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Old Dominion University

2014-2015 Catalog

Requirements for Undergraduate Degrees

Overall Requirements for Baccalaureate Degrees

A candidate for a baccalaureate degree must present a minimum of 120 semester hours (except where otherwise noted in degree program descriptions). A minimum overall cumulative grade point average of C (grade point average of 2.00) must be made in all courses taken, and an overall cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00 must be attained in the major except in those programs requiring a grade point average above 2.00. Grades in all courses taken, including failing grades (except courses in which grade forgiveness was applied), are counted when calculating a student’s cumulative grade point average. Grades in all courses taken in the major, including failing grades, are counted when calculating a student’s grade point average in the major. Students completing a minor must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses taken toward the minor.

A student who seeks a bachelor’s degree from Old Dominion University must, in addition to meeting other requirements of the University, earn a minimum of 25 percent of the total number of credits required for the degree (for example, 30 credits in a 120-credit degree program) through on- or off-campus instruction. This must include a minimum of 12 credit hours of upper-level courses in the declared major program. Some program residency requirements exceed the University minimum. The responsibility for meeting the requirements for a degree rests with the student.

College Requirements

Students should consult with the department of their major for further information regarding the following.

  1. Major programs may require specific Skills or Ways of Knowing courses.
  2. When requirement hours vary, major programs specify the number.
  3. In addition to the University General Education Requirements, college requirements must be met. For example, the College of Arts and Letters and the Strome College of Business require foreign language proficiency at the fourth-semester level (202) for the Bachelor of Arts degree.

Requirements for Major

Each undergraduate student shall select a major department or option at the appropriate time in his or her curriculum. In consultation with the head of his or her major department or a designee, such as the chief departmental advisor, the student shall select the courses for the major. At least 12 hours of upper-level course work in the declared major program must be taken at Old Dominion University in resident or extension study. All students must complete a writing intensive (W) course in the major at the upper-division level at Old Dominion University and earn a grade of C (2.0) or better.

Additional Requirements for Baccalaureate Degrees

A student may not use courses in the discipline of his or her major to fulfill University General Education Requirements in the following Ways of Knowing areas: Human Behavior, Human Creativity and the Nature of Science.

Students should note that credit toward a degree cannot be obtained for material of what is essentially the same course, but offered in various introductory courses for different audiences. For example, a student receiving credit for BIOL 121N cannot receive credit for BIOL 105N or BIOL 110N.

Evaluation of Writing Proficiency

All students following undergraduate degree programs must pass the University’s Evaluation of Writing Proficiency. See the Undergraduate Writing Program Requirements section of this catalog for more information.

Assessment Requirement

In response to demands by the University’s accrediting agencies, including the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools – Commission on Colleges and the State Council or Higher Education for Virginia, Old Dominion University has developed an institution-wide plan to assess the quality of its academic programs and services. The plan calls for the assessment of student learning at the beginning, during, and at the end of the college experience.

Upon enrollment in the University and again prior to the completion of degree requirements, all undergraduate students must take one or more measures related to the University’s assessment plan. Students will be notified about the requirement to complete the measures through their University email address. The email invitations will contain a link to the University’s web-based assessment tool where the measures can be completed at the student’s convenience. Assessment results are used for program improvements and thus are not a part of the student’s transcript.

Sanctions for Noncompliance with Assessment Testing Requirement

All undergraduate students are required to participate in the assessment program. Failure to take assessments when required to do so may preclude the student’s right to register for the ensuing semester, or in the case of seniors, receive the baccalaureate degree.

The University will make all reasonable efforts to assure that students have ample opportunities to complete the required assessments. However, certain precautions will be taken to ensure that students submit to the assessment measures and that they take the measures seriously. Further information regarding sanctions procedures is available in offices of college deans and the University Assessment Office.

University General Education Requirements

All students receiving baccalaureate degrees from Old Dominion University shall complete the University’s General Education Program. At the lower division (freshman and sophomore), the program’s designed courses develop the Skills (Goals 1-2 below) needed for later study and the Ways of Knowing (Goals 3-4) needed to understand the various approaches to knowledge at work in the University. At the upper division (junior and senior), Options B, C and D provide a multidisciplinary experience to broaden the student’s ability to apply the Skills and Ways of Knowing at a more advanced level.

General Education and Experiential Learning

All lower-level requirements within this program may be met by credit awarded to students who are able to demonstrate appropriate experiential learning that fulfills the objectives of the particular Skills and Ways of Knowing requirements. Though not all learning and experiences are worthy of being recognized with the reward of academic credit, the principle that supports the policy is that many valid learning experiences worthy of such credit do take place outside of the traditional classroom setting. For procedures to meet General Education Requirements in this manner, please consult the section of this Catalog on Experiential Learning Credit Options at the Undergraduate Level and visit the Experiential Learning web site at www.uc.odu.edu/elt.

General Education Philosophy

The General Education program at Old Dominion University represents the common core of the baccalaureate degree. It prepares students for pursuing a major, for broadening their views of life, and for understanding an increasingly global and diverse world. It provides students with the basic skills and intellectual perspectives to engage in the search for knowledge. The General Education program develops analytical and critical thinking skills and the ability to make reasoned judgments. Students will also discover that learning is a complex, multifaceted, and lifelong endeavor.

