Sheri Reynolds, Chair
Kristi Costello, Associate Chair of Writing Studies (general education issues)

The Bachelor of Arts in English requires a minimum of 39 hours in English, in addition to English courses taken to satisfy General Education requirements: ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, and ENGL 112L or ENGL 114L.

Upon completion of ENGL 110C, intended majors should apply to the chief departmental advisor for English to declare the major. Once admitted to the program, students take four courses in the core, two literature electives, one open English elective, and six courses in the concentration. The concentration is one of six areas of emphasis (applied language studies, creative writing, journalism, literature, professional writing, teaching) within the overall Bachelor of Arts program and allows the student to pursue that area in depth. The applied language studies concentration is available both online and face-to-face.  Because requirements sometimes change, students should consult the latest course requirement lists available in the department office. All majors must take an English writing intensive (W) course and maintain a grade point average of 2.0 in the major to graduate (2.75 in the teaching concentration).

The department offers graduate degrees in applied linguistics, creative writing, and English. Please refer to the Graduate Catalog for more information.

Bachelor of Arts—English Major

Janis Smith, Chief Departmental Advisor

Lower-Division General Education

Written Communication *6
Oral Communication3
Select one of the following:
Public Speaking
Voice and Diction
Introduction to Interpersonal Communication
Acting One
Acting One
Mathematics3
Language and Culture **0-12
Information Literacy and Research3
Human Creativity3
Interpreting the Past3
Literature3
Philosophy and Ethics3
The Nature of Science8
Impact of Technology ***0-3
Human Behavior3

English Major Requirements

CORE COURSES (12 Hours)
ENGL 307TDigital Writing3
Theory & Analytics
Select two:6
Introduction to Rhetorical Studies
Introduction to Critical Theory
English Linguistics
Writing*
Select one:3
Introduction to Creative Writing
Advanced Composition
Technical Writing
Writing in the Disciplines
Required Literature and Cultural Studies Electives (6 hours)
Select two:6
Introduction to British Literature I
Introduction to British Literature II
Shakespeare's Histories and Comedies
Shakespeare's Tragedies and Poetry
The Short Story
American Drama
Southern Literature
American Literature to 1860
American Literature Since 1860
World Literature I
World Literature II
Chaucer's Canterbury Tales
English Renaissance Drama
Jewish Writers
The Harlem Renaissance
British Literature 1660-1800
The Romantic Movement in Britain
Origins and Early Development of the British Novel to 1800
Victorian Literature
The Twentieth-Century British Novel
American Travel Literature
The American Novel to 1920
The American Novel 1920 to Present
New Literatures in English
Poetry of the Early Twentieth Century
Women Writers
Native American Literature
African American Literature
Asian American Literature
Modern World Drama
Contemporary World Literature
Open English Elective
Select one additional English 300- or 400- level course3
Total Hours21

Concentration Courses (18 hours)

Select one of the following options:

Applied Language Studies

This concentration is available both online and face-to-face.

ENGL 350Aspects of the English Language3
ENGL 371WCommunication Across Cultures3
Select three of the following:9
TESL Methods, Materials, & Assessment
General Linguistics
English Grammar
Southern and African American English
History of the English Language
American English
Language, Gender and Power
Topics in English (linguistics-related independent study)
Select one additional course from the list above or select one approved elective at the 300 or 400 level; for example, Anthropology, World Languages (not World Cultural Studies).3
Total Hours18

Note: Applied Language Studies concentration students must take ENGL 370 in the Theory & Analytics portion of the core.

Creative Writing

ENGL 300WIntroduction to Creative Writing3
Select two of the following:6
Craft of Literary Nonfiction
The Craft of Fiction
The Craft of Poetry
Select two of the following:6
Fiction Workshop
Poetry Workshop
Advanced Fiction Workshop
Advanced Poetry Workshop
Creative Nonfiction
Select one W literature course not taken as literature elective for the major:3
Jewish Writers
New Literatures in English
Women Writers
Native American Literature
African American Literature
Asian American Literature
Total Hours18

Note: If ENGL 300W is taken in the core, an additional creative writing craft or workshop course will be required to meet the concentration requirement of six courses.

Journalism

ENGL 380Reporting and News Writing I3
ENGL 483WReporting and News Writing II3
ENGL 484Feature Story Writing3
ENGL 486Media Law and Ethics3
Select two of the following:6
Editing and Document Design
Public Journalism in the Digital Age
Writing Internship
Public Relations
Reporting News for Television and Digital Media
Digital Journalism
TV News Production
Creative Nonfiction
The Craft of Multimedia Journalism
Advanced Public Relations
Sports Journalism
Editorial and Persuasive Writing
Total Hours18

Literature (special requirements for the major)

Select one not taken to fulfill the literature elective for the major:3
Introduction to British Literature I
Introduction to British Literature II
Select one not taken to fulfill the literature elective for the major:3
American Drama
Southern Literature
American Literature to 1860
American Literature Since 1860
Select one at the 400 level in British literature from the following, or a class approved by the literature concentration coordinator:3
Chaucer's Canterbury Tales
English Renaissance Drama
British Literature 1660-1800
The Romantic Movement in Britain
Origins and Early Development of the British Novel to 1800
Victorian Literature
The Twentieth-Century British Novel
Select one at the 400 level in American literature from the following, or a class approved by the literature concentration coordinator:3
The Harlem Renaissance
American Travel Literature
The American Novel to 1920
The American Novel 1920 to Present
Select one focus class from the following:3
Jewish Writers
New Literatures in English
Women Writers
Native American Literature
African American Literature
Asian American Literature
Select one additional 400-level literature elective.3
Total Hours18

Notes:

  1. Literature concentration students must take ENGL 333 in the Theory & Analytics portion of the core.

  2. Literature concentration students must take one British literature class from ENGL 301 or ENGL 302 and one American literature course from ENGL 340, ENGL 342, ENGL 345, or ENGL 346 to fulfill the Literature and Cultural Studies elective for the major.

  3. Literature concentration students must take a Shakespeare course, ENGL 303 or ENGL 304, as one of their electives for the major.

