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Old Dominion University

2014-2015 Catalog

Engineering Technology

http://www.eng.odu.edu/et/

Alok Verma, Chair

The primary goal of the Department of Engineering Technology and its programs is to provide a general yet sufficiently specialized education to equip the student for immediate employment in a variety of engineering and technical fields. In general, the engineering technology programs provide an opportunity for students who desire a technical undergraduate education with an emphasis directed toward applications of engineering knowledge to solve actual industrial problems. As a result, the engineering technology programs emphasize the practical application of technical knowledge with a strong laboratory program supporting the lecture content of the curricula. For further information, please visit the department web site: http://www.odu.edu/engtech.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Engineering Technology Department is to provide students with preeminent, nationally recognized engineering technology programs that carefully balance theory, robust applied laboratory and engaging classroom experiences designed to serve as a strong foundation of knowledge and skills, enabling graduates to seize opportunities in traditional and emerging careers in civil, electrical and mechanical engineering technology.

The Department of Engineering Technology offers two program categories leading to the Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology degree. The first program category includes programs that are accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission (ETAC) of ABET, http://www.abet.org. The programs in this category are civil engineering technology (CET), electrical engineering technology (EET), and mechanical engineering technology (MET). Graduates of ETAC of ABET accredited programs are eligible to take the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) or the Fundamentals of Land Surveying (FLS) examination in Virginia and in most states. The exam is the first step to licensure as a professional engineer. The programs in this category also offer different options and areas of specialization to meet student interests and industry needs. These options and areas of specialization are listed under each program.

The Department of Engineering Technology also offers a second type of degree option: the Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology with a program in general engineering technology (GET). This program is designed for students with military training and education in mechanical or electrical engineering technology.  The diverse technical education and career background of these students often requires an interdisciplinary mixture of courses utilizing more than one engineering technology field to meet specific educational and career objectives. The GET program meets this objective. The GET program includes the electromechanical systems option. Other options may be developed in coordination with the general engineering technology program advisor.

All upper-level courses required for all engineering technology programs are delivered via distance learning through ODU's distance learning system. Thus, students with associate degrees may complete degree requirements without attending the main campus.

Computer Requirement

The Frank Batten College of Engineering and Technology requires that all incoming freshmen to the college have a notebook or laptop computer that meets or exceeds the Mobile Monarch Student Notebook Program's recommended models for engineering majors. Students are strongly encouraged to consider purchasing one of the Mobile Monarch Student Notebook Program's notebooks; however, students may bring their own notebook if it meets the specifications. More information, including the notebook loaner program, can be found at http://www.odu.edu/efd.

Civil Engineering Technology

Nestor Escobales, Program Director

The Civil Engineering Technology (CET) program is accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission (ETAC) of ABET, http://www.abet.org/.  The CET program offers areas of specialization in construction management, structural design, and site development.  Students in this program are prepared for employment in a wide range of professional and technical positions with the construction, consulting engineering, surveying and site development industries.  Graduates are eligible to take the Fundamentals of Engineering exam, the first step to licensure as a professional engineer. CET courses include topics such as computer-aided drafting, statics, strength of materials, materials testing, surveying, building construction, steel and concrete design, soils and foundations, and hydrology and drainage. Effective written, oral and graphic communications are practiced throughout the curriculum along with computer literacy. The program culminates in a senior project that integrates course work with a practical project assignment in the student's area of interest. To satisfy the upper-division general education requirements, students are encouraged to complete a minor in engineering management, business management, environmental health and safety, or mechanical engineering technology.

Construction Management Area of Concentration

This option prepares students for careers in the construction industry by providing a combination of knowledge and skills from a number of disciplines.  In addition to the basic technical skills in structures, materials, fluids, etc., students in construction management take courses in scheduling, project management, cost estimating, and other topics that enable projects to be completed on schedule and within budget. Graduates of the construction management area of concentration are employed at both large and small companies as project engineers, field engineers, assistant superintendents, estimators, schedulers, and similar construction related positions.

Structural Design Area of Concentration

This option prepares students for careers in both the public and private sectors.  In addition to the basic technical skills in statics, strength of materials, structural analysis, etc., students concentrating in structural design take courses in computer applications in structural design, structural steel, reinforced concrete, wood design, design of structural systems, and environmental loads.  Graduates from this concentration have found employment at both large and small companies as design engineers, project engineers, structural engineers, and similar structural related positions.

Site Development Area of Concentration

This option prepares students to develop survey plans, prepare subdivision plats, design site improvements, obtain approvals and entitlements, and provide turn-key services to manage developments. Students choosing this area of concentration will take course work in hydrology and drainage, land design and development, boundary law, and hydraulic engineering.  Graduates from this concentration are employed in government agencies, engineering firms and surveying firms.

Civil Engineering Technology Program

Mission Statement

The mission of the Civil Engineering Technology (CET) program is to sustain a high quality undergraduate program of study leading to the Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology degree. The program prepares graduates to become certified in their area of specialization. Civil engineering technology is a significant component of the University's commitment to science, engineering and technology, particularly in structural design, construction, site development and related fields, which are of major importance to civilization. Students around the world are enabled to expand opportunities to enhance their education and pursue baccalaureate level studies through the University's distance learning program. Simultaneously, the program supports the general education components that yield a well-rounded graduate who is aware of and able to address societal needs and issues.

Program Objectives

The objective of the Civil Engineering Technology program is to prepare graduates to establish themselves as successful professionals in structural building design, construction, and surveying/land design or related areas during the first few years of their careers by having demonstrated their ability to:

  1. Address and solve increasingly complex technical problems related to one's professional field and area of specialization.
  2. Make well educated, responsible and ethical decisions that will have a positive impact on organization and society.
  3. Work effectively in teams and precisely communicate ideas.
  4. Continue personal and professional growth.

Typical technical problems that CET graduates will be able to address include: building and non-building type structures and construction operations. Typical technical tasks the CET graduates will be expected to perform include: planning and design, field testing and inspection, on-site technical coordination and control, and other tasks relevant to one's emphasis area.

Program Outcomes

The civil engineering technology program has adopted, after deliberations by its constituents, 11 outcomes for the Bachelor of Science program in civil engineering technology. These outcomes are listed below.

  1. an ability to select and apply the knowledge, techniques, skills, and modern tools of the discipline to broadly-defined engineering technology activities;
  2. an ability to select and apply a knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to engineering technology problems that require the application of principles and applied procedures or methodologies;
  3. an ability to conduct standard tests and measurements; to conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments; and to apply experimental results to improve processes;
  4. an ability to design systems, components, or processes for broadly-defined engineering technology problems appropriate to program educational objectives;
  5. an ability to function effectively as a member or leader on a technical team;
  6. an ability to identify, analyze, and solve broadly-defined engineering technology problems;
  7. an ability to apply written, oral, and graphical communication in both technical and non-technical environments; and an ability to identify and use appropriate technical literature;
  8. an understanding of the need for and an ability to engage in self-directed continuing professional development;
  9. an understanding of and a commitment to address professional and ethical responsibilities including a respect for diversity;
  10. a knowledge of the impact of engineering technology solutions in a societal and global context; and
  11. a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.

Civil Engineering Technology Curriculum*

Critical CET course sequences within the Civil Engineering Technology curricula require a minimum grade of C before progressing to subsequent courses. Refer to the individual CET course descriptions for information on specific C grade prerequisites. A grade of C- does not satisfy the requirement for a C grade.

