http://www.odu.edu/academics/programs/undergraduate/environmental-health

Steven M. Becker, Chair

The School of Community and Environmental Health offers undergraduate, graduate, and certificate programs that lead to careers in health services research, public health, community health, health care administration, environmental health, industrial hygiene, and occupational safety and health. Additionally, the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences (B.S.H.S.), the Bachelor of Science in Public Health (B.S.P.H.), and the Master of Public Health offer practicing professionals the opportunity to complete their degrees in a distance format.

Bachelor of Science - Environmental Health

www.hs.odu.edu/commhealth/academics/bs_enviro/

Sean Banaee, Program Director

Environmental health is the study and management of factors that adversely affect the environment and the health and well-being of humans. The curriculum in environmental health, which is accredited by the National Environmental Health Science and Protection Accreditation Council, encompasses a variety of disciplines in the preparation of occupational safety specialists, industrial hygienists, and environmental health specialists.

Environmental health professionals manage safety programs, conduct accident investigations, perform Job Hazard Analysis, provide safety training, conduct safety audits, and lead emergency response services. Industrial hygienists conduct evaluations and monitor harmful agents and health hazards (such as: noise and vibration, chemicals, gases and vapors, radiation, heat, and biohazards) in the work environment and recommend controls to minimize the health risk to workers in the occupational environment. In simple terms they anticipate, recognize, evaluate and control occupational exposures. On the environmental side, environmental health professionals are responsible for education, consultation, and enforcement relating to local, state and federal environmental health laws, regulations, and standards. They work with air, water, food, hazardous and infectious wastes, sewage, housing, vectors, institutional environments, and other health hazards.  Environmental health professionals manage environmental health and safety programs for corporations and private industry, government agencies, academic institutions, health departments, and military installations. 

The program requires three credit hours of internship field practice within an environmental or occupational health facility or industrial site.  A variety of internship sites are available in the Hampton Roads area for these experiences. Internship sites throughout the U.S. and overseas are also available. Internships are available any semester but are typically completed in the summer between the junior and senior year.  Most internships are paid and many out of area internships offer a stipend to cover expenses.

Upon graduation, students are eligible to sit for the professional licensing examination in environmental health.  With work experience, students are eligible to take the certification examinations in industrial hygiene as Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH) and/or in safety as Associate Safety Professional (ASP) and then a Certified Safety Professional (CSP).

A broad spectrum of employment opportunities are available to graduates.  Alumni employment success has been outstanding, with graduates finding employment in agencies such as the USDA, EPA, OSHA, NASA, FDA, and DOD. Many work in private industries, manufacturing plants, the oil industry, consulting firms, health departments, waste and wastewater plants, civil service, and other organizations.

Admission

Students may be admitted to the program on the satisfactory completion of 60 semester hours of recommended study of required prerequisite courses and with the approval of the program director. Applications to the program, including all materials, must be submitted no later than February 1 for consideration for admission the following fall. Exemptions may be appealed through the program director. Students who fail to meet the established deadline for formal admission will usually be allowed to take environmental health courses if space is available; however, permission must be granted by the program director prior to registration.

Requirements

Lower-Division General Education
Written Communication
ENGL 110CEnglish Composition (grade of C or better required)3
ENGL 231CIntroduction to Technical Writing (grade of C or better required) *3
Oral Communication
COMM 101RPublic Speaking *3
Mathematics
MATH 162MPrecalculus I *3
Language and Culture0-6
Information Literacy and Research **3
Human Creativity 3
Interpreting the Past3
Literature3
Philosophy and Ethics ***0-3
The Nature of Science12
Select one of the following sequences:
Environmental Sciences
and Environmental Sciences Lab
and
Introduction to Human Biology
and Introduction to Human Biology Lab
or
General Biology I
and General Biology I Lab
and
General Biology II
and General Biology II Lab
Select one of the following:
Conceptual Physics *
Conceptual Physics *
Introductory General Physics *
Introductory General Physics *
University Physics I *
University Physics II *
Human Behavior3
Impact of Technology (upper-division T course outside the College of Health Sciences; meets upper-division general education)3
Departmental Requirements24
Elementary Statistics *
Introductory Microbiology *
Introductory Microbiology Laboratory *
Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology I *
or
Human Anatomy and Physiology I *
Foundations of Chemistry I Lecture
and Foundations of Chemistry I Laboratory +*
Foundations of Chemistry II Lecture
and Foundations of Chemistry II Laboratory +*
Organic Chemistry I Lecture
and Organic Chemistry I Laboratory *
Major Requirements31
Principles of Environmental Health Science
Environmental and Occupational Health Administration and Law ****
Environmental and Occupational Health Internship I
Principles of Occupational Safety and Health
Communicable Diseases
Water and Wastewater Technology
Industrial Hygiene
Principles of Toxicology
Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Environmental and Occupational Risk Assessment and Decision Analysis
Environmental and Occupational Health Senior Seminar
ENVH Electives *****12
Occupational Health
Occupational Safety Standards, Laws and Regulations
Food Safety
Vector-Borne Diseases and Their Control
Occupational Safety and Health Program Management
Physical Hazards and Their Control
Principles of Ergonomics
Industrial Hygiene Sampling Methods
Air Pollution and Its Control
Physical Hazards Laboratory
Hazardous Waste Management
Industrial Environmental Management

Elective Credit

Elective credit may be needed to meet the minimum requirement of 120 credit hours.

Upper-Division General Education

  • Option A. Approved Disciplinary Minor, 12-24 hours minimum; also second degree or second major.
  • Option B. Interdisciplinary Minor (specifically 12 hours, 3 of which may be in the major)
  • Option C. International Business and Regional Courses or an approved Certification Program such as teaching licensure
  • Option D. Two Upper-Division Courses from outside the College of Health Sciences and not required by the major (6 hours)

Requirements for Graduation

Requirements for graduation include a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 overall and in the major, minimum 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours in upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, and completion of Senior Assessment.

Four-Year Plan - Environmental Health - BS

This is a suggested curriculum plan to complete this degree program in four years.  Please consult information in this Catalog, Degree Works, and your academic advisor for more specific information on course requirements for this degree.

Minor in Environmental Health

Sean Banaee, Coordinator

A minor in environmental health requires a minimum of 12 semester hours of environmental health courses.  The minor is designed to enhance the knowledge of students and help them understand the influences and impact of environmental factors on human health.  For completion of the minor, students must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses specified as a requirement for the minor exclusive of prerequisite courses and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University. Twelve semester hours of science courses are preferred.

Requirements for the environmental health minor are as follows.

ENVH 301Principles of Environmental Health Science3
ENVH 420Communicable Diseases3
ENVH 421Food Safety3
ENVH 423Vector-Borne Diseases and Their Control3
Total Hours12

Environmental Issues and Management Interdisciplinary Minor

Sean Banaee, Coordinator

Continuing environmental degradation is a worldwide problem threatening the quality of life and its viability. The problem can only be understood and addressed by drawing upon the resources of multidisciplinary approaches. The multidisciplinary perspective center of this minor focuses on the human dimensions of the human-environment equation and includes geographical and ecological approaches, scientific and technological methodologies, planning and public policy issues, and ethical, political, economic, and legal considerations.

