Anil Nair, Chair
Karen Eagle, Faculty Advisor and Entrepreneurship Area Coordinator
Jennifer Klinger, Faculty Advisor

A management major is appropriate for those interested in careers in different types of organizations (e.g., for profits/non-profits), working in Human Resource Management/Management Consulting or launching a business.  The program recognizes that most graduates will face several career changes and job choices; thus, the management major is designed to develop a student's understanding of the principles and practice of management in a global economy. The department offers a variety of courses that should give students an opportunity to pursue their interests and focus in areas such as Human Resource Management, General Management or Entrepreneurship.  

For a major in management, all courses must be preceded by listed prerequisites. For completion of the major in management, a student must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses taken toward the major. In addition, a grade of C- or better is required in all management courses counted toward the major. A student who seeks a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degree with a major in Management from Old Dominion University must, in addition to meeting other requirements of the University, earn a minimum of 25 percent of the total number of credits required for the degree (for example, 30 credits in a 120-credit degree program) through on- or off-campus instruction. This must include a minimum of 12 credit hours of upper-level MGMT and/or ENTR courses.

Management course work*

MGMT 330Organizational Behavior3
MGMT 340Human Resources Management3
MGMT 361International Business Operations3
Select four of the following ENTR or MGMT Electives:12
Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship
Managing Small and Family Businesses
Business Communication
Employee Relations Problems and Practices
Labor Management Relations
Cooperative Education
Management Internship
Management Practicum
Employment Law
Advanced Human Resources Management: Contemporary Issues
Business Development
Technology and Innovation Management
Entrepreneurship: New Ventures Creation
Business and Society
Compensation Management
Negotiations and Change Management
Comparative International Management
Management Seminar Abroad
Management Consulting
Selected Topics in Management
200-400 Level Free Elective3
300-400 Level Free Elective3
Free Electives6
Total Hours33

All 300-400 level MGMT courses, except for  MGMT 325 and MGMT 485W,  are included in the calculation of the 2.00 overall grade point average for major course work for graduation.

Four-Year Plan - Management Major - BSBA

This is a suggested curriculum plan to complete this degree program in four years.  Please consult information in this Catalog, Degree Works, and your academic advisor for more specific information on course requirements for this degree.

Management Minor

A management minor is suitable for students who want to complement their major with “soft skills.”  Surveys of employers have frequently found they prefer to recruit graduates with leadership, communication, entrepreneurial, and strategic thinking skills.

A minor in management requires the completion of MGMT 325 plus 12 hours of 300- or 400-level management courses except for MGMT 485W. All courses selected must be preceded by listed prerequisites. For completion of a minor, a student must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses specified as a requirement for the minor exclusive of prerequisite courses. In addition, a grade of C- or better is required in all management courses counted toward the minor. A minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor must be taken through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Entrepreneurship Interdisciplinary Minor

The entrepreneurship interdisciplinary minor is intended to prepare students to solve business and social problems by creating new ventures within or outside existing organizations. 

The interdisciplinary minor requires 12 credit hours of 300/400-level courses selected from at least two different disciplines with a maximum of six credits from any one discipline. For completion of the interdisciplinary minor, students must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses specified as a requirement for the minor exclusive of lower-level courses and prerequisite courses. At least six hours of upper-level courses must be taken through courses offered by Old Dominion University. Three credit hours may be in the major, if a major course is listed as an option for the interdisciplinary minor. As such, it will be credited toward both the major and the interdisciplinary minor.

ENTR 201S is a prerequisite for the minor and is not included in the calculation of the grade point average for the minor. Requirements for the minor are completion of 12 hours from the following,

ENTR 301Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship3
Functional Expertise: select two courses from the following:6
Accounting for Entrepreneurs
Finance and Budgeting in Healthcare
Professional Communication
Interpersonal Communication in Organizations
Project Management
Managing Small and Family Businesses
Decision Techniques in Engineering
Introductory Financial Management
Social Entrepreneurship
Human Resources Management
Technology and Innovation Management
Marketing Principles and Problems
Professional Selling
Marketing on the Internet
Human Factors
Marketing of Hospitality Services
Sport Marketing
Capstone-Project Course (select one of the following):3
Agile Project Management
Entrepreneurship Internship
Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Entrepreneurship
Entrepreneurship: New Ventures Creation
Selected Topics in Management (Practical Entrepreneurship and New Venture Development)
Senior Project: Merchandise Retailing
Total Hours12

Certificate in Entrepreneurship

The certificate in entrepreneurship offers a focus on business creation in a variety of fields.  Students will be provided with tools that support the establishment of new ventures, including resource management, analytical processes, and other factors that contribute to the development of new organizations.   Students will be required to complete a foundational course that will introduce them to the concepts and practical work required in entrepreneurial ventures. They will also complete a capstone course that covers the creation, structure and management of new organizations. Students will also complete two courses from areas that align with their major or new business interest. Students who complete the certificate will be able to take ideas and mold them into the foundation of a new business, regardless of career selection. They will also gain a heightened understanding of critical thinking in support of establishing new ventures.

