the fourth-semester level for students pursuing Bachelor of Arts degrees.  Students pursuing all other undergraduate degrees must meet the lower-level Language and Culture general education requirement.

Students whose native language is not English are exempt from taking a foreign language for General Education. Students pursuing degrees that require proficiency beyond the 100 level must be certified by the World Languages and Cultures Department to obtain a waiver of the 200-300 level courses.

To receive the waiver the student would need one of the following:  (102 level for BS; 202 level for BA; 311 & 312 level for BAIS).
  1. a TOEFL exam at the time of ODU admission;
  2. a high school transcript showing that the student's education was primarily in another language;
  3. for those languages not commonly taught in the World Languages and Cultures Department, a translation exam evaluated by a faculty member indicating the student would pass the appropriate level.

Special emphasis at all levels of language instruction is placed on oral proficiency through dialogues, oral reports, class discussions and assignments in the Language Learning Center.

Language Learning Center

The goal of the Language Learning Center is to serve the needs of faculty, students and the Hampton Roads community in promoting the study of foreign languages offered at Old Dominion University through the use of technology-enhanced methods and materials. The center has been an integral part of the World Languages and Cultures Department since its inception in 1992. Serving over 1,200 students each semester from the Department of World Languages and Cultures and the English Language Center, the center is committed to instructional technology for foreign language learning and quality instruction.

Bachelor of Arts–World Languages and Cultures Major

Lower Division General Education

Written Communication *6
Oral Communication (satisfied in the major for French, German and Spanish concentrations by one of the following. Students in the world cultural studies concentration must complete a general education oral communication course.)0-3
Communicative Competence: Speaking and Listening
Communicative Competence: Speaking and Listening
Communicative Competence: Speaking and Listening
Mathematics3
Language and Culture (satisfied by the major for French, German and Spanish concentrations. Students in the world cultural studies concentration must demonstrate foreign language proficiency at the fourth-semester level.)0-12
Information Literacy and Research3
Human Creativity3
Interpreting the Past
HIST 102HInterpreting the European Past (required)3
Literature
WCS 100LIntroduction to World Literatures and Cultures (required)3
Philosophy and Ethics3
The Nature of Science8
Impact of Technology **0-3
Human Behavior
GEOG 100SCultural Geography (required)3
Total Hours35-53
*

Grade of C or better required in both courses and in ENGL 110C before declaring major.

**

 Satisfied by TLED 430 for teacher licensure students.

Core Requirements6
Option A: Another foreign language at any level or
Option B: Area Studies. Consult the department for a list of approved courses each semester.

Transfer Credits

Students who have received an A.A., A.S. or A.A. and S. from a Virginia community college, Richard Bland College or an equivalent associate degree approved by Transfer Evaluation Services have met all lower-division general education requirements. However, completion of ENGL 211C and either six hours of a second foreign language or six hours of area studies (which may include (WCS 100L) are major requirements and are not automatically met by completion of an associate degree. Transfer students who have taken a different general education course in the same perspective area should consult the chief departmental advisor to determine if substitutions are possible.

All majors must complete the Lower Division General Education requirements and the core requirements and select one of the following concentrations. A cumulative grade point average of 2.00 is required for the 30 hours of upper-division courses in French, German, or Spanish. No more than two FR/GER/SPAN courses taught in English can be counted for the major. At least 12 hours in the concentration must be taken at Old Dominion University. 

Concentration Areas

FRENCH

FR 311Communicative Competence: Speaking and Listening *3
FR 312WCommunicative Competence: Writing and Reading **3
FR 320Contemporary France through the Media3
or FR 420 Francophone Civilization
FR 407Advanced Grammar and Syntax3
Two FR 400-level electives6
Four FR 300 or 400-level electives12
Total Hours30

GERMAN

GER 311Communicative Competence: Speaking and Listening *3
GER 312WCommunicative Competence: Writing and Reading **3
GER 321German Civilization from the Middle Ages to World War I3
GER 407Advanced Grammar and Syntax3
Six GER 300 or 400-level electives18
Total Hours30

SPANISH

SPAN 311Communicative Competence: Speaking and Listening *3
SPAN 312WCommunicative Competence: Writing and Reading **3
SPAN 320Spanish Culture and Civilization3
or SPAN 321 Latin American Culture and Civilization
SPAN 407Advanced Grammar and Syntax (Offered in Fall)3
Select one of the following: 3
Introduction to Spanish Literature: Medieval to 1700
Introduction to Spanish Literature: 1700 to Present
Introduction to Early Latin American Literature
Introduction to Modern Latin American Literature
SPAN 410Spanish Applied Linguistics (Offered in Spring)3
or SPAN 415 Spanish Phonetics
Two SPAN 300 or 400-level electives 6
One SPAN 400-level elective3
SPAN 475WSpanish Senior Research Seminar (Offered in Fall)3
Total Hours30
*

 Satisfies oral communication

**

Grade of C or better required 

WORLD CULTURAL STUDIES

The world cultural studies concentration provides students the critical skills necessary to understand, identify, and approach global challenges and to critically evaluate and provide effective solutions for open-ended problems depending on varying cultural perspectives, values, and resources.  Courses in this concentration are taught in English.

WCS 311Communicative Competence: Speaking and Listening3
WCS 312WCommunicative Competence: Writing and Reading3
WCS 321Human Rights and World Literature and Cultures3
WCS 400Global Cultural Studies3
WCS 407Advanced Grammar and Syntax3
300/400-level elective *3
300/400-level elective *3
300/400-level elective *3
300/400-level elective *3
400-level elective *3
Total Hours30
*

Electives may be chosen from WCS 300/400-level courses, 300/400-level courses in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Japanese and Spanish offered by the World Languages and Cultures Department (if the student is proficient), or approved courses from the Business, Engineering, and Global Citizenship focus areas listed below.

Business Focus Area

The business focus area provides a critical advantage in understanding the global nexus of cultural influences in international business today.

ECON 450International Economics3
FIN 435International Financial Management3
INBU 431Doing Business in Europe3
INBU 432Doing Business in Latin America3
INBU 433Doing Business in Asia3
MGMT 462Comparative International Management3
MGMT 463Management Seminar Abroad3
MKTG 411Multi-National Marketing3
PHIL 303EBusiness Ethics3
PHIL 344EEnvironmental Ethics3
WCS 307Understanding European Culture through Film3
WCS 310Japan: A Cultural Odyssey3
WCS 330Contemporary Cultures and Media3
WCS 410Berlin-Paris: Crucibles of European Ideas3
WCS 445German Cinema I3
WCS 471Hispanic Women Authors3
WCS 476German-Jewish Literature and Culture3

Engineering Focus Area

The Engineering focus area bridges gaps between science and culture, incorporating skills in transcultural communication and understanding that will serve students interested in working for international corporations or in development sectors.

CEE 402Professional Practice of Engineering1
CEE 458Sustainable Development3
CEE 459Biofuels Engineering3
ECE 407Introduction to Game Development3
GEOG 305World Resources3
GEOG 306THazards: Natural and Technological3
IT 425Information Systems for International Business3
PHIL 355EComputer Ethics3
PHIL 383TTechnology: Its Nature and Significance3
POLS 324International Relations Theory3
WCS 307Understanding European Culture through Film3
WCS 310Japan: A Cultural Odyssey3
WCS 330Contemporary Cultures and Media3
WCS 410Berlin-Paris: Crucibles of European Ideas3
WCS 445German Cinema I3
WCS 471Hispanic Women Authors3
WCS 476German-Jewish Literature and Culture3

Global Citizenship Focus Area

In the global citizenship focus area, students learn skills necessary to approach global problems through in-depth analysis, inquiry into global challenges and cultural perspectives, and innovative paths to solutions.

ANTR 320The Sexes in Cross-Cultural Perspective3
CEE 458Sustainable Development3
COMM 306Diplomatic Communication3
COMM 337Model League of Arab States3
COMM 400WIntercultural Communication3
COMM 471WInternational Film History3
ECE 407Introduction to Game Development3
ENGL 371WCommunication Across Cultures3
GEOG 451Europe3
GEOG 452Africa3
GEOG 453Asia3
GEOG 455The Middle East3
GEOG 456Geography of Southeast Asia3
HIST 371Modern Mexico3
HIST 372Central America and the Caribbean Since 18003
HIST 373U.S.-Latin American Relations3
HIST 380Women and Gender in the Middle East3
HIST 470Democracy and Development in Modern Latin America3
PHIL 250EWorld Religions: Beliefs and Values3
PHIL 290GPhilosophy of Digital Culture3
PHIL 353Asian Religions3
PHIL 485Japanese Religion and Philosophy3
POLS 324International Relations Theory3
POLS 325WWorld Politics3
POLS 436Japanese Politics3
POLS 445Globalization: Dynamics and Implications3
POLS 462Ethnic Conflict in the New Global Order3
PSYC 420Cross-Cultural Psychology3
WCS 307Understanding European Culture through Film3
WCS 310Japan: A Cultural Odyssey3
WCS 330Contemporary Cultures and Media3
WCS 410Berlin-Paris: Crucibles of European Ideas3
WCS 445German Cinema I3
WCS 471Hispanic Women Authors3
WCS 476German-Jewish Literature and Culture3
WMST 390TWomen and Technology Worldwide3
WMST 401WWomen: A Global Perspective3

Elective Credit

Elective credit will be needed to meet the minimum requirement of 120 credit hours. 

Upper Division General Education

  • Option A. Approved Minor, 12-24 hours; also second degree or second major
  • Option B. Interdisciplinary Minor, 12 hours specified by the department, 3 of which may be in the major area of study
  • Option C. International business and regional courses or an approved certification program, such as teaching licensure
  • Option D. Two Upper-Division Courses from outside the College of Arts and Letters or from the Social Science Component within the College of Arts and Letters that are not required by the major (6 hours).

Requirements for Graduation

Requirements for graduation include a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 overall and in the major, 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours of upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, and completion of Senior Assessment.

Bachelor of Arts with Licensure in Pre-K Through Grade 12

Admission

All students must apply for and be admitted into the approved foreign language teacher preparation program for French, German or Spanish. Students must meet the required criteria for admission by passing the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments and earn the minimum required grade point averages (GPA).

Prescribed Virginia Board of Education Assessment for Admission to an Approved Teacher Education Program

Old Dominion University students seeking admission to an approved teacher education program must satisfy the Virginia Board of Education Required Assessment for Admission to an Approved Teacher Education Program. This requirement can be satisfied by meeting a passing score in one of the selected criteria below:

  1. Passing Praxis I composite score of 532 by December 31, 2013; or
  2. Passing Praxis Core Academic Skills Tests beginning January 1, 2014:
    Reading Score of 156, Writing Score of 162, and Mathematics Score of 150; or
  3. Approved substitute test scores:
    1. SAT score of 1000 with at least 450 verbal and 510 mathematics taken prior to April 1, 1995; or
    2. SAT score of 1100 with at least 530 verbal and 530 mathematics taken after April 1, 1995 and before March 2016*; or
    3. ACT composite score of 21 with ACT mathematics score of at least 21, and ACT English plus Reading score of at least 37, taken prior to April 1, 1995; or
    4. ACT composite score of 24 with ACT mathematics score of at least 22, and ACT English plus Reading score of at least 46, taken after April 1, 1995; or
    5. Praxis I Math test score of 178 by December 31, 2013 and a composite Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (hereafter referred to as the VCLA) score of 470; or
    6. Praxis Core Academic Skills Mathematics test score of 150 beginning January 1, 2014 and a VCLA score of 470; or
    7. SAT Mathematics test score of at least 510 taken prior to April 1, 1995 and a VCLA score of 470; or
    8. SAT Mathematics test score of at least 530 taken after April 1, 1995 and a composite VCLA score of 470; or
    9. ACT Mathematics test score of at least 21 taken prior to April 1, 1995 and a composite VCLA score of 470; or
    10. ACT Mathematics test score of at least 22 taken after April 1, 1995 and a composite VCLA score of 470.
      Note:  ACT scores taken prior to 1989 are not valid.
*

A new SAT test was released in March 2016.  Praxis Core substitute scores for the new SAT have not been determined.