Course options are as follows:

CEE 350Environmental Pollution and Control3
CEE 458Sustainable Development3
ECON 435Health Economics: A Global Perspective3
ECON 447WNatural Resource and Environmental Economics3
ENVH 301Principles of Environmental Health Science3
ENVH 402WEnvironmental and Occupational Health Administration and Law3
ENVH 420Communicable Diseases3
ENVH 421Food Safety3
ENVH 422Water and Wastewater Technology3
GEOG 305World Resources3
GEOG 306THazards: Natural and Technological3
GEOG 400WSeminar in Geography3
GEOG 420Marine Geography3
GEOG 422WCoastal Geography3
OEAS 302Environmental Geology3
OEAS 310Global Earth Systems4
PAS 300Foundations of Public Service3
PHIL 344EEnvironmental Ethics3
PHIL 345EBioethics3
POLS 300Introduction to Public Policy3
POLS 335Environmental Politics3
POLS 401Global Environmental Policy3
PRTS 405Outdoor Recreation3
SOC 309Population and Society3
SOC 320Social Inequality3
SOC 325Social Welfare3
SOC 440Sociology of Health and Wellbeing3
SOC/CRJS 444Community Justice3

The interdisciplinary minor in environmental issues and management requires 12 credit hours of 300/400-level courses selected from at least two different disciplines with a maximum of six credits from any one discipline. For completion of the interdisciplinary minor, students must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses specified as a requirement for the minor exclusive of lower-level courses and prerequisite courses. At least six hours of upper-level courses must be taken through courses offered by Old Dominion University. Three credit hours may be in the major, if a major course is listed as an option for the interdisciplinary minor. As such, it will be credited toward both the major and the interdisciplinary minor.

Minor in Occupational Safety

Sean Banaee, Coordinator

A minor in occupational safety is available in the environmental and occupational health program and requires a minimum of 12 semester hours of ENVH courses in safety. The minor in occupational safety is designed to prepare students to meet safety standards and guidelines in such areas as business, education and industry with the goal of managing operations to minimize financial losses resulting from accidents, health claims, legal actions and property damage. It is especially attractive to students in majors such as engineering, occupational and technical studies, and business who may reasonably anticipate assignment of safety as an additional duty.

Minor course requirements include:

ENVH 406Principles of Occupational Safety and Health3
ENVH 407Occupational Safety Standards, Laws and Regulations3
ENVH 425Occupational Safety and Health Program Management3
ENVH 426Physical Hazards and Their Control3
Total Hours12

For completion of the minor students must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses specified as a requirement for the minor exclusive of prerequisite courses and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Certificate in Occupational Safety

Sean Banaee, Coordinator

The certificate program in occupational safety is designed to prepare students to meet safety standards and guidelines in such areas as business, education and industry with the goal of managing operations to minimize financial losses resulting from accidents, health claims, legal actions and property damage. It is especially attractive to students in majors such as engineering, occupational and technical studies, and business who may reasonably anticipate assignment of safety as an additional duty, or to individuals already employed in the environmental health and safety field. Courses taken in the certificate program may be applied to degree requirements at both the undergraduate and graduate levels in environmental health. For completion of the undergraduate certificate program students must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses specified as a requirement for the certificate. Students must complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses required for the certificate through courses offered by Old Dominion University. After successful completion of the program, a Certificate in Occupational Safety will be awarded.

A total of 12 semester hours of ENVH safety courses are required that include:

ENVH 406Principles of Occupational Safety and Health3
ENVH 407Occupational Safety Standards, Laws and Regulations3
ENVH 425Occupational Safety and Health Program Management3
ENVH 426Physical Hazards and Their Control3

Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences (BSHS)

Webpage: http://www.odu.edu/commhealth/academics/undergraduate
Program Email: [bshshsa@odu.edu]
Program Director (Interim): 
Jim Bellamy

The Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences (BSHS) degree allows students to choose from the following majors:

  1. Major in Health Services Administration (available online only)
  2. Major in Health Services Administration (for professionals with license or certification; available online only)

The Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences is designed to offer advanced educational experiences to students who are non-health or health professionals and/or who have completed a certification or Associate of Science degree in a health-related discipline, have credentials to practice in their field, and have experience as a health care provider. This program also builds on the expertise of practicing health professionals and allows them the opportunity to enhance their formal learning. The program focuses on upper-level course work and general education in conjunction with an area of career enhancement chosen by the individual student.

The Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences aims to provide students with current, relevant information and experiences that will enable them to function as entry-level health service administrators. The program will prepare individuals to be able to function as health services administrators in local, state, and national arenas. Additionally, the program will prepare persons seeking advanced study in preparation for the M.P.H., M.P.A., and M.S. degrees and the foundation for Ph.D. or M.D. educational career paths.

Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences with a major in Health Services Administration will possess the knowledge and skills necessary to enhance the administration and the delivery of health services through health care management and policy education. These graduates will serve as leaders for health care organizations in the public, private, and military organizations. The curriculum for the Health Services Administration major integrates a multidisciplinary approach that includes global and public health, health care finance, health services research, epidemiology, health care policy and health care management. Students will have the opportunity to gain practical health care management experience and drive the innovation in health care policy.

Graduates of the program will be ready to serve as invaluable leaders in health care services.

Admission to the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences Program

  1. Applicants for admission to the baccalaureate program in health sciences should apply initially to the Office of Admissions of Old Dominion University. Students cannot be accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences program without first being admitted to the University. Admission to the University does not constitute admission to the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences program. Students are admitted to the School of Community and Environmental Health after completion of lower-level General Education courses and BSHS program prerequisite courses.
  2. Applicants for admission to the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences program must complete all prerequisite courses with a grade of “C” or better prior to being admitted to the School of Community and Environmental Health. Transfer students may complete the prerequisite courses at another college or university but are responsible for having a transfer credit evaluation completed by the transfer evaluation unit in the Office of Admissions to determine that transfer courses are equivalent and acceptable to Old Dominion University requirements. Students must be accepted to the program before enrolling in any 300- or 400-level required course.
  3. Applicants must complete a Supplemental Application to be considered for admission to the BSHS program. The Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences Supplemental Application may be obtained directly from the School of Community and Environmental Health website, the College of Health Sciences Academic Advising Center or the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences program website.

Students may be accepted into the program in Fall, Spring or Summer.  The deadlines for applications and submission of all materials are May 15 for Fall term entry, October 15 for Spring term entry, and February 15 for Summer term entry. Admission to the program is competitive; admission decisions are determined by the admissions panel of the BSHS program on the basis of academic qualifications and experience.

Application Checklist

  1. Apply and be admitted to the University as a degree-seeking undergraduate student.  Transfer students should have a transfer credit evaluation completed by the transfer evaluation unit in the Office of Admissions.
  2. Complete lower-division General Education requirements.
  3. Complete prerequisite requirements with a grade of C or better; see major requirements below for specific prerequisite requirements for Health Services Administration and Health Services Administration (Professional).
  4. Maintain a minimum grade point average of 2.00.
  5. Submit a Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences program supplemental application directly to the BSHS program with photocopies of all previous college transcripts attached.

The admissions panel will consider and review all materials submitted as part of the admissions packet to the program. Applicants will be evaluated on the basis of their Statement of Purpose, work experience (if applicable), and strength of recommendations along with the Grade Point Average (GPA). Though GPA is not the sole criterion for admission, a minimum grade point average of 3.00 or higher makes the applicant most competitive.

Applicants will be formally notified of admission status in two weeks after the application deadline and will be advised by an assigned advisor. Students not admitted will receive notice and should pursue academic advising at the College of Health Sciences Academic Advising Center.

For additional information on the curriculum or admission requirements, please contact: Program Director (bshshsa@odu.edu) or College of Health Sciences Advising Center (hsadvising@odu.edu).

Continuance and Readmission Policy

In addition to the Old Dominion University continuance policies in this catalog, the following policies are specific to all declared majors in the BSHS Program:

  1. A grade of C (2.00) or better is required in all BSHS courses to continue in the program.
  2. A student who earns a grade of D or F will not be considered in good academic standing in the major.
  3. A cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or better is required to continue in the BSHS program.
  4. A BSHS student who fails a BSHS course and is readmitted to the BSHS program is allowed to repeat the failed course only once during the next course offering.
  5. A student who leaves the major and is readmitted may be required to take additional course work prior to or concurrent with readmission.
  6. A student may be readmitted to the BSHS major only once.

