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Old Dominion University

2013-2014 Catalog

Physics

Charles I. Sukenik, Chair

Charles E. Hyde, Chief Departmental Advisor

Stephen Bueltmann, Associate Departmental Advisor

Bachelor of Science - Physics Major

The Department of Physics offers a major in physics with five program tracks leading to the B. S. degree and the B. S. degree with honors.

  • Track A (Research) is designed primarily for students preparing to do graduate study in physics and related fields or for students preparing to work professionally upon completion of the B. S. degree in various technical fields requiring the strongest preparation in physics.
  • Track B (Professional) is designed for students who wish to create a specialized program of study which combines a strong foundation in physics with strong preparation in another field. Such other fields include engineering, medicine, computer science, business, and communications, to name a few.
  • Track C (Education) is designed for students who are preparing to be high school physics teachers. This curriculum provides a solid foundation in both contemporary physics and in education pedagogy.
  • Track D is a five-year, dual degree program in physics and electrical engineering. Students will receive a B.S. and B.S.E.E. upon graduation. Track D provides the highest level of preparation for both graduate school and positions in industry.
  • Track E is a five-year Bachelor of Science in physics and Master of Business Administration dual degree program. After students have satisfactorily completed their undergraduate requirements, they complete 30 credit hours in the M.B.A. program.

Degree Requirements

Are comprised of three components:

  1. Lower-level general education requirements.
  2. Departmental requirements.
  3. Upper-level general education requirements.

Some departmental requirements also satisfy upper- or lower-level general education requirements. Students earning the A.S., A.A., or A.A.&S. (university parallel) degree from a Virginia Community College or Richard Bland College automatically satisfy the lower-level general education requirements. For Tracks A and B, the upper-level general education requirement can be satisfied by any University-approved second major, minor, or two upper-division courses (6 credits) from outside the College of Sciences and not required by the major. For Track C, the upper-level general education requirement is satisfied by the Secondary Education Endorsement. For Track D, the second degree in electrical engineering satisfies the upper-level general education requirement, while for Track E, the M.B.A. core curriculum satisfies the upper-level general education requirement.

Graduation Requirements

All tracks require completion of a minimum of 120 credit hours (150 credit hours for Track D), which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours in upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, completion of the Physics Exit Exam with a minimum score of 20th percentile, and Senior Assessment. Additional hours may be required to meet the foreign language requirement. All tracks require a minimum grade of C in PHYS 231N-PHYS 232N. Tracks A, B, D and E require a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 overall and in the major. Track C requires a minimum 2.75 grade point average overall, in the major, and in the professional education core, with no grade less than a C- in the major and professional education core. The professional education core satisfies the upper-level general education requirement.

Math Minor

Physics majors in Tracks A or B wishing to complete a minor in applied mathematics can do so with just two additional math courses. The applied mathematics minor consists of:

MATH 307Ordinary Differential Equations3
MATH 312Calculus III4
MATH 317Calculus IV: Introductory Analysis3
Select two of the following:6
Introductory Linear Algebra
Partial Differential Equations
Applied Numerical Methods I
Applied Numerical Methods II
Intermediate Real Analysis I
Applied Mathematics I: Biomathematics
Applied Mathematics II: Mathematical Modeling
Applied Complex Variables
Applied Mathematics III: Elasticity
Applied Mathematics IV: Fluid Mechanics
Mathematics in Nature
Approved topics courses
Total Hours16

MATH 285 cannot be substituted for courses required in the minor. At least nine credit hours must be taken through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Lower Level General Education Requirements

(Tracks A, B, C, E; for track D refer to the electrical and computer engineering section in the College of Engineering and Technology)