For the most current information on the prescribed Virginia Board of Education admission assessment, visit the Teacher Education Services website, http://www.odu.edu/tes and review the Teacher Education Handbook.

Required grade point averages (GPA):

  • A cumulative GPA of 2.75 is required.
  • A major/content GPA of 2.75 is required – all French, German or Spanish major courses must be passed with a grade of C or higher.
  • A professional education GPA of 2.75 is required – all professional education courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Although students may enroll in a limited number of education courses, students must be admitted into the approved foreign language teacher preparation program prior to enrolling in any instructional strategies practicum education course. Students must also meet with an education advisor in the Office of Teacher Education Services.

Continuance

Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.75, a major/content GPA of 2.75 and a professional education GPA of 2.75. French, German or Spanish courses must be passed with a grade of C or higher. The professional education core must be completed with a grade of C- or higher for continuance. A professional education GPA of 2.75 is required for continuance. Students must take and pass the Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) and the Praxis Subject Assessment, French, German or Spanish World Language (formerly Praxis II) and receive an official rating of Advanced-low or higher on the ACTFL OPI prior to or while enrolled in the instructional strategies course. All assessments must be passed prior to the start of the Teacher Candidate Internship Orientation session.

Background Clearance Requirement

Old Dominion University requires a background clearance check of candidates interested in many of the professional education programs.  Professional education programs have several field experiences that are required for continuance and graduation from the program.  The background clearance must be successfully completed prior to a field experience placement. Candidates will be provided a field experience placement when the background check process is completed with resolution of any issues. The process to complete the ODU clearance background check is located at: http://www.odu.edu/success/academic/teacher-education/placement/background-checks.  The ODU clearance process includes:  an FBI fingerprint, a child protective service/social service review, and a Virginia State Police sex offender registry review. Candidates interested in the professional education programs are advised to complete this clearance process immediately upon entry into the program since the clearance process takes a minimum of eight weeks to complete.

Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments:

  • Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) – a passing composite score of 470 is required on this reading and writing assessment.
  • Praxis Subject Assessment, French World Language (test code 5174) – passing score of 163 required
  • Praxis Subject Assessment, German World Language (test code 5183) – passing score of 163 required
  • Praxis Subject Assessment, Spanish World Language (test code 5195) – passing score of 168 required

To review more information on the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments, visit the Teacher Education Services website, www.odu.edu/tes.

Graduation

Requirements for graduation include completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better; completion of the Senior Assessment; a minimum cumulative 2.75 GPA in the major area and in the professional education core with no grade less than a C in the major/content and with no grade less than a C- in the professional education core; successful completion of the Teacher Candidate Internship, and a minimum of 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours of upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University.

Due to changing University requirements, national accreditation standards, and the Virginia Board of Education licensure regulations, the teacher education programs in the College of Arts and Letters are under constant revision. Any changes resulting from these factors supersede the program requirements described in this Catalog. Students are encouraged to obtain current program information from their advisors and from the Teacher Education Services website at www.odu.edu/tes.

Students holding a baccalaureate degree in French, German, or Spanish (or its accepted equivalent) may enroll in the program leading to licensure. Students seeking licensure only must see an advisor before enrolling. A maximum of nine hours in the language, to be selected with the help of the major advisor, may also be required.

Students seeking licensure in pre-K through grade 12 complete the lower-division General Education requirements listed under the Bachelor of Arts-Foreign Languages and Literatures major.

Concentration in French with Licensure in Pre-K through Grade 12

FR 311Communicative Competence: Speaking and Listening *3
FR 312WCommunicative Competence: Writing and Reading3
FR 320Contemporary France through the Media3
or FR 420 Francophone Civilization
FR 407Advanced Grammar and Syntax3
Six FR 300/400-level electives **18
Total Hours30
*

Satisfies oral communication requirement.

**

At least three credits must be in literature at the 400 level.

Professional Education sequence

FL 452Methods for Teaching Foreign Languages in Pre-K through Grade 123
FL 456Seminar in Foreign Language Teacher Education1
TLED 301Foundations and Introduction to Assessment of Education3
TLED 360Classroom Management and Discipline2
TLED 408Reading and Writing in Content Areas3
TLED 430PK-12 Instructional Technology *3
TLED 485Teacher Candidate Internship **12
SPED 313Fundamentals of Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence3
SPED 406Students with Diverse Learning Needs in the General Education Classroom3
Total Hours33
*

Satisfies impact of technology requirement.

**

Student teaching.

Concentration in German with Licensure in Pre-K Through Grade 12

GER 311Communicative Competence: Speaking and Listening *3
GER 312WCommunicative Competence: Writing and Reading3
GER 321German Civilization from the Middle Ages to World War I3
GER 407Advanced Grammar and Syntax3
Six GER 300/400 level electives **18
Total Hours30
*

Satisfies oral communication requirement.

**

At least six credits must be on the 400 level and one in literature.

Professional Education sequence

TLED 301Foundations and Introduction to Assessment of Education3
TLED 360Classroom Management and Discipline2
TLED 408Reading and Writing in Content Areas3
TLED 430PK-12 Instructional Technology *3
TLED 485Teacher Candidate Internship12
SPED 313Fundamentals of Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence3
SPED 406Students with Diverse Learning Needs in the General Education Classroom3
FL 452Methods for Teaching Foreign Languages in Pre-K through Grade 123
FL 456Seminar in Foreign Language Teacher Education1
Total Hours33
*

Satisfies impact of technology requirement.

Concentration in Spanish with Licensure in Pre-K Through Grade 12

SPAN 311Communicative Competence: Speaking and Listening **3
SPAN 312WCommunicative Competence: Writing and Reading3
SPAN 320Spanish Culture and Civilization3
or SPAN 321 Latin American Culture and Civilization
Select one of the following 3
Introduction to Spanish Literature: Medieval to 1700
Introduction to Spanish Literature: 1700 to Present
Introduction to Early Latin American Literature
Introduction to Modern Latin American Literature
SPAN 407Advanced Grammar and Syntax3
SPAN 410Spanish Applied Linguistics3
or SPAN 415 Spanish Phonetics
Two SPAN 300 or 400-level electives6
One SPAN 400-level elective3
SPAN 475WSpanish Senior Research Seminar3
Total Hours30
*

Satisfies oral communication requirement.

Professional Education sequence

TLED 301Foundations and Introduction to Assessment of Education3
TLED 360Classroom Management and Discipline2
TLED 408Reading and Writing in Content Areas3
TLED 430PK-12 Instructional Technology *3
TLED 485Teacher Candidate Internship12
SPED 313Fundamentals of Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence3
SPED 406Students with Diverse Learning Needs in the General Education Classroom3
FL 452Methods for Teaching Foreign Languages in Pre-K through Grade 123
FL 456Seminar in Foreign Language Teacher Education1
Total Hours33
*

Satisfies impact of technology requirement.

Elective Credit

Elective credit will be needed to meet the minimum requirement of 120 credit hours.

Upper Division General Education

Satisfied by the professional education core.

World Languages and Cultures Minors

The department offers minors in world languages and cultures with a concentration in French, German and Spanish. Students must complete 15 hours of 300/400-level courses in the language and earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in these upper-division courses. Lower-level courses and prerequisite courses do not count toward the grade point average required for the minor. Only one FR/GER/SPAN course taught in English may be applied toward the minor. At least six hours of upper-level courses must be taken through courses offered by Old Dominion University. To declare a minor the student must have completed ENGL 110C and the 202 course in the language.

French Minor

Advisor:  Elizabeth Black, eblack@odu.edu

Fifteen hours of 300/400-level courses in the language are required.  Requirements are as follows:

FR 311Communicative Competence: Speaking and Listening3
FR 312WCommunicative Competence: Writing and Reading3
Three FR courses at the 300/400 level 9
Total Hours15

German Minor

Advisor: Frederick Lubich, flubich@odu.edu

Fifteen hours of 300/400-level courses in the language are required. Requirements are as follows:

GER 311Communicative Competence: Speaking and Listening3
GER 312WCommunicative Competence: Writing and Reading3
Three GER courses at the 300/400 level (GER 321 highly recommended)9
Total Hours15

Spanish Minor

Advisor:  Luis Guadano, lguadano@odu.edu

Fifteen hours of 300/400-level courses in the language are required. Requirements are as follows:

SPAN 311Communicative Competence: Speaking and Listening3
SPAN 312WCommunicative Competence: Writing and Reading3
SPAN 320Spanish Culture and Civilization3
or SPAN 321 Latin American Culture and Civilization
Two SPAN courses at the 300/400 level6
Total Hours15

Interdisciplinary Minor

World Cultures: Values and Visions

Coordinator:  Lee Slater, lslater@odu.edu

The World Cultures: Values and Vision interdisciplinary minor requires 12 credit hours of 300/400-level courses selected from at least two different disciplines with a maximum of six credits from any one discipline. For completion of the interdisciplinary minor, students must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in ALL courses required for the minor exclusive of lower-level courses and prerequisite courses. At least six hours of upper-level courses must be taken through courses offered by Old Dominion University. Three credit hours may be in the major, if a major course is listed as an option for the interdisciplinary minor. As such, it will be credited toward both the major and the interdisciplinary minor.

This interdisciplinary minor develops an understanding of human behavior in different cultures. In order to interpret information from other countries and ethnic groups, students need to learn that certain common notions such as perceptions of personhood, the organization of time and space, and the appropriate organization and behavior of social groups vary from country to country. This minor will explore different cultural perspectives and value systems. Students should emerge with a more sophisticated understanding of their own and others' cultures.

Course options are as follows:

ANTR 304Digging Up the Past3
ANTR 305North American Archaeology3
ANTR 320The Sexes in Cross-Cultural Perspective3
COMM 400WIntercultural Communication3
ENGL 371WCommunication Across Cultures3
FR 320Contemporary France through the Media3
FR 438Studies in Twentieth-Century French Literature3
FR 469A History of French Cinema3
GEOG 451Europe3
GEOG 452Africa3
GEOG 453Asia3
GEOG 455The Middle East3
GEOG 456Geography of Southeast Asia3
IT 425Information Systems for International Business3
MGMT 361International Business Operations3
MKTG 411Multi-National Marketing3
POLS 325WWorld Politics3
PSYC 420Cross-Cultural Psychology3
SPAN 320Spanish Culture and Civilization3
WCS 307Understanding European Culture through Film3
WCS/JAPN 310Japan: A Cultural Odyssey3
WCS/FR/GER 410Berlin-Paris: Crucibles of European Ideas3
WCS/SPAN 471Hispanic Women Authors3
WCS 445/COMM 444/GER 445German Cinema I3
WCS/GER 476German-Jewish Literature and Culture3

Study Abroad: Any study abroad course at the 300-400 level that offers three credits can fulfill one course requirement for this minor.  The coordinator for the minor can approve other courses not listed above to fulfill the minor provided they substantively address some aspect of world cultures.

European Studies Minor

Coordinator:  Peter Schulman, 683-3973

The turn of the twenty-first century coincides with the first united European currency, the Euro. The Euro is emblematic of a new Europe, one that has become a major force not only in world politics but in the ever-evolving cultural landscape of the new millennium. The study of European cultures provides students with a unique understanding of the complex mosaic that is today’s Europe. In the increasingly competitive job market, a focus on European Studies is a valuable asset in any field.