Professional Writing

ENGL 334WTechnical Writing3
ENGL 435WManagement Writing3
Select four of the following not taken in the core:12
Introduction to Rhetorical Studies
Advanced Composition
Client-Based Research Writing
Writing Internship
Public Relations
Writing in the Disciplines
Writing in Digital Spaces
Advanced Writing Internship
Writing with Video
Advanced Public Relations
Topics in English *
Total Hours18

Elective Credit

Elective credit will be needed to meet the minimum requirement of 120 credit hours.

Teaching

(See below, Bachelor of Arts—English Major with Teaching Licensure in English)

Upper-Division General Education

  • Option A. Approved Minor, 12-24 hours; also second degree or second major

  • Option B. Interdisciplinary Minor, 12 hours specified by the department, 3 of which may be in the major area of study

  • Option C. International business and regional courses or an approved certification program, such as teaching licensure

  • Option D. Two Upper-Division Courses from outside the College of Arts and Letters or from the Social Science Component within the College of Arts and Letters that are not required by the major (6 hours).

Requirements for Graduation

Requirements for graduation include a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 overall and in the major, 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours of upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, and completion of Senior Assessment.

Four-Year Plan - English - BA

This is a suggested curriculum plan to complete this degree program in four years.  Please consult information in this Catalog, Degree Works, and your academic advisor for more specific information on course requirements for this degree.

Bachelor of Arts—English Major with Teaching Licensure in English

This program leads to eligibility for teacher licensure in Virginia. Licensure in English prepares students for a full range of secondary school teaching assignments. The program is accredited by the State of Virginia; in addition, Virginia has licensure reciprocity agreements with thirty other states, should the student leave Virginia.

The program combines the usual requirements of a college major and minor. Students take courses in the English department (ENGL) of the College of Arts and Letters and the Teaching and Learning department and Communication Disorders and Special Education department of the Darden College of Education and Professional Studies. Students receive a Bachelor of Arts in English.

Admission

All students must apply for and be admitted into the approved English teacher preparation program. Students must meet the required criteria for admission by passing the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments and earn the minimum required grade point averages (GPA).

Prescribed Virginia Board of Education Assessment for Admission to an Approved Teacher Education Program

Old Dominion University students seeking admission to an approved teacher education program must have submitted Praxis Core or approved alternative test of mathematics, reading, and writing (SAT or ACT).

For the most current information on the prescribed Virginia Board of Education admission assessment, visit the Office of Clinical Experiences website, http://www.odu.edu/oce and review the Professional Education Handbook.

Required grade point averages (GPA):

  • A cumulative GPA of 2.75 is required.

  • A major/content GPA of 2.75 is required – all upper-division English courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher. Lower-division and English W courses must be passed with a grade of C or higher.

  • A professional education GPA of 2.75 is required – all professional education courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Although students may enroll in a limited number of education courses, students must be admitted into the approved English teacher preparation program prior to enrolling in any instructional strategies practicum education course. Students must also meet with an education advisor in the Career and Advising Resource Center in the Darden College of Education and Professional Studies (1107 Education Building).

Continuance

Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.75, a major/content GPA of 2.75 and a professional education GPA of 2.75. All upper-division English courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher. The remaining courses required for the major and in the professional education core must be completed with a grade of C- or higher. A professional education GPA of 2.75 is required for continuance. Students must take and pass the Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) and the Praxis Subject Assessment, English Language Arts content knowledge (formerly Praxis II) prior to or while enrolled in the instructional strategies course. All assessments must be passed prior to the start of the Teacher Candidate Internship Orientation session. Students are encouraged to obtain information regarding the recommended timeline to complete the required assessments from the Office of Clinical Experiences website at www.odu.edu/oce.

Background Clearance Requirement

Old Dominion University requires a background clearance check of candidates interested in many of the professional education programs.  Professional education programs have several field experiences that are required for continuance and graduation from the program.  The background clearance must be successfully completed prior to a field experience placement. Candidates will be provided a field experience placement when the background check process is completed with resolution of any issues. The process to complete the ODU clearance background check is located at: http://www.odu.edu/success/academic/teacher-education/placement/background-checks.  The ODU clearance process includes:  an FBI fingerprint, a child protective service/social service review, and a Virginia State Police sex offender registry review. Candidates interested in the professional education programs are advised to complete this clearance process immediately upon entry into the program since the clearance process takes a minimum of eight weeks to complete.

Virginia Board of Education Prescribed Assessments for Licensure

  • Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) – a passing composite score of 470 is required on this reading and writing assessment.

  • Praxis Subject Assessment, English Language Arts content knowledge (test code #5038)--passing score of 167 required.

To review more information on the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments, visit the Office of Clinical Experiences website, www.odu.edu/oce.

Graduation

Requirements for graduation include completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better; completion of the Senior Assessment; a minimum cumulative 2.75 GPA in the major area and in the professional education core with no grade less than a C- in the major/content and the professional education core; successful completion of the Teacher Candidate Internship, and between 120-132 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours of upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University.

Due to changing University requirements, national accreditation standards, and the Virginia Board of Education licensure regulations, the teacher education programs in the College of Arts and Letters are under constant revision. Any changes resulting from these factors supersede the program requirements described in this Catalog. Students are encouraged to obtain current program information from their advisors and from the Office of Clinical Experiences website at www.odu.edu/oce.

Course requirements are as follows:

Lower-Division General Education

See list under Bachelor of Arts in English above.

Major Requirements

CORE COURSES (12 hours)
ENGL 307TDigital Writing3
ENGL 327WAdvanced Composition *3
ENGL 333Introduction to Critical Theory3
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to Rhetorical Studies
English Linguistics
Required Literature Electives (9 hours)
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to British Literature I
Shakespeare's Histories and Comedies
Shakespeare's Tragedies and Poetry
Select one of the following:3
World Literature I
World Literature II
Contemporary World Literature
Select one of the following:3
Jewish Writers
New Literatures in English
Women Writers
Native American Literature
African American Literature
Asian American Literature
Teaching Concentration Required Courses (18 hours):
ENGL 302Introduction to British Literature II3
ENGL 345American Literature to 18603
ENGL 346American Literature Since 18603
ENGL 350Aspects of the English Language3
ENGL 406The Teaching of Literature3
ENGL 455The Teaching of Composition, Grades 6-123
Professional Education Courses (33 hours)
TLED 301Foundations and Introduction to Assessment of Education3
TLED 360Classroom Management and Discipline2
TLED 408Reading and Writing in Content Areas3
TLED 430WPK-12 Instructional Technology3
TLED 451Developing Instructional Strategies for Teaching in the Middle/High School: English3
TLED 483Seminar in Teacher Education1
TLED 485Teacher Candidate Internship12
SPED 313Fundamentals of Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence3
SPED 406Students with Diverse Learning Needs in the General Education Classroom3
Total Hours72

*Grade of C or better required

Upper-Division General Education

Satisfied through professional education sequence.