Skills
Composition (grade of C or better required in both courses)
ENGL 110CEnglish Composition3
ENGL 211CEnglish Composition3
or ENGL 231C Introduction to Technical Writing
Oral Communication3
Public Speaking
Voice and Diction
Introduction to Interpersonal Communication
Mathematics (Satisfied by major)
Language and Culture (B.S. students' competence must be at the 102 level. High school credit may satisfy the requirement.)0-6
Information Literacy and Research
CS 120GIntroduction to Information Literacy and Research3
or CS 121G Introduction to Information Literacy and Research for Scientists
Ways of Knowing
Human Creativity
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to the Visual Arts
Visual Communication
Film Appreciation
Dance and Its Audience
Music in History and Culture
The Theatre Experience
Interpreting the Past
Select one of the following:3
Interpreting the World Past Since 1500
Interpreting the Asian Past
Interpreting the European Past
Interpreting the Latin America Past
Interpreting the American Past
Interpreting the African Past
Literature
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to Literature
American Writers, American Experiences
Understanding World Literature
Philosophy and Ethics
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to Philosophy
Logic and Philosophy
Introduction to Philosophy of Science
Introduction to Ethics
World Religions: Beliefs and Values
Business Ethics
Environmental Ethics
Bioethics
Foundations of Ethics
Studies in Applied Ethics
Nature of Science (satisfied by the major)
Impact of Technology
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to New Media Technologies
Computers in Society
Telehealthcare Technology
Energy and the Environment
Digital Writing
Hazards: Natural and Technological
The History of Sex and Sexual and Reproductive Technologies
History of Medicine, Disease, and Health Technology
Technology and Civilization
The Evolution of Modern Science
Principles of Information Technology
Music Production: MIDI I
Technology: Its Nature and Significance
Technology and War
Technology and Your World
Technology and Society
Women and Technology Worldwide
PK-12 Instructional Technology (for teacher education)
Human Behavior
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to African American Studies
Introduction to Anthropology
Introduction to Human Communication
Introduction to Criminology
Basic Economics
Principles of Macroeconomics
Principles of Microeconomics
Personal Financial Literacy
Cultural Geography
Environmental Geography
Introduction to International Politics
Introduction to American Politics
Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics
Introduction to Psychology
Lifespan Development
Introduction to Sociology
Introduction to Women's Studies
Total Hours30-36

Departmental Requirements for Research Track (A)

MATH 211Calculus I4
MATH 212Calculus II4
MATH 312Calculus III4
or MATH 285 Transfer Credit for Calculus III
MATH 307Ordinary Differential Equations3
or MATH 280 Transfer Credit for Ordinary Differential Equations
Select one of the following:3
Introductory Linear Algebra
Partial Differential Equations
Applied Mathematics II: Mathematical Modeling
Applied Complex Variables
CHEM 121N
  & CHEM 122N
Foundations of Chemistry I Lecture
   and Foundations of Chemistry I Laboratory *
4
CHEM 123N
  & CHEM 124N
Foundations of Chemistry II Lecture
   and Foundations of Chemistry II Laboratory *
4
CS 150Problem Solving and Programming I4
PHYS 231NUniversity Physics4
PHYS 232NUniversity Physics4
PHYS 303Intermediate Experimental Physics3
PHYS 319Analytical Mechanics3
PHYS 323Modern Physics3
PHYS 355Mathematical Methods of Physics3
PHYS 413Methods of Experimental Physics3
PHYS 420Introductory Computational Physics3
PHYS 425Electromagnetism I3
PHYS 452Introduction to Quantum Mechanics3
PHYS 453Electromagnetism II3
PHYS 454Thermal and Statistical Physics3
PHYS 456Intermediate Quantum Mechanics3
PHYS 499WSenior Thesis **3
or PHYS 489W
  & PHYS 490W
Senior Thesis I
   and Senior Thesis II
PHYS 120Physics in the 21st Century1
or PHYS 309 Physics on the Back of an Envelope
Select two of the following: ***6
Elements of Astrophysics
Light and Lasers
Introduction to Atomic Physics
Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics
Introduction to Solid State Physics
Introduction to Particle Accelerator Physics
Total Hours81

*

CHEM 137N/CHEM 138N may be taken instead of CHEM 121N/CHEM 122N and CHEM 123N/CHEM 124N

**

 Grade of C or better required in PHYS 499W or both PHYS 489W and PHYS 490W

***

With at least three credits at the 400-level.

Departmental Requirements for Professional Track (B)

