https://www.odu.edu/nrotc

Captain Leonard E. Reed, Department Chair

Mission and Basic Program

The primary mission of the Department of Naval Science is to provide professional and leadership instruction to students who desire to serve as commissioned officers in the United States Navy or Marine Corps. The Naval ROTC program is administratively located under the Director of Military Activities and is situated, for academic matters, within the Batten College of Engineering and Technology.

The NROTC program consists of two courses of instruction: the four-year program and the two-year program. Both apply to scholarship and nonscholarship (college program) students.

The four-year program is divided into a two-year basic course and a two-year advanced course.

The basic course is normally pursued by NROTC midshipmen during their freshman and sophomore years. While most freshmen begin the basic course during the fall, it is possible to enter the program in the spring semester.

NAVS 101Introduction to Naval Science2
NAVS 201Naval Ships Systems I3
NAVS 202Naval Ships Systems II3
NAVS 320Naval Sea Power3
Accompanying naval laboratory sessions

The advanced course is normally pursued during the junior and senior years.

NAVS 301Navigation and Naval Operations I3
NAVS 302Navigation and Naval Operations II3
NAVS 401Leadership and Management I3
NAVS 402Leadership and Ethics3
Accompanying laboratory sessions

Students seeking a commission in the Marine Corps or Marine Corps Reserve are not required to take: NAVS 201, NAVS 202, NAVS 301, and NAVS 302 but instead must take NAVS 310 and NAVS 410.

Scholarship recipients supplement classroom instruction with an at-sea training period each summer. College program students supplement classroom instruction with at-sea training during the summer between their junior and senior years. Similarly, Marine Corps option students attend the six-week Marine Officer Candidate School at Quantico, Virginia during the summer between their junior and senior years.

The two-year NROTC program is extended to students who do not participate in NROTC during their freshman and sophomore years. Applications to join must be submitted during the sophomore year. For students entering this program, a six-week summer training period at the Naval Science Institute (NSI) in Newport, Rhode Island following their sophomore year replaces the basic course segment of the four-year program. Students successfully completing summer training enroll in the advanced course for their junior and senior years.

Nuclear Power Option

To be most competitive, those students interested in entering the Navy's nuclear power program should have a college grade point average greater than 3.00. While any major is acceptable, all applicants must have completed at least two semesters of calculus (MATH 211 and MATH 212, or equivalent) and two semesters of calculus-based physics (PHYS 231N and PHYS 232N). Those students with a major in science, math, or engineering are most desirable. While not required, the following courses are recommended regardless of major for those students interested in navy nuclear power:

  • Modern Physics
  • Differential Equations
  • Thermodynamics (ME)
  • Principles of Chemistry
  • Circuit Analysis.

Minor in Military Leadership

A minor in military leadership is available. For further information, see the section on minors in the Batten College of Engineering and Technology.

For more information contact the Department of Naval Science at (757) 683-4741 or visit the web site: http://www.odu.edu/nrotc.

NAVAL SCIENCE Courses

NAVS 101. Introduction to Naval Science. 2 Credits.

Lecture 2 hours; 2 credits. General introduction to the naval service. Particular emphasis placed on the mission, organization, regulations and broad warfare components of the Navy and Marine Corps. Includes customs, discipline, courtesies, leadership, core values and shipboard nomenclatures.

NAVS 111+. Naval Laboratory I. 1 Credit.

On-campus laboratory 2 hours; 1 credit. Prerequisite: departmental permission. Covers basic military formations, drill movements, commands, customs, courtesies, honors and inspection. Lecture and discussion topics include security, equal opportunity and military justice. First year Naval Science students only.

NAVS 112+. Naval Laboratory I. 1 Credit.

On-campus laboratory 2 hours; 1 credit. Prerequisite: departmental permission. Continues basic military formations, drill movements, commands, customs, courtesies, honors and inspections. Lecture and discussion topics include cruise preparation, safety education, administration, security, equal opportunity and military justice. First year Naval Science students only.

NAVS 201. Naval Ships Systems I. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Familiarizes students with types, structure and purpose of naval engineering systems, propulsion systems, auxiliary power systems, electrical systems and ship control. Ship design and stability characteristics are examined.