General Education Goals and Objectives

The Goals (1-5) and particular objectives of General Education are as follows:

  1. Develop and demonstrate effective uses of language.
    1. Develop written communication skills.
    2. Develop oral communications skills.
    3. Develop ability to use a foreign language and learn about another culture.
    4. Develop written communication skills in the major at the upper-division level.
  2. Develop mathematical and information literacy.
    1. Develop basic mathematical competence.
    2. Develop information literacy competence.
  3. Develop an understanding of the natural sciences and technology and their contributions to human culture.
    1. Understand the concepts and methods of the natural sciences.
    2. Understand the nature of technology and its impacts on society and the environment.
  4. Develop an understanding of human behavior, society and culture, with specific attention to technology, international perspectives and issues related to ethnicity, race and gender.
    1. Develop an understanding of history and the ability to think critically about the past.
    2. Think critically about beliefs, values, and moral issues that have shaped human society.
    3. Critically analyze the fine and performing arts and their contribution to culture.
    4. Critically analyze literature and its contribution to culture.
    5. Develop an understanding of behavioral, political, economic, and social systems.
  5. Integrate knowledge at the advanced level.
    Option A. Complete a minor, second major or second degree.
    Option B. Complete an interdisciplinary minor.
    Option C. Complete international business and regional courses or an approved certification program such as teaching licensure.
    Option D: Complete upper-division course work from another college or component (majors in the College of Arts and Letters may select from the Arts and Humanities component or the Social Sciences component depending on the major) outside of and not required by the major.

Students may not use courses in the discipline of their declared major to fulfill University General Education Requirements in the following Ways of Knowing areas: Human Behavior, Human Creativity and the Nature of Science.

Since the Skills and Ways of Knowing are needed for major courses and Upper-Division General Education, students should meet those requirements during their freshman and sophomore years.

Transfer Policies for General Education Requirements

Students who have received an Associate in Arts (A.A.), Associate in Science (A.S.), or Associate in Arts and Sciences (A.A. and S.) degree from Richard Bland College or the Virginia Community College System (including the A.A. & S. in general studies) have met all General Education requirements except those specified as major or college requirements, requirements for completion of the undergraduate writing program, and the upper-division requirement that is met through completion of a second degree or major, a minor, an interdisciplinary minor, international business and regional courses, an approved certification program such as teaching licensure, or upper-division elective coursework from another college outside of and not required by the major. Effective Fall 2010, only the A.S. degrees in general studies that are offered by those institutions whose general studies degrees are recognized as transfer degrees by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia will be guaranteed acceptance as meeting lower-division General Education Requirements. A.S. degrees in general studies received from those institutions whose general studies degrees are not recognized by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia will be examined individually to determine whether the degrees are university parallel programs and eligible for lower-division General Education requirement waivers. Students who have earned an Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree from the Virginia Community College System in specific articulated programs that include the required General Education courses have met all General Education requirements except the requirements for completion of the undergraduate writing program and the upper-level requirement. College-parallel programs at other community colleges or systems (consistent with the requirements of degrees from the Virginia Community College System) are also accepted as meeting lower-division General Education requirements and are reviewed by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. Transfer students should be aware that even though University General Education Requirements may have been met, college, school and/or departmental requirements must still be met. Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in order to receive the credit hours associated with classes taken at other regionally accredited institutions.

Policies governing the transfer of General Education Requirements can be found in the Admissions section of this catalog. See the transfer student website for the complete listing of articulation agreements at http://uc.odu.edu/advising/transfer.

Lower-Division Requirements (freshman and sophomore years)

I. Skills. Completion of course work in the skills areas ensures that all students possess the basic tools with which to pursue their major interests.

A. Written Communication --  Students are advised to consult the department of their major program and the     Undergraduate Writing Program Requirements section of this catalog. 

ENGL 110CEnglish Composition (grade of C or better required)3
Select one of the following:3
English Composition (grade of C or better required)
Introduction to Writing in Business, Education and Social Sciences (grade of C or better required)
Introduction to Technical Writing (grade of C or better required)
Undergraduate students must pass ENGL 110C with a grade of C (2.0) or better in order to qualify to register for ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.
Students must also pass ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C with a grade of C (2.0) or better to qualify to register for a writing intensive (W) course.
Total Hours6

B. Oral Communication

Select one of the following courses3
Public Speaking
Voice and Diction
Introduction to Interpersonal Communication
Total Hours3

Students may meet this requirement by completing an oral communication course appropriate to the student’s program of study or through an approved course(s) within the major. Students are advised to consult the department of their major program.

Majors approved to meet this requirement through major courses are: College of Arts and Letters – communication, foreign languages, foreign languages teacher preparation, music composition, music education, and all theatre concentrations except digital filmmaking; College of Education - human services; College of Health Sciences - medical technology, nursing, dental hygiene, health sciences health services administration concentration depending on elective choices, health sciences with human services minor depending on elective choices, and health sciences cytotechnology track; and College of Sciences - ocean and earth science.

C. Mathematics

Select one of the following courses3
An Introduction to Mathematics for Critical Thinking
College Algebra
College Algebra with Supplemental Instruction
Precalculus I
Elementary Statistics
Total Hours3

For the appropriate course, the major program should be consulted. Some programs require more advanced 200-level courses.

Students should strive to complete the mathematics General Education requirement within their first 30 hours at Old Dominion University and are expected to have completed the requirement before the end of their first 60 hours at the University. Students should be aware that waivers of the mathematics General Education requirement are not granted, and all students are required to complete this requirement before graduating.

D. Language and Culture—(does not apply to students earning high school diplomas before December 31, 1985).

Select 0-6 hours from the following courses0-6
Beginning Arabic
Beginning Chinese
Beginning Farsi
Beginning French I
   and Beginning French II
Beginning German I
   and Beginning German II
Beginning Hebrew I
Beginning Italian I
   and Beginning Italian II
Beginning Japanese
Beginning Latin I
   and Beginning Latin II
Beginning Portuguese I
   and Beginning Portuguese II
Beginning Russian I
   and Beginning Russian II
Beginning Spanish I
   and Beginning Spanish II
Intensive Beginning Spanish
Total Hours0-6

111F courses are six credit hours each. Students may meet this requirement by successfully completing the third level in one foreign language or the second level in each of two foreign languages in high school or by completing a single foreign language at the 102F or 111F level or equivalent work from another institution. Students who have had some foreign language experience but are unable to be exempted from this requirement may complete just the 121F course in the case of Spanish or the 102F course in foreign languages if scores on the CEEB Foreign Language Achievement Test so indicate.