Four-Year Plan - English - Teaching Licensure - BA

This is a suggested curriculum plan to complete this degree program in four years.  Please consult information in this Catalog, Degree Works, and your academic advisor for more specific information on course requirements for this degree.

Bachelor of Science Degree in Interdisciplinary Studies-Professional Writing Major

Please refer to the Interdisciplinary Studies section of this Catalog for information on the IDS professional writing program.

Professional Writing Certificate

This certificate requires 12 hours of professional writing courses from the following courses:

Select four of the following:12
Digital Writing
Introduction to Rhetorical Studies
Advanced Composition
Technical Writing
Client-Based Research Writing
Writing Internship
Public Relations
Writing in the Disciplines
Management Writing
Writing in Digital Spaces
Advanced Writing Internship
Writing with Video
Advanced Public Relations
Total Hours12

For completion of the certificate, students must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses specified as a requirement for the certificate and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses required for the certificate through courses offered by Old Dominion University. To apply for the certificate, contact the coordinator of professional writing.

Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) Certificate

The Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) certificate provides candidates with specialized knowledge of English language fundamentals and emphasizes the relationship between language and culture, communication across cultures, and how to approach the teaching and assessment of English as a second language (ESL). It is designed for candidates who are pursuing or who hold a teaching license and wish to prepare for adding an ESL endorsement to it or who wish to teach English abroad, work for private businesses and schools, or teach ESL to immigrant populations in the USA. In such contexts, candidates will benefit from a solid knowledge of language fundamentals coupled with cross-cultural communication and practical pedagogical training.

The TESL certificate is available to undergraduate students and non-degree seeking professionals who meet the requirements. It can be completed in two modalities: online and face-to-face.

This certificate requires 12 credit hours of coursework from the following courses:

ENGL 350Aspects of the English Language3
or ENGL 442 English Grammar
ENGL 370English Linguistics3
or ENGL 440 General Linguistics
ENGL 371WCommunication Across Cultures3
ENGL 390TESL Methods, Materials, & Assessment3
Total Hours12

For completion of the certificate, students must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses specified as a requirement for the certificate and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses required for the certificate through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Course requirements are as follows.

To apply for the certificate, contact the coordinator of Applied Language Studies.

Minor in English

The English minor consists of 15 hours of 300- and 400-level courses, three hours of which must be at the 400 level. A general minor and five minors in concentration areas are offered, with the general minor and some concentrations also available online.  Regardless of emphasis or delivery method, the curriculum is still called a minor in English.

English: 15 hours selected from 300 and 400-level English courses.
Creative Writing: 15 hours selected from the following:15
Introduction to Creative Writing
Fiction Workshop
Poetry Workshop
Craft of Literary Nonfiction
Advanced Fiction Workshop
Advanced Poetry Workshop
Creative Nonfiction
The Craft of Fiction
The Craft of Poetry
Total Hours15
Journalism: 15 hours selected from the following:15
Editing and Document Design
Public Journalism in the Digital Age
Writing Internship
Reporting and News Writing I
Public Relations
Reporting News for Television and Digital Media
Digital Journalism
Creative Nonfiction
Advanced Public Relations
Sports Journalism
Reporting and News Writing II
Feature Story Writing
Editorial and Persuasive Writing
Media Law and Ethics
Total Hours15
Applied Language Studies: 15 hours selected from the following:15
Aspects of the English Language
English Linguistics
Communication Across Cultures
TESL Methods, Materials, & Assessment
General Linguistics
English Grammar
Southern and African American English
History of the English Language
American English
Language, Gender and Power
Total Hours15
Literature: 15 hours selected from the following:15
Introduction to British Literature I
Introduction to British Literature II
Shakespeare's Histories and Comedies
Shakespeare's Tragedies and Poetry
Introduction to Critical Theory
The Short Story
American Drama
Southern Literature
American Literature to 1860
American Literature Since 1860
The Contemporary American Novel
World Literature I
World Literature II
Chaucer's Canterbury Tales
English Renaissance Drama
Jewish Writers
British Literature 1660-1800
The Romantic Movement in Britain
Origins and Early Development of the British Novel to 1800
Victorian Literature
The Twentieth-Century British Novel
The American Novel to 1920
The American Novel 1920 to Present
New Literatures in English
Poetry of the Early Twentieth Century
Women Writers
African American Literature
Asian American Literature
Modern World Drama
Contemporary World Literature
Total Hours15
Professional Writing: 15 hours selected from the following:15
Digital Writing
Introduction to Rhetorical Studies
Advanced Composition
Technical Writing
Client-Based Research Writing
Writing Internship
Public Relations
Writing in the Disciplines
Management Writing
Writing in Digital Spaces
Writing with Video
Advanced Public Relations
Feature Story Writing
Total Hours15

For completion of a minor, a student must have a minimum grade point average of 2.00 in all courses specified as a requirement for the minor exclusive of lower-level courses and prerequisite courses and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Advising

To declare an English major or minor, students must see the English departmental advisor (CDA). The CDA will assign each major to a faculty advisor. Students in the Secondary Education Endorsement Program will also have an advisor in the Darden College of Education and Professional Studies. All English majors are required to have a conference with their advisors before each semester (preferably during preregistration). The CDA will hold periodic group meetings with English majors to keep them fully informed.

Research Practicum

Students who wish to combine research and real-world experience can take ENGL 369 Research Practicum.

ENGLISH Courses

ENGL 101. Composition Studio. 3 Credits.