NAVS 202. Naval Ships Systems II. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Introduction to theory and principles of operation of naval weapons systems. Covers types of weapons and fire control systems, capabilities/limitations, theory of target acquisition, identification and tracking, trajectory principles and basics of naval ordnance.

NAVS 211+. Naval Laboratory II. 1 Credit.

On-campus laboratory 2 hours; 1 credit. Prerequisite: departmental permission. Covers military formations, drill movements, commands, customs, courtesies, honors and inspections. Lecture/discussion topics include cruise preparation/evaluation, security, administration and military justice. Second year Naval Science students only.

NAVS 212+. Naval Laboratory II. 1 Credit.

On-campus laboratory 2 hours; 1 credit. Prerequisite: departmental permission. Military formations, drill movements, commands, customs, courtesies, honors and inspections. Lecture and discussion topics include cruise preparation and evaluation, safety, administration, security, equal opportunity and military justice. Second year Naval Science students only.

NAVS 301. Navigation and Naval Operations I. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. In-depth study of piloting including theory, principles and procedures. Includes use of charts, visual and electronic aids, and theory and operation of compasses. Other topics include tides, currents, effects of wind and weather, and nautical rules of the road.

NAVS 302. Navigation and Naval Operations II. 3 Credits.

Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: departmental permission. Relative motion vector-analysis theory, relative motion problems, formation tactics, and ship employment. Also includes an introduction to naval operations and operations analysis, ship behavior and characteristics in maneuvering, applied aspects of ship handling, and afloat communications. Concepts in naval leadership and naval operations reinforced through case studies.

NAVS 310. Evolution of Warfare. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: departmental permission. Explores the basic concepts for understanding the operational art of warfare from the beginning of recorded history to the present.

NAVS 311+. Naval Laboratory III. 1 Credit.

On-campus laboratory 2 hours; 1 credit. Prerequisite: departmental permission. Military formations, drill movements, commands, customs, courtesies, honors and inspections. Lecture/discussion topics include cruise preparation and evaluation, security and military justice. Third year Naval Science students only.

NAVS 312+. Naval Laboratory III. 1 Credit.

On-campus laboratory 2 hours; 1 credit. Prerequisite: departmental permission. Military formations, drill movements, commands, customs, courtesies, honors and inspections. Lecture and discussion topics include cruise preparation and evaluation, safety, administration, security, equal opportunity and military justice. Third year Naval Science students only.

NAVS 320. Naval Sea Power. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: NAVS 101 or department approval. The study of the evolution of the major world naval and maritime nations. The role of American naval and maritime affairs in the rivalries of the great world powers during the colonial period, the spread of revolutionary movements, and the era of civil and international conflicts in the 19th and 20th centuries.

NAVS 395. Topics. 3 Credits.

Study of selected topics. Prerequisite: departmental permission.

NAVS 401. Leadership and Management I. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: NROTC Junior or Senior Midshipman or STA-21/MECEP; Non-NOTC student; departmental permission. The fundamentals of the managerial process (planning, organization, directing, and controlling) are considered in their relationship to the effectiveness of naval organization and readiness. Coverage includes human resources management, naval personnel management, material management and administration of division discipline.

NAVS 402. Leadership and Ethics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: completion of all previous NAVS courses. Capstone course, designed to equip the student with the critical thinking skills to address moral and ethical dilemmas frequently faced by naval officers.

NAVS 410. Amphibious Warfare. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: departmental permission. Historical survey of the projection of sea power with the emphasis on the evolution of the amphibious warfare in the 20th century. Defines the concept of amphibious warfare, explores its doctrinal origins and traces its evolution as an element of naval policy.

NAVS 411+. Naval Laboratory IV. 1 Credit.

On-campus laboratory 2 hours; 1 credit. Prerequisite: departmental permission. Covers military formations, drills, commands, customs, courtesies, honors and inspections. Lecture/discussion topics include precommissioning preparation, administration, equal opportunity, safety and military justice. Fourth year Naval Science students only.

NAVS 412+. Naval Laboratory IV. 1 Credit.

On-campus laboratory 2 hours; 1 credit. Prerequisite: departmental permission. Military formations, drill movements, commands, customs, courtesies, honors and inspections. Lecture and discussion topics include precommissioning preparation, safety, administration, security, equal opportunity and military justice. Fourth year Naval Science students only.