An overall grade point average of 2.0 or above in all courses specified as a requirement for the certificate is required for the award of the certificate.  Students must complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses required for the certificate through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Curriculum Requirements

ENTR 201SIntroduction to Entrepreneurship3
Restricted Electives (select two from the following):6
Accounting for Entrepreneurs
Finance and Budgeting in Healthcare
Professional Communication
Interpersonal Communication in Organizations
Administrative Leadership and Professional Development
Project Management
Decision Techniques in Engineering
Introductory Financial Management
Leadership and Management for Health Professionals
Monarch Think Tank II
Human Resources Management
Business Development
Negotiations and Change Management
Marketing Principles and Problems
Professional Selling
Marketing on the Internet
Marketing of Hospitality Services
Human Factors
Sport Marketing
Capstone:3
Entrepreneurship: New Ventures Creation
Total credit hours 12

ENTREPRENEURSHIP Courses

ENTR 201S. Introduction to Entrepreneurship. 3 Credits.

This course will broaden students' views of careers and work in an increasingly global and diverse world. It provides students intellectual perspectives of entrepreneurship, and engages students in the search for knowledge regarding opportunity value and resource management. Basic analytical and critical thinking skills are developed for making reasoned judgments concerning organization creation.

ENTR 301. Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship. 3 Credits.

This course is designed for students interested in learning about entrepreneurship. It examines entrepreneurship from different perspectives, and engages students in opportunity recognition, value creation and resource management. Basic analytical and critical thinking skills are developed for making reasoned judgments concerning venture creation. Students will learn how to improve the likelihood of success of business start-ups. Course will also be valuable for students interested in consulting with small businesses or launching new divisions in large businesses. Prerequisites: Junior standing.

ENTR 368. Entrepreneurship Internship. 1-3 Credits.

Students complete an entrepreneurial project or assignment for a business, non-profit agency, or other organization. Students should work 50 hours for each credit and complete course assignments integrating coursework and entrepreneurial experiences. Prerequisites: ENTR 201S and approval of the program coordinator and Strome Entrepreneurial Center director.

ENTR 410. Managing Small and Family Businesses. 3 Credits.

This course investigates the risks and challenges of small businesses with particular emphasis on family businesses. It focuses on knowledge necessary to support the continuity of such businesses. Topics may include: the entrepreneurial life, types of small businesses, getting started, financing and ownership, professionalizing and growth, and change, adaptation, and innovation to stay in business. Prerequisites: MGMT 325, ENTR 201S, and ENTR 301.

ENTR 476/576. Social Entrepreneurship. 3 Credits.

The class draws students from all disciplines to collaborate with each other, faculty and community members as they co-design project-based solutions to pertinent social issues. Topics related to social entrepreneurship vary each year. Guided by distinguished faculty, students analyze their topic through in-depth classroom and field research, readings and off-campus trips. Prerequisite: ENTR 201S or PAS 300.

ENTR 477/577. Design Thinking. 3 Credits.

Design thinking is a human-centered approach to innovation that uses design methods and tools to integrate the needs of people and organizations, the opportunities of technology, and the requirements for personal, organizational, and business success. The design thinking course introduces students to a robust process for understanding problems, ideation, innovation, and entrepreneurship. This course is facilitated using workshops where students will work in project teams in a design thinking innovation challenge. Prerequisite: ENTR 201S.

ENTR 494. Entrepreneurship Project in Management. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to help students enhance their personal and professional development through innovation guided by faculty members and professionals. It offers students an opportunity to integrate disciplinary theory and knowledge through developing a nonprofit program, product, business, or other initiative. The real-world experiences that entrepreneurships provide will help students understand how academic knowledge leads to transformations, innovations, and solutions to different types of problems. The course can be delivered either as an independent project for individual students or as group projects similar to those sometimes offered in topics courses. Prerequisite: ENTR 201S or MGMT 426.

ENTR 498. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Entrepreneurship. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. The study should lead to presentation of a paper at a conference or publication as appropriate. Prerequisites: ENTR 201S and approval of the program coordinator.

MANAGEMENT Courses

MGMT 325. Contemporary Organizations and Management. 3 Credits.

The fundamentals of the managerial process (planning, organizing, leading and controlling) are considered in the context of 21st century organizations. Topics are almost evenly split between macro and micro perspectives Prerequisites: A declared major in the University or an intended major in the Strome College of Business or permission of the Dean's Office of the Strome College, AND Junior Standing.