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
CET 1203Human Creativity Way of Knowing3
ENGN 1102ENGT 1112
MATH 162M3MATH 1633
CHEM 121N3PHYS 111N4
CHEM 122N1ENGL 110C (grade of C or better required)3
Human Behavior Way of Knowing3 
 15 15
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
CET 200 (grade of C or better required)3CET 2053
MATH 211 (grade of C or better required)4CET 220 (grade of C or better required)3
PHYS 112N4CET 345W (grade of C or better required)2
ENGL 211C (grade of C or better required)3EET 3053
Literature Way of Knowing3COMM 101R3
 Philosophy and Ethics Way of Knowing**3
 17 17
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
CET 2103CET 3403
CET 3013CET 341W (grade of C or better required)2
CET Elective3CET 360****3
CET 3303CET Elective3
MET 335W (grade of C or better required)1ENMA 3023
Upper Division Gen Ed***3 
 16 14
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
CET 3553CET 410 or 4503
CET 4341CET 4753
CET 4403Two CET Electives6
CET Elective3Impact of Technology Way of Knowing3
Upper Divsion Gen Ed***3 
Interpreting the Past Way of Knowing3 
ENGN 4011 
 17 15
Total credit hours: 126
*

Does not include the University's General Education language and culture requirement. Additional hours may be required.

**

ENMA 480 Ethics and Philosophy in Engineering Applications is preferred.

***

One or more additional courses will be required to complete a minor. See advisor for details.

****

Students with an interest in construction, design or site development may substitute an alternate course with approval of their advisor.

The General Education information literacy and research requirement is met though the major.
 

Electrical Engineering Technology

John R. Hackworth, Program Director

The electrical engineering technology (EET) program is accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission (ETAC) of ABET, http://www.abet.org/. The EET program contains both an electrical systems technology concentration and a computer engineering technology concentration. Students in either concentration take courses in dc and ac circuits, electronic devices and circuits, digital electronics, linear electronics, microprocessors, and programming. Supporting laboratories provide experience in instrumentation, testing and trouble-shooting, and design and implementation. Graduates should be qualified for application positions in electronic and electrical product design and development, electronic and electrical system operation and maintenance, field operations, and various other technical functions.

Electrical Systems Technology Concentration

Students choosing the electrical systems technology concentration will take required courses in electrical power and machinery and transmission networks. The remainder of the technical program consists of senior electives in such areas as communications, high frequency and microwave technology, control systems, power systems, and other areas. To satisfy the upper-division general education requirement, students are required to complete any minor in the College of Engineering and Technology or the College of Sciences.

Computer Engineering Technology Concentration

Students choosing the computer engineering technology (ComET) concentration will take a series of courses offered by both the Department of Engineering Technology and the Department of Computer Science. These include additional C++ programming and problem solving, data structures, and software engineering. The remainder of the program will consist of a combination of senior electives in computer science and specific electrical courses that support the computer engineering technology concentration. Computer engineering technology majors will automatically satisfy a minor in computer science.

Electrical Engineering Technology Program

Mission Statement

The mission of the Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) program is to sustain a high quality undergraduate program of study leading to the Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology degree. It is a significant component of the University's commitment to science, engineering and technology, particularly in fields of major importance to the region. Through the University's distance learning program, the electrical engineering technology program provides opportunities for technical personnel throughout the state and elsewhere to enhance their education and pursue baccalaureate level studies. Simultaneously, the program supports the general education components that yield a well-rounded graduate who is aware of societal needs and issues.

Program Objectives

The objective of the electrical engineering technology program is to prepare graduates to establish themselves as successful professionals in electrical systems technology, computer engineering technology or related areas during the first few years of their careers by having demonstrated their ability to:

  1. Address and solve increasingly complex technical problems related to one's professional field and area of specialization.
  2. Make well educated, responsible and ethical decisions that will have a positive impact on organization and society.
  3. Work effectively in teams and precisely communicate ideas.
  4. Continue personal and professional growth.

Typical technical problems that EET graduates will be able to address include: planning, specification, development, design, procurement of equipment and materials, implementation, and performance verification. Typical technical tasks the EET graduates will be expected to perform include: conduct engineering experiments, make observations, collect and analyze data, and formulate conclusions.

Program Outcomes

The electrical engineering technology program has adopted, after deliberations by its constituents, 11 outcomes for the Bachelor of Science program in electrical engineering technology. These outcomes are listed below.

  1. an ability to select and apply the knowledge, techniques, skills, and modern tools of the discipline to broadly-defined engineering technology activities;
  2. an ability to select and apply a knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to engineering technology problems that require the application of principles and applied procedures or methodologies;
  3. an ability to conduct standard tests and measurements; to conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments; and to apply experimental results to improve processes;
  4. an ability to design systems, components, or processes for broadly-defined engineering technology problems appropriate to program educational objectives;
  5. an ability to function effectively as a member or leader on a technical team;
  6. an ability to identify, analyze, and solve broadly-defined engineering technology problems;
  7. an ability to apply written, oral, and graphical communication in both technical and non-technical environments; and an ability to identify and use appropriate technical literature;
  8. an understanding of the need for and an ability to engage in self-directed continuing professional development;
  9. an understanding of and a commitment to address professional and ethical responsibilities including a respect for diversity;
  10. a knowledge of the impact of engineering technology solutions in a societal and global context; and
  11. a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement. 

Electrical Engineering Technology Curriculum

Critical EET course sequences within the Electrical Engineering Technology curricula require a minimum grade of C before progressing to subsequent courses. Refer to the individual EET course descriptions for information on specific C grade prerequisites. A grade of C- does not satisfy the requirement for a C grade.

Electrical Systems Technology Concentration*

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
EET 1203EET 1103
EET 1252ENGT 1112
ENGN 1102MATH 1633
MATH 162M3PHYS 111N4
ENGL 110C (grade of C or better required)3Human Creativity Way of Knowing3
Human Behavior Way of Knowing3 
 16 15
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
EET 2003EET 2203
EET 2052EET 2252
EET 2103Laboratory Science14
PHYS 112N4COMM 101R3
MATH 2114ENGL 211C (grade of C or better required)3
 16 15
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
EET 3003EET 3124
EET 3053EET 3203
EET 3103EET 3252
EET 3152EET 3303
EET 3603Literature Way of Knowing3
EET 365W2Interpreting the Past Way of Knowing3
 16 18
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
EET 3352EET 480W (grade of C or better required)3
EET 4341Senior Elective (EET)3
Senior Electives (EET)3Minor26
EET 370T3ENMA 48033
Minor26 
 15 15
Total credit hours: 126
*

Does not include the University's General Education language and culture requirement. Additional hours may be required.

1

  CHEM 121N and CHEM 122N are recommended, especially for those who plan to take the Fundamentals of Engineering Examination.

2

  Students must select from any minor in either the College of Engineering and Technology or the College of  Sciences. Note that minors requiring more than four courses will increase the total credits required to complete the degree.

3

  Meets philosophy and ethics general education requirement.

The General Education requirements in information literacy and research, impact of technology, and philosophy and ethics are met through the major.

