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Old Dominion University

2013-2014 Catalog

Modeling, Simulation and Visualization Engineering

http://eng.odu.edu/msve

Frederic D. McKenzie, Chair

The Department of Modeling, Simulation and Visualization Engineering offers an undergraduate four-year degree program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Modeling and Simulation Engineering. The program was initiated in January 2010 and will seek accreditation by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of ABET as a general engineering program following graduation of the first senior class. Program graduates are prepared to enter the workforce as entry-level modeling and simulation engineers. In addition, graduates are prepared to enter graduate study in modeling and simulation and, with appropriate use of elective freedom, other disciplines where modeling and simulation has application. Program graduates also are prepared to seek certification as a Certified Modeling and Simulation Professional (CMSP) and, with proper selection of electives, licensure as an Engineer in Training (EIT).

The department also offers programs of graduate study leading to the degrees of Master of Engineering, Master of Science, Doctor of Engineering, and Doctor of Philosophy with a major in modeling and simulation. The department's academic programs are coupled with a strong departmental research program conducted jointly with researchers from the Virginia Modeling, Analysis and Simulation Center (VMASC). Research activities range from investigation of fundamental modeling and simulation methodologies and technologies to applications of modeling and simulation in medicine and health science, transportation, education, science and engineering, and business.

Bachelor of Science in Modeling and Simulation Engineering

James Leathrum Jr., Chief Departmental Advisor

The modeling and simulation engineering curriculum is based on a solid foundation in mathematics and basic science. Core program content includes a thorough introduction to key concepts from computer science, the major modeling and simulation paradigms, computer visualization, analysis methods, and simulation software design. Laboratory courses provide hands-on experience in the engineering of modeling and simulation systems. A capstone course sequence taken during the senior year provides an opportunity to exercise this cumulative preparation to solve a real engineering problem in a team setting. An important component of the program is the requirement that students complete courses in another academic program where modeling and simulation is used as a support tool. In addition, course work in General Education skills and ways of knowing is required to assure a well-rounded program of study.

Program Educational Objectives

The program educational objectives describe the expected accomplishments of graduates during the first few years after graduation. The educational objectives of the modeling and simulation engineering program, established with participation of all program constituencies, are consistent with the mission of Old Dominion University and the Department of Modeling, Simulation and Visualization Engineering.

The program educational objectives of the modeling and simulation engineering program are as follows.

The modeling and simulation engineering program seeks to prepare graduates who, after the first few years of their professional careers, have:

  • Established themselves as practicing professionals in modeling and simulation engineering or a related area;
  • Demonstrated their ability to work successfully as members of a professional team and to function effectively as responsible professionals; and,
  • Demonstrated their ability to adapt to changing situations, evolving technologies, and new career challenges.

Program Outcomes

The modeling and simulation engineering program must be designed to have an educational process to produce a set of outcomes that foster attainment of the program objectives and an assessment process that measures the degree to which the objectives and outcomes are achieved. The results of this assessment are applied to the further development of the program.

The modeling and simulation engineering program outcomes are as follows. Modeling and simulation engineering students who qualify for graduation have the following general education characteristics:

  1. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering;
  2. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data;
  3. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability;
  4. An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams;
  5. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems;
  6. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities;
  7. An ability to communicate effectively;
  8. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context;
  9. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, life-long learning;
  10. A knowledge of contemporary issues; and, 
  11. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

    In addition, students have the following characteristics specific to the modeling and simulation engineering discipline, which expand on the above engineering program outcomes:
     
  12. An ability to model a variety of systems from different domains;
  13. An ability to communicate designs across technical and nontechnical boundaries;
  14. An ability to develop and input models based on observed data;
  15. An ability to select and apply appropriate simulation tools and techniques;
  16. An ability to develop a simulation in software;
  17. An ability to apply the experimental process to acquire desired simulation results;
  18. An ability to apply visualization techniques to support the simulation process;
  19. An ability to use appropriate techniques to verify and validate models and simulations; and
  20. An ability to analyze simulation results to reach an appropriate conclusion.

Modeling and Simulation Engineering Curriculum*

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MATH 2114MATH 2124
ENGL 110C (grade of C or better required)3CHEM 123N**3
CHEM 121N**3CS 1504
CHEM 122N**1PHYS 231N4
ENGN 1102MSIM 1112
COMM 101R3 
 16 17
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MSIM 2013MSIM 2053
STAT 3303MSIM 2811
PHYS 232N4MATH 3073
CS 2504ENGL 231C (grade of C or better required)3
CS 2521Human Creativity3
 Literature3
 15 16
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
CS 3303MSIM 3313
CS 3813MSIM 3831
MSIM 3203Approved MSIM Technical Elective I3
MSIM 3821MSIM 4103
Human Behavior3MSIM 4513
Approved Program Elective3Upper-Division General Education course/Option D Course I3
 16 16
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MSIM 4413ENMA 480***3
MSIM 487W (grade of C or better required)4MSIM 4883
Upper-Division General Education course/Option D Course II3Approved Program Elective3
ENMA 4013Interpreting the Past3
Approved MSIM Technical Elective II3Impact of Technology****3
 16 15
Total credit hours: 127

*

Does not include the University's General Education language and culture requirement. Additional hours may be required.