Internship

The internship (CHP 468) is designed and implemented to ensure that students achieve the following objectives:

  1. Practical experience in a health setting via exposure to an organization and/or community context that generates health activities.
  2. Acquisition of practical skills via related field assignments that challenge students to utilize knowledge of competencies learned from the academic curriculum and improved understanding of the political, economic, social and organizational context within which public health and health services administrative activities operate.

Internship is a planned, supervised and evaluated exercise that serves as a culminating experience for students pursuing the BSHS degree. Internships must be planned and approved during the penultimate semester of coursework at ODU. This is imperative as the foundational skills and concepts are achieved during the span of entire coursework at ODU. Internships should be sought and undertaken in an organization, agency, department or community that provides planning and/or services that are relevant to the core areas of health services administration or public health. Any student who plans to organize an internship without the appropriate foundation may be at a disadvantage in the organizations in which internships are undertaken. All students are strongly encouraged to complete an Internship within their major, i.e. Health Services Administration or Public Health. The internship experience and course address the relevance of developing skills and competencies as required for the future of public health practitioners and health services administrators.  

Requirements for the Major in Health Services Administration

Lower-division general education courses and STAT 130M and CHP 200 are prerequisites and must be completed prior to submission of the BSHS program application. STAT 130M and CHP 200 must be completed with a grade of C or better.  Students must be admitted to the program by the Program Director prior to starting the B.S.H.S. major courses.

Lower-Division General Education
Written Communication (grade of C or better required in both courses)6
Mathematics (STAT 130M required; must be completed with a grade of C or better prior to submission of the BSHS program application) 3
Human Creativity 3
Interpreting the Past3
Literature3
The Nature of Science8
Information Literacy and Research (HLTH 120G preferred)3
Language and Culture0-6
Oral Communication (met in the major by CHP 400, CHP 450, and CHP 415W or CHP 430W)
Human Behavior3
Philosophy and Ethics (met in the major by CHP 400)
Impact of Technology (met in the major by CHP 485)
Total Hours32-38

Major Course Requirements

CHP 200Principles of Public Health (must be completed with a C or better prior to submission of the BSHS program application)3
Core Courses15
Public Health Science
Population Health
The U.S. Healthcare Delivery System
Managerial Epidemiology
Principles of Environmental Health Science
Program Requirements48
Ethics in Health Administration *
Critical Issues in Public/Community Health Administration *
Community Health Resources and Health Promotion
Health Aspects of Aging
Finance and Budgeting in Healthcare
Health Services Research Methods
Research Methods in the Health Sciences
Public and Community Health Administration *
Policy and Politics of Health
Healthcare Marketing
Health Ethics and the Law
Health Informatics **
Internship
Contemporary Organizations and Management
Select four MGMT 300/400-level electives from the following
Organizational Behavior
Human Resources Management
Employee Relations Problems and Practices
Labor Management Relations
Employment Law
Advanced Human Resources Management: Contemporary Issues
Negotiations and Change Management
Comparative International Management
Total Hours66

Electives

Elective credits may be needed to achieve the minimum 120 hours required for the degree.  Electives can be from any College. Some electives that can be considered are:  ENVH 401, ENVH 420, and HLSC 405.

Upper-Division General Education

Completion of the MGMT courses required for the major results in a minor in management and meets upper-division general education.

Graduation Requirements

Requirements for graduation include a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 overall and in the major, a minimum 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours in upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C, or ENGL 221C, or ENGL 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, and completion of Senior Assessment.

Total: 120 credit hours

Four-Year Plan - Health Services Administration Major - BSHS

This is a suggested curriculum plan to complete this degree program in four years.  Please consult information in this Catalog, Degree Works, and your academic advisor for more specific information on course requirements for this degree.

Requirements for the Major in Health Services Administration (Professional)

Lower-division general education courses and STAT 130M with at least a grade of C or higher are prerequisites and must be completed prior to submission of the BSHS program application. CHP 200 is waived for students in this major. Students must be admitted to the program by the Program Director prior to starting the BSHS major courses.

Current licensure as a health professional, an Associate of Applied Science degree, and/or certification will be used toward satisfying the professional elective requirements. Certification refers to the passing of an exam upon completion of an educational program to demonstrate competency in a chosen profession. The following programs are some that have been accepted: Medical Corps, Radiation Technology, Medical Dosimetry, Nuclear Medicine Technology, Radiologic Technology, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Dental Hygiene, Emergency Medical Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, Cytotechnology, Paramedic, Respiratory Therapy, and Physical Therapy Assistant or military experience such as Hospital Corpsman.  Consult the Program Director for specific information on program eligibility.  CHP 200 is waived for students meeting these standards.  Up to 23 professional elective credits will be awarded upon program admission; the number of credits is determined by training hours completed.  These experiential hours are included in the overall number of hours needed for graduation.  These hours are applied to the number of elective hours needed to meet the graduation requirement of 120  hours.  In summary, three credit hours are waived (CHP 200 not required) and up to 23 experiential credit hours can be awarded, leaving 97 hours needed to complete the BSHS Health Services Administration professional major.

Lower-Division General Education
Written Communication (grade of C or better required in both courses)6
Mathematics (STAT 130M required; must be completed with a C or better prior to submission of the BSHS program application) 3
Human Creativity 3
Interpreting the Past3
Literature3
The Nature of Science8
Information Literacy and Research (HLTH 120G preferred)3
Language and Culture0-6
Oral Communication (met in the major by CHP 400, CHP 450 and CHP 415W or CHP 430W)
Human Behavior3
Philosophy and Ethics (met in the major by CHP 400)
Impact of Technology (met in the major by CHP 485)
Total Hours32-38

Major Requirements

Core Courses15
Public Health Science
Population Health
The U.S. Healthcare Delivery System
Managerial Epidemiology
Principles of Environmental Health Science
Program Requirements39
Ethics in Health Administration *
Critical Issues in Public/Community Health Administration *
Community Health Resources and Health Promotion
Finance and Budgeting in Healthcare
Health Services Research Methods
Research Methods in the Health Sciences
Public and Community Health Administration
Health Ethics and the Law
Health Informatics **
Internship
Contemporary Organizations and Management
Select four MGMT 300/400-level electives from the following
Organizational Behavior
Human Resources Management
Employee Relations Problems and Practices
Labor Management Relations
Employment Law
Advanced Human Resources Management: Contemporary Issues
Negotiations and Change Management
Comparative International Management
Total Hours54

Upper-Division General Education

Completion of the MGMT courses required for the major results in a minor in management and meets upper-division general education.

Electives

Elective credit may be needed to achieve the minimum 120 hours required for the degree.

Graduation Requirements

Requirements for graduation include a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 overall and in the major, a minimum 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours in upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C, or ENGL 221C, or ENGL 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, and completion of Senior Assessment.

Total:  120 credit hours

Minor in Community Health

A minor in community health is available in the BSHS Health Services Administration program.

The minor in community health is designed to prepare students in the ever-changing world of healthcare and health behavior as practitioners and offers courses in such areas as nutrition, healthcare marketing and use of policy and health administration methods. The goal of the minor is to emphasize operations and public health preparedness as well as communication and critical thinking. It is possible to complement the minor with courses in environmental or occupational health.  The minor is especially attractive to students in other majors such as psychology, nursing, dental hygiene, engineering, occupational and technical studies, and business who may reasonably anticipate public health and community health as core components of their duties. The minor prepares the students for an experience in internship sites like the American Heart Association, the American Red Cross, hospitals, nursing homes, fitness centers, work site health education programs, and substance abuse prevention centers and other non-profit organizations.