MATH 211Calculus I4
MATH 212Calculus II4
MATH 312Calculus III4
or MATH 285 Transfer Credit for Calculus III
MATH 307Ordinary Differential Equations3
or MATH 280 Transfer Credit for Ordinary Differential Equations
Select one of the following:3
Introductory Linear Algebra
Partial Differential Equations
Applied Mathematics II: Mathematical Modeling
Applied Complex Variables
CHEM 121N
  & CHEM 122N
Foundations of Chemistry I Lecture
   and Foundations of Chemistry I Laboratory *
4
CHEM 123N
  & CHEM 124N
Foundations of Chemistry II Lecture
   and Foundations of Chemistry II Laboratory *
4
CS 150Problem Solving and Programming I4
PHYS 231NUniversity Physics4
PHYS 232NUniversity Physics4
PHYS 323Modern Physics3
PHYS 319Analytical Mechanics3
PHYS 303Intermediate Experimental Physics3
PHYS 355Mathematical Methods of Physics3
PHYS 413Methods of Experimental Physics3
PHYS 425Electromagnetism I3
PHYS 452Introduction to Quantum Mechanics3
PHYS 454Thermal and Statistical Physics3
Select one of the following:3
Introductory Computational Physics
Electromagnetism II
Intermediate Quantum Mechanics
PHYS 499WSenior Thesis **3
or PHYS 489W
  & PHYS 490W
Senior Thesis I
   and Senior Thesis II
PHYS 120Physics in the 21st Century1
or PHYS 309 Physics on the Back of an Envelope
Select two of the following: ***6
Color in Nature and Art
Elements of Astrophysics
Physics of Music and Musical Reproduction
Light and Lasers
Introduction to Atomic Physics
Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics
Introduction to Solid State Physics
Introduction to Particle Accelerator Physics
Total Hours75

*

CHEM 137N/CHEM 138N may be taken instead of CHEM 121N/CHEM 122N and CHEM 123N/CHEM 124N

**

 Grade of C or better required in PHYS 499W or both PHYS 489W and PHYS 490W

***

With at least three credits at the 400-level.

Elective Credit

Elective credit may be needed to meet the minimum requirement of 120 credit hours.

Bachelor of Science - Physics Major with Teacher Education Licensure

Due to changing University requirements, national accreditation standards, and the Virginia Board of Education licensure regulations, the teacher preparation programs in the College of Sciences are under constant revision. Any changes resulting from these factors supersede the program requirements described in this Catalog. Students are encouraged to obtain current program information from their advisors and the Teacher Education Services website at http://education.odu.edu/tes/.

Admission

Students must first declare the physics (Track C) teacher preparation track as their major with the physics departmental advisor. All students must apply for and be admitted into the approved physics teacher preparation program. Students must meet the required criteria for admission by passing the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments and earn the minimum required grade point averages (GPA).

Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments:

  • A passing PRAXIS I composite score of 532 or
  • Qualifying SAT or ACT test scores or
  • PRAXIS I Math test score of 178 and a composite Virginia Communication and Literacy (VCLA) score of 470 or
  • SAT Mathematics test score of 530 and a composite Virginia Communication and Literacy (VCLA) score of 470 or
  • ACT Mathematics test score of 22 and a composite Virginia Communication and Literacy (VCLA) score of 470

To review more information on the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments, visit the Teacher Education Services website, http://education.odu.edu/tes/.

Required Grade Point Averages (GPA)

  • A cumulative GPA of 2.75 is required.
  • A major/content GPA of 2.75 is required - all physics courses and all other science content courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher.
  • A professional education GPA of 2.75 is required – all professional education courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher.

Although students may enroll in a limited number of education courses, students must be admitted into the approved physics teacher preparation program prior to enrolling in any instructional strategies practicum education course. Students must also meet with an education advisor in the Office of Teacher Education Services.

Continuance

Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.75, a major/content GPA of 2.75 and a professional education GPA of 2.75. Physics courses must be passed with a grade of C- or higher. The remaining courses required for the major and in the professional education core must be completed with a grade of C- or higher for continuance. A professional education GPA of 2.75 is required for continuance. Students must take and pass the Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) and the PRAXIS II Physics Content examination prior to or while enrolled in the instructional strategies course. All assessments must be passed prior to the start of the Teacher Candidate Internship Orientation session.

Virginia Board of Education Prescribed Assessments

Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) – a passing composite score of 470 is required on this reading and writing assessment

PRAXIS II Physics: Content Knowledge (test code: 0265) – passing score of 147 is required

To review more information on the Virginia Board of Education prescribed assessments visit the Teacher Education Services website, http://education.odu.edu/tes/.

Graduation

Requirements for graduation include completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, completion of the Senior Assessment, completion of the Physics Exit Exam with a minimum score of 20thpercentile, a minimum cumulative 2.75 GPA, in the major area, and in the professional education core, with no grade less than a C- in the major and the professional education core; successful completion of the Teacher Candidate Internship and a minimum of 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours in upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University.