This course is an immersive study of writing, rhetoric, and composing concepts and strategies designed to extend the ENGL 110C curriculum. The course provides additional instruction, guided practice, and support as writers learn to successfully compose and revise in multiple genres for multiple purposes and audiences and navigate university literacy expectations. Corequisite: ENGL 110C. Prerequisites: A score of 1 on the WSPT or an override from an academic advisor.

ENGL 110C. English Composition. 3 Credits.

The principal objective of the course is to prepare students to be effective writers of the kinds of compositions they will be called on to produce during their college careers. By the end of the course, students should be more mature in their understanding and use of language, should develop efficient writing processes, and should know and demonstrate the qualities of effective composition in a given rhetorical situation. Prerequisites: A passing grade on the Writing Success Placement Tool (WSPT).

ENGL 112L. Introduction to Literature. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to a broad range of literary forms, including poetry, fiction and drama, exposing students to a diverse range of writers across race, gender, sexuality, nationality, and time periods. As students engage with the readings, they will develop skills in literary interpretation, analysis and critical evaluation.

ENGL 114L. American Writers, American Experiences. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the diversity of American culture as depicted in American literature. Readings expose students to a diverse range of writers across race, gender, sexuality, and time periods. As students engage with the readings, they will develop skills in literary interpretation, analysis and critical evaluation.

ENGL 126C. Honors: English Composition. 3 Credits.

Special honors sections of ENGL 110C. Prerequisites: A passing score on the Writing Success Placement Tool (WSPT).

ENGL 127L. Honors: Introduction to Literature. 3 Credits.

Open only to students in the Honors College. A special honors section of ENGL 112L.

ENGL 200. Introduction to English Studies. 1 Credit.

A preview of the subject areas of an English major (literature, linguistics, creative writing, journalism, professional writing, rhetoric, teaching) with attention to the student's curricular and career planning. Required of English majors. Open to anyone interested in English.

ENGL 211C. Introduction to Academic Writing. 3 Credits.

This course emphasizes critical reading, thinking, and writing. Students are introduced to principles of analysis and argumentation and taught the requisite skills that will allow them properly to paraphrase, summarize, and synthesize research in the common modes of academic writing. The course culminates in the preparation of a fully-documented research paper. A student with credit for ENGL 111C, ENGL 221C, or ENGL 231C cannot receive credit for ENGL 211C. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C with a grade of C or higher.

ENGL 221C. Introduction to Writing in Business, Education and Social Sciences. 3 Credits.

This course emphasizes critical reading, thinking, and writing as they apply to business, education, and the social sciences. Students are introduced to principles of analysis and argumentation and taught the requisite skills that will allow them to properly paraphrase, summarize, and synthesize research as it applies to and is most commonly found in business, education, and the social sciences. The course culminates in the preparation of a fully-documented research paper. A student with credit for ENGL 111C, ENGL 211C, or ENGL 231C cannot receive credit for ENGL 221C. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C.

ENGL 231C. Introduction to Technical Writing. 3 Credits.

This course emphasizes critical reading, thinking, and writing as they apply to the technical and scientific disciplines. Students are introduced to principles of analysis and argumentation and taught the requisite skills that will allow them properly to paraphrase, summarize, and synthesize research as it applies to and is most commonly found in the technical and scientific communities. The course culminates in the preparation of a fully-documented research paper. A student with credit for ENGL 131C, ENGL 211C, or ENGL 221C cannot receive credit for ENGL 231C. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C.

ENGL 295. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors or for elective credit within a major. Prerequisite: ENGL 110C with a grade of C or better.

ENGL 300W. Introduction to Creative Writing. 3 Credits.

A creative writing workshop course combining individual conferences with the instructor and class discussion of student writing. Students will work in fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 301. Introduction to British Literature I. 3 Credits.

A survey of British literature from the beginning of textual records until 1780, focusing on the development of different literary forms in their social and cultural contexts. Prerequisites: Literature way of knowing requirement and 6-hour General Education composition requirement or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 302. Introduction to British Literature II. 3 Credits.

A survey of British literature after 1780, focusing on the development of different literary forms in their social and cultural contexts. Prerequisites: Literature way of knowing requirement and 6-hour General Education composition requirement or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 303. Shakespeare's Histories and Comedies. 3 Credits.

An exploration of Shakespearean comedy and historical drama, through plays such as, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, As You Like It, Measure for Measure, and The Tempest for the former; Richard II, Henry IV, and Richard III for the latter. Prerequisites: Literature way of knowing requirement and 6-hour General Education composition requirement or permission of instructor.

ENGL 304. Shakespeare's Tragedies and Poetry. 3 Credits.

A study of Shakespearean poetry and tragedy through the longer poems and the sonnets for the former, and through plays such as Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, and Antony and Cleopatra for the latter. Prerequisites: Literature way of knowing requirement, 6-hour General Education composition requirement, or permission of instructor.

ENGL 307T. Digital Writing. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to issues of writing in various digital environments like web pages, email, blogs, wikis, and discussion boards. It also introduces fundamentals of hypertext authoring, digital and visual rhetoric, and image manipulation. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 325. Introduction to Rhetorical Studies. 3 Credits.

Explores the nature and function of rhetoric and its contribution to the knowledge-making enterprises of English studies and other disciplines. Students will use that 'lens' to assess the effectiveness of their own language practices. Prerequisite: 6-hour General Education composition requirement.

ENGL 327W. Advanced Composition. 3 Credits.

This course emphasizes development of a mature, professional style in expository writing by study of the stylistic and analytical principles underlying effective prose writing. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and a grade of C or better in one of the following: ENGL 211C, ENGL 221C, or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 333. Introduction to Critical Theory. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to theories about the nature and value of literature and gives them experience in applying such theories to specific literary texts. Prerequisite: Lower-division General Education requirements in Literature (3 hours, under Ways of Knowing) and in Written Communication (6 hours), or permission of instructor.

ENGL 334W. Technical Writing. 3 Credits.

This course provides the student with a working knowledge of various types of technical communication, including the writing of proposals, instructions, and reports for both the specialist and the nonspecialist. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 335. Editing and Document Design. 3 Credits.

This course provides practical experience in copy editing and includes an analysis of technical formats used in journalism, business, industry, and government. It features hands-on lab work in document presentation, page layout, and design. Prerequisite: Six hours in English to include ENGL 334W or ENGL 380.