An undergraduate minor in community health can be obtained by the completion of 12 credit hours from the following courses:

CHP 318Principles of Nutrition3
CHP 450Public and Community Health Administration3
CHP 465Policy and Politics of Health3
CHP 475Healthcare Marketing3
CHP 485Health Informatics3
One of the following may be substituted for one CHP course:
Research Methods in the Health Sciences
Principles of Environmental Health Science
Occupational Health

For completion of the minor, a student must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses specified as a requirement for the minor exclusive of prerequisite courses and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences (BSHS) Specialty Concentrations

Through special agreements and curriculum design, courses for the certificate program in cytotechnology, offered by the School of Medical Diagnostic and Translational Sciences, may be applied as a specialty concentration in the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences. The concentration can be found in the School of Medical Diagnostic and Translational Sciences section of this Catalog. Students pursuing cytotechnology who already have baccalaureate degrees from accredited institutions may opt for a certificate in this program rather than a second baccalaureate degree.

Cytotechnology Concentration in the BSHS

Deborah Krzyzaniak , Program Director

This concentration is available to students who complete the requirements for the BSHS degree. Specific information on the cytotechnology program can be found in the School of Medical Diagnostic and Translational Sciences section of this Catalog.

Bachelor of Science in Public Health (BSPH)

Webpagehttp://www.odu.edu/commhealth/academics/undergraduate
Program Email: [bsph@odu.edu]
Program Director (Interim):  Jim Bellamy

Graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Public Health (BSPH) will possess knowledge and skills necessary to prevent disease, prolong life and promote health through the organized efforts of society. Graduates will be able to serve as leaders in the various departments of health, health care organizations, non-profit organizations, health care providers, research organizations and communities with a primary aim of providing conditions in which people can lead healthy lives. The curriculum for the Public Health major incorporates a flexible, challenging, and contemporary curriculum that includes coursework in epidemiology and biostatistics, health care ethics, the natural sciences, public and health policy, health care economics, environmental health issues and social and behavioral health, among other areas. The program also provides students with courses in basic research methods necessary for assessment, analysis, communication, research, problem solving and critical thinking abilities in the emerging emphasis on evidence-based health care and public health. Students will have the opportunity to gain practical public health exposure and mentoring in clinical, research, or community settings. 

The Bachelor of Science in Public Health is available in both online and traditional formats.

Admission to the Bachelor of Science in Public Health Program

  1. Applicants for admission to the baccalaureate program in Public Health should apply initially to the Office of Admissions of Old Dominion University. Students cannot be accepted into the Bachelor of Science in Public Health program without first being admitted to the University. Admission to the University does not constitute admission to the Bachelor of Science in Public Health program. Students are admitted to the School of Community and Environmental Health after completion of lower-level General Education courses and BSPH program prerequisite courses.
  2. Applicants for admission to the Bachelor of Science in Public Health program must complete all prerequisite courses with a grade of “C” or better prior to being admitted to the School of Community and Environmental Health. Transfer students may complete the prerequisite courses at another college or university but are responsible for having a transfer credit evaluation completed by the transfer evaluation unit in the Office of Admissions to determine that transfer courses are equivalent and acceptable to Old Dominion University requirements. Students must be accepted to the program before enrolling in any 300- or 400-level required course.
  3. Applicants must complete a Supplemental Application to be considered for admission to the BSPH program. The Bachelor of Science in Public Health Supplemental Application may be obtained directly from the School of Community and Environmental Health website, the College of Health Sciences Academic Advising Center or the Bachelor of Science in Public Health program website.
  4. For non-native English speakers, a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 550 on the paper-based test (or 79-80 on the iBT) is required.

Students may be accepted into the program in Fall, Spring or Summer.  The deadlines for applications and submission of all materials are May 15 for Fall term entry, October 15 for Spring term entry, and February 15 for Summer term entry. Admission to the program is competitive; admission decisions are determined by the admissions panel of the BSPH program on the basis of academic qualifications and experience.

Application Checklist

  1. Apply and be admitted to the University as a degree-seeking undergraduate student.  Transfer students should have a transfer credit evaluation completed by the transfer evaluation unit in the Office of Admissions.
  2. Complete lower-division General Education requirements.
  3. Complete prerequisite requirements with a grade of C or better; see major requirements below for specific prerequisite requirements for Public Health.
  4. Maintain a minimum grade point average of 2.50.
  5. Submit a Bachelor of Science in Public Health program supplemental application directly to the BSPH program with photocopies of all previous college transcripts attached.

The admissions panel will consider and review all materials submitted as part of the admissions packet to the program. Applicants will be evaluated on the basis of their Statement of Purpose, work experience (if applicable), and strength of recommendations along with the grade point average (GPA). Though GPA is not the sole criterion for admission, a minimum grade point average of 3.00 or higher makes the applicant most competitive.

Applicants will be formally notified of admission status in two weeks after the application deadline and will be advised by an assigned advisor. Students not admitted will receive notice and should pursue academic advising at the College of Health Sciences Academic Advising Center.

For additional information on the curriculum or admission requirements, please contact: Program Director (bsph@odu.edu) or College of Health Sciences Advising Center (hsadvising@odu.edu).

Continuance and Readmission Policy

In addition to the Old Dominion University continuance policies in this catalog, the following policies are specific to all declared majors in the BSPH Program:

  1. A grade of C (2.00) or better is required in all BSPH courses to continue in the program.
  2. A student who earns a grade of D or F will not be considered in good academic standing in the major.
  3. A cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or better is required to continue in the BSPH program.
  4. A BSPH student who fails a BSPH course and is readmitted to the BSPH program is allowed to repeat the failed course only once during the next course offering.
  5. A student who leaves the major and is readmitted may be required to take additional course work prior to or concurrent with readmission.
  6. A student may be readmitted to the BSPH major only once.

Internship (Capstone Experience)

The internship (capstone experience) (CHP 468) is a three-credit pass/fail course that serves as the capstone experience for students pursuing the Bachelor of Science in Public Health program.  It is a planned, supervised, and evaluated 200-clock hour experience under the direction of the internship coordinator. (Note:  Students enrolled in the Linked BSPH to MPH program are required to perform 120-clock hours.) The policies, guidelines, and processes followed by the coordinator and students are delineated in the Internship Manual provided to students when they enroll in the program.  The internship provides the opportunity for students to integrate their academic work into experiential learning.  The experience will allow a student to gain basic job entry or advanced skills by working with experienced public health or healthcare professionals in a public or private organization.  Students may select the internship site or they may seek guidance from faculty about possible sites.

Internships must be planned and approved during the penultimate semester of coursework at ODU. This is imperative as the foundational skills and concepts are achieved during the span of entire coursework at ODU. Internships should be sought and undertaken in an organization, agency, department or community that provides planning and/or services that are relevant to the core areas of public health. Any student who plans to organize an internship without the appropriate foundation may be at a disadvantage in the organizations in which internships are undertaken. All students are strongly encouraged to complete an internship within their major, i.e. public health. The internship experience and course address the relevance of developing skills and competencies as required for the future of public health practitioners.  

As part of the course assessment, students are required to compile an electronic portfolio (ePortfolio).  The ePortfolio is a collection of work completed by the student during the internship and can be used to present the student’s “professional” or digital self to others.  In addition to submitting an ePortfolio, students must submit a comprehensive attendance record that covers the entire internship period.

A criminal background check and proof of vaccination status may be required of students prior to beginning the internship, if required by participating organization.