The curriculum is as follows:

Departmental Requirements for Education Track (C)

MATH 211Calculus I4
MATH 212Calculus II4
MATH 307Ordinary Differential Equations3
or MATH 280 Transfer Credit for Ordinary Differential Equations
CHEM 121N
  & CHEM 122N
Foundations of Chemistry I Lecture
   and Foundations of Chemistry I Laboratory *
4
CHEM 123N
  & CHEM 124N
Foundations of Chemistry II Lecture
   and Foundations of Chemistry II Laboratory *
4
CS 150Problem Solving and Programming I4
PHYS 103NIntroductory Astronomy4
PHYS 231NUniversity Physics4
PHYS 232NUniversity Physics4
PHYS 323Modern Physics3
PHYS 319Analytical Mechanics3
PHYS 303Intermediate Experimental Physics3
PHYS 120Physics in the 21st Century1
or PHYS 309 Physics on the Back of an Envelope
PHYS 355Mathematical Methods of Physics3
PHYS 413Methods of Experimental Physics3
PHYS 425Electromagnetism I3
PHYS 499WSenior Thesis **3
or PHYS 489W
  & PHYS 490W
Senior Thesis I
   and Senior Thesis II
Total Hours57

*

CHEM 137N/CHEM 138N may be taken instead of CHEM 121N/CHEM 122N and CHEM 123N/CHEM 124N

**

 Grade of C or better required in PHYS 499W or both PHYS 489W and PHYS 490W

The Professional Education Core Courses and Requirements

TLED 301Foundations and Introduction to Assessment of Education3
TLED 360Classroom Management and Discipline2
SPED 406Students with Diverse Learning Needs in the General Education Classroom3
TLED 408Reading and Writing in Content Areas3
TLED 430PK-12 Instructional Technology (satisfies impact of technology requirement)3
SPED 313Fundamentals of Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence3
STEM 454Developing Instructional Strategies for Teaching in the Middle/High School: Science3
TLED 483Seminar in Teacher Education (corequisite with STEM 454)1
TLED 485Teacher Candidate Internship12
Total Hours33

Departmental Requirements for Track D (Dual Degree in Physics and Electrical Engineering)

Common Course Requirements
Approved Physics Seminar1
CHEM 121N
  & CHEM 122N
Foundations of Chemistry I Lecture
   and Foundations of Chemistry I Laboratory
4
MATH 211Calculus I4
MATH 212Calculus II4
MATH 312Calculus III4
MATH 307Ordinary Differential Equations3
CS 150Problem Solving and Programming I4
PHYS 231NUniversity Physics4
PHYS 232NUniversity Physics4
Physics Course Requirements
CHEM 123N
  & CHEM 124N
Foundations of Chemistry II Lecture
   and Foundations of Chemistry II Laboratory
4
Select one of the following:3
Introductory Linear Algebra
Partial Differential Equations
Applied Mathematics II: Mathematical Modeling
Applied Complex Variables
PHYS 323Modern Physics3
PHYS 319Analytical Mechanics3
PHYS 303Intermediate Experimental Physics2-3
or ECE 287 Fundamental Electric Circuit Laboratory
PHYS 425Electromagnetism I3
PHYS 452Introduction to Quantum Mechanics3
PHYS 413Methods of Experimental Physics3
PHYS 454Thermal and Statistical Physics3
PHYS 420Introductory Computational Physics3
PHYS 453Electromagnetism II3
PHYS 456Intermediate Quantum Mechanics3
PHYS 499WSenior Thesis *3
or PHYS 489W
  & PHYS 490W
Senior Thesis I
   and Senior Thesis II
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to Atomic Physics
Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics
Introduction to Solid State Physics
Introduction to Particle Accelerator Physics
Engineering Course Requirements
ENGN 110Explore Engineering and Technology2
ECE 111Information Literacy and Research for Electrical and Computer Engineering2
ECE 201Circuit Analysis I3
ECE 202Circuit Analysis II3
ECE 241Fundamentals of Computer Engineering4
ECE 287Fundamental Electric Circuit Laboratory2
ECE 302Linear System Analysis3
ECE 303Introduction to Electrical Power3
ECE 304Probability, Statistics, and Reliability3
ECE 313Electronic Circuits4
ECE 332Microelectronic Materials and Processes3
ECE 381Introduction to Discrete-time Signal Processing3
ECE 387Microelectronics Fabrication Laboratory3
ECE 485WElectrical Engineering Design I3
ECE 486Preparatory ECE Senior Design II2
ECE 487ECE Senior Design II2
ECE Tech Elective I, II, III9
Approved Elective1-3
Total Hours129-132

*

 Grade of C or better required in PHYS 499W or both PHYS 489W and PHYS 490W

 

Departmental Requirements for Track E (B.S. Physics and M.B.A.)