Computer Engineering Technology Concentration*

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
EET 1203EET 1103
EET 1252ENGT 1112
ENGN 1102MATH 1633
MATH 162M3PHYS 111N4
ENGL 110C (grade of C or better required)3Laboratory Science14
Human Behavior Way of Knowing3 
 16 16
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
EET 2003EET 2203
EET 2052ENGL 211C (grade of C or better required)3
EET 2103MATH 2114
PHYS 112N4CS 2504
CS 1504CS 2521
 16 15
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
EET 3003EET 3124
EET 3053EET 3203
EET 3103EET 3252
EET 3152EET 3303
CS 3613CS 3503
Literature Way of Knowing3 
 17 15
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
EET 3352EET 480W (grade of C or better required)3
EET 4341Senior Elective (EET)3
Senior Elective (EET)3COMM 101R3
EET 370T3Human Creativity Way of Knowing3
Senior Electives (CS)6ENMA 48023
Interpreting the Past Way of Knowing3 
 18 15
Total credit hours: 128
*

Does not include the University's General Education language and culture requirement. Additional hours may be required.

1

 CHEM 121N and CHEM 122N are recommended, especially for those who plan to take the Fundamentals of Engineering Examination.

2

 Meets philosophy and ethics general education requirement.

The General Education requirements in information literacy and research, impact of technology, and philosophy and ethics are met through the major.

Mechanical Engineering Technology

Cheng Y. Lin, Program Director

The mechanical engineering technology (MET) program is accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission (ETAC) of ABET, http://www.abet.org/. The MET program offers areas of concentration in manufacturing systems, mechanical systems design, nuclear systems, and marine systems. Students in this program take common courses in areas such as computer-aided drafting, statics, strength of materials, dynamics, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, automation and controls, and computer solid modeling. The program culminates in a senior project that integrates course work with a practical project assignment in the student's area of interest. To satisfy the upper-division general education requirements, students are required to complete a minor within the College of Engineering and Technology or the College of Sciences. Graduates should be qualified for application positions in mechanical product design, development and manufacturing, mechanical system operation and maintenance, field operations, and various other technical functions.

Manufacturing Systems Area of Concentration

Along with the courses previously mentioned, various senior electives are available in the manufacturing area such as robotics, computer numerical control in production, advanced manufacturing processes, and lean engineering. Graduates of the manufacturing systems area of concentration are prepared for employment in a wide range of professional and technical positions at both large and small companies in areas such as manufacturing engineering, quality control, production management, test engineering, and maintenance management.

Mechanical Systems Design Area of Concentration

The mechanical systems design area of concentration provides the skills for career success in designing, building, and installing mechanical systems of all descriptions including thermal and air conditioning systems, automated production equipment, and power systems. Graduates of this area of concentration are prepared for careers in engineering, fabrication, and technical positions in both the public and private sectors.

Nuclear Systems Area of Concentration

The nuclear systems area of concentration is a special program available only to graduates of the U. S. Navy Nuclear Power School or programs related to nuclear power plant operation through Dominion Energy. These students receive advanced standing credits that apply to the MET degree based on their professional education in nuclear power systems.

Marine Systems Area of Concentration

Senior electives related to this area of concentration include: MET 475 Principles of Marine Engineering I, MET 476 Principles of Marine Engineering II, and MET 485 Maintenance Engineering. It should attract students interested in ships' systems operation and the shipbuilding/repair industry.

Mechanical Engineering Technology Program

Mission Statement

The mission of the Mechanical Engineering Technology (MET) program is to sustain a high quality undergraduate program of study leading to the Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology degree. It is a significant component of the University's commitment to science, engineering and technology, particularly in fields of major importance to the region. Through the University's distance learning program, the mechanical engineering technology program provides opportunities for technical personnel throughout the state and elsewhere to enhance their education and pursue baccalaureate level studies. Simultaneously, the program supports the general education components that yield a well-rounded graduate who is aware of societal needs and issues.

Program Objectives

The objective of the mechanical engineering technology program is to prepare graduates to establish themselves as successful professionals in mechanical systems or related areas during the first few years of their careers by having demonstrated their ability to:

  1. Address and solve increasingly complex technical problems related to one's professional field and area of concentration.
  2. Make well educated, responsible and ethical decisions that will have a positive impact on organization and society.
  3. Work effectively in teams and precisely communicate ideas.
  4. Continue personal and professional growth.

Typical technical problems that MET graduates will be able to address include: planning, specification, development, design, procurement of equipment and materials, implementation, and performance verification. Typical technical tasks the MET graduates will be expected to perform include: conduct engineering experiments, make observations, collect and analyze data, and formulate conclusions.

Program Outcomes

The mechanical engineering technology program has adopted, after deliberations by its constituents, 11 outcomes for the Bachelor of Science program in mechanical engineering technology. These outcomes are listed below:

  1. an ability to select and apply the knowledge, techniques, skills, and modern tools of the discipline to broadly-defined engineering technology activities;
  2. an ability to select and apply a knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to engineering technology problems that require the application of principles and applied procedures or methodologies;
  3. an ability to conduct standard tests and measurements; to conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments; and to apply experimental results to improve processes;
  4. an ability to design systems, components, or processes for broadly-defined engineering technology problems appropriate to program educational objectives;
  5. an ability to function effectively as a member or leader on a technical team;
  6. an ability to identify, analyze, and solve broadly-defined engineering technology problems;
  7. an ability to apply written, oral, and graphical communication in both technical and non-technical environments; and an ability to identify and use appropriate technical literature;
  8. an understanding of the need for and an ability to engage in self-directed continuing professional development;
  9. an understanding of and a commitment to address professional and ethical responsibilities including a respect for diversity;
  10. a knowledge of the impact of engineering technology solutions in a societal and global context; and
  11. a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement. 

Mechanical Engineering Technology Curriculum*

Critical MET course sequences within the Mechanical Engineering Technology curricula require a minimum grade of C before progressing to subsequent courses. Refer to the individual MET course descriptions for information on specific C grade prerequisites. A grade of C- does not satisfy the requirement for a C grade.

Freshman
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MET 1203MET 2403
ENGN 1102ENGT 1112
MATH 162M3MATH 1633
CHEM 121N3PHYS 111N4
CHEM 122N1ENGL 110C (grade of C or better required)3
Human Behavior Way of Knowing3 
 15 15
Sophomore
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MET 2003CET 2203
CET 2003MET 2251
MATH 2114STEM 221 or 2313
PHYS 112N4COMM 101R3
ENGL 211C (grade of C or better required)3Human Creativity Way of Knowing3
 Gen Ed Literature3
 17 16
Junior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MET 3003MET 3303
MET 3103MET 335W1
MET 3203MET 3503
EET 3053MET 370**3
EET 3503MET 386**1
EET 3551ENMA 480***3
 Minor****3
 16 17
Senior
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
MET 3872MET 435W (grade of C or better required)3
MET 4341Senior Electives (MET)6
ENGN 4011Minor****6
Senior Electives (MET)6 
Minor****3 
Interpreting the Past Way of Knowing3 
 16 15
Total credit hours: 127
*

Does not include the University's General Education language and culture requirement. Additional hours may be required.

**

Must be taken together.

***

 Meets philosophy and ethics general education requirement.

****

Students must select from any minor in either the College of Engineering and Technology or the College of Sciences. Note that minors requiring more than four courses will increase the total credits required to complete the degree.

General Education requirements in information literacy and research, impact of technology, and philosophy and ethics are met through the major.