Students who do not pass the internship in the first attempt will have the opportunity to repeat the course twice.  If they are unsuccessful on their final attempt, they will be unable to earn the Bachelor of Science in Public Health.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Public Health

Prerequisite requirements are completion of all lower-division general education courses and completion of  ENGL 110C, BIOL 121NBIOL 122NBIOL 123NBIOL 124NMATH 162MSTAT 130M with a grade of C or higher prior to submission of the BSPH program application. Students must be admitted to the program by the Program Director prior to starting BSPH major courses. 

General Education Courses

Lower-Division General Education
Written Communication (grade of C or better required in both courses; ENGL 110C must be completed prior to submission of the BSPH program application)6
Oral Communication (met in the major by CHP 400, CHP 450, and CHP 415W or CHP 430W)
Mathematics (MATH 162M) must be completed with a C or better prior to submission of the BSPH program application)3
Language and Culture*0-6
Information Literacy and Research (HLTH 120G preferred) 3
Human Creativity 3
Interpreting the Past3
Literature3
Philosophy and Ethics (met in the major by CHP 400)
The Nature of Science (BIOL 121N/BIOL 122N and BIOL 123N/BIOL 124N required; must be completed with a C or better prior to submission of the BSPH program application)8
Human Behavior (met by PSYC 201S or SOC 201S in foundations coursework)
Impact of Technology (met in the major by CHP 485)
Total Hours29-35

Health Sciences Foundation Courses

BIOL 240Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology I4
or BIOL 250 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
BIOL 294Genetics3
CHEM 121N
CHEM 122N
Foundations of Chemistry I Lecture
and Foundations of Chemistry I Laboratory *
4
CHEM 123N
CHEM 124N
Foundations of Chemistry II Lecture
and Foundations of Chemistry II Laboratory
4
CHEM 211Organic Chemistry I Lecture3
PHYS 111NIntroductory General Physics4
PSYC 201SIntroduction to Psychology *3
or SOC 201S Introduction to Sociology
STAT 130MElementary Statistics3
Total Hours28

Major Course Requirements 

CHP 328Public Health Science3
CHP 335Population Health3
CHP 360Introduction to Global Health3
CHP 390The U.S. Healthcare Delivery System3
CHP 400Ethics in Health Administration *3
CHP 415WCritical Issues in Public/Community Health Administration *3
or CHP 430W Community Health Resources and Health Promotion
CHP 445Health Services Research Methods3
CHP 450Public and Community Health Administration *3
CHP 461Managerial Epidemiology3
CHP 485Health Informatics **3
ENVH 301Principles of Environmental Health Science3
ENVH 448Epidemiology and Biostatistics3
PUBH 403WSocial and Behavioral Aspects of Public Health3
PUBH 415One Health-One Medicine3
PUBH 421Leadership in Public Health3
PUBH 422Health, Culture and Diversity-Reducing Disparities in Public Health3
HLSC 405Interprofessional Study Abroad on Global Health3
or CHP 475 Healthcare Marketing
Capstone Course
CHP 468Internship3
Total Hours54

Upper-Division General Education

Students may choose one of the following options to fulfill their upper-division general education requirement.

  • Option A:  A University-approved disciplinary minor, second degree or second major, with advisor approval.
  • Option B:  A University-approved interdisciplinary minor.
  • Option C:  International business and regional courses or an approved certification program.
  • Option D. Six hours of upper division courses outside the College of Health Sciences.

Electives

Electives may be needed to achieve the minimum 120 hours required for the baccalaureate degree.  Some electives that can be considered are:  ENVH 401, ENVH 420 and HLSC 405.

Graduation Requirements

Requirements for graduation include a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 overall and in the major, a minimum 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours in upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C, or ENGL 221C, or ENGL 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, and completion of Senior Assessment.

Total:  120 credit hours

Four-Year Plan - Public Health - BSPH

This is a suggested curriculum plan to complete this degree program in four years.  Please consult information in this Catalog, Degree Works, and your academic advisor for more specific information on course requirements for this degree.

Linked Bachelor of Science in Public Health (BSPH) to Master of Public Health (MPH) Program

The linked Bachelor of Science in Public Health (BSPH) to Master of Public Health (MPH) program provides qualified ODU undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn a Master of Public Health degree while taking up to 12 credits of the MPH program as an undergraduate student.  Students in the linked program must earn a minimum of 151 credit hours (120 discrete credit hours for the undergraduate degree and 31 discrete credit hours for the graduate degree).

The program is designed for highly motivated students with the desire to continue their education after the baccalaureate (BSPH) degree. It is especially relevant to individuals seeking to work (or currently working) in the public health or non-profit sectors. Successful applicants must have demonstrated both a mature attitude and superior academic achievement. They must be recommended to the program by their major advisor or program director.

Linked BSPH to MPH program students should carefully consider their undergraduate degree program requirements when planning their course of study.  Students in the linked program work in close consultation with the BSPH Director and the MPH Program Office to develop an individualized plan of study based on the required coursework.

Well-qualified undergraduate students (overall program GPA of 3.5 and above) may take MPH-level courses as early as four semesters prior to their graduation and count up to 12* graduate credit hours toward their undergraduate degree. After receiving the undergraduate degree, a student will continue with the MPH program, taking MPH courses until completing the required 43 credit hours.

*For additional information, please contact the Program Directors at bsph@odu.edu or mph@odu.edu 

Admission Information

Applicants for the linked BSPH to MPH program must meet the following requirements:

  • Current Old Dominion University BSPH program student.
  • Complete general education requirements by the end of Junior year.
  • Apply to the linked program after completion of a minimum of 60 credits and before completion of 105 credits.  
  • A minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.5 or higher at the time of application.
  • Complete an interview with the BSPH Program Director and the MPH Program Director.
  • Apply to the MPH program via Graduate Admissions no later than the June 15 application deadline, including a personal statement, two letters of recommendation including one letter of recommendation from the Undergraduate Program Director, and other application requirements set by the MPH program.
  • Student progress will be reviewed at the end of Junior and Senior years by the undergraduate and graduate program directors.
  • Once admitted to the linked program, students must maintain a 3.0 GPA or above throughout the program. Undergraduate students who fail to maintain a 3.0 GPA may revert to the regular BSPH program and count up to 12 hours of completed graduate coursework toward the undergraduate degree.

COMMUNITY HEALTH PROFESSIONS Courses

CHP 200. Principles of Public Health. 3 Credits.

Overview of the principles and practices of public health in the world. What is public health? What are its origins, evolution, and how is it structured and administered globally? A discussion of the mission, concepts, principles and practices of population-based public health will predominate. Topics will include global health and environmental health. Cross-listed with PUBH 200.

CHP 318. Principles of Nutrition. 3 Credits.

Course designed especially for those entering the health education or health care field, covering the physiology of each of the major body systems as a basis for understanding those aspects of its function that reflect the importance of various nutrients. Prerequisites: CHEM 105N-CHEM 106N or CHEM 121N-CHEM 122N and CHEM 123N-CHEM 124N; BIOL 240, BIOL 241, BIOL 250 or BIOL 251 or permission of the instructor.

CHP 328. Public Health Science. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to expand knowledge of the core functions of public health: biostatistics, environmental sciences, epidemiology, health policy and management sciences, and social and behavioral sciences. Prerequisites: CHP 200 and a declared major in the BSHS Health Services Administration program or the BS in Public Health or approval of the program director.

CHP 335. Population Health. 3 Credits.

This course provides a population-based approach to professional work in disease management, chronic care management and politics, in addition to students studying public health, health policy, quality and patient safety, health care administration, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, social work and other related clinical professions. Prerequisites: CHP 200 and a declared major in the BSHS Health Services Administration program or the BS in Public Health or approval of the program director.