Physics Course Requirements
MATH 211Calculus I4
MATH 212Calculus II4
MATH 312Calculus III4
MATH 307Ordinary Differential Equations3
Select one of the following:3
Introductory Linear Algebra
Partial Differential Equations
Applied Mathematics II: Mathematical Modeling
Applied Complex Variables
CHEM 121N
  & CHEM 122N
Foundations of Chemistry I Lecture
   and Foundations of Chemistry I Laboratory *
4
CHEM 123N
  & CHEM 124N
Foundations of Chemistry II Lecture
   and Foundations of Chemistry II Laboratory *
4
CS 150Problem Solving and Programming I4
PHYS 231NUniversity Physics4
PHYS 232NUniversity Physics4
PHYS 323Modern Physics3
PHYS 319Analytical Mechanics3
PHYS 303Intermediate Experimental Physics3
PHYS 355Mathematical Methods of Physics3
PHYS 413Methods of Experimental Physics3
PHYS 425Electromagnetism I3
PHYS 452Introduction to Quantum Mechanics3
PHYS 454Thermal and Statistical Physics3
Select one of the following:3
Introductory Computational Physics
Electromagnetism II
Intermediate Quantum Mechanics
PHYS 499WSenior Thesis **3
or PHYS 489W
  & PHYS 490W
Senior Thesis I
   and Senior Thesis II
Approved Physics Seminar1
Select one of the following:3
Color in Nature and Art
Elements of Astrophysics
Physics of Music and Musical Reproduction
Light and Lasers
Introduction to Atomic Physics
Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics
Introduction to Solid State Physics
Introduction to Particle Accelerator Physics
Total Hours72

*

Or CHEM 137N-CHEM 138N

**

 Grade of C or better required in PHYS 499W or both PHYS 489W and PHYS 490W

Upper Division General Education

Satisfied by M.B.A. Core Curriculum: MBA Core course taken senior year – all must be B or better for continuance in the M.B.A. program

ACCT 601Accounting for Managers3
BNAL 600Foundations of Statistics for Business and Economics3
ECON 604Managerial Economics and International Trade3
FIN 605Financial Management3
MGMT 602Organizational Management3
MKTG 603Marketing Management3
Total Hours18

Senior Thesis

An important feature of all tracks is the Senior Thesis, which is based on individual research done under the supervision of a faculty advisor. The Senior Thesis is a capstone experience that gives a student the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom to real-life research problems in physics. This research can be done either in on-campus laboratories and facilities or at other scientific institutions in the region where departmental faculty members perform research, such as the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (including the Applied Research Center) or the Langley Research Center of NASA. On completion of the project, the student must prepare a written final report and make an oral presentation of the results to the department.  The senior thesis can be completed in one semester, by taking PHYS 499W, or in two semesters, by taking the PHYS 489W & PHYS 490W sequence.

Minor in Physics

PHYS 231N-PHYS 232N must be completed as prerequisites for the minor in physics and are not included in the calculation of the grade point average for the minor. The minor in physics requires completion of the following, with an overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or better in these courses exclusive of 100/200 level courses and prerequisite courses:

PHYS 319Analytical Mechanics3
PHYS 323Modern Physics3
Two 300 or 400-level PHYS courses6
Total Hours12

Students must complete a minimum of six credit hours of 300-level or 400-level PHYS courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University. Up to three credits can be in Independent Study courses, with approval of the chief departmental advisor. Any substitutions must be approved in writing by the chief departmental advisor.

B. S. Degree with Honors

Qualified students may receive the B.S. degree with honors (to be noted on their diplomas) by completing specified additional requirements. At the time of application for this designation, a student must have a GPA of 3.50 or higher in physics, a GPA of 3.25 or higher overall, must have completed two contract honors courses, and must have completed 60 credit hours (of which at least 54 must be in grade-point graded courses) at Old Dominion University. (Contract honors courses are specialized courses of individual study under the direct supervision of a professor. Permission to take these courses is granted jointly by the Department of Physics and the Honors College.)