General Engineering Technology

Alok Verma, Program Director
Robert F. Curry, Program Advisor

The Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology with a major in general engineering technology (GET) is designed for students with military training and education in mechanical or electrical engineering technology.  Students obtain a concentration in electromechanical systems and a minor in engineering management.  The degree program is included in the Navy College Program Distance Learning Partnership (NCPDLP), Air Force Associate's to Bachelor's Cooperative (A-B-C), Coast Guard Afloat Education, and Marine Corps Career College Program.

Program Goals

The goals of the general engineering technology program are fully supportive of the mission of the University and can be summarized as follows:

  • Provide broad-based engineering technology studies at the advanced level, combined with complementary engineering management studies.
  • Enhance a student's career progression in either the military or a civilian capacity.
  • Prepare graduates for positions in technical leadership or management that require knowledge of technology, as well as the ability to manage personnel and projects of an engineering nature.
  • Provide a general education to improve the graduate's ability to communicate effectively and function as a responsible citizen.
  • Develop and demonstrate a national model for delivering distance education utilizing state-of-the-art electronic media, including virtual laboratories and simulation tools.

Lower Division General Education

To participate in this program, students must have at least 24 relevant military credits (based on ACE recommendations) that satisfy the required lower-division technical base.

Lower Division General Education
Written Communication Skills (grade of C or better required in both)6
Oral Communication (COMM 101R preferred)3
Language and Culture0-6
Mathematical Skills3
Precalculus I (required)
Information Literacy and Research3
Human Creativity3
Interpreting the Past3
Literature3
Philosophy and Ethics3
The Nature of Science8
Introductory General Physics
   and Introductory General Physics
Human Behavior3
Impact of Technology3
Total Hours41-47

Departmental Requirements

The following table details the required upper division courses, which are 14 hours in electrical engineering technology, 13 hours in mechanical engineering technology, and 12 hours in engineering management.  All of the upper-division courses are available by distance learning in multiple formats, making the program accessible from any location.

Departmental Requirements
MATH 163Precalculus II3
MATH 211Calculus I4
EET 350Fundamentals of Electrical Technology3
EET 360Electrical Power and Machinery3
EET 365WElectrical Power and Machinery Laboratory (grade of C or better required)2
EET 410Communication Principles3
EET 415Programmable Machine Controls3
MET 300Thermodynamics3
MET 305Fundamentals of Mechanics3
MET 310Dynamics3
MET 330Fluid Mechanics3
MET 335WFluid Mechanics Laboratory (grade of C or better required)1
ENMA 301Introduction to Engineering Management3
ENMA 302Engineering Economics3
ENMA 401Project Management3
ENMA 420Statistical Concepts in Engineering Management3
Department Technical Base24
Free Electives3-9
Total Hours73-79

 A minimum of 120 credit hours and a 2.0 grade point average in the major, minor and overall are required.

CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Courses

CET 120. Civil 2D Computerized Aided Drafting. 3 Credits.

This course is computer based drafting, where methods are taught with a major emphasis on practical application using two-dimensional AutoCAD software in the computer lab. This includes the basic principles of Civil Engineer drawings to include but not limited to: dimensioning and tolerances, spot elevations, contours, plan and profile view, section views, details, scaling, measurements. It will introduce students to site plan drawings, mechanical view, structural views, architectural views, roadway plan and profiles, as well as buried infrastructure plan and profiles. Finally, it will be the basis for preparation of a working set of plans, for use in all follow-on CET courses.

CET 200. Statics. 3 Credits.

Scalar methods and free body diagrams are employed in the analysis of discrete and distributed force systems and their application to bodies in external equilibrium. Friction, moment of inertia, and center of gravity are also included. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 211.

CET 205. Principles of Surveying. 3 Credits.

Basic plane surveying measurements and computations, survey control systems, elementary digital mapping and simple curves, and building construction survey and stakeout. Field exercises using standard surveying instrumentation, traverse and leveling techniques, topographic mapping and curve layout. Prerequisites: MATH 163 and MET 120.

CET 210. Fundamentals of Building Construction. 3 Credits.

Introduction to various materials and methods available for design and construction of buildings. Covers application and combination of traditional materials and methods, and recent innovations in construction systems. Prerequisites: sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.

CET 220. Strength of Materials. 3 Credits.

Mechanical behavior of materials subjected to various external loads. Stress-strain relationships are utilized to design members subjected to shear, axial, bending, and torsional loads. Deformations are predicted and Mohr's circle is introduced. Prerequisites: MATH 211 and CET 200.

CET 295. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Study of selected topics.

CET 296. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Study of selected topics.

CET 301. Structural Analysis. 3 Credits.

Determination of forces, moments, and deflections in statically determinate and indeterminate beams, frames, and trusses due to various load cases and load combinations. Methods of analysis will include matrix stiffness analysis, moment distribution and other approximate and computer methods. Prerequisite: CET 220.

CET 314. Boundary Law. 3 Credits.

Laws, evidence and procedures in boundary surveying. Topics include written, unwritten and riparian rights, easements, interpretation of written and field boundary evidence, subdivisions, and preparation of boundary descriptions and plans. Boundary project management and professional practice are emphasized throughout the course. Prerequisites: CET 205.

CET 319. Surveying for Engineers. 1 Credit.

Special topics in surveying for civil engineering students and professional engineers. Not open to civil engineering technology majors. Prerequisite: MATH 163.

CET 330. Fluid Mechanics. 3 Credits.

Elementary mechanics of fluids. Fluid properties; hydrostatics; fluid kinematics; equations of motion; energy equation; momentum principles; flow of liquids and gasses in closed conduits; flow in open channels and/or compressible flow. Use of spreadsheets is required. Prerequisite: CET 220.

CET 332. Water Resources Engineering. 3 Credits.

Hydrologic and hydraulic principles are utilized in the planning, design, operation and construction of water management projects. The course addresses fundamental hydrology, including precipitation and runoff and basic hydraulics including open channel flow, pipe networks and pumps. Prerequisites: CET 330.

CET 340. Soils and Foundations. 3 Credits.

A study of the engineering properties of soil including stress, shear strength, and bearing capacity. Movement of water through soils, consolidation and settlement of structures and the design of shallow and deep foundations are also covered. Prerequisite: CET 220.

CET 341W. Soils Testing Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Course includes standard methods for inspecting, sampling, testing, and evaluating soils. Students use typical test equipment and perform tests on samples of local soils. A written report is required for each experiment. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisite: CET 220; grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

CET 345W. Materials Testing Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Standard methods of inspecting and testing structural materials used in construction are followed. A written report is required for each experiment. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C. Pre- or corequisite: CET 220.

CET 355. Sustainable Building Practices. 3 Credits.

The course will examine industry trends in sustainable building practices. It explores the green building strategies used in the design and construction of sustainable buildings. The role of site selection, water efficiency, energy, materials and resources, and indoor environmental quality will be explored. Prerequisites: Junior standing.

CET 360. Plans and Specifications. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of the form and content of typical plans and specification documents used in the construction industry. The use of computer-aided drafting in assembling a set of plans and specifications. Prerequisites: CET 210 and MET 120 or CET 120.

CET 367. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits.

Available for pass/fail grading only. Student participation for credit based on the academic relevance of the work experience, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and Career Management prior to the semester in which the work experience is to take place. (offered fall, spring, summer) (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: approval by the department and Career Management in accordance with the policy for granting credit for Cooperative Education programs.