CHP 360. Introduction to Global Health. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to health-care delivery systems of nonWestern countries, specifically developing countries. The various factors that influence health-care planning and delivery of health services are addressed. Prerequisite: CHP 200.

CHP 369. Practicum in Health Sciences. 1-3 Credits.

This course is intended for the student in the College of Health Sciences seeking a CAP experience. Prerequisites: junior standing and approval of the Health Sciences Advisor and the Career Development Services.

CHP 390. The U.S. Healthcare Delivery System. 3 Credits.

The uniqueness of the U.S. healthcare delivery system will be explored in terms of a systems framework and its complexity. The basic characteristics that differentiate the U.S. healthcare delivery system from that of other countries will be presented. An understanding of the U.S. health care system has specific implications for health services managers. Prerequisites: CHP 200 and a declared major in the BSHS Health Services Administration program or the BS in Public Health or approval of the program director.

CHP 395. Topics in Health. 1-3 Credits.

Study of selected topics. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

CHP 400/500. Ethics in Health Administration. 3 Credits.

A survey of philosophical problems common to health sciences, including an analysis of the nature of health in its historical and contemporary contexts. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

CHP 415W/515. Critical Issues in Public/Community Health Administration. 3 Credits.

Identification and analyses of critical issues currently facing public/community health and the American health care system. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C with a grade of C or better and a declared major in Health Sciences-Health Services Administration or BS Public Health or approval of the program director.

CHP 420/520. Foundations of Gerontology. 3 Credits.

Focuses on changes in the characteristics, status, and roles of the elderly; personality development, mental health, and adjustment of individuals with emphasis on biophysical and psychosocial processes as they influence capacity and performance in the elderly. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CHP 425/525. Health Aspects of Aging. 3 Credits.

Identifies major issues and problems in meeting health care needs of the aged. Emphasis on role of social assets and supports in determining effects of life changes on the aging process. Prerequisite: CHP 420/CHP 520 or permission of the instructor.

CHP 430W/530. Community Health Resources and Health Promotion. 3 Credits.

Designed to provide information about community health resources. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C with a grade of C or better and a declared major in Health Sciences-Health Services Administration or BS Public Health or approval of the program director.

CHP 440/540. Finance and Budgeting in Healthcare. 3 Credits.

This course covers financial management functions in healthcare organizations including operating and capital budgeting processes along with budgeting and financial controls. Prerequisites: junior standing and a declared major in the BSHS Health Services Administration program or the BS in Public Health or approval of the program director.

CHP 445/545. Health Services Research Methods. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on health services research and its assessment abilities and application in health care. Topics include the use of EXCEL, SAS, and SPSS to analyze data. An exploration of the issues and challenges of health services research for health related organizations and other organizations. Statistical procedures and practices will also be conducted. Prerequisite: STAT 130M.

CHP 450/550. Public and Community Health Administration. 3 Credits.

A review of the principles and practice of administering public and community health organizations and programs at federal, state, and local levels. Constitutional, statutory and administrative bases for organizing and conducting public/community health programs will be discussed. CHP 400, CHP 415W or CHP 430W, and CHP 450 meet the oral communication requirement in the major. All three courses must be taken to meet the requirement. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CHP 456/556. Substance Use and Abuse. 3 Credits.

Focuses on facts about drugs and drug abuse, on value judgments concerning drugs, and on interaction of facts and value judgments. Emphasis is on drug abuse prevention. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CHP 461/561. Managerial Epidemiology. 3 Credits.

This course will blend theory and application of epidemiology. This course will also provide a comprehensive introduction to epidemiology and explain how to use epidemiological concepts and tools to improve decisions about the management of health services. Prerequisites: CHP 200 and a declared major in the BSHS Health Services Administration program or the BS in Public Health or approval of the program director.

CHP 465/565. Policy and Politics of Health. 3 Credits.

This course will explore both health policy and the politics of health. Students will develop an understanding of the systematic and analytical framework for developing health and health care policy issues. Prerequisite: junior standing.

CHP 468. Internship. 1-3 Credits.

The internship will allow a person new to the health administration field to complete a capstone internship to gain entry skills for a beginning career pathway in health services administration. The course is intended to provide cumulative experience and assimilation of all the theoretical aspects learned in the coursework in a practical/work setting. Internship is the last course in the program coursework. A minimum of 200 hours is required. Prerequisites: CHP 415W or CHP 430W, CHP 440, CHP 445, CHP 450, CHP 461, and CHP 480.

CHP 470/570. Death, Dying and Survivorship. 3 Credits.

Utilizes readings from sociology, psychology, literature, art, law, religion, and the medical and nursing sciences to explore death in its personal, cultural and professional significance. Audiovisual presentations and guest speakers will provoke thought and discussion to allow students to come to terms with their attitudes toward death and assist others in dealing with this important life experience. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CHP 475/575. Healthcare Marketing. 3 Credits.

This course provides a basic understanding of marketing in a health care setting. It will cover the following: the history of marketing in a health care setting, health care markets, marketing techniques, and leadership skills in managing and supporting the marketing efforts. Prerequisites: a declared major in the University or approval of the program director.

CHP 480/580. Health Ethics and the Law. 3 Credits.

This course provides the students with a basic knowledge of health law and examines legal issues confronting health services administrators in various health care environments. Prerequisites: a declared major in the University or approval of the program director.

CHP 485/585. Health Informatics. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on healthcare informatics (information systems) and applications in health care organizations. It provides an overview of health information system concepts, management, and integration of technology in healthcare organizations. Prerequisites: junior standing and a declared major in the University or approval of the program director.

CHP 495/595. Topics in Public/Community Health Administration. 1-3 Credits.

This course provides the opportunity for the study of selected topics in public/community health, including informatics, under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

CHP 496/596. Topics in Public/Community Health Administration. 1-3 Credits.

This course provides the opportunity for the study of selected topics in public/community health, including informatics, under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

CHP 497/597. Readings in Public/Community Health Administration. 1-3 Credits.

This course provides the opportunity for advanced investigations of selected issues/concerns in public/community health administration, under the supervision of a faculty member. It must be taken by students who wish to pursue topics not covered by regularly scheduled courses. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH Courses

ENVH 301. Principles of Environmental Health Science. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the chemical, physical and biological factors affecting human health and well-being. The emphasis is on application of controls to prevent disease and maximize environmental quality. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C.

ENVH 395. Topics in Environmental Health. 1-3 Credits.

Advanced study of selected topics. Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.

ENVH 401/501. Occupational Health. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the industrial environment relative to health problems and the etiologically related agents. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 402W/502. Environmental and Occupational Health Administration and Law. 3 Credits.

A review of the concepts and practice of administering environmental and occupational health control programs within agencies at the federal, state and local levels. The principles of administration and leadership of programs in the private sector are also discussed. The constitutional, statutory and administrative law bases for organizing and conducting such programs and developing environmental and occupational policies as well as the legal implications of enforcement will be addressed. A review of all major statutes and their agencies that enforce them will be addressed. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: junior standing and a grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ENVH 403. Environmental and Occupational Health Internship I. 3 Credits.

Includes placement in a health-related facility or industrial setting, prearranged with faculty instructor. Prerequisites: ENVH 301 and permission of program director.

ENVH 404. Environmental Health Internship II. 3 Credits.

Includes placement in a health-related facility or industrial setting, prearranged with faculty instructor. Prerequisites: ENVH 301 and permission of program director.

ENVH 405. Environmental Health Internship III. 6 Credits.

Includes placement in a health-related facility or industrial setting, prearranged with faculty instructor. Prerequisites: ENVH 301 and permission of program director.

ENVH 406/506. Principles of Occupational Safety and Health. 3 Credits.