Students who minor in European Studies focus on different aspects of European culture, language, literature, film, politics, geography, philosophy, and history. Students may declare a minor in European Studies upon successful completion of FR 311 and FR 312W or GER 311 and GER 312W or SPAN 311 and SPAN 312W, or the equivalent. The additional 12 credit hours will include electives in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures and courses from the following program areas: Art, Geography, History, Music, Philosophy, and Political Science.

Option 1

  • Two courses from World Languages and Cultures, above 312W or the equivalent. One course must be outside the language of proficiency, or can be a WCS course with a European emphasis.
  • Two courses from related disciplines outside of the Department of World Languages and Cultures.

Option 2

  • Three courses from World Languages and Cultures, above 312W. One course must be outside the language of proficiency, or can be a WCS course with a European emphasis.
  • One course from related disciplines outside of the World Languages and Cultures Department.

Credits can also be earned by studying abroad in Europe. The student's course of study will be determined in consultation with an advisor from the Department of World Languages and Cultures.

For completion of a minor, a student must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the minor exclusive of lower-level courses and prerequisite courses and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Latin American Studies Minor

Coordinator: Andrew Gordus, agordus@odu.edu, 683-4319

The requirements for a minor in Latin American Studies are 15 credit hours comprised of the following:

1.  Three credit hours to demonstrate Spanish proficiency  (Portuguese is also accepted).

2.  Twelve credit hours at the 300- or 400-level taken from at least three of the following program areas:  Geography, History, International Business, Political Science and Spanish.

Note:  Credits may also be earned by studying abroad in Latin America (including Brazil).

The Latin American Studies program at Old Dominion University offers a variety of interdisciplinary courses during the academic year. A minor must represent at least three of the following program areas. These courses include:

Geography
GEOG 454WLatin America3
History
HIST 371Modern Mexico3
HIST 372Central America and the Caribbean Since 18003
HIST 373U.S.-Latin American Relations3
HIST 470Democracy and Development in Modern Latin America3
International Business
INBU 432Doing Business in Latin America3
Political Science
POLS 337Latin American Politics3
Spanish
SPAN 321Latin American Culture and Civilization3
SPAN 333Introduction to Early Latin American Literature3
SPAN 334Introduction to Modern Latin American Literature3
SPAN 449Contemporary Spanish-American Drama3
SPAN 469Hispanic Film3
SPAN 471Hispanic Women Authors3

Other courses with a Latin American focus may count.

For completion of a minor, a student must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the minor exclusive of lower-level courses and prerequisite courses and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Japanese Studies Minor

Coordinator: Minori Marken, mmarken@odu.edu

The Japanese Studies minor consists of 15 credit hours of 300- and 400-level courses that combine the study of language and culture. For completion of a minor, a student must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the minor exclusive of lower-level courses and prerequisite courses and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Required Courses: 6 credit hours
JAPN 311Communicative Competence: Speaking and Listening *3
JAPN 312Communicative Competence: Writing and Reading3
Electives: 9 credit hours
Electives may be selected from any two different subject areas listed below.
Asian Art
Japan's Era of Transformation
Politics of East Asia
Asian Religions
Topics in Health and Physical Education (Theory of Martial Arts)
Japan's Era of Transformation
Comparative International Management
Management Seminar Abroad
Asian Religions
Japanese Religion and Philosophy
Politics of East Asia
Japanese Politics
Topics in Communication **
Japan: A Cultural Odyssey
Topics in World Cultural Studies
*

JAPN 212 or equivalent is a prerequisite to JAPN 311.

**

Topics courses dealing with Japan can be applied toward the minor. Advisor's approval required.

Chinese Studies Minor

Coordinator: Zhongtang Ren, zren@odu.edu, 683-5242

The Chinese Studies minor consists of 12 credit hours of 300- and 400- level courses that combine the study of language and culture. For completion of a minor, a student must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the minor exclusive of lower-level courses and prerequisite courses and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Requirements: 12 credit hours

Prerequisite Courses: 12 Credits *
CHIN 111FBeginning Chinese6
CHIN 212Intermediate Chinese6
*

Prerequisite courses do not count in the 2.00 grade point average required for the minor.

Required Courses: 6 credit hours
CHIN 311Advanced Chinese Language and Culture I3
CHIN 312Advanced Chinese Language and Culture II3
Elective Courses: 6 credit hours from any two different subject areas listed below
Topics in Chinese
Topics in Chinese (Study abroad in China)
Topics in Chinese
The Emergence of New China
Politics of East Asia
Asian Religions
Topics in Asian Studies (Study abroad in China)
Chinese Politics
The Emergence of New China
Politics and Society in East Asia Since 1945
Doing Business in Asia
Comparative International Management
Management Seminar Abroad
Asian Religions
Buddhism
Chinese Religion and Philosophy
Politics of East Asia
Chinese Politics
International Relations in East Asia

Any study abroad course at the 300-400 level that offers three credits can fulfill one course requirement for this minor. In cases where a study abroad course fits the themes of another interdisciplinary minor, students may request approval from the minor coordinator to use that study abroad course.

ARABIC Courses

ARAB 111F. Beginning Arabic. 6 Credits.

This is an introductory class to Modern Standard Arabic and Middle Eastern Culture. Students are expected to reach intermediate low to intermediate mid-level. The Arabic alphabet and sounds are introduced as well as simple language in context reflecting the authentic cultural nuances dealing with simple topics ranging from family, school and hobbies. No prior knowledge is required.

ARAB 195. Topics. 1-6 Credits.

Special topics in Arabic.

ARAB 212. Intermediate Arabic. 6 Credits.

The class is a continuous sequence of ARAB 111F or an equivalent class. The students are expected to reach intermediate high level. The class focuses on expanding the topics of communication the students developed in the introductory class. Modern standard and Levantine Arabic will be the means of communication in class and the student will be exposed to practical grammar, authentic media and texts. The students will produce culture through role plays and group work simulations and recognize the different registers in the targeted culture through paying attention to sociolinguistic variations. Prerequisites: ARAB 111F.

ARAB 295. Topics. 1-6 Credits.

A topics course in Arabic, with topics announced prior to the semester in which they are offered.

ARAB 311. Advanced Arabic Language and Culture I. 3 Credits.

The purpose of the class is to reinforce the vocabulary and grammar introduced in ARAB 111F and ARAB 212 through activating the learned materials and pushing the students to the advanced level. The language of interaction will be Levantine and Standard Arabic, which students will be able to manipulate to the specific language situations as in the countries this deglosic phenomenon exists. In addition to the grammar and vocabulary introduced in the textbook, the class will incorporate an extensive authentic reading component and a variety of Arabic contemporary media to reflect the linguistic and cultural aspects of the Middle East. Prerequisites: ARAB 212.

ARAB 312. Advanced Arabic Language and Culture II. 3 Credits.

The class is a continuous sequence of ARAB 311 or an equivalent class. Students are expected to reach advanced low level and explore the Middle Eastern cultures through the language spoken there. Levantine and Standard Arabic are the only means of communication in this class. The class incorporates a high load of writing to express students’ ideas relating to a wide variety of Middle Eastern topics and current events, which will be introduced through weekly readings and authentic media. This is a crucial class for students planning to travel to the Middle East, who want to explore the Arab world first hand. Prerequisites: ARAB 311.

ARAB 395. Topics in Arabic. 1-6 Credits.

A study of selected topics for elective credit. These courses will appear in the course schedule booklet and will be more fully described in a booklet distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: ARAB 212 or equivalent.

ARAB 495. Topics in Arabic. 1-6 Credits.

A study of selected topics for elective credit. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described in a booklet distributed to academic advisors.

CHINESE Courses

CHIN 111F. Beginning Chinese. 6 Credits.

This course focuses on the fundamental elements of the Chinese language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on building a foundation of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. The course includes Chinese Pinyin phonetic system, character formation, basic sentence structures, and Chinese culture and cultural activities. Students are expected to comprehend and respond to essential topics in Chinese and demonstrate their cultural awareness.

CHIN 212. Intermediate Chinese. 6 Credits.

This course continues to focus on the fundamental elements of the Chinese language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. The course includes Chinese basic sentence patterns and real-life topics on Chinese cultural activities. Students are expected to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and simple written Chinese and demonstrate their cultural awareness. Prerequisites: CHIN 111F.

CHIN 295. Topics in Chinese. 1-3 Credits.

Study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

CHIN 311. Advanced Chinese Language and Culture I. 3 Credits.

This course takes students to an advanced level of communicative competence and language social interaction. The course includes more complex sentence patterns and Chinese cultural activities. Students learn to respond to topics of interest to college-age students, such as campus life, career planning, and Chinese cultural traditions. Students are exposed to the speech of native speakers in real cultural situations and develop sensitivity to communicative strategies and cultural competency. Prerequisites: CHIN 212.

CHIN 312. Advanced Chinese Language and Culture II. 3 Credits.

This course takes students to a higher level of communicative competence and language social interaction. The course gradually introduces more formal speech and written-style language in the real cultural context. The course trains students to interpret textual and cultural meanings and to express their opinions and cultural understanding by using connected paragraph length discourse. Prerequisites: CHIN 311.

CHIN 395. Topics in Chinese. 1-3 Credits.

Selected topics, genres, authors and/or literary, cultural, sociopolitical, or historical movements in the Chinese-speaking world. May be repeated for credit if the topic is different. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

CHIN 396. Topics in Chinese. 1-3 Credits.

Seminars engage students in in-depth study of a specified topic through readings, research and oral and written student reports. Special attention is paid to theoretical and bibliographic issues. Topics vary according to the areas of expertise and professional interests of departmental faculty. May be repeated if topics are different. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

CHIN 495. Topics in Chinese. 3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. May be repeated for credit if the topic is different. Prerequisites: Senior standing or permission of the instructor.

FARSI Courses

FARS 111F. Beginning Farsi. 6 Credits.

Aural comprehension, oral drill and discussion of grammar principles, written exercises, and reading assignments.

FARS 212. Intermediate Farsi. 6 Credits.

Oral drill and discussion of grammar principles, written exercises and reading assignments. Prerequisite: FARS 111F.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES Courses

FL 195. Topics in Foreign Languages. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics for elective credit. These courses will appear in the course schedule.

FL 196. Topics in Foreign Languages. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics for elective credit. These courses will appear in the course schedule.

FL 210. Language in Motion. 1 Credit.

This course provides opportunities for foreign language students with study-abroad and international experience to expand their knowledge of language and culture, to process their own intercultural and language-learning experiences, and to enrich local public school language classrooms. In addition to attending training workshops on topic selection, methodology, and technique, students will confer with the instructor and host teachers/community partners to develop individual projects for presentations in school classrooms. Particular activities will depend on the knowledge and interests of the students and the requests of the host teachers (International Education Week, National French Week, etc.). Prerequisites: Undergraduate-level foreign language study and study/sojourn abroad experience.

FL 369. Foreign Language Practicum. 3 Credits.

Internships in private, public and business organizations that deal with foreign nationals, foreign products or are involved in teaching French, German or Spanish. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: nine credit hours of upper-level language at ODU, junior standing.

FL 452. Methods for Teaching Foreign Languages in Pre-K through Grade 12. 3 Credits.

Taken in the fall semester preceding student teaching. A systematic approach to established and experimental methods of foreign language instruction. Corequisite: FL 456. Prerequisite: admission to the teacher preparation program or licensure only program, a cumulative and major GPA of 2.75 with grades of C or higher, professional education GPA of 2.75 or higher with grades of C- or higher; passing PRAXIS I scores, qualifying SAT or ACT scores, or passing PRAXIS I math and VCLA scores also required.