CET 368. Internship. 1-3 Credits.

Available for pass/fail grading only. Academic requirements will be established by the department and will vary with the amount of credit desired. Allows students to gain short duration career-related experience. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: approval by department and Career Management.

CET 369. Practicum. 1-3 Credits.

Available for pass/fail grading only. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: approval by department and Career Management.

CET 395. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Topics in Civil Engineering Technology. Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.

CET 396. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Topics in Civil Engineering Technology. Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.

CET 400. Computer Applications in Structural Design. 3 Credits.

Use and application of commercial software for analysis and design of building and non-building type structures. Determination of compliance with strength, serviceability, and fabrication requirements. Introduction to computer modeling in 2D and 3D, pre and post processors, interpretation of results and development of professionally written reports. Prerequisites: CET 301.

CET 405. Environmental Loads. 3 Credits.

Familiarize the student with the analysis of environmental design loads required for the design of building and non-building type structures in the United States. A thorough study of loading categories and load combinations for ASD and LRFD is also covered. Extensive use of the International Building Code (IBC) and the Minimum Design Loads for Building and Other Structures (ASCE 7) is expected. Prerequisites: CET 220.

CET 408. Hydraulic Engineering. 3 Credits.

Analysis of hydraulics problems associated with the design of civil engineering structures. Uniform, steady flow in open channels; hydraulic models; design problems for dams; spillways and hydraulic structures; hydraulic machinery and other related topics will be discussed. Use of spreadsheets is required. Prerequisites: CET 330. Pre- or corequisite: MET 335W.

CET 410. Reinforced Concrete Design. 3 Credits.

Structural analysis and design of reinforced concrete members. Topics include flexural analysis and design of structures, including slabs, beams and columns using strength design procedures. Prerequisite: CET 301.

CET 415. Design of Structural Systems. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on assembly design as opposed to member design as learned in structural design courses. The students are able to work on the overall stability of structures using one or more building materials such as concrete, wood, steel, cold-formed steel, and/or masonry. The use of building codes, standards and specifications is required. The main objective of this class is to adequately prepare the student for the senior design project. The course also offers an introduction to low-rise building design. Prerequisites: CET 450 or CET 410 or CET 452. Pre- or corequisite: CET 400.

CET 420. Hydrology and Drainage. 3 Credits.

Hydrologic and hydraulic principles are utilized in the planning, design, operation and construction of water management projects. Topics include elements of stormwater drainage pertaining to hydrology, hydraulics of open channel and pipe flow, stormwater management, and issues pertinent to state stormwater regulations and the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Act. The course also covers water distribution and sewage collection systems. Prerequisites: senior standing.

CET 425. Land Design and Development. 3 Credits.

Applications of fundamental site engineering principles, land design principles and permitting issues. A brief historical review of exemplary subdivision, NewTown, and urban designs and their impact on current practice. Site surveying and engineering issues including hydrology, storm water management, site geometry, grading, design of roads, engineering design standards and computer applications in site engineering are examined. The principles of siting and theories of design for esthetic and efficient alignment of roads, layout of structures and subdivision parcels are introduced. Prerequisites: CET 340 and CET 420.

CET 434. Introduction to Senior Project. 1 Credit.

This course must be taken in the semester prior to the Senior Project course. A collection of career-related topics pertaining to engineering technology. Topics include engineering codes and standards, engineering ethics, technical report writing, job search and resume writing techniques, patents and property rights, and professional engineering licensure. The course concludes with the selection of the student's project topic for the subsequent Senior Project course. Prerequisites: senior standing.

CET 440. Contract Documents. 3 Credits.

The basic concepts of contracts and the standard contract documents used in construction. Also included is a study of the dispute resolution process in arbitration. Prerequisites: CET 210.

CET 445. Construction Planning and Scheduling. 3 Credits.

The basic elements of planning and scheduling building construction projects. All elements of building construction, including the precedence methods of scheduling. Use of computers and planning and scheduling software are emphasized. Prerequisites: CET 210.

CET 450. Structural Steel Design. 3 Credits.

Structural analysis and design of steel structures, including beams, girders, columns, composite sections, trusses, rigid frames and connections using the LRFD method. Analysis of statically-determinate cantilever (hungspan) systems also are covered. Prerequisite: CET 301.

CET 452. Wood Design. 3 Credits.

Analysis and design of wooden structural elements of buildings to satisfy design codes. Included are shearwall design and connections as well as beams, columns and other elements. Prerequisite: CET 301.

CET 460. Construction Cost Estimating. 3 Credits.

Evaluation and analysis of the basic elements of estimating construction costs for buildings. Elements of take off and pricing for Division 1 through Division 6 are covered. Use of computers and estimating software are emphasized. Prerequisites: CET 210.

CET 465. Construction Project Management. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the procedures and methods that are used by a contractor during the construction phase of a project. Special emphasis on planning, managing and documenting project activities. Topics include job site layout and control, subcontracting and purchasing and changes and claims/progress payments. Prerequisite: CET 210.

CET 470. Infrastructure, Heavy Highway and Equipment. 3 Credits.

Methods and resources used to construct traditional civil infrastructure systems. Equipment utilization. Prerequisites: CET 205 and CET 210.

CET 475. Senior Design Project. 3 Credits.

Students in the structural design emphasis area must also have CET 360. Independent or group design projects in the various CET emphasis areas with instructor and/or mentor guidance. Projects should include development and design, leading to appropriate engineering documents, with written and oral reports. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: CET 434, final semester or permission of the instructor.

CET 495. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Topics in civil engineering technology. Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.

CET 496. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Topics in civil engineering technology. Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Courses

EET 110. Electrical Circuits I. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 162M. Fundamentals of electrical circuits including basic electrical parameters and variables, circuit laws and theorems, mesh analysis, node analysis, Thevenin's and Norton's Theorems, capacitance, inductance, magnetism, and elementary RC and RL transients.

EET 120. Logic Circuits and Microprocessors. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An introduction to logic circuits, Boolean algebra, digital interface devices, combinational and sequential logic design, and microprocessor fundamentals. (Offered Fall.).

EET 125. Logic And Microprocessor Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Lecture 1 hour; laboratory 2 hours; 2 credits. Pre-or corequisite: EET 120. Team-oriented experiments in basic combinational and sequential logic circuits and an introduction to fundamental microprocessors. (offered fall).

EET 195. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Study of selected topics.

EET 200. Electrical Circuits II. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: MATH 163 and a grade of C or better in EET 110 . A continuation of EET 110 with emphasis on steady-state ac circuit analysis and applications. Topics include alternating current and voltage, phasors and complex numbers and their applications in circuit analysis, series and parallel resonance, complex power, and polyphase circuits. (offered fall).

EET 205. Circuits Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Lecture 1 hour; laboratory 3 hours; 2 credits. Pre- or corequisite: EET 200. Electrical laboratory instruction including test equipment, measurements, data analysis, verification of circuit laws, formal report preparation, and circuit construction.

EET 210. Electronic Devices and Circuits I. 3 Credits.

Semiconductor properties and semiconductor devices including diodes, MOS field-effect transistors, junction field-effect transistors and bipolar junction transistors. The ideal operational amplifier and its applications. FET and BJT biasing, including constant current biasing, and amplifier circuits with emphasis on dc modeling and graphical analysis. Multisim simulation of circuit biasing. Prerequisites: EET 110.

EET 220. Electronic Devices and Circuits II. 3 Credits.