A broad overview of the field of safety. A study of the factors influencing the occurrence of accidents and incidents is set in the context of safety legislation, current issues in the practice of safety and the ethical and professional responsibilities of the safety practitioner. The course also includes discussions of product safety, fire prevention and protection systems safety and human elements in loss prevention. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 407/507. Occupational Safety Standards, Laws and Regulations. 3 Credits.

A review of the important Occupational Safety and Health Standards and Codes with particular emphasis on application of these codes to typical work situations. Governmental enforcement methodologies are also discussed. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 420/520. Communicable Diseases. 3 Credits.

An in-depth study of the communicable disease processes as they pertain to environmental sources. A detailed discussion of specific communicable diseases that are manifested by various environmental etiologic agents. Various environmental control measures to prevent the incidence of communicable diseases are presented. Prerequisites: BIOL 110N or BIOL 121N, BIOL 117N or BIOL 123N, BIOL 103 or permission of the instructor.

ENVH 421/521. Food Safety. 3 Credits.

A comprehensive study of food and milk production, processing and preservation and controls exercised for the prevention of foodborne illnesses and spoilage. Prerequisites: BIOL 110N or BIOL 121N, BIOL 117N or BIOL 123N, BIOL 103, or permission of instructor.

ENVH 422/522. Water and Wastewater Technology. 3 Credits.

Introduction to water quality management and wastewater treatment technology. Topics include the effect of organic, inorganic and thermal pollutants in water quality streams, waterborne diseases, monitoring concepts, methods of water quality management, regulatory considerations, theory and application of wastewater treatment concepts, wastewater characterization, and treatment methods and disposal methods. Prerequisite: BIOL 103 or permission of instructor.

ENVH 423/523. Vector-Borne Diseases and Their Control. 3 Credits.

Vector-borne diseases affect the health and well-being of humans and other animals in a wide variety of ways. Arthropod vectors (e.g., mosquitoes, filth flies, ticks and related groups) transmit numerous debilitating infectious diseases that oftentimes impose significant burden on healthcare systems. This course provides insight on the ways in which arthropods impact global health and economic growth through the diseases they transmit. Prerequisite: BIOL 110N or BIOL 121N, BIOL 117N or BIOL 123N, BIOL 103, or permission of instructor.

ENVH 424/524. Residential and Institutional Environments. 3 Credits.

A study of the physical aspects of housing and institutions as they relate to human health and well-being. Coverage is also given to infection control in health-care facilities. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 425/525. Occupational Safety and Health Program Management. 3 Credits.

The establishment, implementation and maintenance of occupational safety and health programs. Paradigms of safety, techniques for safety training and creation of value for safety among business managers and employees are emphasized. Prerequisite: ENVH 406 or permission of instructor.

ENVH 426/526. Physical Hazards and Their Control. 3 Credits.

An in-depth examination of the varied types of physical hazards in the work environment and the methods of prevention, recognition and control. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 438/538. Environmental Emergencies and Disasters. 3 Credits.

This course uses a multi-disciplinary approach and draws on theory, case studies, research, and field experience to examine the global problem of environmental emergencies and disasters. Particular attention is devoted to the public health challenges posed by chemical and radiological contamination situations. Students discuss contemporary issues and controversies, and spend time working in teams to craft solutions to key emergency preparedness problems. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

ENVH 440/540. Principles of Ergonomics. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the terminology, concepts and applications of physiology, anthropometry, biomechanics and engineering to workplace and work methods design. Emphasis will be given to workplace design and work methods for job safety and health. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 441/541. Industrial Hygiene. 3 Credits.

An in-depth study of the chemical and physical agents responsible for occupational illness and the methods used for their measurement, evaluation and control. Prerequisite: CHEM 121N, CHEM 123N, CHEM 211, BIOL 240 or BIOL 250, or permission of instructor.

ENVH 442/542. Industrial Hygiene Sampling Methods. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the detection and sampling alternatives used for estimating worker exposure to hazardous chemical, physical and biological agents in the occupational environment. Field and class activities are intended to simulate select occupational exposure situations and provide a basis for selection of the best evaluation techniques. Emphasis is on quantitative and qualitative methods typically used when estimating employee exposure to hazardous agents and the subjective decision making process. Pre- or corequisite: ENVH 441 or permission of instructor.

ENVH 443. Principles of Toxicology. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the fundamentals of toxicology with emphasis on the interaction of environmental and industrial chemicals with humans are studied. Exposure, dose response, kinetics and distribution of toxicants, metabolism of toxic agents, factors that affect toxicity and introductory chemical carcinogenesis are discussed. Prerequisites: BIOL 110N or BIOL 121N, BIOL 117N or BIOL 123N, BIOL 240 or BIOL 250, CHEM 121N, CHEM 123N, or permission of the instructor.

ENVH 445/545. Air Pollution and Its Control. 3 Credits.

The study of air pollution in relation to air quality criteria, pollutant production, atmospheric evolution, measurement and control techniques. Prerequisites: PHYS 101N or PHYS 111N, CHEM 121N, CHEM 123N, MATH 162M, or permission of instructor.

ENVH 446/546. Physical Hazards Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Use and application of sampling methods and equipment for measurement of physical hazards in the work environment. Includes aspects such as ergonomics, noise, vibration and radiation. Pre- or corequisite: ENVH 426 or permission of instructor.

ENVH 448/548. Epidemiology and Biostatistics. 3 Credits.

An introductory course in the principles and practices of epidemiology and the application of statistical and mathematical design and analysis of health research studies for the understanding and control of population health and disease with emphasis on environmental applications. Prerequisite: STAT 130M, MATH 162M or permission of instructor.

ENVH 461/561. Hazardous Waste Management. 3 Credits.

Description of the hazardous waste problem, the fundamentals of the chemistry involved with hazardous waste transport, methods of identification, assessment, control, and disposal of toxic and hazardous waste are discussed. In addition the relevant legal statutes, risk assessment emergency response and case studies are presented. Introduction to the toxicological effects of exposure to hazardous waste is discussed. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 465/565. Hazardous Materials Management. 3 Credits.

The management of hazardous materials includes a wide array of interlocking regulations addressing use, manufacturing, exposure, storage, shipping and disposal. A life cycle review of hazardous materials highlighting best practices and legislation is presented. Useful in preparation for CHMM examination. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 466. Environmental and Occupational Risk Assessment and Decision Analysis. 3 Credits.

The principles of quantitative health risk assessment of toxicants are presented. Qualitative and quantitative skills necessary to evaluate the probability of injury, disease, or death in the general population from exposure to environmental and occupational contaminants are discussed. Hazardous identification, exposure assessment, dose-response evaluation and risk characterization are emphasized. Risk management group projects assessing some real environmental risks are an important segment of the class. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 470/570. Industrial Environmental Management. 3 Credits.

Course addresses day-to-day technical and management aspects of environmental compliance, as well as regulatory issues faced in industrial applications. Includes audits and inspections, air and water pollution and hazardous waste. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 495/595. Topics in Environmental Health. 1-3 Credits.

Advanced study of selected topics. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 498/598. Independent Study in Environmental Health. 1-3 Credits.

An opportunity is afforded students to undertake independent study under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisites: permission of the Program Director.

ENVH 499. Environmental and Occupational Health Senior Seminar. 1 Credit.

Advanced seminar. Prerequisites: second semester senior standing and permission of the program director.

PUBLIC HEALTH Courses

PUBH 200. Principles of Public Health. 3 Credits.

Overview of the principles and practices of public health in the world. What is public health? What are its origins, evolution, and how is it structured and administered globally? A discussion of the mission, concepts, principles and practices of population-based public health will predominate. Topics will include global health and environmental health. Cross-listed with CHP 200.

PUBH 301. Principles of Environmental Health. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the chemical, physical and biological factors affecting human health and well-being. The emphasis is on application of controls to prevent disease and maximize environmental quality. Cross-listed with ENVH 301. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C.