The College of Arts and Letters and the Strome College of Business require foreign language proficiency at the fourth-semester level for students pursuing Bachelor of Arts degrees.

Students whose native language is not English are exempt from taking a foreign language for General Education. Students pursuing degrees that require proficiency beyond the 100 level must be certified by the Foreign Languages and Literatures Department to obtain a waiver of the 200-400 level courses.

American Sign Language courses taken in high school or transferred to Old Dominion University from another institution are accepted by Old Dominion University to meet General Education requirements in language and culture. American Sign Language courses transferred from another institution are accepted to meet the foreign language requirement for B.A. degrees in the Strome College of Business and the College of Arts and Letters except for Asian Studies, foreign languages and international studies.

E. Information Literacy and Research

Select one of the following courses3
Introduction to Information Literacy and Research
Introduction to Information Literacy and Research for Scientists
Information Literacy for Health Professions
Basic Information Literacy and Research
Philosophy of Digital Culture
Computer Literacy: Communication and Information
Total Hours3

Students may meet this requirement in the major and are advised to consult the department of their major program.

Majors approved to meet this requirement through major courses are: College of Arts and Letters – African American and African Studies depending on elective choice, art education, art history, Asian Studies depending on elective choice, fine arts, geography, history, history teacher preparation, international studies depending on elective choice, political science, and studio art; College of Engineering and Technology - all majors except the general engineering technology concentration; and College of Health Sciences – dental hygiene and nursing.

II. Ways of Knowing. Courses in the Ways of Knowing develop the students’ critical and analytical thinking abilities. They also develop understanding of the various approaches to knowledge, the contributions various academic disciplines can make to solving specific problems, and the effective use of the English language. Courses in the Ways of Knowing also develop and reinforce written communication skills and include relevant insights into technology. In addition, courses within each Way of Knowing focus on objectives unique to that way of knowing.

A. Human Behavior

The objective of this Way of Knowing is to enable students to learn about human behavior in changing contexts. The courses will address how ideological, scientific, and ethical judgments affect human behavior in Western and non-Western cultures. They will also offer perspectives on the challenges, concerns, and contributions of diverse groups such as women and minorities.

Courses that meet the human behavior Way of Knowing are:

Select one of the following courses3
Introduction to African American Studies
Introduction to Anthropology
Introduction to Human Communication
Introduction to Criminology
Basic Economics
Principles of Macroeconomics
Principles of Microeconomics
Introduction to Entrepreneurship
Personal Financial Literacy
Cultural Geography
Environmental Geography
Introduction to International Politics
Introduction to American Politics
Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics
Introduction to Psychology
Lifespan Development
Introduction to Sociology
Introduction to Women's Studies
Total Hours3

B. Human Creativity

This Way of Knowing emphasizes artistic creative endeavor and appreciation and the history of the arts. The courses include field experience with the professional arts community in Hampton Roads as well as with the faculty of relevant departments. The objectives are to foster an appreciation of aesthetic experiences, develop abilities to make reasoned aesthetic judgments and develop an understanding of diverse cultures.

Courses that meet the human creativity Way of Knowing are:

Select one of the following courses3
Introduction to the Visual Arts
Visual Communication
Film Appreciation
Dance and Its Audience
Music in History and Culture
The Theatre Experience
Total Hours3

C. Interpreting the Past

The objective of this Way of Knowing is to provide an understanding of historical analysis for non-history majors.

Courses that meet the interpreting the past Way of Knowing are:

Select one of the following courses3
Interpreting the World Past Since 1500
Interpreting the Asian Past
Interpreting the European Past
Interpreting the Latin America Past
Interpreting the American Past
Interpreting the African Past
Total Hours3

D. Literature

This Way of Knowing emphasizes the contribution of literature to culture. Through critical reading and analysis, students will develop an ability to make effective use of the English language and informed aesthetic judgments about style and content.

Select one of the following courses3
Introduction to Literature
American Writers, American Experiences
Understanding World Literature
Total Hours3

E. The Nature of Science

This Way of Knowing requires two semesters of natural science. A student may fulfill the requirement with two non-sequential natural science classes with labs unless a sequence is specifically required for the major. These courses introduce the disciplines and the methods of science and develop the abilities to make reasoned judgments based on scientific considerations.

Courses that meet the nature of science way of knowing are:

Select two of the following courses8
Biology for Nonscience Majors I
Biology for Nonscience Majors II
Environmental Sciences
   and Environmental Sciences Lab
Environment and Man
   and Environment and Man Laboratory
Introduction to Human Biology
   and Introduction to Human Biology Lab
General Biology I
   and General Biology I Lab
General Biology II
   and General Biology II Lab
Introductory Chemistry
   and Introductory Chemistry Laboratory
Introductory Organic and Biochemistry
   and Introductory Organic and Biochemistry Laboratory
Foundations of Chemistry I Lecture
   and Foundations of Chemistry I Laboratory
Foundations of Chemistry II Lecture
   and Foundations of Chemistry II Laboratory
Advanced General Chemistry I and II Lecture
   and Advanced General Chemistry I and II Laboratory
Introductory Oceanography
Understanding Global Climate Change
Earth Science
Physical Geology
Historical Geology
Conceptual Physics
Conceptual Physics
Introductory Astronomy
Introductory Astronomy
Introductory General Physics
Introductory General Physics
University Physics
University Physics
Total Hours8

F. Philosophy and Ethics

Because of the many decisions students will be called upon to make in their personal and professional lives, they will need an appreciation and understanding of philosophical, religious, and ethical foundations to help them to make informed, intelligent choices. Further, as the pace of change and interdependency in the world accelerates, it is important that students be given an ample opportunity to critically examine philosophy and ethical values and to understand how philosophical and ethical issues affect decision-making in professional disciplines.