ENGL 336. The Short Story. 3 Credits.

A genre course on the art of the short story. Students will explore how the writers' careful selection of detail creates meanings that emerge through the characters, plot, setting, diction, point of view, and other elements of fiction. Prerequisites: Literature way of knowing requirement and 6-hour General Education composition requirement or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 338. Writing for Games. 3 Credits.

A genre course on the aesthetic considerations of writing for games. Students will explore how games translate traditional elements of storytelling such as character, conflict, voice, and plot into effective gameplay. This course will provide students with an opportunity to experiment with composing narratives for a variety of genres of games and game-related productions. It also provide students with practical experience composing game design documents and other industry-specific forms of writing. Prerequisite: six-hour General Education composition requirement or permission of instructor.

ENGL 340. American Drama. 3 Credits.

A study of American drama from its beginnings to the present day. The course includes plays from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with a generous selection from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Prerequisites: Literature way of knowing requirement and 6-hour General Education composition requirement or permission of instructor.

ENGL 342. Southern Literature. 3 Credits.

A survey of the literature of the American South from William Byrd to Ernest Gaines. Selected writings are studied not only for their literary value but also as expressions of evolving regional attitudes to be evaluated in terms of the mainstream of American culture. Prerequisites: Literature way of knowing requirement and 6-hour General Education composition requirement or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 345. American Literature to 1860. 3 Credits.

The course presents a survey of American literature from the beginning to the Civil War. Among the authors studied are Franklin, Bryant, Poe, Hawthorne, Emerson, Thoreau, and Melville. Prerequisites: Literature way of knowing requirement and 6-hour General Education composition requirement or permission of instructor.

ENGL 346. American Literature Since 1860. 3 Credits.

The course explores significant writers and literary movements, which might include naturalism, social realism, modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, post-war confessional poetry, the Civil Rights era, and postmodernism. Prerequisites: Literature way of knowing requirement and 6-hour General Education composition requirement or permission of instructor.

ENGL 349. The Contemporary American Novel. 3 Credits.

Reading and analysis of American novels published since 1945. Emphasis on contemporary themes and techniques. Prerequisites: Literature way of knowing requirement and 6-hour General Education composition requirement or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 350. Aspects of the English Language. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the grammar of mainstream English. Primary focus is on analyzing English sentences, including study of parts of speech, phrases, clauses, and sentence types. Prerequisites: Six credit hours of general education composition courses, junior standing or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 351. Fiction Workshop. 3 Credits.

Students write, criticize, discuss, and revise works of fiction. Prerequisites: ENGL 300W or permission of the instructor, based on writing samples submitted.

ENGL 352. Poetry Workshop. 3 Credits.

Students write, criticize, discuss, and revise poetry. Prerequisites: ENGL 300W or permission of the instructor, based on writing samples submitted.

ENGL 354. Client-Based Research Writing. 3 Credits.

This is a client-based research course that aims to provide students with workplace research experience. The primary objective is to teach students the rhetorical nature of conducting and reporting research in professional contexts for multiple audiences. Research methods such as surveys, interviews, and observations will be covered. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C.

ENGL 355. Game Design and Rhetoric. 3 Credits.

Using a number of methodologies privileged by English studies, this course will study the representative and rhetorical strategies through which computer game designers make meaning via their rhetorical choices. Multi-perspective in nature, it will also examine the discursive struggles that determine how players construct themselves as subjects in and against computer games via their rhetorical choices. This course will attempt to come to terms with the larger question of how scholars, through various forms of critical play, construct, categorize, and produce computer games as a subject of academic study. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ENGL 110C, and either ENGL 211C, ENGL 221C, or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 360. World Literature I. 3 Credits.

An introduction to selected major works in translation from the beginnings of world literature through the early seventeenth century. Works will be chosen that illustrate the relationship of literature to cultural tradition in different global regions. Prerequisites: Literature way of knowing requirement, 6-hour General Education composition requirement, or permission of instructor.

ENGL 363. World Literature II. 3 Credits.

An introduction to selected major works of literature in translation from the seventeenth century to the present day. Works from a variety of world cultures will be used to explore the interaction between literature and society in centuries of expanding global awareness. Prerequisites: Literature way of knowing requirement, 6-hour General Education composition requirement, or permission of instructor.

ENGL 366. Public Journalism in the Digital Age. 3 Credits.

This course exposes students to conventional and alternative approaches to reporting in public journalism. Students use a combination of conventional and alternative approaches as they research, interview and construct a story on a local community issue or concern. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C; ENGL 380 or ENGL 382 or COMM 260 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 367. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits.

Student participation for credit based on the academic relevance of the work experience, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and the Cooperative Education program prior to the semester in which the work experience is to take place. Prerequisites: Approval of the department and Career Development Services.

ENGL 368. Writing Internship. 1-3 Credits.

A structured work experience involving writing and/or editing. A paper, a portfolio of work done, and satisfactory evaluations by supervisor and cooperating faculty member are required. No more than two English internships (chosen among 368, 369, 468, or cooperative education courses of similar content) may be counted towards a degree. Prerequisites: 15 hours in English, with ENGL 327W or ENGL 334W recommended; permission of departmental internship coordinator.

ENGL 369. Research Practicum. 3 Credits.

This course enables students to combine traditional research in scholarship with real world applications. Can be repeated for credit. (Qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: ENGL 327W or ENGL 335, plus 15 hours in the major (with sufficient coursework in an involved emphasis) and approval by faculty practicum advisor.

ENGL 370. English Linguistics. 3 Credits.

A survey of topics in English linguistics. Topics include the sound system, the structure of words, the ways in which words and phrases form meaningful utterances, the structure of conversations, differences between spoken and written English, language acquisition by children, language variation, and language in its social context. Prerequisites: 6-hour general education composition requirement or permission of instructor.

ENGL 371W. Communication Across Cultures. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary examination of intercultural communication through film and readings in anthropology, linguistics, and world literature, this course will compare the values, beliefs, social structures and conventions of a number of cultures to those of the U.S. This course is part of the World Cultures interdisciplinary minor. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 380. Reporting and News Writing I. 3 Credits.