**

Students in the Modeling and Simulation Engineering program may substitute BIOL 115N and BIOL 116N in place of the CHEM 121N, CHEM 122N, and CHEM 123N requirement.

***

Meets philosophy and ethics general education requirement.

****

Not necessarily met by the associate degree. Coursework may be taken either at Old Dominion University or the community college.

The General Education requirements in information literacy and research and philosophy and ethics are met through the major.

Program Continuance Regulations

It is the policy of the Department of Modeling, Simulation and Visualization Engineering to deny a student eligibility to enroll in program courses after it becomes evident that the student is unable to maintain reasonable standards of academic achievement. This department continuance regulation is in addition to any University continuance regulations.

At the end of each semester, including summer sessions, the department reviews the records of all students. Depending on the number of credits attempted and the major grade point average earned, the following actions are taken prior to the beginning of the next term.

  1. After six or more credits in the major have been attempted, if the major grade point average falls below 2.00 the student is placed on departmental academic probation.
  2. A student who is on academic probation is subject to termination from the program under the following conditions:
    1. if fewer than 35 credits in the major have been attempted and a deficiency of more than nine grade points below that required to maintain a 2.00 cumulative grade point average in the major exists; or
    2. if 35 or more credits in the major have been attempted and a deficiency of more than six grade points below that required to maintain a 2.00 cumulative grade point average in the major exists.

Appeals of termination from the program are in order if extenuating circumstances warrant. Appeals are to be made in writing to the chair of the department. When submitted, an appeal is reviewed by the chair and a departmental faculty committee.

Minor in Modeling and Simulation

The department offers a minor in modeling and simulation.  For more information, see the section on minors in this catalog.  /undergraduate/frankbattencollegeofengineeringandtechnology/minorsbattencollege/

For further information contact the Department of Modeling, Simulation, and Visualization Engineering.

MODELING AND SIMULATION Courses

MSIM 111. Information Literacy and Research for Modeling and Simulation Engineers. 2 Credits.

Prerequisites: ENGN 110. An introduction to methods and standards for locating and using information in the discipline of modeling and simulation engineering. Topics include: assessing information requirements; searching for, locating and evaluating information sources related to modeling and simulation; tools for managing, sharing, and presenting information; and ethical issues in the use of information. Students will complete exercises and research on topics involving information of interest to modeling and simulation engineers.

MSIM 201. Introduction to Modeling and Simulation Engineering. 3 Credits.

This is the first course for Modeling and Simulation Engineering (M&SE) students. M&SE discipline is surveyed at an overview level of detail. Topics include basic definitions, M&S paradigms and methodologies, applications, design processes, and human factors. Information literacy and research methods are addressed. Papers and oral presentations are required and allow the student to investigate different aspects of the discipline. The course provides a general conceptual framework for further M&SE studies. Pre- or corequisite: CS 150 and MATH 163.

MSIM 205. Discrete Event Simulation. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: MSIM 201. An introduction to the fundamentals of modeling and simulating discrete-state, event-driven systems. Topics include basic simulation concepts and terms, queuing theory models for discrete event systems, structure of discrete event simulations, problem formulation and specification, input data representation, output data analysis, verification and validation, and the design of simulation exeriments.

MSIM 281. Discrete Event Simulation Laboratory. 1 Credit.

A laboratory course designed to provide a hands-on introduction to the development and application of discrete event simulation. Topics include an introduction to one or more discrete event simulation tools, common modeling constructs, data gathering and input data modeling, design of simulation experiments, output data analysis, and verification and validation. The design and implementation of a series of increasingly complex simulations of various discrete event systems are conducted. The laboratory is designed to accompany MSIM 205. Student written reports are required.

MSIM 320. Continuous Simulation. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the fundamentals of modeling and simulating continuous-state, time-driven systems. Topics include differential equation representation of systems, formulation of state variable equations, numerical integration, and techniques for numerical solution of differential equations including the Taylor algorithm and the methods of Runge-Kutta. Application domains considered include physical and biological systems. Corequisite: MSIM 382. Prerequisites: MATH 307(or MATH 280)and MSIM 201. Pre- or corequisite: PHYS 227N or PHYS 232N.

MSIM 331. Simulation Software Design. 3 Credits.

Introduction to data structures, algorithms, programming methodologies, and software architectures in support of computer simulation. Topics include lists, queues, sets, trees, searching, sorting, reusable code, and order of complexity. Simulation structures developed include event lists, time management, and queuing models. Software models are implemented and tested. Corequisite: MSIM 383. Prerequisites: MSIM 205, CS 330 and CS 381.

MSIM 367. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits.

Prerequisites: approval by department and Career Management. Student participation for credit based on the academic relevance of work experience, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and Career Management prior to the semester in which the work is to take place. (Qualifies as a CAP experience).