FL 456. Seminar in Foreign Language Teacher Education. 1 Credit.

Students observe teachers in PreK-12 and may practice teaching methods under supervision. Preparation for Praxis II with passing scores required on Praxis II and VCLA and Advanced-low rating or higher on the ACTFL OPI. Available for pass/fail grading only. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Corequisite: FL 452. Prerequisite: passing scores on Praxis I and admission to the teacher education program.

FL 480W. Senior Seminar in International Studies. 3 Credits.

Interdisciplinary research and the preparation of a senior thesis in international studies. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisite: grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, senior standing in the BAIS degree program or permission of the instructor and the director of the BAIS program.

FL 495/595. Topics in Foreign Languages. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

FL 497. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Foreign Languages and Literatures. 1-6 Credits.

Independent readings and study on a topic to be selected under direction of professor. Prerequisite: appropriate survey course or permission by the instructor and chair.

FL 498. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Foreign Languages and Literatures. 1-6 Credits.

Independent readings and study on a topic to be selected under direction of professor. Prerequisite: appropriate survey course or permission by the instructor and chair.

FRENCH Courses

FR 101F. Beginning French I. 3 Credits.

Aural comprehension, oral drill and discussion of grammar principles, written exercises, and reading assignments.

FR 102F. Beginning French II. 3 Credits.

Aural comprehension, oral drill and discussion of grammar principles, written exercises, and reading assignments. Prerequisite: FR 101F or satisfactory score on the placement exam.

FR 195. Topics in French. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives for non-majors. These courses will appear in the course schedule.

FR 196. Topics in French. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives for non-majors. These courses will appear in the course schedule.

FR 201. Intermediate French I. 3 Credits.

Graded readings with grammar review. Emphasis on civilization and culture, also on speaking and listening competency. Prerequisites: FR 102F or satisfactory score on the placement exam.

FR 202. Intermediate French II. 3 Credits.

Graded readings with grammar review. Emphasis on civilization and culture and also speaking and listening. Prerequisites: FR 201 or satisfactory score on the placement exam.

FR 295. Topics in French. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives for nonmajors. These courses will appear in the course schedule.

FR 296. Topics in French. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives for nonmajors. These courses will appear in the course schedule.

FR 311. Communicative Competence: Speaking and Listening. 3 Credits.

This course is primarily a conversation course to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency in verbal communication. Task-oriented communication strategies in cross-cultural training will be practiced by presenting students with models that demonstrate appropriate linguistic and cultural competencies. Students will practice these skills by role-playing, giving presentations, enriching self-awareness with practiced in-group discussions on various topics (such as, prejudice, racism, values, and customs) that dispel stereotypes and foster more in-depth social-cultural understanding, and with participation in guided cultural encounters. Students will improve their listening and comprehension skills and deepen cultural proficiency by learning how to communicate and collaborate with other people and cultures in a global age. (This is an oral skills course.) Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in FR 202 or advanced placement or permission of the instructor.

FR 312W. Communicative Competence: Writing and Reading. 3 Credits.

This is an intensive writing course designed with writing assignments that examine various cultural contexts that enable students to understand cultural content, style, audience and organization. The main objective of the course is increased awareness of and sensitivity to appropriate word choice, and syntax in the language. Students will engage in writing for different cultural audiences and in varied contexts such as literary, artistic and media expressions around the world. Special emphasis is placed on the methodology of close reading as students hone the analytics skills and vocabulary necessary to interpret idioms, regionalism, cultural expressions and overall intercultural skills observed in various genres and cultures. Students will analyze compelling global issues and the diverse cultural perspectives that inform them. Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C, ENGL 221C, or ENGL 231C and a grade of C or better in FR 202 or advanced placement.

FR 320. Contemporary France through the Media. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to social, political, economic, intellectual and artistic manifestations of France and the French-speaking world today. Students learn to analyze socio-cultural trends as well as innovations in industry as they unfold and develop by reading French and Francophone newspapers and magazines, watching news broadcasts and exploring online content such as blogs, advertising and social media. Prerequisites: FR 202 or advanced placement.

FR 331. French Literary Forms: Prose. 3 Credits.

Students will be introduced to a selection of French/Francophone short stories, which will give them a general sampling of a variety of different styles and periods from the 18th to the 20th century, contextualized in historical, social, political, and cultural milieux. Students will learn different ways of approaching the French short story (historical, stylistic, philosophical), what to look for in a given story (ideas, language, plot) and how to write about French prose critically and creatively. Prerequisites: FR 202 or advanced placement.

FR 332. French Literary Forms: Theatre. 3 Credits.

Students will be introduced to a selection of French plays, which will give them a general sampling of a variety of different dramaturgical styles and periods from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, contextualized in the historical, social, political, and cultural milieu. Students will learn different ways of approaching French theater (historical, stylistic, philosophical), what to look for in a given play (ideas, poetry, plot) and how to write about French theater critically and creatively. Prerequisites: FR 202 or advanced placement.

FR 333. French Literary Forms: Poetry. 3 Credits.

Survey of French-language literary movements and an introduction to the genre of poetry from the Middle Ages to the present day. Poems and poets are contextualized in the historical, social, political, and cultural milieux. Course aims: allow students to gain an understanding of literary developments in the French language; introduce methods of literary analysis primarily through close reading of texts; give an experience of the creative process that goes into writing fixed-form poetry; practice recitation; allow students to reflect on recurrent themes in French-language poetry; and assess the pertinence of a literary form in the creative imagination of a nation. Prerequisites: FR 202 or advanced placement.

FR 366. Business French: Language and Culture. 3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the culture, politics, economics and commerce of modern France as they relate to the French business world, providing a background for all students regardless of specific career goals. They will learn to write and speak in a professional context and learn to apply what they have learned through the study of business documents and training in commercial correspondence. This class will also be useful preparation for those interested in internships abroad or in the U.S. (for more information about internship possibilities, contact Career Development Services in Webb Center). Prerequisites: FR 202 or advanced placement.

FR 369. Practicum. 1-3 Credits.

Internships in private, public and business organizations that deal with foreign nationals, foreign products or are involved in teaching French. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisite: nine credit hours at the 300 or 400 level.

FR 395. Topics in French. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for non-majors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described by academic advisors. Prerequisites: FR 202 or advanced placement test.

FR 396. Topics in French. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for non-majors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described by academic advisors. Prerequisites: FR 202 or advanced placement test.

FR 407/507. Advanced Grammar and Syntax. 3 Credits.

This class is designed to solidify and refine students’ working knowledge of written skills in the language, with an emphasis on increasing their written sophistication. Focus is on analysis of vocabulary, grammar, and cultural nuances in the syntax to examine how language reflects the ways of life and beliefs of its speakers, contrasted with the extent of language’s influence on culture. Students will refine their skills in written inter-cultural communication, paying attention to idioms and the fine points of “cultural grammar,” communicative competence and specialized discourse to develop excellent communication skills. This course is intended to prepare students for using their knowledge of language and culture in professional settings. Prerequisites: FR 312W or permission of the instructor.

FR 410/510. Berlin and Paris: Crucibles of European Ideas. 3 Credits.

This course explores the cultural movements that have characterized the German-French commonalities and differences from the early 1900s through the 1990s in cross-disciplinary discourses such as film, literature, art, politics, and economics. Cross-listed with WCS 410/WCS 510. Prerequisites: German and French students must read and write in the target language. Pre- or corequisite: FR 312W.

FR 415/515. Applied Phonetics. 3 Credits.

This class is a skills-based, laboratory class on French phonetics designed to develop students’ mastery of spoken French. Students will acquire a more native-like French accent and see clear correspondences between orthography and pronunciation. By using oral texts with social and cultural themes students acquire knowledge of French pronunciation in a culturally relevant way. Students additionally investigate non-standard accents from Québec, the south of French, and Belgium. Prerequisites: FR 311 or permission of the instructor.

FR 420/520. Francophone Civilization. 3 Credits.

This seminar traces the historical narratives of French colonialism up until contemporary times, examining the roots of unrest in the Maghreb and other ex-French colonies through representative political, literary, and cinematic texts relating to today’s political flashpoints in the Maghreb and West Africa as well as other former French colonies. It also approaches different aspects of France’s colonial and post-colonial legacy through a historical lens as students explore texts from such revolutionary leaders as Césaire, Senghor, Memmi and others. Examination of both the revolutionary movements that propelled France’s ex-colonies towards independence and France’s shifting perspectives from ex-colonizer to Francophone ally. Prerequisites: FR 312W or the instructor's permission.

FR 427/527. Studies in Seventeenth-Century French Literature. 3 Credits.

Following a preparatory period, the political stability of the French monarchy ushers in the golden age of classicism. Representative works from comic and dramatic theater, philosophy, poetry and the evolving novel. Prerequisites: FR 312W or permission of the instructor.

FR 428/528. Studies in Eighteenth-Century French Literature. 3 Credits.

A study of the two main currents of ideas of the Age of Reason or Enlightenment; the rationalistic drive to question established authority, exemplified by the 'Encyclopedie' and leading to the Revolution of 1789; and the Rousseauistic return to nature and emotivity. Representative readings. Prerequisites: FR 312W or permission of the instructor.

FR 437/537. Studies in Nineteenth-Century French Literature. 3 Credits.

A study of the post-Revolutionary (1789) literary movements: Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, Symbolism, which opened new horizons of modern science and culture in France. Representative works. Prerequisites: FR 312W or permission of the instructor.

FR 438/538. Studies in Twentieth-Century French Literature. 3 Credits.

A survey of representative works and movements in 20th century French and Francophone literature. Prerequisites: FR 312W or permission of the instructor.

FR 469/569. A History of French Cinema. 3 Credits.

This course will function as a survey of French film classics from the birth of cinema through contemporary times, and also shed light on various French cultural and literary movements as they are represented in film (Surrealism, WWII, Nouvelle Vague, decolonization). Prerequisites: FR 312W or permission of instructor.

FR 495/595. Topics in French. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of the selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors. Prerequisites: FR 311, FR 312W, FR 320 or permission of the instructor.

FR 496/596. Topics in French. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of the selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described by academic advisors. Prerequisites: FR 311, FR 312W, FR 320 or permission of the instructor.

FR 497. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in French. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: senior standing and approval of department chair.

FR 498. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in French. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: senior standing and approval of department chair.

GERMAN Courses

GER 101F. Beginning German I. 3 Credits.

This is the first part of a two-semester introductory German language and culture course. Through the study of German culture, such as German geography, etiquette, customs, holidays as well as university, family, and work life, students learn basic grammatical concepts and vocabulary. The communicative cultural approach, interactive in-class and homework assignments, and the inclusion of multimedia (online resources, Youtube videos, songs, texts, films, etc.) enhance the acquisition of the basic skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural competency.

GER 102F. Beginning German II. 3 Credits.

This is the second part of a two-semester introductory German language and culture course. Through the study of German culture, such as food and leisure culture, the German health system, and traveling in Germany, students continue to learn basic vocabulary and grammatical concepts. The communicative cultural approach, interactive in-class and homework assignments, and inclusion of multimedia (online resources, Youtube videos, songs, texts, films, etc.) enhance the acquisition of the basic skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural competency. Prerequisites: GER 101F.

GER 195. Topics in German. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives for non-majors. These courses will appear in the course schedule.

GER 196. Topics in German. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives for non-majors. These courses will appear in the course schedule.

GER 201. Intermediate German i. 3 Credits.