Courses that meet the philosophy and ethics Way of Knowing are:

Select one of the following courses3
Introduction to Philosophy
Logic and Philosophy
Introduction to Philosophy of Science
Introduction to Ethics
World Religions: Beliefs and Values
Business Ethics
Environmental Ethics
Bioethics
Studies in Applied Ethics
Total Hours3

Students may meet this requirement in the major and are advised to consult the department of their major program. Majors approved to meet this requirement through major courses are: College of Arts and Letters – interdisciplinary studies concentrations in professional writing and work and professional studies depending on elective choice; College of Education – sport management; College of Engineering and Technology – all majors if ENMA 480 is completed; and College of Health Sciences – dental hygiene, dental hygiene degree completion, health sciences health services administration concentration depending on elective choices, and health sciences with human services minor depending on elective choices.

G. Impact of Technology

It is important for students to understand not only how a technology functions, but also how technology affects society.

Courses in the impact of technology Way of Knowing are intended to develop students’ abilities to make reasoned judgments about the impact of technological development upon world cultures and the environment as well as upon individuals and societies.

Courses that meet the impact of technology Way of Knowing are:

Select one of the following courses3
Introduction to New Media Technologies
Computers in Society
Telehealthcare Technology
Energy and the Environment
Digital Writing
Hazards: Natural and Technological
The History of Sex and Sexual and Reproductive Technologies
History of Medicine, Disease, and Health Technology
Towers, Tanks and Time: Technology on the Eve of WWI
Discovering Earth's History
Technology and Civilization
The Evolution of Modern Science
Principles of Information Technology
Music Production: MIDI I
Technology: Its Nature and Significance
Technology and War
Technology and Your World
Technology and Society
Women and Technology Worldwide

The impact of technology way of knowing can also be met by major requirements. Students are advised to consult the department of their major program. Majors approved to meet this requirement through major courses are: College of Arts and Letters – communication depending on elective choice, dance education, English teacher preparation, fine arts and studio arts depending on elective choice, foreign languages teacher preparation, geography depending on elective choice, history depending on elective choice, history teacher preparation, interdisciplinary studies concentrations in music business/production and professional writing, interdisciplinary studies early childhood and special education, interdisciplinary studies primary/elementary education, interdisciplinary studies concentration in work and professional studies depending on elective choice, all music majors; theatre education, and women’s studies. College of Business—all majors except the B.A. in economics; College of Education—exercise science, health and physical education teacher preparation, all majors in occupational and technical studies; College of Engineering and Technology—all majors except civil engineering technology, general engineering technology and modeling and simulation engineering; College of Health Sciences—health sciences health services administration concentration depending on elective choices, and health sciences with human services minor depending on elective choices; College of Sciences - biology teacher preparation, chemistry teacher preparation, earth science education, mathematics teacher preparation and physics teacher preparation.

NOTE: For General Education requirements that can be met through the major (information literacy and research, impact of technology, oral communication, and philosophy and ethics), students who complete the required courses in their major that meet these requirements and then change to a major that does not meet the requirement through courses in the major will have met the requirement for the new major.

Honors Courses that Meet General Education Requirements*

Skills
Written Communication
ENGL 126CHonors: English Composition3
Oral Communication
COMM 126RHonors: Public Speaking3
Information Literacy and Research
CS 126GHonors: Introduction to Information Literacy and Research3
Ways of Knowing
Human Behavior
COMM 226SHonors: Introduction to Human Communication3
CRJS 226SHonors: Introduction to Criminology3
ECON 226SHonors: Principles of Macroeconomics3
ECON 227SHonors: Principles of Microeconomics3
GEOG 126SHonors: Cultural Geography3
POLS 126SHonors: Introduction to American Politics3
POLS 127SHonors: Introduction to International Politics3
PSYC 226SHonors: Introduction to Psychology3
SOC 226SHonors: Introduction to Sociology3
WMST 226SHonors: Women in A Changing World3
Human Creativity
ARTS 126AHonors: Art as Experience3
ARTH 127AHonors: Introduction to the Visual Arts3
COMM 227AHonors: Film Appreciation3
MUSC 126AHonors: Music in History and Culture3
THEA 227AHonors: Film Appreciation3
Interpreting the Past
HIST 126HHonors: Interpreting the American Past3
HIST 127HHonors: Interpreting the European Past3
Literature
ENGL 127LHonors: Introduction to Literature3
The Nature of Science
BIOL 136N
  & BIOL 137N
Honors General Biology I
   and Honors General Biology I Lab
4
BIOL 138N
  & BIOL 139N
Honors General Biology II
   and Honors General Biology II Lab
4
OEAS 126NHonors: Introductory Oceanography4
PHYS 126N
  & PHYS 127N
Honors: Introductory Astronomy
   and Honors: Introductory Astronomy
8
PHYS 226N
  & PHYS 227N
Honors: University Physics
   and Honors: University Physics
8
Philosophy and Ethics
PHIL 126PHonors: Introduction to Philosophy3
PHIL 127PHonors: Introduction to Philosophy of Science3
PHIL 227EHonors: World Religions: Beliefs and Values3
PHIL 228EHonors: Introduction to Ethics3
*

Courses listed are open only to students in the Honors College. 

Upper-Division Requirements (junior and senior years)

Writing Intensive Course in the Major

All students are required to demonstrate written communication skills in the major by taking a Writing Intensive (W) course at the upper-division level. All undergraduate students must complete their W course in the major (3 credits) at Old Dominion University and earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in order to earn a baccalaureate degree.

Criteria for Writing Intensive courses include:

  1. Students will demonstrate, in a series of individual (not group) assignments, their mastery of the subject in a discipline, through the writing of formal documents.
  2. For each writing assignment, the instructor will provide feedback to the student, evaluating content and writing style (organization, development, logic, coherence and mechanics).
  3. Types of documents for writing assignments include essays, laboratory reports, project reports, critiques of performances, research proposals, case studies, journal article reviews, book reviews, creative writing, written interviews, and other forms appropriate to a particular discipline.
  4. A maximum of 10% total of identified graded writing in the form of essays for tests, quizzes, and/or a mid-term examination (not a final exam) may be included. It is to be evaluated for both content and writing style as indicated in (b) above.
  5. Graded writing requirements comprise at least 51% of the overall course grade.