This class focuses on media literacy and on the role of media in society. Students learn and practice elements of news writing, including writing leads, organizing stories, reporting techniques, and interviewing. Story assignments come from handouts, press releases, press conferences, speeches, and public meetings. Some assignments are completed under simulated deadline pressure in the computer lab. Prerequisite: Six semester hours in English.

ENGL 381. Public Relations. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce the student to certain disciplines related to the public relations process. The emphasis is equally distributed between the handling of written materials and the dynamics of group relations, i.e., the publicist and the person or persons whom he or she is representing. The focus is distinguished from advertising by virtue of its emphasis upon public service, particularly the continued need for the free flow of information in the democratic process. Prerequisites: Six semester hours in English.

ENGL 382. Reporting News for Television and Digital Media. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on writing for television news and producing online news reports. Students strengthen their journalistic skills and learn the importance of writing clearly for a viewing audience while working under newsroom deadlines. By the end of the course, students should feel confident in producing accurate, detailed reports for both television news and online news sites. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C.

ENGL 383. Digital Journalism. 3 Credits.

Students will create a WordPress site and are expected to produce news stories on this site from events on campus and in the community. These news stories may include the use of audio, short video, hyperlinks, infographics, digital maps, and photo galleries. This is a hands-on practical course that will include news reporting and writing for on-line platforms, podcasts, blogs, video, and social media. Students will create a Twitter account and will be expected to Tweet from news events that they will cover. Additionally, in a group project, students will either produce a podcast or a video news story. By the end of the course, students will have marketable digital portfolio. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and either ENGL 211C, ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 387. TV News Production. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the reporting, writing, and production aspects of a television news program. Students will learn how to create 15- and 30-minute news broadcasts by developing story ideas and news gathering. Students will also learn the intricacies of shooting and editing video along with the production process involved in recording a live news broadcast. Each student will spend time both in front of and behind the television studio cameras. The goal of this course is to produce weekly news programs worthy of broadcast on local television. Students will assume the roles of reporter, writer, producer, floor director, photojournalist, videographer, technician, and more. (Cross listed with COMM 387/THEA 387) Prerequisites: COMM 271 or THEA 271 or DANC 271. Pre- or corequisite: COMM 382 or ENGL 382.

ENGL 390. TESL Methods, Materials, & Assessment. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide students with the background and tools necessary for teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) at the K-12 or secondary level. The course is divided into three modules. In the first module, students will study the major theories of language learning, focusing primarily on current methods for language learning and teaching. In the second module, attention will be focused on designing a course including consideration of both program goals and students’ needs. Finally, the third module addresses practical application of teaching methods through a focus on designing activities, lesson plans and developing assessment tools. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and either ENGL 211C, ENGL 221C, or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 395. Topics in English. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and either ENGL 211C, ENGL 221C, or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 396. Topics in English. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected topics designed for nonmajors or for elective credit within a major. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors. Prerequisite: Lower-division General Education requirements in Literature (3 hours, under Ways of Knowing) and in Written Communication (6 hours), or permission of instructor.

ENGL 406/506. The Teaching of Literature. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide an intensive examination of issues, approaches, and methods utilized in the teaching of literature, particularly literature written for children and young adults. Prerequisites: One 300-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 407/507. Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. 3 Credits.

A study of The Canterbury Tales with an introduction to Middle English language and culture. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in literature.

ENGL 416/516. English Renaissance Drama. 3 Credits.

An extensive survey of the secular national dramas of Renaissance England that were written and performed by Shakespeare's contemporaries in London between 1576 and 1642. Students study the literary features, social contexts and ideological underpinning of representative works by Kyd, Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, Ford, and others. Prerequisite: One 300-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 418W/518. Jewish Writers. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the Jewish literary traditions and the cultural trends shaping these traditions and the Jewish identity. It will examine the impact of such issues as immigration, family, marginality, the Holocaust, assimilation, cultural diversity, feminism, Israel, race and religion. Readings will include short stories, poems, essays, novels, and autobiographical writing. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: One 300-level literature course or permission of instructor and a grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and a grade of C or better in one of the following: ENGL 211C, ENGL 221C, or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 419/519. The Harlem Renaissance. 3 Credits.

The class provides students with a solid grasp of the Harlem Renaissance: what it was, why it came to be, and how it continues to resonate in American culture. Students will gain a greater understanding of this period and the ways in which the artistic endeavors of the Harlem Renaissance--especially the literature--helped to transform that era and make possible the growing respect for diversity that we now enjoy. Prerequisite: One 300-level literature class or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 421/521. British Literature 1660-1800. 3 Credits.

British literature from the Restoration of the monarchy after the Civil War and Puritan Commonwealth to the French Revolution, focusing on how cultural changes (legalized female actors, commercialized printing, colonialism, and growing market capitalism) interacted with the flowering of satire and scandalous theatrical comedy, and the emergence of modern literary forms (periodical journalism, 'picturesque' poetry, and the novel). Prerequisites: One 300-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 423/523. The Romantic Movement in Britain. 3 Credits.

A study of the literature written in Britain between 1770-1830, focusing on how the literary experiments and innovations of poets like Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Percy Shelley, Keats, Burns, and Barbauld, and of novelists like Mary Shelley, Radcliffe, and Scott interacted with cultural changes such as the Industrial Revolution, the French Revolution, and the emergence of feminism and working-class radicalism. Prerequisite: One 300-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 427W/527. Writing in the Disciplines. 3 Credits.

This is a discussion/workshop course emphasizing contexts and strategies of text production in and across academic disciplines and professional settings. Students will produce a variety of texts designed to meet the needs of specific audiences. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 432/532. Origins and Early Development of the British Novel to 1800. 3 Credits.

A study of early novels and how the novel developed from other traditions such as the epic, romance, criminal biography, and travel narrative. Prerequisite: One 300-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 433/533. Victorian Literature. 3 Credits.

A study of the chief writers and the cultural and philosophical backgrounds of the Victorian era, touching on the changes from the early to the later part of the period. Works analyzed include fiction, nonfiction prose, and poetry. Prerequisites: One 300-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 435W/535. Management Writing. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on writing as a means of making and presenting management decisions. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C, and six semester hours in English, to include ENGL 334W or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 438/538. The Twentieth-Century British Novel. 3 Credits.