Advanced Placement

Advanced placement credit for PHYS 111N-112N (four credits each, for a total of eight credits) will be awarded for a score of 4 or 5 on the Physics B examination, advanced placement credit for PHYS 231N (four credits) will be awarded for a score of 4 or 5 on the Physics C (Mechanics) examination, and advanced placement credit for PHYS 232N (four credits) will be awarded for a score of 4 or 5 on the Physics C (Electricity and Magnetism) examination, each administered by the Advanced Placement Program of the College Board.

Advanced placement credit for courses other than PHYS 111N-112N and PHYS 231N-232N may be received on the basis of examinations administered by the Department of Physics. Permission to take such an examination must be obtained from the chief departmental advisor. Students may also refer to the Policy on Experiential Learning Credit Options at the Undergraduate Level found in this Catalog.

Clifford L. and Lillian R. Adams Scholarship

The Department of Physics selects one or more students each year to receive the Clifford L. and Lillian R. Adams Scholarship. The recipient must be a declared physics major and may be an entering freshman, a transfer student, or a continuing student. Selection is based on a student's academic record, relevant test scores, and recommendations. The award is renewable.

PHYSICS Courses

PHYS 101N. Conceptual Physics. 4 Credits.

An introductory descriptive course which develops and illustrates the concepts of physics in terms of phenomena encountered in daily life. Topics include mechanics, electricity and magnetism. (offered fall, summer).

PHYS 102N. Conceptual Physics. 4 Credits.

An introductory descriptive course which develops and illustrates the concepts of physics in terms of phenomena encountered in daily life. Topics include sound, light, fluids and heat. (offered spring) Prerequisites: PHYS 101N.

PHYS 103N. Introductory Astronomy. 4 Credits.

A study of the physical principles and scientific investigation of objects in our solar system. Emphasis on how we acquire knowledge of celestial objects to develop models of our universe.

PHYS 104N. Introductory Astronomy. 4 Credits.

Emphasizes the study of stars, star systems, cosmology and relativity. Emphasis on how we acquire knowledge of celestial objects to develop models of our universe.

PHYS 109. Introductory Astronomy Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory 2 hours; 1 credit. Prerequisite: written permission of the chief departmental advisor of the Physics Department. An introductory laboratory course in astronomy dealing with experiments about the laws of nature that apply to objects in our solar system.

PHYS 111N. Introductory General Physics. 4 Credits.

Emphasizes mechanics, wave motion and heat and will also cover the needed elements of trigonometry and vectors. Students receiving credit for PHYS 111N cannot receive credit for PHYS 102N either simultaneously or subsequently. (offered fall, spring, summer) Prerequisite: MATH 102M or MATH 103M or MATH 162M or MATH 166.

PHYS 112N. Introductory General Physics. 4 Credits.

Emphasizes electricity, light, and introduction to modern physics. Prerequisites: PHYS 111N and MATH 102M (or MATH 103M) or MATH 162M or MATH 166. (offered fall, spring, summer).

PHYS 113. Physics Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Prerequisites: written permission of the chief departmental advisor of the Physics Department. Available for pass/fail grading only. An introductory laboratory covering experiments from mechanics, wave motion, heat and sound.

PHYS 114. Physics Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Prerequisites: written permission of the chief departmental advisor of the Physics Department. Available for pass/fail grading only. An introductory laboratory covering experiments from electricity, magnetism, and optics.

PHYS 120. Physics in the 21st Century. 1 Credit.

Lecture 1 hour; 1 credit. This seminar will provide students with a broad introduction to the cutting edge of physics research and its applications in diverse areas of contemporary physics. Recommended for incoming students interested in physics and the natural sciences.

PHYS 126N. Honors: Introductory Astronomy. 4 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 4 credits. Open only to students in the Honors College. A special honors version of PHYS 103N.

PHYS 127N. Honors: Introductory Astronomy. 4 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 4 credits. Open only to students in the Honors College. A special honors version of PHYS 104N.

PHYS 226N. Honors: University Physics. 4 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 4 credits. Open only to students in the Honors College. A special honors version of PHYS 231N.

PHYS 227N. Honors: University Physics. 4 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 2 hours; 4 credits. Open only to students in the Honors College. A special honors version of PHYS 232N.

PHYS 231N. University Physics. 4 Credits.