This is the first part of a two-semester intermediate German language and culture course. Through the study of German culture, students continue to learn basic vocabulary and grammatical concepts and deepen their understanding of German culture. The communicative cultural approach, interactive in-class and homework assignments, and inclusion of multimedia (German websites, Youtube videos, songs, texts, films, etc.) enhance the acquisition of the basic skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural competency. Prerequisites: GER 102F or satisfactory score on the placement test.

GER 202. Intermediate German II. 3 Credits.

This is the second part of a two-semester intermediate German language and culture course. Through the study of German culture, students continue to learn basic vocabulary and grammatical concepts and deepen their understanding of German culture. The communicative approach, interactive in-class and homework assignments, and inclusion of multimedia (online resources, Youtube videos, songs, texts, films, etc.) enhance the acquisition of the basic skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural competency. Prerequisites: GER 102F or satisfactory score on the placement test.

GER 295. Topics in German. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives for non-majors. These courses will appear in the course schedule.

GER 296. Topics in German. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives for non-majors. These courses will appear in the course schedule.

GER 311. Communicative Competence: Speaking and Listening. 3 Credits.

This course is primarily a conversation course to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency in verbal communication. Task-oriented communication strategies in cross-cultural training will be practiced by presenting students with models that demonstrate appropriate linguistic and cultural competencies. Students will practice these skills by role-playing, giving presentations, enriching self-awareness with practiced in-group discussions on various topics (such as, prejudice, racism, values, and customs) that dispel stereotypes and foster more in-depth social-cultural understanding, and with participation in guided cultural encounters. Students will improve their listening and comprehension skills and deepen cultural proficiency by learning how to communicate and collaborate with other people and cultures in a global age. (This is an oral skills course.) Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in GER 202 or advanced placement or permission of the instructor.

GER 312W. Communicative Competence: Writing and Reading. 3 Credits.

This is an intensive writing course designed with writing assignments that examine various cultural contexts that enable students to understand cultural content, style, audience and organization. The main objective of the course is increased awareness of and sensitivity to appropriate word choice, and syntax in the language. Students will engage in writing for different cultural audiences and in varied contexts such as literary, artistic and media expressions around the world. Special emphasis is placed on the methodology of close reading as students hone the analytics skills and vocabulary necessary to interpret idioms, regionalism, cultural expressions and overall intercultural skills observed in various genres and cultures. Students will analyze compelling global issues and the diverse cultural perspectives that inform them. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 211C, ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C and a grade of C or better in GER 202, advanced placement or permission of the instructor.

GER 321. German Civilization from the Middle Ages to World War I. 3 Credits.

Over the centuries, German culture and history have exerted a tremendous influence on Western Civilization. This course will trace Germany’s historical and cultural development from Emperor Barbarossa’s Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation to World War I. Readings will include segments from various chapters of Die Deutschen reflecting central aspects of the major cultural epochs of Western Civilization including the Middle Ages, the Age of Reformation and the Nordic Renaissance, Baroque, The Age of Enlightenment, German Classicism and Romanticism, Young Germany during the revolutionary period of 1848 and up to German Expressionism and World War I. The central themes will be complemented by a variety of other samples drawn from poetry, philosophy, music and the visual arts. Prerequisites: GER 311 or GER 312W.

GER 350. Modern Swiss German Literature: A Multicultural Model. 3 Credits.

Readings and discussions of selected master works by Frisch and Dürrenmatt, the two literary giants of modern Swiss literature. Topics include the multicultural aspects of modern Switzerland, the concepts “Heimat," provincialism versus globalism, Old World versus New World, the dialectics of myth and modernity, the mixed blessings of technology, as well as the discourse of gender ideology and matriarchal mythography. The course is complemented by a film screening and slide presentations. Readings and discussions are in German. Prerequisites: GER 311 or GER 312W or permission of the instructor.

GER 355. The City as Cultural Focus. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on a particular German city such as Berlin, Vienna, or Munich in light of historical and cultural shifts and continuities. Students will read literary and historical texts, poetry and newspaper articles and screen films. Prerequisite: GER 311 or GER 312W or permission of the instructor.

GER 366. Business German: Language and Culture. 3 Credits.

This is an advanced intermediate German language and culture course that prepares students for using German in professional settings. Since the course focuses on German language usage in personal, business, and employment situations, the vocabulary is geared toward living and working abroad. Students gain a deep knowledge about German business culture and social etiquette, engage in situational role-playing, create an application portfolio in German geared towards the German job market, and prepare for job interviews. The workshop format of the course, the inclusion of online resources and authentic materials provide students with hands-on immersion in German business culture. This course offers some grammar review and practice. Prerequisites: GER 311 or GER 312W or permission of the instructor.

GER 378. Extracurricular Studies. 1-3 Credits.

An extracurricular activity approved for credit based on objectives, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and the student prior to the semester in which the activity is to take place. Such credit is subject to review by the provost. Qualifies as a CAP experience. Prerequisite: approval of the department chair.

GER 380. German Literature from Sturm und Drang to Jugendstil. 3 Credits.

Readings and critical interpretations of exemplary literary works and historical documents that reflect the various representative periods of German and European culture and history from the second half of the 18th century to the beginning of the 20th century. In addition to understanding and appreciating these texts for their own artistic and historical value, students will also interpret them as first intellectual articulations of issues that will become central for the social and cultural history of (post-) modernity. They include the topics of religious relativism, issues of gender and sexual politics, aesthetics, social justice and multicultural diversity. The course will be complemented with video clips, films, and samples from musical history and the visual arts. Readings and discussions in German. Prerequisites: GER 311 or GER 312W.

GER 395. Topics in German. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for non-majors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule. Prerequisite: GER 202 or the equivalent.

GER 396. Topics in German. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for non-majors, or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule. Prerequisite: GER 202 or the equivalent.

GER 407/507. Advanced Grammar and Syntax. 3 Credits.

This class is designed to solidify and refine students’ working knowledge of written skills in the language, with an emphasis on increasing their written sophistication. Focus is on analysis of vocabulary, grammar, and cultural nuances in the syntax to examine how language reflects the ways of life and beliefs of its speakers, contrasted with the extent of language’s influence on culture. Students will refine their skills in written inter-cultural communication, paying attention to idioms and the fine points of “cultural grammar,” communicative competence and specialized discourse to develop excellent communication skills. This course is intended to prepare students for using their knowledge of language and culture in professional settings. Prerequisites: GER 311 and GER 312W, or permission of the instructor.

GER 408/508. Conversation and Composition. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to further develop the mastery of spoken and written German, review grammar, build vocabulary and fine-tune the student’s stylistic proficiency in German. The textbook Anders gedacht is an intermediate/advanced reader that covers a wide variety of historical, political and cultural events and developments in contemporary German speaking countries. The Übungsbuch accompanies the grammatical and thematic features of the textbook and provides further exercises. The course will be complemented by several video screenings and multi-media presentations covering a variety of aspects in contemporary German speaking culture. Prerequisites: GER 311 and GER 312W, or permission of the department chair.

GER 410/510. Berlin and Paris: Crucibles of European Ideas. 3 Credits.

This course explores the cultural movements that have characterized the German-French commonalities and differences from the early 1900s through the 1990s in cross-disciplinary discourses such as film, literature, art, politics, and economics. Cross-listed with FLET 410/FLET 510. Prerequisite: German and French students must read and write in the target language.

GER 420/520. Masterpieces of German Poetry. 3 Credits.

This course will delineate 800 years of German poetry, analyzing exemplary works within their cultural and historical context such as the courtly love tradition of the Middle Ages, the spirituality of the German Reformation, the (meta-)physical passions of the Baroque, the humanist ideals of Weimar Classicism, the profound longings and ultimate ironies of German Romanticism, fin de siècle symbolism and European décadence, the avant-garde of Weimar culture, the legacy of the Third Reich, and the poetics and politics of East/West Germany up to the fall of the Berlin Wall and the unification of Germany. The close readings will be complemented by videos, film clips, slides and musical samples. Readings and discussions in German. Prerequisites: GER 311 and GER 312W, or permission of instructor.

GER 445/545. German Cinema I. 3 Credits.

The first half of the 20th century was the most creative and destructive period in German and European history. Its rich cultural achievements included Viennese psychoanalytical theory of the turn of the century, Art Nouveau, German Expressionism, and the avant garde aesthetics of the Weimar Republic. Conversely, World War I and II exposed the cultural agony and human depravity of modern civilization. This course will trace these various aspects and developments in a variety of exemplary genres. Readings and discussions in German. (Cross-listed with WCS 445/WCS 545 and COMM 444/COMM 544) Prerequisite: GER 311 or GER 312W or permission of instructor.

GER 446/546. German Cinema II. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on the German cinema from perspectives such as fascism and its legacy, film as historical critique, or Weimar cinema. This survey course covers major German movies in film history from the 1970's to the present. (Cross-listed with WCS 445/WCS 545 and COMM 444/COMM 544) Prerequisite: GER 311 or GER 312W or permission of instructor.

GER 450/550. German Satires and Parodies. 3 Credits.

A study of comical and satirical features in exemplary literary and visual texts ranging from late medieval broad sheets and moralistic narratives to postmodern parodies in literature, music, film and graphic design. Students will study a wide variety of texts and analyze them as critical reflections of their social and cultural contexts, which include the spiritual conflicts and religious challenges of the Age of Renaissance and Reformation, anti-Nazi collages, and the permanent quest for pleasure and entertainment in our present-day multi-media Spassgesellschaft (fun society). Readings and discussions in German. Prerequisites: GER 311 and GER 312W, or permission of instructor.

GER 455/555. Germany 1900-1945: From High Culture to Holocaust. 3 Credits.

The first half of the 20th century was the most creative and destructive period in German and European history. Its rich culture achievements included Viennese psychoanalytical theory of the turn of the century, Art Nouveau, German Expressionism in painting and poetry, and the avant garde aesthetics of the Weimar Republic (film, dance, cabaret, architecture etc). They played a central part in the evolution of a modern and postmodern sensibility. Conversely, World War I and World War II exposed the cultural agony and human depravity of modern Civilization. This course will trace these various aspects and developments in a variety of exemplary verbal and visual texts, including the genres of poetry, novella, drama, painting and film. Readings and discussions in German. Prerequisites: GER 311 and GER 312W.

GER 470/570. Post World War II Germany. 3 Credits.

The course will cover representative literary texts and cultural events of divided and united Germany, including Heinrich Boll, Gunter Grass, Max Frisch, Christa Wolf, Doris Dorrie et al, as well as film, painting, popular music, the culture of memory and German Jewish relations after the Shoah. Prerequisite: GER 311 or GER 312W.

GER 473/573. The Enlightenment and Its Critics. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on German intellectual history as represented by great thinkers such as Lessing, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud. More recent works by Frankfurt School writers Adorno and Horkheimer represent critical engagements with the tenets of the European Enlightenment. Prerequisites: GER 311 or GER 312W.

GER 476/576. German-Jewish Literature and Culture. 3 Credits.

A survey of seminal texts by German-Jewish philosophers and writers from the Enlightenment to the present day, including Marx, Kafka, Freud, Schnitzler and Arendt. (cross-listed with WCS 476/WCS 576). Prerequisites: junior standing.

GER 478/578. German Drama. 3 Credits.

This course provides a survey of representative examples from 200 years of German drama. Texts include plays from Weimar Classicism, Young Germany, Naturalism and Symbolism, fin de siècle Vienna, German Expressionism, Weimar Modernism, Exile Literature, “Vergangenheitsbewältigung”(texts of coming to terms with the past), and post-modern experimentalism. The course will focus on issues such as mythology, psychopathology, sexual morality, epic theater, Marxist ideology, fascism and guilt, and feminist politics and aesthetics. The readings will be complemented by screenings of various film adaptations. All readings and discussions are in German. Prerequisites: GER 311 and GER 312W.