Offered in specific sections of 1900-1945, 1945-present, 1900-present. Major British novels are studied. Prerequisite: One 300-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 439/539. Writing in Digital Spaces. 3 Credits.

This course offers composition practice in critical contemporary digital environments. Readings and discussions will provide the history of and context for these digital spaces. Students should expect to participate in, develop, and engage in critical discussions about a range of digital spaces, including websites, wikis, blogs, and various interactive media. Prerequisites: ENGL 307T or equivalent or permission of instructor.

ENGL 440/540. General Linguistics. 3 Credits.

An introduction to linguistic analysis of world languages. Emphasis is on the analysis of sound systems (phonetics, phonology) and the structure of words and sentences (morphology and syntax). Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor; previous 300- or 400-level coursework in phonetics or linguistics strongly recommended with ENGL 370 preferred.

ENGL 441/541. American Travel Literature. 3 Credits.

This is a survey course that examines the American experience, American identity and American culture through travel "texts" that include prose, poetry, art, and film. The course takes an interdisciplinary American Studies approach, using lenses such as race, gender, and class. Prerequisites: ENGL 112L or ENGL 114L.

ENGL 442/542. English Grammar. 3 Credits.

This course is a descriptive study of English grammar as it relates to the contexts in which it is used, with implications for grammar pedagogy and TESOL classrooms. Prerequisites: ENGL 350 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 443/543. Southern and African American English. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the linguistic diversity of the American South, with emphasis on Southern White and African American varieties of English. It examines variation and change in the phonological, lexical, and syntactic systems, language contact, and dialect discrimination directed towards Southern and African American speakers, both inside and out of the South. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

ENGL 444/544. History of the English Language. 3 Credits.

A study of the origins and development of the English language. Primary focus is on sound, word, and grammatical changes. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor; previous 300- or 400-level coursework in phonetics or linguistics is strongly recommended with ENGL 370 preferred.

ENGL 447/547. The American Novel to 1920. 3 Credits.

Examination of the American novel from its origins in the late eighteenth century through World War I. The course will emphasize the novel as a genre, cultural trends during the period, and such relevant literary modes as romanticism, realism, and naturalism. Prerequisite: One 300-level literature course.

ENGL 448/548. The American Novel 1920 to Present. 3 Credits.

Examination of the American novel from the end of World War I to the present day. The course will emphasize formal issues related to the genre of the novel and relevant literary and cultural trends during the period including modernism and postmodernism. Prerequisite: One 300-level literature course.

ENGL 449/549. Craft of Literary Nonfiction. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of technique in literary nonfiction with an emphasis on the memoir, the essay, reportage, and travel narrative. Especially designed for, but not limited to, creative writing students; supplements the creative writing workshops. Prerequisites: ENGL 300W, or three semester hours in literature and permission of the instructor.

ENGL 450/550. American English. 3 Credits.

This course explores the geographic, social, and stylistic diversity of English spoken in the U.S. It also examines how perceptions of dialect diversity affect access to education and other socioeconomic opportunities. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 451/551. Advanced Fiction Workshop. 3 Credits.

This course, an expansion of the principles and techniques learned in ENGL 351, focuses on the writing and criticism of the short story, the novella, and the novel. Prerequisites: ENGL 351; junior standing, or permission of the instructor, based on writing samples submitted.

ENGL 452/552. Advanced Poetry Workshop. 3 Credits.

This course, an expansion of the principles and techniques learned in ENGL 352, focuses on the writing and criticism of poetry. Prerequisites: ENGL 352 and junior standing or permission of the instructor, based on writing samples submitted.

ENGL 454/554. Creative Nonfiction. 3 Credits.

A course in the techniques of writing nonfiction imaginatively within a factual context. Emphasis is placed on regard for reader psychology, selection of significant detail, and the development of a style at once lively and lucid. Assignments are made individually with regard to the student's field of interest---history, biography, science, politics, informal essay, etc. Advice is given on the marketing of promising manuscripts. Prerequisites: ENGL 327W or ENGL 351 and junior standing or permission of the instructor, based on writing samples submitted.

ENGL 455/555. The Teaching of Composition, Grades 6-12. 3 Credits.

A study of the theory and practice of teaching writing. Special attention will be given to the ways effective teachers allow theories and experiences to inform their pedagogical strategies. Prerequisites: ENGL 300W or ENGL 327W or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 456/556. The Craft of Fiction. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of fictional technique in the novel and short story, with emphasis on character development, conflict, point of view, plot, setting, mood, tone, and diction. Especially designed for, but not limited to, creative writing students; supplements the creative writing workshops. Prerequisites: Six semester hours in literature or ENGL 300W plus three semester hours in literature; junior standing or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 457/557. The Craft of Poetry. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of technique in poetry, with emphasis on form, imagery, rhythm, and symbolism. Especially designed for, but not limited to, creative writing students; supplements the creative writing workshops. Prerequisites: Six semester hours in literature or ENGL 300W plus three semester hours in literature; junior standing or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 459W/559. New Literatures in English. 3 Credits.

A study of the diverse "new" literatures in English, including those of the Caribbean and Central America, Africa, India, as well as of Canada and Australia, in their current historical and political contexts. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: One 300-level literature course or permission of instructor and a grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and a grade of C or better in one of the following: ENGL 211C, ENGL 221C, or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 461/561. Poetry of the Early Twentieth Century. 3 Credits.

Works of major British and American poets from 1900 to 1945 are studied. Prerequisites: One 300-level literature course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 463W/563. Women Writers. 3 Credits.

This course applies concepts developed through women's studies scholarship and feminist literary criticism to works by women writers of different races and cultures. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: One 300-level literature course or permission of instructor and a grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and a grade of C or better in one of the following: ENGL 211C, ENGL 221C, or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 464W/564. Native American Literature. 3 Credits.

This class offers an investigation of Native American literature both past and present and seeks to foster an appreciation for indigenous cultures, traditions, and the ongoing concerns that inform so much of Native literary output. By privileging Native centered approaches to narrative and history-keeping, the course hopes to promote a greater understanding of the issues Native peoples faced in the colonial milieu and the continued implications of those histories for Native communities and indigenous identities today. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: One 300-level literature course or permission of instructor and a grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and a grade of C or better in one of the following: ENGL 211C, ENGL 221C, or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 465W/565. African American Literature. 3 Credits.