MGMT 327. Business Communication. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the importance and centrality of communication in business. Students will learn the application of business communication principles by working both individually and collaboratively on communicating through effective business documents, presentations, professional written and oral correspondence, and use of digital media. Attention will be given to both interpersonal and group audiences, as well as formal and informal delivery. Prerequisite: MGMT 325.

MGMT 330. Organizational Behavior. 3 Credits.

This class examines theories and concepts pertaining to people at work. Topics include personality differences, motivation principles, high-performing work teams, and leadership development. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Pre- or corequisite: MGMT 325.

MGMT 340. Human Resources Management. 3 Credits.

This class examines all issues pertaining to managing people in an organization. Topics include strategic planning for Human Resources, recruitment and selection systems, performance evaluation and development programs, Equal Employment Opportunity, and diversity management. Prerequisites: MGMT 325. Pre- or corequisite: MGMT 330.

MGMT 350. Employee Relations Problems and Practices. 3 Credits.

Examines personnel topics such as absenteeism, substance abuse, theft, gambling and counseling problem employees. Policies and practices used by organizations to anticipate and resolve these problems are explored and evaluated. Prerequisite: junior standing, and a declared major in the University or permission of the Dean's Office.

MGMT 360. Labor Management Relations. 3 Credits.

A contextual study of the trade union movement and its development, structure and processes. Emphasizes the impact of union organization on management practice and effectiveness in both private and public sector organizations. Prerequisites: MGMT 340, and a declared major in the University or permission of the Dean's Office.

MGMT 361. International Business Operations. 3 Credits.

An examination of the environment of multinational business, foreign trade, and the operation of multinational enterprises. Management, marketing, accounting, and financial problems unique to enterprises operating in varying economic, cultural, and political legal environments are investigated. This course includes a CAP experience. International business majors may not take MGMT 361 for credit. Prerequisites: FIN 323, MKTG 311 and MGMT 325, and a declared major in the University or permission of the Dean's Office.

MGMT 367. Cooperative Education. 1-6 Credits.

May be repeated for credit. Available for pass/fail grading only. Student participation for credit based on the academic relevance of the work experience, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and Career Development Services prior to the semester in which the work experience is to take place. Prerequisites: MGMT 325 and approval by the department and Career Development Services, in accordance with the policy for granting credit for cooperative education programs, and a declared major in the University or permission of the Dean's Office.

MGMT 368. Management Internship. 1-3 Credits.

Approval for enrollment and allowable credits is determined by the department and the Career Development Services in the semester prior to enrollment. Available for pass/fail grading only. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: MGMT 325, and a declared major in the University or permission of the Dean's Office.

MGMT 369. Management Practicum. 1-3 Credits.

Approval for enrollment is determined by the Management CAP advisor and the Career Development Services in the semester prior to enrollment. Student will participate in a relevant work setting. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: MGMT 325, and a declared major in the University or permission of the Dean's Office; transfer students must have completed one semester at Old Dominion University.

MGMT 417/517. Employment Law. 3 Credits.

An analysis of how the federal and state governments may regulate the employer-employee relationship. Topics include labor relations law, equal employment opportunity law, other current statutory employment law and common law employment issues. Prerequisite: junior standing and MGMT 325 or MGMT 602, and a declared major in the University or permission of the Dean's Office.

MGMT 418. Advanced Human Resources Management: Contemporary Issues. 3 Credits.

An in-depth analysis of current issues and concerns within human resources management. The course will focus on specific issues and problems associated with the law and equal employment opportunity, employee selection, training and development, performance management/appraisal, and compensation. Methods of instruction include cases, exercises and PC applications. Prerequisites: junior standing and MGMT 325 and MGMT 340, and a declared major in the University or permission of the Dean's Office.

MGMT 420. Business Development. 3 Credits.

Course focuses on assessing the strategies, tactics, dilemmas, processes and solutions associated with developing a new business. Emphasis is devoted to how new ventures should raise rates (sales, prices, productivity), decrease costs, promote and execute while pursuing innovation. The course explores a wide variety of actual small business case studies to illuminate the critical strategic, operational and behavioral considerations necessary to build a successful enterprise, including rollouts (duplicating a business model in multiple locations), rollups (acquiring similar businesses to accelerate growth), and franchises. Prerequisites: MGMT 325 and ACCT 201.

MGMT 424. Technology and Innovation Management. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on three core elements of managing innovation and technology in small and large organizations. First, it teaches in-depth analysis of how innovations can transform companies and industries, including who gains and loses from such developments. Second, it explains how organizations can organize to create innovations internally and externally, and how they can take advantage of opportunities while mitigating threats in technology and innovation development. Third, it discusses how firms benefit and prosper by using various methods of commercialization and protecting new technologies and innovation. Prerequisites: MGMT 325.