PUBH 318. Principles of Nutrition. 3 Credits.

Course designed especially for those entering the health education or health care field, covering the physiology of each of the major body systems as a basis for understanding those aspects of its function that reflect the importance of various nutrients. Cross-listed with CHP 318. Prerequisites: CHEM 105N-CHEM 106N or CHEM 121N-CHEM 122N and CHEM 123N-CHEM 124N; BIOL 240, BIOL 241, BIOL 250 or BIOL 251. a declared major in the University or approval of the program director.

PUBH 328. Public Health Science. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to expand knowledge of the core functions of public health: biostatistics, environmental sciences, epidemiology, health policy and management sciences, and social and behavioral sciences. Cross-listed with CHP 328. Prerequisites: A declared major in the University or approval of the program director.

PUBH 335. Population Health. 3 Credits.

This course provides a population-based approach to professional work in disease management, chronic care management and politics, in addition to students studying public health, health policy, quality and patient safety, health care administration, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, social work and other related clinical professions. Cross-listed with CHP 335. Prerequisites: A declared major in the University or approval of the program director.

PUBH 360. Introduction to Global Health. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to health-care delivery systems of nonWestern countries, specifically developing countries. The various factors that influence health-care planning and delivery of health services are addressed. Cross-listed with CHP 360. Prerequisites: A declared major in the University or approval of the program director.

PUBH 390. The U.S. Healthcare Delivery System. 3 Credits.

The uniqueness of the U.S. healthcare delivery system will be explored in terms of a systems framework and its complexity. The basic characteristics that differentiate the U.S. healthcare delivery system from that of other countries will be presented. An understanding of the U.S. health care system has specific implications for health services managers. Cross-listed with CHP 390. Prerequisites: A declared major in the University or approval of the program director.

PUBH 395. Topics in Public Health. 3 Credits.

Study of selected topics. Prerequisite: A declared major in the University or approval of the program director.

PUBH 400. Ethics in Public Health. 3 Credits.

A survey of philosophical problems common to health sciences, including an analysis of the nature of health in its historical and contemporary contexts. Cross-listed with CHP 400. Prerequisites: A declared major in the University or approval of the program director.

PUBH 403W. Social and Behavioral Aspects of Public Health. 3 Credits.

The course will emphasize the importance of social context and cultural construction, social and behavioral foundations of public health and examine current issues in health from a social and behavioral sciences perspective. The course uses a social ecological framework to address multilevel influences on health and enlarge the dominant "risk factor" approach to health behavior. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C with a C or better, CHP 328, CHP 335, and CHP 390.

PUBH 413W. Critical Issues in Public Health. 3 Credits.

Identification and analyses of critical issues currently facing public/community health and the American health care system. This is a writing intensive course. Cross-listed with CHP 415W. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C with a grade of C or better and a declared major in the University or approval of the program director.

PUBH 415. One Health-One Medicine. 3 Credits.

This course will teach students the applications of multidisciplinary competencies towards solving human health challenges. The course will identify all areas of global health issues that require human, veterinary and environmental applications for solutions. Prerequisites: junior standing and a declared major in the University or approval of the program director.

PUBH 421. Leadership in Public Health. 3 Credits.

The course will introduce students to the main theories of leadership in public health covering key concepts and strategies using the six levels of leadership framework. The course will explore how individual, team, organizational, community, professional and global leadership impact population and public health. Prerequisites: CHP 328, CHP 335 and CHP 390.

PUBH 422. Health, Culture and Diversity-Reducing Disparities in Public Health. 3 Credits.

The course will introduce students to the main theories of culture, health and diversity and examines what is meant by culture, the ways in which culture intersects with health issues, how public health efforts can benefit by understanding and working with cultural processes, and a brief selection of conceptual tools and research methods that are useful in identifying relationships between culture and health. The course will also include practical guidelines for incorporating cultural understanding in public health settings and examples of programs where that has occurred. Prerequisites: junior standing and a declared major in the University or approval of the program director.

PUBH 425. Health Aspects of Aging. 3 Credits.

Identifies major issues and problems in meeting health care needs of the aged. Emphasis on role of social assets and supports in determining effects of life changes on the aging process. Prerequisites: PUBH 328, PUBH 335, and PUBH 390.

PUBH 430W. Community Health Resources and Health Promotion. 3 Credits.

Designed to provide information about community health resources. This is a writing intensive course. Cross-listed with CHP 430W. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C with a grade of C or better and a declared major in the University or approval of the program director.

PUBH 441/541. Multi-Disciplinary Approaches to Suicide Prevention. 3 Credits.

Using readings from health sciences, public health, law and psychology, the course addresses multi-level influences on suicide and its prevention. Topics covered include suicide prevention-related ethical issues, terminology, attitudes and social norms, vulnerable populations, risk/protective factors, and public health approaches to prevention. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

PUBH 445. Health Services Research Methods. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on health services research and its assessment abilities and application in health care. Topics include the use of EXCEL, SAS, and SPSS to analyze data. An exploration of the issues and challenges of health services research for health related organizations and other organizations. Statistical procedures and practices will also be conducted. Cross-listed with CHP 445. Prerequisites: STAT 130M.

PUBH 448. Epidemiology and Biostatistics. 3 Credits.

An introductory course in the principles and practices of epidemiology and the application of statistical and mathematical design and analysis of health research studies for the understanding and control of population health and disease with emphasis on environmental applications. Cross-listed with ENVH 448. Prerequisites: STAT 130M, MATH 162M, and a declared major in the University or approval of the program director.

PUBH 450. Public and Community Health Administration. 3 Credits.

A review of the principles and practice of administering public and community health organizations and programs at federal, state, and local levels. Constitutional, statutory and administrative bases for organizing and conducting public/community health programs will be discussed. PUBH 400, PUBH 413W or PUBH 430W, and PUBH 450 meet the oral communication requirement in the major. All three courses must be taken to meet the requirement. Cross-listed with CHP 450. Prerequisites: A declared major in the University or approval of the program director.

PUBH 461. Managerial Epidemiology. 3 Credits.

This course will blend theory and application of epidemiology. This course will also provide a comprehensive introduction to epidemiology and explain how to use epidemiological concepts and tools to improve decisions about the management of health services. Cross-listed with CHP 461. Prerequisites: PUBH 328, PUBH 335, PUBH 390, and a declared major in the University or approval of the program director.

PUBH 468. Internship. 3 Credits.

The internship will allow a person new to the health administration field to complete a capstone internship to gain entry skills for a beginning career pathway in health services administration. The course is intended to provide cumulative experience and assimilation of all the theoretical aspects learned in the coursework in a practical/work setting. Internship is the last course in the program coursework. A minimum of 200 hours is required. Cross-listed with CHP 468. Prerequisites: PUBH 390, PUBH 403W, PUBH 413W or PUBH 430W, PUBH 445, and PUBH 461.

PUBH 475. Healthcare Marketing. 3 Credits.

This course provides a basic understanding of marketing in a health care setting. It will cover the following: the history of marketing in a health care setting, health care markets, marketing techniques, and leadership skills in managing and supporting the marketing efforts. Cross-listed with CHP 475. Prerequisite: a declared major in the University or approval of the program director.

PUBH 485. Public Health Informatics. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on healthcare informatics (information systems) and applications in health care organizations. It provides an overview of health information system concepts, management, and integration of technology in healthcare organizations. Cross-listed with CHP 485. Prerequisite: junior standing and a declared major in the University or approval of the program director.

PUBH 495. Topics in Public Health. 3 Credits.

This course provides the opportunity for the study of selected topics in public/community health, including informatics, under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisites: A declared major in the University or approval of the program director.