An investigation of how African American literature has innovated, influenced, and been influenced by literary movements, historical events, social transitions, and political upheavals. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: One 300-level literature course or permission of instructor and a grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and a grade of C or better in one of the following: ENGL 211C, ENGL 221C, or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 466W/566. Asian American Literature. 3 Credits.

The course introduces students to key texts in Asian American literature, supported by critical studies (and occasion films) to interrogate the theme of Asian American identities in their multiple forms. The course will examine sociopolitical histories that undercut the literature and the contributions of Asian American writers to the breadth and scope of American as well as global literature today. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: One 300-level literature course or permission of instructor and a grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and a grade of C or better in one of the following: ENGL 211C, ENGL 221C, or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 468. Advanced Writing Internship. 3 Credits.

A structured work experience involving writing and editing in a professional setting. Prerequisites: 15 hours in English, with ENGL 327W or ENGL 334W recommended; permission of department internship coordinator required.

ENGL 473/573. Writing with Video. 3 Credits.

This course engages students in a comprehensive exploration of video as a rhetorical narrative medium, with emphasis on the actual production of video work. Writing is also integrated into the production process. From brainstorming to storyboarding and critique, writing is positioned as an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: ENGL 307T.

ENGL 477/577. Language, Gender and Power. 3 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course explores how language reflects and interacts with society, with particular emphasis on gender and race. Topics include definition, framing, stereotypes, language taboos, and powerful and powerless language. Prerequisites:Junior standing and three upper-division hours in English, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 478. The Craft of Multimedia Journalism. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce students to audio and visual storytelling. Students will expand their reporting repertoire to incorporate the use of audio, still photography, and video into what they have already learned about print reporting. Staff positions in media organizations and freelance journalism now require a command of multimedia skills; however, the foundation of all good story telling--even in the multi-platform, digital age--remains the written word. This course will enable students to develop an understanding of visual story-telling and the production of multimedia news and feature stories. Prerequisites: ENGL 380 and ENGL 382.

ENGL 481/581. Advanced Public Relations. 3 Credits.

Designed to strengthen the skills of the public relations practitioner with emphasis on the creative aspects of problem solving. Attention is given to crisis public relations, interviewing, speech writing, and graphics. Prerequisite: ENGL 381 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 482/582. Sports Journalism. 3 Credits.

This is primarily a sportswriting course in which students are introduced to various types and styles of sports stories that are representative of sports journalism as practiced in newspapers and magazines. The course also explores the role of sports in American society. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 483W/583. Reporting and News Writing II. 3 Credits.

Designed to familiarize students with the fundamentals of beat reporting and its practice in the multi-media environment of "converged" newsrooms. The course emphatically focuses on writing but also provides instruction on how the tools and techniques of multimedia platforms are used to enhance storytelling. Emphasis is also placed on accessing information through web-based resources and government documents. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C; ENGL 380 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 484/584. Feature Story Writing. 3 Credits.

Course includes discussion and practice of writing a variety of newspaper and magazine feature stories. Students will write and critique stories on people, places, businesses, trends, and issues. Assistance is given in the marketing of manuscripts. Prerequisite: Nine semester hours in English.

ENGL 485W/585. Editorial and Persuasive Writing. 3 Credits.

A study of the practice and function of writing editorials, commentary, reviews and columns for newspapers and online media. Lectures will focus on the techniques of crafting a persuasive argument, content analyses of Pulitzer Prize-winning editorials and columns, and guest lectures by newspaper editorial writers. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C; ENGL 380.

ENGL 486/586. Media Law and Ethics. 3 Credits.

Designed to introduce students to components of communication law that may affect the professional writer or broadcaster. Topics include defamation, constitutional constraints, freedom of information, privacy, copyright, and telecommunications law. Ethical issues relating to the mass media will also be examined. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 487. Television News Production Workshop. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce students to the reporting, writing, and production of a television news program. Students will learn how to create a 30-minute news program from the framing of story ideas and news gathering to shooting and editing video along with the production process involved in recording a live news broadcast. Each student will spend time both in front of and behind the video and television studio cameras. The goal of this course is to produce weekly news broadcasts. In doing so, students will alternately assume the roles of reporter, writer, producer, director, anchor, photojournalist, technician, and more. Using the campus and surrounding neighborhoods as our news universe, students will report news and feature stories that impact the University and its neighbors. Prerequisites: ENGL 380 or ENGL 382 or COMM 271 or THEA 271.

ENGL 492/592. Modern World Drama. 3 Credits.

A comparative study of selected major dramatic works of the world, featuring texts drawn from a range of cultures from around the globe. The course will begin in the late nineteenth century and continue to the present. Works written in languages other than English will be read in translation. Prerequisite: One 300-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 493/593. Contemporary World Literature. 3 Credits.

Fiction, poetry, and plays written during the last fifty years in nations throughout the world. Most texts will have been written originally in languages other than English. The course will focus on a comparative study of works produced in a variety of cultural contexts, and will explore a range of approaches to defining or circumscribing world literature. Prerequisite: One 300-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 494. Entrepreneurship in English Studies. 3 Credits.

This course will broach the theoretical and practical questions of how entrepreneurship intersects with English Studies. Conceived of as a studio course, it is designed to teach students a hands-on methodology through which they can translate disciplinary theory and knowledge into real-world outcomes. This course will teach students how academic knowledge can lead to transformations, innovations, and solutions to different types of problems. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ENGL 495/595. Topics in English. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, because of their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors. Prerequisite: Three semester hours in literature.

ENGL 496/596. Topics in English. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, because of their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors. Prerequisite: Three semester hours in literature.

ENGL 497. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in English. 1-3 Credits.

Independent study in literature, writing, or linguistics according to a program of reading and/or writing designed under the direction of an instructor. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the chair of the Department of English.

ENGL 498. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in English. 1-3 Credits.

Independent study in literature, writing, or linguistics according to a program of reading and/or writing designed under the direction of an instructor. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the chair of the Department of English.