A continuation of EET 210. Small-signal analysis of transistor circuits emphasizing the hybrid-π equivalent circuit. Analysis of high frequency effects in FETs and BJTs and their effect on frequency response. Waveform generating and waveform modification circuits. High power devices and their applications, including power supplies and power amplifiers. Multisim simulation of circuit gain and frequency response. Prerequisites: EET 200 and EET 210.

EET 225. Electronics Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Lecture 1 hour; laboratory 3 hours; 2 credits. Prerequisite: EET 205. Pre- or corequisite: EET 220. Practical design, construction, testing and troubleshooting of electronic circuits including single state and multistage amplifiers, power amplifiers, linear integrated circuits, and control devices.

EET 295. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Study of selected topics.

EET 300. Advanced Circuit Analysis. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: MATH 211 and a grade of C or better in EET 200. General analysis of linear networks using classical methods, Laplace transforms and computer-aided methods. Topics include single element transients, first- and second-order circuits, transfer function analysis, and phasor analysis, Bode plots and waveform analysis. Circuit analysis software is used to supports the analytical methods.

EET 305. Advanced Technical Analysis. 3 Credits.

Analytical and computational methods to support upper-division engineering technology courses. Topics include linear algebra, ordinary differential equations of engineering systems, elements of vector analysis, introductory statistical concepts, and software usage/development. MATLAB is used throughout the course to support all the topics. Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in MATH 211.

EET 310. Digital Electronics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: EET 120, 125, 205, and 210. First course in an upper division sequence in digital electronics circuits and systems. Topics include a comprehensive treatment of Boolean algebra, computer arithmetic, and applications of digital integrated circuits.

EET 312. Wireless Communications I. 4 Credits.

Overview of communications systems including both time and frequency domain analysis. Topics include spectrum analysis, analog modulation methods, digital modulation methods, receiver design, and cellular technology. Virtual laboratory projects utilizing simulation software. Prerequisites: EET 300 and EET 305.

EET 315. Digital Electronics Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Lecture 1 hour; laboratory 3 hours; 2 credits. Pre- or corequisite: EET 310. Application oriented experiments and design problems in digital electronics. Prototype construction using wire-wrap methods will also be covered. Formal written reports will be required.

EET 320. Microprocessors and Microcontrollers. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: EET 310. Second lecture course in the upper-division digital electronics sequence. Software/hardware design of microprocessors and microcontrollers, interface circuitry, and system designs. Organization, architecture, software programming, simulation, peripheral interface designs, communication protocols, and the application of microprocessor-based systems design.

EET 325. Microprocessor Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Lecture 1 hour; laboratory 3 hours: 2 credits. Pre-or corequisite: EET 320. Hands-on implementation of microprocessor and microcontroller systems and peripheral interfacing experiments. Emphasis is placed on the hardware and software design and firmware construction in embedded system applications.

EET 330. Linear Electronics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: EET 220 and 300. General treatment of linear electronic circuits with emphasis on the operational amplifier and integrated circuits derived from it. Topics include various amplifier circuits and converters, integrators and differentiators, comparators, waveform generators, active filters, A/D and D/A converters, and regulators. Design of circuits to meet specifications. Circuit analysis software is used to validate some of the designs.

EET 335. Linear Electronics Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Lecture 1 hour; laboratory 3 hours; 2 credits. Pre- or corequisite: EET 330. Design testing, and evaluation of "linear" electronic circuits and subsystems with primary emphasis on circuit components and modules. Measurement techniques, instrumentation and error analysis. Simulation of circuit designs using Multisim including transient response and frequency response.

EET 340. Transmission Networks. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: EET 300. Transmission line theory including both transients and steady-state conditions. Smith chart and its application to RF design. Introduction to electric and magnetic fields and plane wave propagation. Circuit analysis software is used to support the analytical methods.

EET 350. Fundamentals of Electrical Technology. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 211. A comprehensive course in electrical engineering technology for nonmajors. Major topics are basic electricity (AC and DC), circuit analysis, linear electronics and digital electronics. Not open to electrical engineering technology majors except as a substitute for EET 110 in special cases.

EET 355. Electrical Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory 2 hours; 1 credit. Pre- or corequisite: EET 350. Selected electrical laboratory topics for nonmajors including basic measurements, instrumentation, operational amplifiers, digital circuits, and rotating machines. Not open to electrical engineering technology majors.

EET 360. Electrical Power and Machinery. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: EET 200 or EET 350. A study of synchronous and asynchronous AC machinery, DC machinery, power distribution systems,and instrumentation.

EET 365W. Electrical Power and Machinery Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Lecture 1 hour; laboratory 2 hours; 2 credits. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C; EET 205 or 355; Pre- or corequisite: EET 360. A laboratory course dealing with electrical power and machinery as covered in EET 360. Formal written reports will be required. (This is a writing intensive course.).

EET 367. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits (may be repeated for credit). Prerequisite: approval by the department and Career Management in accordance with the policy for granting credit for Cooperative Education programs. Available for pass/fail grading only. Student participation for credit based on the academic relevance of the work experience, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and Career Management prior to the semester in which the work experience is to take place. (qualifies as a CAP experience).

EET 368. Internship. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Prerequisite: approval by department and Career Management. Available for pass/fail grading only. Academic requirements will be established by the department and will vary with the amount of credit desired. Allows students to gain short duration career-related experience. (qualifies as a CAP experience).

EET 369. Practicum. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Prerequisite: approval by department and Career Management. Available for pass/fail grading only. (qualifies as a CAP experience).

EET 370T. Energy and the Environment. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Prerequisite: PHYS 101N or PHYS 111N or PHYS 226N or PHYS 231N. A study of existing and new energy production methods, energy as a purchased/traded commodity, physics of energy, positive and negative implications for the environment, economics of energy alternatives, and resulting human/social impacts.

EET 395. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Study of selected topics. Prerequisite: junior standing.

EET 396. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Study of selected topics. Prerequisite: junior standing.

EET 400. CAD Electronics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: EET 310, 320, 325. An upper-division study of the fundamentals of electronic schematic capture, circuit simulation, and printed circuit board design using microcomputers. Schematic symbols, simulation models, and pcb modules are developed by the students.

EET 405. Introduction to Local Area Networks. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: EET 320 and 325. Design, installation, and management of PC based local area networks. Topics include network topology (Ethernet, token ring, FDDI, etc.), network interface card installation and configuration, client/server hardware, LAN/WAN concepts, bridges and routers, and software controls.

EET 410. Communication Principles. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Prerequisite: EET 300 or 350. Fourier series and transforms, spectral analysis, signal transmission, analog modulation and detection methods, sampling theorem, pulse and digital modulation methods, and time-division and frequency-division multiplexing.

EET 412. Wireless Communications II. 3 Credits.

A continuation of EET 312. Topics include digital encoding techniques, signal-to-noise comparisons of different analog and digital modulation methods, link analysis, and satellite communication. System level simulations for determining subsystem design requirements and overall performance. Prerequisites: EET 312.

EET 415. Programmable Machine Controls. 3 Credits.

Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 3 credits. Pre- or corequisite: EET 310, or prerequisite: EET 350. Application oriented experiments and design problems in programmable controller setup and programming techniques with emphasis on practical applications. Computer assignments include ladder programs simulation.