Upper-Division Studies Outside the Major

Students are required to complete Option A, B, C or D to meet the upper-division general education requirement. In addition to the completion of courses in the area of the major field, a candidate for a baccalaureate degree may select Option A, any University-approved minor, second degree or second major. The minor may be chosen to support the major, to offer greater job opportunities to the student on graduation, or to provide academic recognition of study in a second disciplinary area. A baccalaureate degree candidate may also choose an integrative disciplinary experience through the selection of Option B, an Interdisciplinary Minor; Option C, International Business and Regional Courses or an approved Certification Program such as Teaching Licensure; or Option D, six hours of elective upper-division course work from outside of and not required by the student’s major and college.

Option A: Any University-approved minor* (minimum of 12 hours determined by the department), second degree, or second major

Students who complete the course requirements for the minor, but who do not attain a 2.00 grade point average in the minor, may request that the course work be approved to meet the upper-division general education requirement. The request may be initiated through the student’s advisor and the associate dean of their college and submitted to the assistant vice president for undergraduate studies in the Office of Academic Affairs. Students whose requests are approved will meet the upper-division requirement, but they will not receive credit for the minor.

*

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration majors pursuing a minor or second major in the Strome College of Business other than Economics, Military Leadership (minor only) or Public Service (minor only) must also take six hours of 200-400 level courses outside the College, or in economics, or in military leadership or in study abroad. Students majoring in Economics who pursue a minor or second major in the Strome College of Business fulfill upper-division general education requirements and do not need to take the six hours of 200-400 level courses outside the College.

Option B: Any University-approved interdisciplinary minor (specifically 12 hours, three of which may be in the major)

Three credit hours in the interdisciplinary minor may be in the major if a major course is listed as an option for the interdisciplinary minor. As such, it will be credited toward both the major and the interdisciplinary minor. Interdisciplinary minors require 12 credit hours of 300/400-level courses selected from at least two different disciplines with a maximum of six credits from any one discipline. Course substitutions may be approved by the interdisciplinary minor coordinator.

Approved interdisciplinary minors are as follows.

Administrative Leadership and Ethics for Professional Roles Interdisciplinary Minor

James Van Dore, Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, Coordinator

The intent of the Administrative Leadership and Ethics for Professional Roles interdisciplinary minor is to develop management-related skills. The minor is designed to improve the student’s professionalism through an understanding of applied ethics, effective communication, processes in organizations, applied psychology, and legal issues in the workplace. An appreciation for the qualities of leadership, the functions of administration, and a sensitivity for ethical decision making will allow the student to apply for a wider variety of positions.

Course options are as follows:

CHP 400Ethics in Health Administration3
CHP 450Public and Community Health Administration3
CHP 480Health Ethics and the Law3
COMM 351Interpersonal Communication in Organizations3
DNTH 416Administrative Leadership and Professional Development3
ENGL 486Media Law and Ethics3
ENVH 402WEnvironmental Health Administration and Law3
HLTH 425Leadership and Management for Health Professionals3
MEDT 403WManagement in the Clinical Setting3
MGMT 325Contemporary Organizations and Management3
MGMT 350Employee Relations Problems and Practices3
MKTG 414Ethics and Social Issues in Administration3
NMED 475WAdministration and Management in Nuclear Medicine Technology3
NURS 480WLeadership and Management3
NURS 490WNursing Leadership3
PAS 301Ethics, Governance and Accountability in Public Service3
PHIL 303EBusiness Ethics3
PHIL 345EBioethics3
PSYC 303Industrial/Organizational Psychology3
SMGT 450WEthics and Morality in Sport3

Biomedical Engineering Interdisciplinary Minor

Christian Zemlin, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Coordinator

This interdisciplinary minor is for students who would like to learn about processes encountered in biomedical engineering innovation and enhance their ability to integrate knowledge from different disciplines with principles used in biomedical engineering. The minor offers an opportunity for students to be recognized for study in this growing multidisciplinary field and to enhance competitiveness for job opportunities upon graduation.

Course requirements are as follows:

BME 401
  & BME 402
Biomedical Engineering I: Principles
   and Biomedical Engineering II: Applications
6
Select two elective courses from the following:6
Comparative Biomechanics
Frontiers in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
Advanced Human Physiology
Topics (approved by minor advisor)
Intermediate Biochemistry
Anatomical Kinesiology
Biomechanics
Introduction to Bioelectrics
Introduction to Medical Image Analysis (MIA)
Mechanics of Fluids
Introduction to Finite Element Analysis
Introductory Linear Algebra
Clinical Instrumentation and Electronics
Contemporary Organizations and Management
Analysis for Modeling and Simulation
Fundamental Concepts in Nuclear Medicine Technology
Studies in Professional Nursing
Students have the option to substitute one course from those that satisfy their major requirements for one of the minor electives with approval of the minor coordinator.
Students interested in medical simulation are encouraged to select their electives from ECE 462, MAE 440 and MATH 316.

Children’s Rights Interdisciplinary Minor

Karen Polonko, Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice, Coordinator

This interdisciplinary minor is focused on the exploration of child rights within and across diverse disciplines and in the U.S. and internationally. This perspective challenges approaches in the various disciplines that have in their study of children traditionally denied or failed to recognize children’s human rights and dignity. In place of the traditional perspectives, courses in this interdisciplinary minor frame the study of children within the larger framework of human rights, more specifically, children’s rights and status as a group within society in social science research and theory, literature, the arts, humanities, education, counseling, law and public policy.