GER 495/595. Topics in German. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule. Prerequisite: appropriate survey course or permission of the instructor.

GER 496/596. Topics in German. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule. Prerequisite: appropriate survey course or permission of the instructor.

GER 497. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in German. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: senior standing and approval of the department chair.

GER 498. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in German. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: senior standing and approval of the department chair.

HEBREW Courses

HEBR 111F. Beginning Hebrew I. 6 Credits.

Aural comprehension, oral drill and discussion of grammar principles, written exercises and reading assignments.

HEBR 212. Intermediate Hebrew. 6 Credits.

Oral drill and discussion of grammar principles, written exercises and reading assignments. Prerequisite: HEBR 111F or permission of the instructor.

ITALIAN Courses

ITAL 101F. Beginning Italian I. 3 Credits.

Aural comprehension, oral drills and discussion of grammar principles; written exercises, and reading assignments.

ITAL 102F. Beginning Italian II. 3 Credits.

Aural comprehension, oral drill and discussion of grammar principles; written exercises, and reading assignments. Prerequisite: ITAL 101F.

ITAL 201. Intermediate Italian I. 3 Credits.

Aural comprehension, oral drills and discussion of grammar principles; written exercises, and readings assignments. Prerequisites: ITAL 102F or satisfactory score on the placement test.

ITAL 202. Intermediate Italian II. 3 Credits.

Aural comprehension, oral drills and discussion of grammar principles; written exercises, and reading assignments. Prerequisites: ITAL 201.

ITAL 295. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics for elective credit. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors.

ITAL 296. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics for elective credit. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors.

ITAL 395. Topics in Italian. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics for elective credit. These courses will appear in the course schedule. Prerequisite: ITAL 202 or equivalent.

ITAL 396. Topics in Italian. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics for elective credit. These courses will appear in the course schedule. Prerequisite: ITAL 202 or equivalent.

JAPANESE Courses

JAPN 111F. Beginning Japanese. 6 Credits.

This course introduces basic speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills, including the three forms of written Japanese: Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji. Students will have the opportunity to interact with Japanese students on campus through the coursework. The course enhances speaking and listening skills and provides awareness of the Japanese style of communication. Analyzing Japanese sentence structures and grammar leads students to be aware of the different value systems of a high context culture.

JAPN 195. Topics in Japanese. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives for non-majors. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described by academic advisors.

JAPN 196. Topics in Japanese. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives for non-majors. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described by academic advisors.

JAPN 212. Intermediate Japanese II. 6 Credits.

The main focus of this course is to build communication skills, developing the basic language skills acquired in JAPN 111F. Students may have an opportunity to exchange emails with a Japanese speaker in addition to direct or online conversation. Through this interaction, skills to negotiate meaning are gained. Use of authentic TV materials introduces pragmatic features that are unique to Japanese. Through systematic explicit instruction of the skills using pragmatic elements, skills for a Japanese style of communication are enhanced. Prerequisites: JAPN 111F.

JAPN 295. Topics in Japanese. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives for non-majors. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described by academic advisors. Prerequisites: 6 hours at the 100 level.

JAPN 296. Topics in Japanese. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives for non-majors. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described by academic advisors. Prerequisites: 6 hours at the 100 level.

JAPN 309. Kanji I. 3 Credits.

This course introduces the basic structure of kanji, which is one of the forms of written Japanese, and the history behind its creation as well as cultural aspects of kanji usage in Japanese society. Identifying radicals or parts of kanji, and understanding the system of Kanji compounds, makes it possible to easily guess the meaning of kanji characters. Advanced reading skills are efficiently developed by guessing the meaning of kanji. Daily journal writing on authentic novels or newspaper articles builds vocabulary and enhances flexibility with reference materials. Prerequisites: JAPN 212.

JAPN 310. Japan: A Cultural Odyssey. 3 Credits.

This course is offered in English. Topics vary with the semester and the instructor, but are likely to include Japanese literature, history, social issues, pop culture, or art. The course provides in-depth analysis or practice of the selected topic, emphasizing identity and the value system of Japan and the Japanese. No knowledge of Japanese is necessary. Cross-listed with WCS 310. Prerequisites: junior standing or permission of the instructor.

JAPN 311. Communicative Competence: Speaking and Listening. 3 Credits.

The primary objective of this course is to increase fluency in spoken Japanese and to make the students aware of cultural difference. The different modules are designed to enrich the students’ knowledge of the language and the culture. An oral presentation in a small group gives students the opportunity to practice communication skills unique to the Japanese language, which is a high context culture. Advanced speaking and listening skills are developed through interviews with exchange students from Japan. Advanced written communication skills are gained through dynamic information exchange activities to learn about Japanese students on campus. Prerequisite: JAPN 212 with a grade of C or above or a satisfactory score on the placement test.

JAPN 312. Communicative Competence: Writing and Reading. 3 Credits.

The primary objective of this course is to strengthen communication skills in spoken and written Japanese in formal/semi-formal contexts as well as to lead students to reflect on their own culture(s) critically. Special emphasis is placed on the different levels of honorific language use, which may not be found in the students’ society. Cultural and social topics are explored through authentic materials to familiarize students with knowledge of Japan and its diverse people. Insightful cultural awareness is gained through the process of making appointments and conducting online interviews with a person in Japan. Prerequisites: JAPN 212 with a grade of C or above or a satisfactory score on the placement test.

JAPN 395. Topics in Japanese. 1-3 Credits.

This course provides a study of selected topics in Japanese. Topics vary with the semester and the instructor. Expectations for materials covered and produced for the class vary with the level (higher-level classes will have higher expectations). Contact the Japanese Program Coordinator for details about specific topics covered in a given semester. Prerequisites: JAPN 212 or the equivalent.

JAPN 396. Topics in Japanese. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics in Japanese. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described by academic advisors. Prerequisites: JAPN 212 or the equivalent.

JAPN 495/595. Topics in Japanese. 1-3 Credits.

This course provides a study of selected topics in Japanese. Topics vary with the semester and the instructor. Expectations for materials covered and produced for the class vary with the level (higher-level classes will have higher expectations). Contact the Japanese Program Coordinator for details about specific topics covered in a given semester. Prerequisites: third-year Japanese or permission of the instructor.

JAPN 496/596. Topics in Japanese. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics in Japanese. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described by academic advisors. Prerequisites: third-year Japanese or permission of the instructor.

LATIN Courses

LATN 101F. Beginning Latin I. 3 Credits.

Introduction to Latin literature and Roman civilization.

LATN 102F. Beginning Latin II. 3 Credits.

Latin is immortal! Roman mythology, the destruction of Pompeii, and the rise of the Colosseum are some of the topics. Reading Latin and building your vocabulary are reinforced with interactive student activities and videos. Prerequisites: LATN 101F.

LATN 201. Intermediate Latin I. 3 Credits.

Latin Lives! Roman mythology, gladiator fights, and comedy in the theater are some of the topics. Advanced Latin readings and grammar are reinforced with interactive student activities and videos. Prerequisites: LATN 102F or satisfactory score on the placement test.

LATN 202. Intermediate Latin II. 3 Credits.

Carpe diem! The poetry of Catullus and Horace is funny, nasty and philosophical. Translate analyze, and compare their poetry to our culture today. Also read parts of Ovid's Metamorphoses the mythology book which kept Latin alive through the Dark Ages until its resurgence in the Renaissance. Prerequisites: LATN 201.

LATN 395. Topics in Latin. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics for elective credit. Study Roman literature, culture, and its influence. Translate, analyze, discuss relevance to today's world. Prerequisites: LATN 202 or equivalent.

LATN 396. Topics in Latin. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics for elective credit. These courses will appear in the course schedule booklet and will be more fully described in a booklet distributed to all academic advisors. Prerequisite: LATN 202 or equivalent.

PORTUGUESE Courses

PRTG 101F. Beginning Portuguese I. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the four skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) of elementary Portuguese.

PRTG 102F. Beginning Portuguese II. 3 Credits.

This course will build and expand on the linguistic proficiency in the four skills areas (listening, speaking, reading, writing) of elementary Portuguese. Prerequisites: PRTG 101F or permission of the instructor.

PRTG 295. Topics in Portuguese. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics for elective credit. These courses will appear in the course schedule.

RUSSIAN Courses

RUS 101F. Beginning Russian I. 3 Credits.

Aural comprehension, oral drill and discussion of grammar principles, written exercises, and reading assignments.

RUS 102F. Beginning Russian II. 3 Credits.

Aural comprehension, oral drill and discussion of grammar principles, written exercises, and reading assignments. Prerequisites: RUS 101F.

RUS 195. Topics in Russian. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives. These courses will appear in the course schedule. Highly interactive.

RUS 196. Topics in Russian. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives. These courses will appear in the course schedule. Highly interactive.

RUS 201. Intermediate Russian I. 3 Credits.

Graded readings with grammar review followed in the second semester by an introduction to Russian literature.

RUS 202. Intermediate Russian II. 3 Credits.

Graded readings with grammar review followed in the second semester by an introduction to Russian literature. Prerequisite: RUS 201.

RUS 295. Topics in Russian. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives. These courses will appear in the course schedule.

RUS 296. Topics in Russian. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives. These courses will appear in the course schedule.

RUS 305. Contemporary Russian Conversation. 3 Credits.

A study of selected dialogues emphasizing the spoken language and designed to improve oral proficiency and aural comprehension. Prerequisite: RUS 202 or advanced placement.

RUS 395. Topics in Russian. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives. These courses will appear in the course schedule. Prerequisite: RUS 202 or the equivalent.

SPANISH Courses

SPAN 101F. Beginning Spanish I. 3 Credits.

This course is the first of the beginning Spanish language sequence. The course takes a task-based, content-based, communicative approach to language learning and teaching. It develops beginning skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. The course also builds communicative competence and enhances social and cultural awareness of the Spanish-speaking world.

SPAN 102F. Beginning Spanish II. 3 Credits.

This course is the second of the beginning Spanish language sequence. The course takes a task-based, content-based, communicative approach to language learning and teaching. It develops beginning skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. The course also builds communicative competence and enhances social and cultural awareness of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisites: SPAN 101F.

SPAN 121F. Intensive Beginning Spanish. 6 Credits.

This is a six-credit accelerated introductory-level course designed to provide a thorough foundation in all the language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students should expect an average of 1-2 hours of online homework five days a week. Students will learn grammar and vocabulary at home, and class time will be devoted to meaningful, authentic, and interactive practice. Class is conducted in Spanish only. Prerequisites: Students must have taken at least three years of high school Spanish.

SPAN 195. Topics in Spanish. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives for non-majors. These courses will appear in the course schedule.

SPAN 196. Topics in Spanish. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives for non-majors. These courses will appear in the course schedule.

SPAN 201. Intermediate Spanish I. 3 Credits.

This first course of the intermediate language sequence is designed to improve the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills of students and to provide insight into the language and culture of Spanish-speaking people. Meant to integrate and extend earlier learning, the course is intended to keep building communicative competence and social and cultural awareness of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisites: SPAN 102F or SPAN 121F or advanced placement.

SPAN 202. Intermediate Spanish II. 3 Credits.

This course is a continuation of SPAN 201 that further improves the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills of students and provides insight into the language and culture of Spanish-speaking people. It is intended to keep building communicative competence and social and cultural awareness of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisites: SPAN 201 or advanced placement.

SPAN 221. Intensive Intermediate Spanish. 6 Credits.

This accelerated course continues the focus in SPAN 121F on the study of Hispanic cultures and the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing in Spanish. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in SPAN 121F or SPAN 102F or have placed into SPAN 201 by examination.