EET 420. Advanced Logic Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: EET 310. Advanced digital logic design and circuit reduction. Topics include lattice structure, symmetry recognition and simplification, threshold logic, design-for-testing techniques, shortest path test planning, adaptive testing, and fuzzy logic. Computer assignments include design simulation and testing.

EET 430. Automatic Control Systems. 3 Credits.

Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: EET 305, 330, 360, 365W. A study of modern control devices and applications including electrical, mechanical and pneumatic types.

EET 434. Introduction to Senior Project. 1 Credit.

Lecture 1 hour; 1 credit. Prerequisite: senior standing. This course must be taken in the semester prior to the Senior Project course. A collection of career-related topics pertaining to engineering technology. Topics include engineering codes and standards, engineering ethics, technical report writing, job search and resume writing techniques, patents and property rights, and professional engineering licensure. The course concludes with the selection of the student's project topic for the subsequent Senior Project course.

EET 440. High Frequency and Microwave Technology. 3 Credits.

Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: EET 340. Methods for generating, transmitting, and detecting signals in the VHF, UHF, and microwave frequency ranges. Laboratory will emphasize high frequency and microwave measurements including bridges, slotted lines, spectrum analyzers and reflectometers.

EET 450. Digital Control Systems. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: EET 305, 320, 325, 330. A study of modern digital control systems including the sampling process of linear systems, modeling of discrete systems, z-transforms, analysis of discrete systems, signal conversion, the digital computer as controller, feedback and cascade compensation, and hardware and software for digital control systems.

EET 460. Modern Communication Systems. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: EET 410. Overview of the principles of satellite communications, television systems, fiber optics, antennas and other relevant topics.

EET 470. Microprocessor Based Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: EET 310, 320, and 325. High level and low level programming languages that relate to advanced microprocessor/microcontroller embedded system designs. The low level assembly language in embedded systems, and high level C and C++ languages in a PC that are used in real time controls and communications are the focus of this course. Topics include the related hardware/software interfacing built between different devices such as memories, ADCs, and display modules; mathematic utilities routines development; wireless RF modules; communication in serial and parallel formats; and communications protocols.

EET 480W. Senior Project. 3 Credits.

Lecture 1 hour; laboratory 6 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: EET 434, senior standing and faculty approval; grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C. Individual projects performed under the direction of a sponsoring faculty member. Projects may involve analytical and/or experimental results. Formal written reports will be required. (qualifies as a CAP experience) (This is a writing intensive course.).

EET 485. Electrical Power Systems. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: EET 360. Fundamentals of electrical power transmission and distribution systems. Transformer operation/application, balanced/unbalanced loads, power factor correction, per-unit system system applications, fault calculations, power quality, over-current protection, relay construction/application, lighting system design, grounding, and introduction to the National Electric Code.

EET 490. Computer-Aided Circuit Simulation. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: EET 300, 330, 335, and 340. Advanced treatment of computer-aided analysis software such as Multisim and MATLAB and the applications to electronic circuit analysis and design. Topics include non-linear models, distortion analysis, spectral analysis, and Monte Carlo techniques.

EET 495. Topics in Electrical Engineering Technology. 1-3 Credits.

Study of selected topics. Prerequisite: junior standing.

EET 496. Topics in Electrical Engineering Technology. 1-3 Credits.

Study of selected topics. Prerequisite: junior standing.

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Courses

ENGT 111. Engineering Technology Information Literacy/Research. 2 Credits.

Fundamental information literacy and research as applied to engineering technology. Course includes where and how to efficiently locate and critically evaluate technical information. Proper use of technical information and the associated ethical and legal issues will be examined. Prerequisite: ENGN 110.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Courses

MET 120. Computer Aided Drafting. 3 Credits.

Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 3 credits. Computer based drafting methods are taught with a major emphasis on 'Hands On' practice using 2-D AutoCAD software in the computer lab, along with the various methods of editing, manipulation, visualization and presentation of technical drawings. This course includes the basic principles of engineering drawing/hand sketching, dimensioning and tolerancing.

MET 200. Manufacturing Processes and Methods. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Application and characteristics, both physical and chemical, of the materials most commonly used in industry as well as procedures and processes used in converting raw materials into a finished product.

MET 225. Material Science Laboratory. 1 Credit.

A laboratory course dealing with the standard methods of inspecting and testing materials used in engineering applications with emphasis on laboratory reports, including presentation and interpretation of experimental data. Pre- or Corequisite: CET 220.

MET 240. Computer Solid Modeling. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: MET 120. A treatment of modern 3-D parametric solid modeling techniques including introduction of the software utilized sketching, parts and assembly creation techniques, orthographic views extraction and manufacturing drawing generation. Presentations include exploded views and animation.

MET 295. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Study of selected topics.

MET 300. Thermodynamics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: CHEM 121N, MATH 211 and a grade of C or better in PHYS 111N or PHYS 231N. The basic laws of thermodynamics, properties of fluids, heat, and work and their applications in processes and cycles and an introduction to conduction heat transfer.

MET 305. Fundamentals of Mechanics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHYS 111N and MATH 211. Selected topics in statics and strength of materials are applied to mechanical engineering technology. Coverage includes force systems, equilibrium, friction, and stress-strain relationships and their application to the mechanical behavior of materials.

MET 310. Dynamics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: MATH 211, and a grade of C or better in CET 200, and a grade of C or better in PHYS 111N or PHYS 231N. A fundamental treatment of coplanar and three-dimensional kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies, including relative motion, mass moments of inertia. Newton's laws, work and energy, impulse and momentum, and simple vibrations.

MET 320. Design of Machine Elements. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 211, a grade of C or better in CET 220 and PHYS 111N or PHYS 231N. A rapid review of the fundamental principles of strength of materials and working stresses followed by practical analyses of fundamental machine elements such as shafts, springs, and screws.

MET 330. Fluid Mechanics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: MET 310. The study of fluid statics and dynamics, including momentum, energy, Bernoulli's equation, laminar and turbulent fluid flow and friction in pipes, fluid machinery, and open-channel flow.

MET 335W. Fluid Mechanics Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory 2 hours; 1 credit. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C; Pre- or corequisite: MET 330. A laboratory course dealing with the verification of fluid equations and principles and the characteristics of fluid machinery with emphasis on laboratory report writing, including presentation and interpretation of experimental data.

MET 350. Thermal Applications. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: MET 300. A study of basic applications of thermodynamics. Topics include the basic steam and gas turbine power plant, introduction to refrigeration systems, psychometrics, basic conduction and convection heat transfer including heat exchangers and surveys of other energy conversion systems.

MET 367. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits (may be repeated for credit). Prerequisite: approval by the department and Career Management in accordance with the policy for granting credit for Cooperative Education programs. Available for pass/fail grading only. Student participation for credit based on the academic relevance of the work experience, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and the Career Management program prior to the semester in which the work experience is to take place. (offered fall, spring, summer) (qualifies as a CAP experience).

MET 368. Internship. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Prerequisite: approval by department and Career Management. Available for pass/fail grading only. Academic requirements will be established by the department and will vary with the amount of credit desired. Allows students to gain short duration career-related experience. (qualifies as a CAP experience).

MET 369. Practicum. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Prerequisite: approval by department and Career Management. Available for pass/fail grading only. (qualifies as a CAP experience).

MET 370. Automation and Controls. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: MATH 211 and EET 350 and 355. A study of the design and analysis of feedback control system. Includes the fundamentals of programmable controllers as well as practical applications of interfacing mechanical, electrical, pneumatic and hydraulic feedback control circuits. Computer simulation software is used to model system responses.