Course options are as follows:

COMM 427Children's Communication Theory and Research3
CRJS/SOC 403Violence in the World of Children3
CRJS/SOC 408Children's Rights and the Law3
HMSV 448Interventions and Advocacy with Children3
PSYC 351Child Psychology3
SOC 402Sociology of Child Welfare3
TLED 476Practical Applications in the World of Children3

The Designed World Interdisciplinary Minor

Ken Daley, Department of Art, Coordinator

This interdisciplinary minor explores the interwoven historical, cultural, aesthetic, perceptual, and technical domains of the designed world. That virtually all aspects of the human-built world are designed is a generally accepted belief; however, it is not given the careful scrutiny it deserves. Creative planning and critical analysis of design dynamics are emphasized within the context of these course offerings.

Course options are as follows:

ARTH 320WHistory of Design3
ARTH 435WModern Architecture3
ARTH 439Art Between the Wars: 1919-19393
ENGL 382Reporting News for Television and Digital Media3
ENGL 477Language, Gender and Power3
GEOG 310Geography of the City3
GEOG 412Cities of the World3
PSYC 344Human Factors3
PSYC 413Sensation and Perception3
SEPS 303Social Aspects of Clothing3
SEPS 422Fashion Product Development3
SEPS 423Visual Merchandising and Display3
STEM 382Industrial Design3
STEM 386Architecture3
STEM 417Exploring Technology and Modern Industry3

Environmental Issues and Management Interdisciplinary Minor

James English, Department of Community and Environmental Health, Coordinator

Continuing environmental degradation is a worldwide problem threatening the quality of life and its viability. The problem can only be understood and addressed by drawing upon the resources of multidisciplinary approaches. The multidisciplinary perspective center of this minor focuses on the human dimensions of the human-environment equation and includes geographical and ecological approaches, scientific and technological methodologies, planning and public policy issues, and ethical, political, economic, and legal considerations.

Course options are as follows:

CEE 350Environmental Pollution and Control3
CEE 458Sustainable Development3
ECON 435Health Economics: A Global Perspective3
ECON 447WNatural Resource and Environmental Economics3
ENVH 301WEnvironmental Health3
ENVH 402WEnvironmental Health Administration and Law3
ENVH 420Communicable Diseases and Their Control3
ENVH 421Food Safety3
ENVH 422Water and Wastewater Technology3
GEOG 305World Resources3
GEOG 306THazards: Natural and Technological3
GEOG 400WSeminar in Geography3
GEOG 420Marine Geography3
GEOG 422WCoastal Geography3
OEAS 302Environmental Geology3
OEAS 310Global Earth Systems3
PAS 300Foundations of Public Service3
PHIL 344EEnvironmental Ethics3
PHIL 345EBioethics3
POLS 300Introduction to Public Policy3
POLS 335Environmental Politics3
POLS 401Global Environmental Policy3
PRTS 405Outdoor Recreation3
SOC 309Population and Society3
SOC 320Social Inequality3
SOC 325Social Welfare3
SOC 440Health, Illness, and Society3
SOC/CRJS 444Community Justice3

Health and Wellness Interdisciplinary Minor

Laura Hill, Department of Human Movement Sciences, Coordinator

The Health and Wellness interdisciplinary studies minor explores personal involvement in and commitment to health and wellness and the factors that influence the health status of individuals and society. This interdisciplinary minor also fosters an appreciation for personal responsibility for health and strategies to enhance and preserve the individual’s and the public’s health. Societal health and the factors that impact on the health and wellness of a community and the individual’s role in health policy are examined. Students gain an awareness of the cultural, psychological, sociological and ethical issues affecting and effected by the health and wellness of individuals and the society in which they live.

Course options are as follows:

CHP 360Introduction to Global Health3
CHP 400Ethics in Health Administration3
CHP 420Foundations of Gerontology3
CHP 425Health Aspects of Aging3
CHP 456Substance Use and Abuse3
CHP 465Policy and Politics of Health3
CHP 470Death, Dying and Survivorship3
CRJS 401Understanding Violence3
CRJS/SOC 421Deviant Behavior3
CRJS/SOC 427Violence Against Women3
CRJS/SOC 441Drugs and Society3
EXSC 403Lifetime Fitness and Wellness3
EXSC 408Nutrition for Fitness and Sport3
EXSC 415Exercise Testing for Normal and Special Populations4
HE 402Methods and Materials in Health Education3
HPE 430Teaching Wellness and Health-Related Fitness3
HMSV 341Introduction to Human Services3
HMSV 491Family Guidance3
PE 300Management Skills for Teaching Health and Physical Education3
PE 319Physical Growth and Motor Development3
PE 409Physiology of Exercise3
PHIL 345EBioethics3
PSYC 306Health Psychology3
PSYC 325Drugs and Behavior3
PSYC 351Child Psychology3
PSYC 352Cognitive Development During Childhood3
PSYC 353The Psychology of Adulthood and Aging3
PSYC 363Psychology of Sex3
PSYC 405Abnormal Psychology3
PSYC 408Theories of Personality3
PSYC 410Human Cognition3
PSYC 420Cross-Cultural Psychology3
PSYC 424Physiological Psychology3
PSYC 431Community Psychology3
PSYC 460Psychology of African Americans3
PSYC 461Drug Abuse and Dependence3
SOC 440Health, Illness, and Society3
SPED 313Fundamentals of Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence3

The Impact of Technology Interdisciplinary Minor

Philip A. Reed, Department of STEM Education and Professional Studies, Coordinator

This interdisciplinary minor develops a broader understanding of technology and its impact on individuals, societies, and the environment. It provides the social context and the historical and philosophical backgrounds needed by informed students to evaluate technology and its impacts. The minor equips students with skills to make better personal decisions about technology and more appropriate choices for their futures.