MSIM 368. Internship. 1-3 Credits.

Prerequisites: approval by department and Career Management. Academic requirements will be established by the department and will vary with the amount of credit desired. Allows students to gain short duration career-related experience. (Qualifies as a CAP experience).

MSIM 369. Practicum. 1-3 Credits.

Prerequisites: approval by the department and Career Management. Academic requirements will be established by the department and will vary with the amount of credit desired. Allows students to gain short duration career-related experience. (Qualifies as a CAP experience).

MSIM 382. Continuous Simulation Laboratory. 1 Credit.

A laboratory course designed to provide a hands-on introduction to the development and application of continuous simulation. Topics include an introduction to one or more continuous simulation tools, modeling of various physics-based systems, and numerical solution of differential equations. The design and implementation of a series of increasingly complex simulations of various continuous sytems are conducted. Written communication skills are stressed; weekly writing assignments are required. The laboratory is designed to accompany MSIM 320. Student written reports are required.

MSIM 383. Simulation Software Design Laboratory. 1 Credit.

A laboratory course designed to provide a hands-on introduction to the development of simulation software. Topics include data structures, algorithms, and simulation executives. The students will conclude with the development of a basic simulation executive capable of managing discrete event simulations. Written communication skills are stressed; writing is required for each laboratory assignment. The laboratory is designed to accompany MSIM 331. Student written reports are required.

MSIM 395. Topics in Modeling and Simulation Engineering. 1-3 Credits.

Prerequisites: permission of the instructor. Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on the recent developments in modeling and simulation engineering.

MSIM 396. Topics in Modeling and Simulation Engineering. 1-3 Credits.

Prerequisites: permission of the instructor. Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on the recent developments in modeling and simulation engineering.

MSIM 406/506. Introduction to Distributed Simulation. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: MSIM 331. An introduction to distributed simulation. Topics include motivation for using distributed simulation, distributed simulation architectures, time management issues, and distributed simulation approaches. Current standards for distributed simulation are presented.

MSIM 408/508. Introduction to Game Development. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: CS 361 or MSIM 331. An introductory course focused on game development theory and modern practices with emphasis on educational game development. Topics covered include game architecture, computer graphics theory, user interaction, audio, high level shading language, animation, physics, and artificial intelligence. Students will develop games related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. The developed games can run on a variety of computer, mobile, and gaming platforms.

MSIM 410/510. Model Engineering. 3 Credits.

The goal of this course is to develop understanding of the various modeling paradigms appropriate for capturing system behavior and conducting digital computer simulation of many types of systems. The techniques and concepts discussed typically include UML, concept graphs, Bayesian nets, Markov models, Petri nets, system dynamics, Bond graphs, etc. Students will report on a particular technique and team to implement a chosen system model. (cross-listed with ECE 410) Prerequisites: MSIM 205. Pre- or corequisite: MSIM 320.

MSIM 441/541. Computer Graphics and Visualization. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: CS 250. An introduction to visualization techniques and graphical systems and methods as applied to simulation. Topics include surfaces, solids, and realism techniques such as visible surface, lighting, shadows, and surface detail. Applications to modeling and simulation including 2-D and 3-D solid models, data visualization, and animation.

MSIM 451/551. Analysis for Modeling and Simulation. 3 Credits.

An introduction to analysis techniques appropriate to the conduct of modeling and simulation studies. Topics include input modeling, random number generation, output analysis, variance reduction techniques, and experimental design. In addition, techniques for verification & validation are introduced. Course concepts are applied to real systems and data. Prerequisites: MSIM 205 and STAT 330.

MSIM 487W. Capstone Design I. 4 Credits.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C; MSIM 310, MSIM 331, and MSIM 351. Part one of the senior capstone design experience for modeling and simulation engineering majors. Lectures focus on providing professional orientation and exploration of the M&S design process. Written communication, oral communication and information literary skills are stressed. Individual and group design projects focus on the conduct of a complete M&S project. Industry-sponsored projects are an option. Individual and team reports and oral presentations are required. (This is a writing intensive course.).

MSIM 488. Capstone Design II. 3 Credits.

Part two of the senior capstone design experience for modeling and simulation engineering majors. Lectures focus on providing professional orientation and exploration of the M&S design process. Written communication, oral communication and information literacy skills are stressed. Individual and group design projects focus on the conduct of a complete M&S project. Industry-sponsored projects are an option. Individual and team reports and oral presentations are required. Prerequisites: MSIM 441 and MSIM 487W.

MSIM 495/595. Topics in Modeling and Simulation Engineering. 1-3 Credits.

Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on recent developments in modeling and simulation engineering. Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.

MSIM 496/596. Topics in Modeling and Simulation Engineering. 1-3 Credits.

Prerequisites: permission of the instructor. Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on the recent developments in modeling and simulation engineering.

MSIM 497/597. Independent Study in Modeling and Simulation Engineering. 3 Credits.

Individual analytical, computational, and/or experimental study in an area seleted by the student. Supervised and approved by the advisor.