SPAN 266. Spanish for Health Professions. 3 Credits.

This course seeks to develop Spanish language abilities for students involved in the health professions, i.e., medical fields, dentistry, physical therapy, etc. Although this course develops all skill areas (reading, writing, speaking, listening), it will concentrate on the development of oral communication and the cultural issues facing professionals and Spanish-speaking patients. Prerequisites: SPAN 101F and SPAN 102F or SPAN 121F or 3 years of Spanish at the secondary level.

SPAN 295. Topics in Spanish. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives for nonmajors. These courses will appear in the course schedule.

SPAN 296. Topics in Spanish. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed as electives for nonmajors. These courses will appear in the course schedule.

SPAN 310. Advanced Grammar Review. 3 Credits.

May be taken concurrently with SPAN 312W. The objective of the course is to improve the student's knowledge of Spanish grammar and syntax through the review of grammatical rules and their application. Emphasis is placed on how grammatical forms codify meaning and how grammar and meaning interact to construct the language and textual structure of different genres. The course is required for majors or minors of Spanish having received a C or lower in SPAN 202. All Spanish majors and minors may take the course for review. Prerequisites: SPAN 202 or placement through testing.

SPAN 311. Communicative Competence: Speaking and Listening. 3 Credits.

This course is primarily a conversation course to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency in verbal communication. Task-oriented communication strategies in cross-cultural training will be practiced by presenting students with models that demonstrate appropriate linguistic and cultural competencies. Students will practice these skills by role-playing, giving presentations, enriching self-awareness with practiced in-group discussions on various topics (such as, prejudice, racism, values, and customs) that dispel stereotypes and foster more in-depth social-cultural understanding, and with participation in guided cultural encounters. Students will improve their listening and comprehension skills and deepen cultural proficiency by learning how to communicate and collaborate with other people and cultures in a global age. (This is an oral skills course.) Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in SPAN 202 or advanced placement.

SPAN 312W. Communicative Competence: Writing and Reading. 3 Credits.

This is an intensive writing course designed with writing assignments that examine various cultural contexts that enable students to understand cultural content, style, audience and organization. The main objective of the course is increased awareness of and sensitivity to appropriate word choice, and syntax in the language. Students will engage in writing for different cultural audiences and in varied contexts such as literary, artistic and media expressions around the world. Special emphasis is placed on the methodology of close reading as students hone the analytics skills and vocabulary necessary to interpret idioms, regionalism, cultural expressions and overall intercultural skills observed in various genres and cultures. Students will analyze compelling global issues and the diverse cultural perspectives that inform them. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENGL 211C, ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C and a grade of C or better in SPAN 202 or advanced placement.

SPAN 320. Spanish Culture and Civilization. 3 Credits.

A survey of Spanish civilization from the Roman occupation of the Iberian Peninsula to the present day with emphasis on the political and social development of Spain. Prerequisites: SPAN 311 and SPAN 312W with a grade of C or better.

SPAN 321. Latin American Culture and Civilization. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to social, political, economic, intellectual and artistic manifestations of Latin America culture today, and also provides a day-by-day analysis of contemporary cultures by reading current newspapers, magazines, watching current news broadcasts and tapping into Internet resources. The course will discuss such topics as the arts, ethnic heritage and diversity, urban and rural life of Latin Americans, cultural institutions (family life, religion, work, etc.), pre-Colombian civilizations, the Spanish Conquest and Colonial period, the fight for Independence, relations with the U.S., and current events. Prerequisites: SPAN 311 and SPAN 312W with a grade of C or better.

SPAN 331. Introduction to Spanish Literature: Medieval to 1700. 3 Credits.

This survey course introduces students to the literary tradition of medieval and Golden Age Spain. In addition to reading the prose, poetry and theater of the most prominent writers of this period, students will learn critical terminology for talking about literature. Course objectives are for students to be able to do the following: read, analyze, compare, and critically discuss works of literature in Spanish; characterize various literary periods and movements of the 13th-17th centuries; and relate the texts read in class to their corresponding historical contexts. Prerequisites: SPAN 311 and SPAN 312W with a grade of C or better.

SPAN 332. Introduction to Spanish Literature: 1700 to Present. 3 Credits.

The course offers an overview of the literature of Spain from the mid-1700s to the present. Students will read works of prose, poetry and theater of the most prominent writers of these centuries, along with background material in order to become familiar with literary periods and their historical contexts. Course objectives are for students to be able to do the following: read, analyze, compare, and critically discuss works of literature in Spanish; characterize various literary periods and movements of the 18th-20th centuries; and relate the texts read in class to their corresponding historical contexts. Prerequisites: SPAN 311 and SPAN 312W with a grade of C or better.

SPAN 333. Introduction to Early Latin American Literature. 3 Credits.

This course will give students a broad knowledge of Spanish American literature from its origins in pre-Colombian indigenous literature through the essayists of the Spanish conquest, the colonial writers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the Romantics and Realists to the Modernists. The course cultivates a general understanding of the complex and rich history of Latin America and its varied cultural production. Students engage in a critical textual analysis that focuses on the artistic and literary forms and their connection to Latin America’s socio-cultural context. Prerequisites: SPAN 311 and SPAN 312W with a grade of C or better.

SPAN 334. Introduction to Modern Latin American Literature. 3 Credits.

The course will give students a broad knowledge of Spanish American literature from Modernists to the post-Modernists to the contemporary novelists, short story writers, poets and dramatists. It cultivates a general understanding of the complex and rich history of Latin America and its varied cultural production. Students engage in a critical textual analysis that focuses on the artistic and literary forms and their connection to the socio-cultural context. Prerequisites: SPAN 311 and SPAN 312W with a grade of C or better.

SPAN 366. Business Spanish: Language and Culture. 3 Credits.

This course aims to equip students for the eventuality of working with or for a Spanish company here or abroad. It is a language course, with a strong cultural component, for the intermediate learner. The emphasis of the course is on Spanish language usage in personal, business, and employment situations. The course provides a background for all students regardless of specific career goals. Students learn about cultural mores and social etiquette, engage in situational role playing, and prepare for job interviews. Students will combine their various practical assignments, involving realistic employment-seeking tasks, into an electronic portfolio of neatly-kept revisions. Prerequisites: SPAN 311 and SPAN 312W or permission of instructor.

SPAN 369. Practicum. 1-3 Credits.

Internships in private and public organizations that provide an opportunity for students to apply and enhance language skills or cultural knowledge in a workplace setting. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisite: nine credit hours at the 300 or 400 level.

SPAN 395. Topics in Spanish. 1-3 Credits.

Selected topics, genres, authors and/or literary, cultural, sociopolitical, or historical movements in the Spanish-speaking world. May be repeated for credit if the topic is different. Prerequisites: SPAN 311 and SPAN 312W.

SPAN 396. Topics in Spanish. 1-3 Credits.

Seminars engage students in in-depth study of a specified topic through readings, research and oral and written student reports. Special attention is paid to theoretical and bibliographic issues. Topics vary according to the areas of expertise and professional interests of departmental faculty. May be repeated if topics are different. Prerequisites: SPAN 311 and SPAN 312W.

SPAN 407/507. Advanced Grammar and Syntax. 3 Credits.

This class is designed to solidify and refine students' working knowledge of written skills in the language, with an emphasis on increasing their written sophistication. Focus is on analysis of vocabulary, grammar, and cultural nuances in the syntax to examine how language reflects the ways of life and beliefs of its speakers, contrasted with the extent of language’s influence on culture. Students will refine their skills in written inter-cultural communication, paying attention to idioms and the fine points of "cultural grammar," communicative competence and specialized discourse to develop excellent communication skills. This course is intended to prepare students for using their knowledge of language and culture in professional settings. Prerequisites: SPAN 311, SPAN 312W, SPAN 320 or SPAN 321, and SPAN 331 or SPAN 332 or SPAN 333 or SPAN 334.

SPAN 410/510. Spanish Applied Linguistics. 3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to Spanish linguistics and establishes the basis for the application of linguistic principles, including an introduction to the description and organization of data dealing with phonology (how sound patterns form words), discussion on topics in morphology (word formation and verbal inflection) and the description and organization of data dealing with syntax (how words combine to form phrases and sentences). In addition, the course analyzes the regional variations of Spanish (dialectology), and applying linguistics concepts, students contrast and compare the regional categories of Spanish use world-wide. It will provide students with a level of knowledge to make connections between the structure of Spanish and relevant issues in contemporary Hispanic linguistics, such as second language learning, language variation, bilingualism, and Spanish in the United States. Prerequisites: SPAN 311, SPAN 312W, SPAN 320 or SPAN 321, and SPAN 331 or SPAN 332 or SPAN 333 or SPAN 334.

SPAN 415/515. Spanish Phonetics. 3 Credits.

This class is an introduction to the descriptive analysis of Spanish sounds and provides a comprehensive presentation of phonetics concepts as well as the comparisons drawn between the sounds of Spanish and those of English from a theoretical perspective. Students will gain a solid understanding of the sound system and strengthening of their pronunciation of Spanish from engaging, culturally driven activities taken from real-life modern Spanish sources, as well as enhancing awareness through aural comprehension of the nuances of the different dialects from speakers across the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisites: SPAN 311, SPAN 312W, SPAN 320 or SPAN 321, and SPAN 331 or SPAN 332 or SPAN 333 or SPAN 334.

SPAN 447/547. Drama of the Spanish Golden Age. 3 Credits.

A study of selected works of the major playwrights of the Golden Age: Lope de Vega, Calderon de la Barca, Tirso de Molina, Ruiz de Alarcon. Prerequisites: SPAN 311, SPAN 312W, SPAN 320 or SPAN 321, and SPAN 331 or SPAN 332 or SPAN 333 or SPAN 334.

SPAN 448/548. Contemporary Spanish Drama. 3 Credits.

Through reading and analysis of the most representative texts of Spanish drama of the last decades, this course intends to introduce students to contemporary theater production in relation to the social, political and cultural trends that dominate in Spain today. Readings will allow students to gain a deeper understanding of the debates predominating within Spanish society and of possible correlations linking Spanish and European culture today. Prerequisites: SPAN 311, SPAN 312W, SPAN 320 or SPAN 321, and SPAN 331 or SPAN 332 or SPAN 333 or SPAN 334.

SPAN 449/549. Contemporary Spanish-American Drama. 3 Credits.

In this course students will read at least thirteen Spanish-American plays from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Through class discussions and presentations, students will learn an appropriate vocabulary to converse about the plays as well as literary theory to enable them to analyze and interpret the plays. By the end of the course, students should be able to see literary trends and begin to form opinions about the direction that Spanish-American theater has taken and why. Prerequisites: SPAN 311, SPAN 312W, SPAN 320 or SPAN 321, and SPAN 331 or SPAN 332 or SPAN 333 or SPAN 334.

SPAN 450/550. Contemporary Peninsular Narrative. 3 Credits.

This course will study fiction produced in Spain after 1975, the year in which Francisco Franco died and his dictatorship ended. Discussion will focus on the changes that characterize the post-Franco era, paying particular attention to the fictional as a space through which Franco's legacy may be confronted, and through which a Spanish society may be constructed. The reading of novels and short stories by Martín Gaite, Montero, Eduardo Mendoza, Vázquez Montalbán, Marsé, Etxebarria and others will be informed by studies in narratology, trauma, memory, and national identity. Particular attention will be given to the "movida," the period of social and cultural transformation that is celebrated in the films of Pedro Almodóvar and others. Prerequisites: SPAN 311, SPAN 312W, SPAN 320 or SPAN 321, and SPAN 331 or SPAN 332 or SPAN 333 or SPAN 334.