Course options are as follows:

CHP 360Introduction to Global Health3
COMM 340Media and Popular Culture3
COMM 372TIntroduction to New Media Technologies3
COMM 400WIntercultural Communication3
COMM 401Communication Theory3
COMM 448Transnational Media Systems3
CS 300TComputers in Society3
CS 312Internet Concepts3
ECON 402Transportation Economics3
ECON 454WEconomic Development3
ENGL 380Reporting and News Writing I3
ENGL 382Reporting News for Television and Digital Media3
ENGL 480Investigative Reporting Techniques3
ENVH 301WEnvironmental Health3
ENVH 402WEnvironmental Health Administration and Law3
GEOG 305World Resources3
GEOG 306THazards: Natural and Technological3
HIST 304THistory of Medicine, Disease, and Health Technology3
HIST 389TTechnology and Civilization3
HIST 386T/SCI 302TThe Evolution of Modern Science3
IT 360TPrinciples of Information Technology3
MUSC 335TMusic Production: MIDI I3
OPMT 303Operations Management3
PHIL 355Computer Ethics3
PHIL 383TTechnology: Its Nature and Significance3
POLS 350TTechnology and War3
SOC 352War and Peace3
STEM 370TTechnology and Society3
STEM 382Industrial Design3
STEM 417Exploring Technology and Modern Industry3
WMST 390TWomen and Technology Worldwide3

The Urban Community Interdisciplinary Minor

Christopher B. Colburn, Department of Economics, Coordinator

This interdisciplinary minor encourages an interdisciplinary approach to the problems and crucial issues that emerge from urban environments. Students gain an understanding of the issues associated with the convergence of diverse populations in urban locations and acquire an appreciation of the complexities of the interlocking and contingent nature of urban problems. This will be accomplished through an examination of the topical areas of common space, diversity, urban services, disorder, and work.

Course options are as follows:

ARTH 435WModern Architecture3
CHP 415WCritical Issues in Public/Community Health Administration3
COMM 467Media, Politics and Civic Engagement3
CRJS 323Police in American Society3
CRJS 325Women and Crime3
CRJS 355Crime and the Community3
CRJS 441Drugs and Society3
ECON 402Transportation Economics3
ECON 445WUrban Economics3
GEOG 310Geography of the City3
GEOG 411Urban and Regional Planning3
GEOG 412Cities of the World3
PSYC 431Community Psychology3
PRTS 433Community Recreation3
SOC/CRJS 444Community Justice3

World Cultures: Values and Visions Interdisciplinary Minor

Luis Guadano, Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, Coordinator

The World Cultures: Values and Vision interdisciplinary minor requires 12 credit hours of 300/400-level courses selected from at least two different disciplines with a maximum of six credits from any one discipline. For completion of the interdisciplinary minor, students must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in ALL courses required for the minor exclusive of lower-level courses and prerequisite courses. At least six hours of upper-level courses must be taken through courses offered by Old Dominion University. Three credit hours may be in the major, if a major course is listed as an option for the interdisciplinary minor. As such, it will be credited toward both the major and the interdisciplinary minor.

This interdisciplinary minor develops an understanding of human behavior in different cultures. In order to interpret information from other countries and ethnic groups, students need to learn that certain common notions such as perceptions of personhood, the organization of time and space, and the appropriate organization and behavior of social groups vary from country to country. This minor will explore different cultural perspectives and value systems. Students should emerge with a more sophisticated understanding of their own and others' cultures.

Course options are as follows:

ANTR 304Digging Up the Past3
ANTR 305North American Archaeology3
ANTR 320The Sexes in Cross-Cultural Perspective3
COMM 400WIntercultural Communication3
COMM 444/GER 445/FLET 445German Cinema3
ENGL 371WCommunication Across Cultures3
FLET 307Understanding European Film3
FLET/JAPN 310Japan: A Cultural Odyssey3
FLET/FR/GER 410Berlin-Paris: Crucibles of European Ideas3
FLET/SPAN 471Hispanic Women Authors3
FLET/GER 476German-Jewish Literature and Culture3
FR 320Contemporary France through the Media3
FR 438Studies in Twentieth-Century French Literature3
FR 469A History of French Cinema3
GEOG 451Europe3
GEOG 452Africa3
GEOG 453Asia3
GEOG 455The Middle East3
GEOG 456Geography of Southeast Asia3
IT 425Information Systems for International Business3
MGMT 361International Business Operations3
MKTG 411Multi-National Marketing3
PHIL 354Comparative Philosophy East and West - Personhood3
POLS 325WWorld Politics3
PSYC 420Cross-Cultural Psychology3
SPAN 320Spanish Culture and Civilization3
SPAN 471Hispanic Women Authors3

Study Abroad: Any study abroad course at the 300-400 level that offers three credits can fulfill one course requirement for this minor. In cases where a study abroad course fits the themes of another interdisciplinary minor, students may request approval from the minor coordinator to use that study abroad course.

Option C: International Business and Regional Courses or an approved Certification Program such as Teaching Licensure.

The international business and regional courses option requires ECON 450: International Economics and six hours of approved courses from a selected regional focus described below.

Asian Focus
Select two of the following:6
Major Issues in Asia
Asia
South Asia Since Independence
The Emergence of New China
Politics and Society in East Asia Since 1945
Politics of East Asia
International Relations in East Asia
European Focus
Select two of the following:6
Europe
Berlin-Paris: Crucibles of European Ideas
Cold War in History
European Politics
Europe in World Affairs
Latin American Focus
Select two of the following:6
Latin America
U.S.-Latin American Relations
Democracy and Development in Modern Latin America
Modern Mexico
Central America and the Caribbean Since 1800
Latin American Politics
Latin American Culture and Civilization

For more information contact Bruce M. Seifert, Department of Finance.

Option C can also be met through an approved certification program such as teaching licensure. The professional education requirements specified for teaching licensure programs meet this option.

Option D: Upper-Division Course Work from Another College Outside of and not Required by the Major

Six hours of elective upper-division course work from outside of and not required by the student’s major and college. Transfer courses and study abroad courses may be used to meet this requirement. Military Science and Leadership courses (MSL) and Naval Science courses (NAVS) may be used to meet the Option D requirement for all students, regardless of the student's major and college.  Upper-division courses elected to meet the Philosophy and Ethics and Impact of Technology Ways of Knowing areas may also meet the requirement but they must be outside the college and not required by the major.