MGMT 426. Entrepreneurship: New Ventures Creation. 3 Credits.

A study of the essential elements leading to entrepreneurial and intrapreneurial success with emphasis on the creation, structure and management of new ventures. A recommended elective for business students. Prerequisites: MGMT 325, MKTG 311, and ACCT 201, and a declared major in the University or permission of the Dean's Office.

MGMT 427. Business and Society. 3 Credits.

An examination of the relationship between business (usually the individual firm, but occasionally a group of firms in an industry or a set of headline-makers in different industries) and society (an individual, group of people, the general public, or government entity representing the interests of this individual or group or the public). Emphasizes stakeholders and ethics. The course material is both philosophical and practical for executives and informative and practical for citizens. Prerequisites: MGMT 325, 3 hours of ACCT and 3 hours of ECON, and a declared major in the University or permission of the Dean's Office.

MGMT 430. Compensation Management. 3 Credits.

This class examines issues pertaining to developing, evaluating, and re-designing an organization's direct and indirect compensation systems. Topics include pay structure, incentive plans, benefit programs, and special cases such as executive compensation. Prerequisites: Senior standing, MGMT 325, a C- or higher in MGMT 340, and a declared major in the University or permission of the Dean's Office.

MGMT 440. Human Resource Staffing Strategies. 3 Credits.

This course examines both research and practice regarding the strategic recruitment, selection, and development of top talent in organizations. Discussion topics include understanding and planning for talent needs, use of current recruitment methods and selection techniques, development of both internal and external talent pools, and the influences of external and internal changes due to competitive business environments and job design/redesign initiatives. The strategic and legal context of employment decision making is emphasized. Prerequisites: MGMT 325, MGMT 330, and MGMT 340.

MGMT 450. Performance Measurement and Management. 3 Credits.

The role of performance management (PM) systems (performance measurement, appraisal, and development) is critical to organizational and workers success. This course focuses on how an effective PM system created in alignment with an organization’s strategy, mission, values, and product or services, can attract, develop, and retain top-performers. We will discuss how PM systems are tied to reward systems and will examine the legal regulations to which an organization must adhere. Topics include performance appraisals, coaching, feedback, reward systems, and related management activities. Prerequisites: MGMT 325, MGMT 330, and MGMT 340.

MGMT 452/552. Negotiations and Change Management. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on negotiations and change. Students will develop analytical, interpersonal, and communication skills, with an emphasis placed on experiential learning through case studies, role playing, and simulations. Prerequisite: MGMT 325 or permission of the Dean's Office.

MGMT 462. Comparative International Management. 3 Credits.

The course examines organizational structure and functioning from cross-cultural and cross-national perspectives. Compares how management practices differ from one society to another. Comparisons are made between the U.S., Western Europe, Japan, the USSR, China, and the Third World nations. Prerequisites: senior standing and MGMT 325, and a declared major in the University or permission of the Dean's Office.

MGMT 463/563. Management Seminar Abroad. 3 Credits.

A study tour abroad under the direction of a faculty member including on-site visits and management lectures designed to provide insight into differences in management practices in foreign countries. Offered summers only and when available. Prerequisite: permission of the chief departmental advisor, and a declared major in the University or permission of the Dean's Office.

MGMT 485W. Business Policy and Strategy. 3 Credits.

Strategic management addresses the concerns of the high level executive or general manager, who must use a perspective that is qualitatively different from that of the lower-level functional manager or operations manager. Strategic decisions cut across functional lines. Whereas other courses focus on competency at a functional level (Are we doing things right?), this course deals with the overall effectiveness of the total organization (Are we doing the right things?). This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C; senior standing, FIN 323, MGMT 325, MKTG 311, and a declared major in the University or permission of the Dean's Office.

MGMT 490. Management Consulting. 3 Credits.

An exploration of the consulting industry and its role in driving improvements across various types of organizations. Students will learn problem-solving frameworks used to direct decision making as well as real-world communication and project management skills. Prerequisites: MGMT 325. Pre- or corequisite: MGMT 485W.

MGMT 495/595. Selected Topics in Management. 3 Credits.

Designed to provide advanced students in management an opportunity to study administration in highly specialized areas under the guidance of a faculty member. Prerequisite: permission of the chief departmental advisor/graduate program director.

MGMT 497. Independent Study in Management. 3 Credits.

Designed to provide advanced students in management an opportunity for independent study of selected areas under the guidance of a faculty member. Prerequisite: permission of the chief departmental advisor, and a declared major in the University or permission of the Dean's Office.