A general introduction to physics in which the principles of classical and modern physics are applied to the solution of physical problems. The reasoning through which solutions are obtained is stressed. Topics include mechanics, fluids, and thermodynamics. This course is designed for majors in the physical sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computational sciences. Students receiving credit for PHYS 231N and PHYS 232N cannot simultaneously or subsequently receive credit for PHYS 101N and PHYS 102N or PHYS 111N and PHYS 112N. (offered fall, spring, summer) Pre- or corequisite: MATH 211 or MATH 226 or permission of instructor.

PHYS 232N. University Physics. 4 Credits.

A general introduction to physics in which the principles of classical and modern physics are applied to the solution of physical problems. The reasoning through which solutions are obtained is stressed. This course is designed for majors in the physical sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computational sciences. Topics include electricity and magnetism, and optics. Students receiving credit for PHYS 231N and PHYS 232N cannot simultaneously or subsequently receive credit for PHYS 101N and PHYS 102N or PHYS 111N and PHYS 112N. (offered fall, spring, summer) Prerequisites: PHYS 231N, MATH 211 or MATH 226. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 212 or permission of instructor.

PHYS 303. Intermediate Experimental Physics. 3 Credits.

A laboratory oriented course designed to provide students with a broad introduction to instrumentation and techniques used in modern physics laboratories. Topics to be covered include: basic electronics, vacuum technology, optics and lasers, nuclear instrumentation, LabView programming and computer interfacing. Prerequisite: PHYS 232N.

PHYS 304. Intermediate Experimental Physics. 3 Credits.

Laboratory 6 hours; 3 credits each semester. Prerequisite: PHYS 232N and PHYS 303. A laboratory oriented course designed to provide students with a broad introduction to instrumentation and techniques used in modern physics laboratories. This course is a continuation of PHYS 303.

PHYS 309. Physics on the Back of an Envelope. 1 Credit.

Lecture 1 hour; 1 credit. Corequisite: PHYS 102N, PHYS 112N or PHYS 232N. Physicists should be able to estimate the order-of-magnitude of anything. How many atoms of Julius Ceasar do you eat every day? How much waste does a nuclear power plant generate? Will develop concepts, relations and numbers useful for estimation. Will cover little new material, emphasizing already acquired knowledge. Will help students apply physics to real-life questions and understand which physical effects are appropriate on which scales. Seminar course.

PHYS 311. Color in Nature and Art. 3 Credits.

Explores the relationship between light as stimulus and color perceived by us. Develops underlying concept of technology of art and applied art. Describes basis for optical phenomena involved in many facets of daily life. Topics include: the interaction of light and the visual perception it produces; the basic concept of spectra; wave, ray, and quantum optics; polarized light; photography; paintings; pigments; rainbows and mirages; color theory systems; formation of images; optical instruments. There is no physics prerequisite for this course. Prerequisite: MATH 102M (or MATH 103M).

PHYS 313. Elements of Astrophysics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: PHYS 232N. A one-semester course covering the important topics of modern astrophysics. The physical basis of stellar evolution and chemical element formation is derived from first principles. Observational details of white dwarfs, neutron stars, pulsars, and black holes are developed.

PHYS 319. Analytical Mechanics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: PHYS 232N. Corequisite: MATH 307. Fundamentals of Newtonian mechanics. Topics include kinematics, dynamics, energy and momentum, central forces and planetary motion, and resonance phenomena.

PHYS 323. Modern Physics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Corequisite: MATH 212. Prerequisite: PHYS 232N. Introduction to the wave nature of matter, with applications in materials science, atomic, and nuclear physics. Introduction to relativity, including applications in mechanics and electrodynamics.

PHYS 332. Physics of Music and Musical Reproduction. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 102M. This course explores the topics of: the nature of sound, vibrations, resonance, the human ear, loudness, pitch, timbre, musical scales, dissonance and consonance, musical instruments, sound recording and reproduction, electronic music, noise, and acoustics.

PHYS 350. Light and Lasers. 3 Credits.

Lecture and demonstrations 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: PHYS 102N or PHYS 112N or PHYS 232N. An analysis of those concepts of geometrical physical optics needed for the understanding of laser resonators, optical propagation, and radiation detection. A study of laser diodes, molecular, neutral and ion gas lasers, tuneable dye and excimer lasers. Laser applications in medicine, communications, information processing, holography, pollution detection, and material testing and fabrication are stressed.

PHYS 355. Mathematical Methods of Physics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHYS 232N and MATH 212. This course will provide a strong foundation in the mathematical methods and applications necessary for undergraduate study of physics beyond the introductory level.