In the College of Arts & Letters, courses are divided into two components: (1) Arts & Humanities and (2) Social Sciences.

Arts and Letters majors will be permitted to take upper-division courses in their non-major component for this requirement or courses from another college.

By definition the Arts and Humanities component will include: Art, Dance, English, Foreign Languages, History, Music, Philosophy, and Theatre. The Social Sciences component will include: African-American Studies,  American Studies, Asian Studies, Anthropology, Communication, Criminal Justice, Geography, International Studies, Political Science, Sociology, and Women’s Studies.

Students must satisfy all prerequisites before enrolling in any upper-division course.

Second Major

The University permits an undergraduate student to pursue a second major. A student pursuing two majors must meet all the degree requirements of one major and at least the departmental requirements of the other. (Most professional degree majors require completion of both the departmental/school and the college requirements.) Requirements for both majors must be completed prior to receiving the baccalaureate degree. The student will receive one baccalaureate degree. Both majors will appear on the transcript. The degree awarded will be determined by the major to which University and college requirements are applied. Prior to undertaking the second major, the student must have the program approved by the appropriate chief departmental advisor/chair and dean.

Completion of a second major will meet the upper-division General Education Requirements. Students pursuing two majors in the Strome College of Business may not use the second business major to satisfy the upper-division General Education requirement unless one of the majors is economics.

Students wishing to earn a second degree rather than a second major should see the “Second Baccalaureate Degree” section of the catalog.

Second Baccalaureate Degree

The University will permit a student to acquire a second baccalaureate degree, provided that he or she:

  1. Pursues a different course of study.
  2. Meets all University, college, school, and departmental requirements (credits earned for the first degree may be applied, if suitable, toward the second degree).
  3. Completes a minimum of 30 semester hours at Old Dominion University that are beyond the requirements for the first degree.

A minimum of 150 credit hours is required for students earning two baccalaureate degrees from Old Dominion University. If the degrees are to be awarded simultaneously, an application for graduation and degree certification must be submitted through the respective advisors for each degree program.

Prior to undertaking the second degree, the Office of Admissions will conduct an evaluation of all prior university-level coursework the student has completed.  Those who meet the admissions standards of the University will be admitted; however, this does not guarantee admission into specific degree programs where separate applications are required.  The University, as a general rule, will not permit a student to pursue more than two baccalaureate degrees.

Second degree students are not required to take the Writing Sample Placement Test (WSPT) and are considered to have fulfilled the lower-division writing requirement and University General Education Requirements with the exception of the writing intensive (W) course in the major.  Second degree students must complete the writing intensive course in the major at Old Dominion University and must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better.  Students receiving two degrees from Old Dominion University must complete the writing intensive course in both majors and earn a grade of C or better in both courses.  

All second degree students must meet the college/departmental requirements for both degrees even if some of these requirements are also general education courses. 

Students who received their first degree from Old Dominion University should be aware that grades in all undergraduate courses (for both the first and the second degree) will be included in the cumulative grade point average.

Students wishing to earn a second major rather than a second degree should see the “Second Major” section of the catalog for information.

Minors

In addition to the completion of courses in the area of the major field, a candidate for a baccalaureate degree may complete a minor. The completion of a minor is optional. The minor may be chosen to support the major, to offer greater job opportunities to the student on graduation, or to provide recognition of study in a second academic area. Completion of a University-approved minor will meet the upper-division General Education Requirements. Students who complete the course requirements for the minor, but who do not attain a 2.00 grade point average in the minor, may request that the course work be approved to meet the upper-division general education requirement. The request may be initiated through the student’s advisor and the associate dean of their college and submitted to the assistant vice president for undergraduate studies in the Office of Academic Affairs. Students whose requests are approved will meet the upper-division requirement, but they will not receive credit for the minor.

For completion of a minor, an undergraduate student must have the following:

  1. A minimum of 12 credit hours in a specified minor, normally at the 300 and 400 upper-level.
  2. An overall grade point average of 2.0 or above in all courses specified as a requirement in the minor exclusive of prerequisite courses. All 300-, 400-, and approved 200-level courses designated for the minor and taken by the student will be calculated in the student's grade point average for the minor. For example, if the minor requires four courses at the 300- and 400- level and the student completes five courses, all five courses will be included in the calculation of the grade point average for the minor.
  3. Six credit hours in the minor from Old Dominion University. No course that is introductory or foundational, or that meets a lower level General Education requirement, may be included, although such courses may be prerequisites for courses in the minor.

Minors may be proposed by departments and programs and must be approved by the appropriate college committee and dean, by Faculty Senate Committee A and by the provost and vice president for academic affairs. Interdisciplinary minors must be reviewed by all colleges and departments involved prior to submission to Committee A of the Faculty Senate. Three credit hours in the interdisciplinary minor may be in the major, if a major course is listed as an option for the interdisciplinary minor. As such, it will be credited toward both the major and the interdisciplinary minor. Interdisciplinary minors require 12 credit hours of 300/400-level courses selected from at least two different disciplines with a maximum of six credits from any one discipline.

Specific minor requirements may be found in the section on Colleges, Schools and Departments of Instruction in this catalog.

Procedures

Students who wish to pursue a minor must declare the minor with and be advised by the department offering the minor, their site director, or the distance learning representative.  Students completing a minor should present the minor for certification when submitting applications for graduation.

Following are approved academic minors:

Arts and Letters

Business

Education

Engineering and Technology

Health Sciences

Sciences

Interdisciplinary Minors

  • Administrative Leadership and Ethics for Professional Roles
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Children’s Rights
  • The Designed World
  • Environmental Issues and Management
  • Health and Wellness
  • The Impact of Technology
  • The Urban Community
  • World Cultures: Values and Visions