SPAN 451/551. Contemporary Latin American Narrative. 3 Credits.

This class traces the major cultural moments in Latin America from the 1920s to the present. Students will read, view and listen to cultural products from a broad range of genres and media (narrative, manifesto, photography, film, video and popular music) in order to reflect upon significant artistic trends, political movements and intellectual debates of the last century: modernism and modernity, nationalism and cosmopolitanism, revolution, subalternity and post-dictatorship. The course will conclude with a consideration of contemporary cultural forms, such as video, performance art, blogging and other digital media. Students will be expected to contribute oral and written assignments reflecting upon these works and will learn to think critically about Latin American cultural production. Prerequisites: SPAN 311, SPAN 312W, SPAN 320 or SPAN 321, and SPAN 331 or SPAN 332 or SPAN 333 or SPAN 334.

SPAN 452/552. Latin American Poetry. 3 Credits.

This course will study the principal figures and poetic movements of twentieth-century Latin America, which, by definition, includes Brazil and Spanish America. The primary objective is to learn to love poetry and develop the lifelong habit of reading and studying poetry. Students will learn to read a poem objectively, using only the internal form and content as the criteria of analysis. Moreover, students will learn to situate that poem within the poet’s body of work as well as a given aesthetic movement. Finally, students will learn to analyze that poet’s creative output within a socio-cultural, historical, political, and economic framework. Prerequisites: SPAN 311, SPAN 312W, SPAN 320 or SPAN 321, and SPAN 331 or SPAN 332 or SPAN 333 or SPAN 334.

SPAN 453/553. Border Culture and Literature. 3 Credits.

Students study a variety of current cultural texts from the U.S. and Mexico to explore the multiplicity of images that surround and define the highly contested and increasingly important area of the U.S.-Mexico border. Discussions are grounded in an ideological analysis with the goal of developing a description of the historical and social parameters and strategies that are utilized in the critical revision of the Borderlands. Specifically, this course focuses on questions dealing with subaltern identities, for example women, indigenous groups, immigrants, and the poor. Prerequisites: SPAN 311, SPAN 312W, SPAN 320 or SPAN 321, and SPAN 331 or SPAN 332 or SPAN 333 or SPAN 334.

SPAN 469/569. Hispanic Film. 3 Credits.

A topical study of the major works of Spanish and Latin American film from Bunuel to the present. The course will explore many issues, including those related to gender, race, symbolism, and class struggle. (cross-listed with COMM 443/COMM 543) Prerequisites: SPAN 311, SPAN 312W, SPAN 320 or SPAN 321, and SPAN 331 or SPAN 332 or SPAN 333 or SPAN 334.

SPAN 471/571. Hispanic Women Authors. 3 Credits.

A study of fictional and non-fictional works by Spanish, Spanish-American, and U.S. Latina writers from the 16th to the 20th century. The course analyzes gender identity and roles and the interaction of gender, race, and class in literary representations of courtship and marriage, spirituality, nationalism, colonialism, and multiculturalism. (Cross-listed with WCS 471/WCS 571) Prerequisites: SPAN 311, SPAN 312W, SPAN 320 or SPAN 321, and SPAN 331 or SPAN 332 or SPAN 333 or SPAN 334.

SPAN 473/573. Contemporary Latina Literature: From Borders to Crossroads. 3 Credits.

The course focuses on poetry, prose fiction and theater written by Chicana, Puerto Rican, Cuban-American, and Dominican-American women authors in the last twenty years. Attention will also be paid to the very influential theoretical work written by Chicanas. Prerequisites: SPAN 311, SPAN 312W, SPAN 320 or SPAN 321, and SPAN 331 or SPAN 332 or SPAN 333 or SPAN 334.

SPAN 475W. Spanish Senior Research Seminar. 3 Credits.

The course is designed to provide Spanish majors with a small group setting that facilitates in-depth discussion of key concepts of critical theory, literary studies, and the discipline. The seminar will encourage students to research and explore relevant topics related to Hispanic literature and the arts and experiment with the application of the different concepts under discussion. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: Senior standing; SPAN 311; SPAN 312W; SPAN 320 or SPAN 321; SPAN 331 or SPAN 332 or SPAN 333 or SPAN 334; and grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

SPAN 495/595. Topics in Spanish. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule. Prerequisites: SPAN 311, SPAN 312W, SPAN 320 or SPAN 321, and SPAN 331 or SPAN 332 or SPAN 333 or SPAN 334.

SPAN 496/596. Topics in Spanish. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule. Prerequisites: SPAN 311, SPAN 312W, SPAN 320 or SPAN 321, and SPAN 331 or SPAN 332 or SPAN 333 or SPAN 334.

SPAN 497. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Spanish. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: SPAN 311, SPAN 312W, SPAN 320 or SPAN 321, and SPAN 331 or SPAN 332 or SPAN 333 or SPAN 334.

SPAN 498. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Spanish. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: SPAN 311, SPAN 312W, SPAN 320 or SPAN 321, and SPAN 331 or SPAN 332 or SPAN 333 or SPAN 334.

WORLD CULTURAL STUDIES Courses

WCS 100L. Introduction to World Literatures and Cultures. 3 Credits.

This multicultural course introduces the student to the forms and meanings of cultural expressions from around the world, with an emphasis on world literature. It provides students with the skills necessary for the appreciation and comparative analysis of these works as representations of rich and diverse cultural values. A primary focus of the course will be the role of culture in the formation of national and individual identity, paying special attention to gender, sexuality, race, class, and struggles for social justice. All works will be read in English.

WCS 307. Understanding European Culture through Film. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with an historic overview of films from a variety of European countries. Students will gain the vocabulary necessary to analyze individual films and for the comparative analysis of films from different cultural and historical contexts. The course will focus on issues such as national and individual identity, film as aesthetic form, gender and sexuality, and popular culture. (cross-listed with COMM 307) Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

WCS 310. Japan: A Cultural Odyssey. 3 Credits.

Lectures in English, films and slides, all readings, discussions, and lectures in English. Studies of novels, short stories, poems, and films produced by Japanese authors. Covers Japan's initial encounter with the West and the establishment of individual identity. No knowledge of Japanese necessary though some familiarity with Japanese history, art, and society would be helpful. (cross-listed with JAPN 310) Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor.

WCS 311. Communicative Competence: Speaking and Listening. 3 Credits.

This course is primarily a conversation course to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency in verbal communication. Task-oriented communication strategies in cross-cultural training will be practiced by presenting students with models that demonstrate appropriate linguistic and cultural competencies. Students will practice these skills by role-playing, giving presentations, enriching self-awareness with practiced in-group discussions on various topics (such as, prejudice, racism, values, and customs) that dispel stereotypes and foster more in-depth social-cultural understanding, and with participation in guided cultural encounters. Students will improve their listening and comprehension skills and deepen cultural proficiency by learning how to communicate and collaborate with other people and cultures in a global age. Prerequisite: ENGL 110C.

WCS 312W. Communicative Competence: Writing and Reading. 3 Credits.

This is an intensive writing course designed with writing assignments that examine various cultural contexts that enable students to understand cultural content, style, audience and organization. The main objective of the course is increased awareness of and sensitivity to appropriate word choice, and syntax in the targeted languages. Students will engage in writing for different cultural audiences and in varied contexts such as literary, artistic and media expressions around the world. Special emphasis is placed on the methodology of close reading as students hone the analytics skills and vocabulary necessary to interpret idioms, regionalism, cultural expressions and overall intercultural skills observed in various genres and cultures. Students will analyze compelling global issues and the diverse cultural perspectives that inform them. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C.

WCS 321. Human Rights and World Literature and Cultures. 3 Credits.

Struggles for human rights and social justice often find their most evocative expression in literary works from around the world. In this course, students will work toward an understanding of different cultural perspectives that inform world concepts of human rights. We will focus on novels, short stories, and poetry. We will also consider the fundamental value of these artistic expressions as both spaces of empathy and agents of change in society. As we discover texts from around the world we will also delve into important socio-political contexts that inform each work. Lastly, this course will turn the lens toward the reader’s own values and ideas, and inspire a reconsideration of our place in this world. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C.

WCS 330. Contemporary Cultures and Media. 3 Credits.

A study of film as a means of communication from an intercultural perspective. The course is designed to cultivate an ability to deal with film in a critical way, as well as broaden understanding of film and culture in a global context. A variety of cinematic traditions will be examined including film works from Europe, the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and North and South America. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C.

WCS 395. Topics in World Cultural Studies. 3 Credits.

This course invites students to discover approaches to global problems and concerns through an analysis of cultural expressions from around the world. Students will consider the ways in which literary and artistic expression (literature, film, visual art, music) draw from and impact broader social and political contexts. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C.

WCS 400. Global Cultural Studies. 3 Credits.

This course will examine selected cultural studies perspectives on mass communication. It will cover cultural studies philosophies, theories, and/or approaches to the study of cultural artifacts and practices that may include some of the following: postmodernism, deconstruction, feminism, and post-colonialism. The readings will include theoretical texts as well as artistic or cultural texts that will more clearly illustrate the theoretical positions. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C.

WCS 407. Advanced Grammar and Syntax. 3 Credits.

This class is designed to solidify and refine students’ working knowledge of written skills in the targeted languages, with an emphasis on increasing their written sophistication. Focus is on analysis of vocabulary, grammar, and cultural nuances in the syntax to examine how language reflects the ways of life and beliefs of its speakers, contrasted with the extent of language’s influence on culture. Students will refine their skills in written inter-cultural communication, paying attention to idioms and the fine points of “cultural grammar,” communicative competence and specialized discourse to develop excellent communication skills. This course is intended to prepare students for using their knowledge of language and culture in professional settings. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C.

WCS 410/510. Berlin-Paris: Crucibles of European Ideas. 3 Credits.

This course explores the cultural movements that have characterized the German-French commonalities and differences from the early 1900s through the 1990s in cross-disciplinary discourses such as film, literature, art, politics, and economics. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C.

WCS 445/545. German Cinema I. 3 Credits.

The first half of the 20th century was the most creative and destructive period in German and European history. Its rich cultural achievements included Viennese psychoanalytical theory of the turn of the century, Art Nouveau, German Expressionism, and the avant garde aesthetics of the Weimar Republic. Conversely, World War I and II exposed the cultural agony and human depravity of modern civilization. This course will trace these various aspects and developments in a variety of exemplary genres. Readings and discussions in German. (Cross-listed with GER 445/GER 545 and COMM 444/COMM 544) Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C.

WCS 471/571. Hispanic Women Authors. 3 Credits.

A study of fictional and non-fictional works by Spanish, Spanish-American, and U.S. Latina writers from the 16th to the 20th century. The course analyzes gender identity and roles and the interaction of gender, race, and class in literary representations of courtship and marriage, spirituality, nationalism, colonialism, and multiculturalism. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C.

WCS 476/576. German-Jewish Literature and Culture. 3 Credits.

A survey of seminal texts by German-Jewish philosophers and writers from the Enlightenment to the present day, including Marx, Kafka, Freud, Schnitzler and Arendt. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C.

WCS 495/595. Topics in World Cultural Studies. 3 Credits.

This course invites students to discover approaches to global problems and concerns through an analysis of cultural expressions from around the world. Students will consider the ways in which literary and artistic expression (literature, film, visual art, music) draw from and impact broader social and political contexts. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C.

WCS 496/596. Topics in World Cultural Studies. 3 Credits.

This course invites students to discover approaches to global problems and concerns through an analysis of cultural expressions from around the world. Students will consider the ways in which literary and artistic expression (literature, film, visual art, music) draw from and impact broader social and political contexts. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C.