MET 386. Automation and Controls Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory 2 hours; 1 credit. Pre- or corequisite: MET 370. Laboratory and computer simulation of control systems including programmable controllers as well as practical applications of interfacing mechanical, electrical and pneumatic control systems.

MET 387. Power and Energy Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Lecture 1 hour; laboratory 2 hours; 2 credits. Prerequisites: MET 335W and MET 350. Experiments dealing with applied thermodynamics, mechanical power and energy systems with emphasis on laboratory report writing, including presentation and interpretation of experimental data.

MET 395. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Study of selected topics. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

MET 396. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Study of selected topics. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

MET 400. Computer Numerical Control in Production. 3 Credits.

Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: Senior standing. Principles of computer numerical control consistent with most recently developed standards, industry practices, and CAD/CAM systems including such topics as types of CNC machines, CNC milling, CNC turning and CNC electro-discharge machinery. A significant portion of the course includes programming in multiple axes.

MET 410. Advanced Manufacturing Processes. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: MET 200. A course in nontraditional manufacturing processes including ultrasonic machining, abrasive jet machining, waterjet cutting, electromechanical machining, electrical discharge machining, plasma arc machining and chemical milling. Semester project is required. (qualifies as a CAP experience).

MET 415. Introduction to Robotics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: MET 310, and EET 350. An introductory course in robotics dealing with the history and development of robots, mechanical components and control systems, actuators, robot programming and utilization. Included are laboratory experiments in robot motion and programming.

MET 426. Introduction to Mechatronics. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 211 and EET 350 and EET 355. A study of the mechatronics concepts and their application on actual problems encountered in engineering practice. Includes the basics of electromechanical systems, electrical circuits, solid-state devices, digital circuits and motors, all of which are fundamental to understanding mechatronic systems.

MET 427. Mechatronic System Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: MET 426. A study of the integrated modeling and optimal design of a physical system, which includes sensors, actuators, electronic components, and its embedded digital control system. Includes simultaneous optimal design practice with respect to the realization of the design specifications related to different engineering domains.

MET 430. Mechanical Subsystem Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: MET 320. Fundamental principles required for the correct design of the separate elements which compose the machine with attention given to problems of synthesis and the interrelationships of the design of elements within the sub-assembly. Topics include stress analysis of screws, belts, clutches, brakes, chains and thin and thick cylinders, and lubrication and bearings.

MET 434. Introduction to Senior Project. 1 Credit.

Lecture 1 hour; 1 credit. Prerequisite: senior standing. This course must be taken in the semester prior to the Senior Project course. A collection of career-related topics pertaining to engineering technology. Topics include engineering codes and standards, engineering ethics, technical report writing, job search and resume writing techniques, patents and property rights, and professional engineering licensure. The course concludes with the selection of the student's project topic for the subsequent Senior Project course.

MET 435W. Senior Design Project. 3 Credits.

Lecture 1 hour; laboratory 6 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C; MET 434 and senior standing. A capstone course exercising upper level course work involving independent or group design projects. Students are required to collect data and synthesize a mechanical design. Submission of written reports and a final oral presentation are required. (qualifies as a CAP experience) (This is a writing intensive course.).

MET 440. Heat Transfer. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours: 3 credits. Prerequisite: MET 300. A study of conduction, convection and radiation heat transfer and heat exchangers. Emphasis is on applications and problem solving using current techniques, and modern correlations.

MET 445. Computer Integrated Manufacturing. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: senior standing. Principles of computer integrated manufacturing, system integration, architecture and data base development. Topics include part design specifications, process engineering, fixed automation and process planning.

MET 450. Energy Systems. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: MET 350. A study of the application of thermodynamics to power plants, engines, compressors, turbines, and associated systems. A detailed study is made of fossil fuel power plants with an introductory study of nuclear power and other energy conversion systems.

MET 455. Lean Engineering. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Senior standing. This course looks at the history of lean and six sigma philosophies, their principles and implementation methodologies for creating a world class enterprise. Topics in Lean include five s, value stream mapping, cellular manufacturing, pull system, performance metrics, Lean supplier network, Lean product development and Lean implementation models. Semester research report is a course requirement. Class activities may involve physical simulation of production environment.

MET 460. Refrigeration and Air Conditioning. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: MET 330 and 350. The design and application of refrigeration and air conditioning systems. Studies are made of compressors, condensers, evaporators, psychometric processes, load calculations and air distribution systems. High performance vapor compression systems, absorption systems and other cycles are analyzed.

MET 465. Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Senior Standing. Methods and rules of dimensioning and tolerancing, calculation of fits, and geometrical tolerances using ANSI-Y14.5M, tolerances of form, orientation, and profile, including flatness, straightness, circularity, cylindricity, angularity, etc. Student work consists of designing and detailing various product drawings.

MET 471. Nuclear Systems I. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 211 and PHYS 111N. Reactor physics principles as applied to the design and operation of various types of commercial nuclear power reactors. Topics include sources of radiation and interaction with matter, neutron interactions, diffusion theory, and reactor kinetics.

MET 472. Nuclear Systems II. 3 Credits.

Complete study of the nuclear fuel cycle, from mining through fabrication, fuel management in an operating commercial power reactor, spent fuel management, and fuel reprocessing, with emphasis on chemical engineering considerations. Prerequisites: MET 471, CHEM 121N and CHEM 122N or equivalent.

MET 475. Marine Engineering I. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: MET 330 and 350. This course includes: fundamental principles of naval architecture including nomenclature, geometry, stability, hydrostatics, structures, and motions; ship design processes; and a basic introduction to shipboard systems such as HVAC, refrigeration, power generation, propulsion, hydraulics, electronics, cargo handling systems, seawater systems, freshwater systems, and fuel, lube and other oil systems.

MET 476. Marine Engineering II. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: MET 475. This course builds upon MET 475 and provides a more in-depth look at shipboard systems and introduces topics such as basic shipboard operations and ship specifications.

MET 480. High Performance Piston Engines. 3 Credits.

Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: MET 300 or MAE 311. Corequisite: MET 350 or MAE 312. A study of the fundamental principles and performance characteristics of spark ignition and diesel internal combustion engines. Overview of engine types and their operation, engine design and operating parameters; ideal and semi-empirical models of engine cycles; combustion, fluid flow and thermal considerations in engine design and performance. Laboratory evaluation of engine performance using flow and dynamometer systems. (cross-listed with MAE 477/577).

MET 485. Maintenance Engineering. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: EET 305 and MET 200. This course looks at maintenance systems: predictive, preventative and corrective; large scale maintenance systems, principles of reliability engineering, maritime logistics; planning for maintenance and repair, using and ordering spare parts, technical manuals, system specifications, and shipyard operations.

MET 490. Lean Enterprise. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: MET 200. The history of lean philosophy, founding principles, and the extension of these principles to above-shop-floor activities to create a lean enterprise. Topics include five s, value stream mapping, cellular manufacturing, pull system, performance metrics, point of use storage, built-in-quality, mistake proofing and lean implementation models. Research report on one of the lean principles is a course requirement.

MET 495. Topics in Mechanical Engineering Technology. 1-3 Credits.

Study of selected topics. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

MET 496. Topics in Mechanical Engineering Technology. 1-3 Credits.

Study of selected topics. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.