PHYS 367. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits each semester (may be repeated for credit). Prerequisite: approval of the chief departmental advisor and Career Management in accordance with the policy for granting credit for Cooperative Education programs. Available for pass/fail grading only. Student participation for credit based on the academic relevance of the work experience, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and Career Management prior to the semester in which the work experience is to take place. (qualifies as a CAP experience).

PHYS 368. Internship. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Prerequisite: approval by the chief departmental advisor and Career Management. Available for pass/fail grading only. Academic requirements will be established by the department and will vary with the amount of credit desired. Allows students to gain short duration career-related experience. (qualifies as a CAP experience).

PHYS 406/506. Observational Astronomy. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: junior standing. Observational techniques in astronomy with emphasis on constellation identification, celestial movements, and telescopic observation. Individualized night observations are required.

PHYS 408/508. Astronomy for Teachers. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: junior standing. A course in astronomy dealing with stars and stellar systems. Topics will include observational astronomy, the electromagnetic spectrum, relativity, stellar and galactic structures, cosmology, and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence.

PHYS 411. Introduction to Atomic Physics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHYS 452 and MATH 307. The hydrogen atom, radiative transitions, two-electron systems, many-electron atoms, interaction with external fields, theory of atomic spectra.

PHYS 413/513. Methods of Experimental Physics. 3 Credits.

Laboratory 6 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHYS 303 and PHYS 323. Corequisite: CS 150. Experiments in classical and modern physics, designed to develop skills in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of experimental data.

PHYS 415/515. Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: PHYS 452. Corequisite: MATH 307. An introduction to the structure of the atomic nucleus, natural and artificial radioactivity, nuclear decay processes and stability of nuclei, nuclear reactions, properties of nuclear forces, and nuclear models. Also, particle phenomenology, experimental techniques and the standard model. Topics include the spectra of leptons, mesons, and baryons; strong, weak, and electromagnetic interactions.

PHYS 416/516. Introduction to Solid State Physics. 3 Credits.

Introduction to solid state physics and materials science, with emphasis placed on the applications of each topic to experimental and analytical techniques. Topics include crystallography, thermal and vibrational properties of crystals and semiconductors, metals and the band theory of solids, superconductivity and the magnetic properties of materials. Prerequisites: PHYS 352 or PHYS 452 and MATH 307.

PHYS 417/517. Introduction to Particle Accelerator Physics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHYS 319 or MAE 205, and PHYS 425 or ECE 323. Introduction to the historical development and applications of particle accelerators to the fields of nuclear physics, particle physics, material sciences, and medical therapy and the design and physics of particle accelerators. Aspects of linear accelerators, circular accelerators such as cyclotrons, betatrons, synchrotrons, and storage rings, and recirculated linacs are covered. Topics include linear and non-linear single particle motion in accelerators, collective effects and beam stability in particle accelerators, and the electromagnetic radiation emitted by relativistic particles in accelerators. Up to date descriptions of the most modern particle accelerators will be included, as well as applications such as fixed target nuclear physics arrangements, colliding beam accelerators for high energy physics research, advanced storage ring sources of X-Rays, advanced neutron sources, radiation and radioactive material sources, and cancer therapy devices.

PHYS 420/520. Introductory Computational Physics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 2 hours; Laboratory 2 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHYS 232N and MATH 212. Introduction of computational methods and visualization techniques for problem solving in physics.

PHYS 425/525. Electromagnetism I. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. Corequisite: MATH 312. Prerequisite: PHYS 232N and PHYS 355. A study of the classical theory and phenomena of electricity and magnetism. Topics include the calculation of electric and magnetic fields, magnetic and dielectric properties of matter, and an introduction to Maxwell's equations.

PHYS 451/551. Theoretical Mechanics. 3 Credits.

A mathematical study of the concepts of mechanics. Vector calculus methods are used. Topics include mechanics of a system of particles, Lagrangian mechanics, Hamilton's canonical equations, and motion of a rigid body. Prerequisites: PHYS 319, PHYS 355 and MATH 312.

PHYS 452/552. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: PHYS 319, PHYS 323, and PHYS 355. Introduction to the physical and mathematical structure of quantum theory, including the historical and experimental origins of the subject. The subject matter includes techniques for solving the Schrodinger equation in one, two, and three dimensions. Both coordinate and momentum space representations are used. The harmonic oscillator and the Hydrogen atom receive particular attention.

PHYS 453/553. Electromagnetism II. 3 Credits.

A course in electrodynamics developed from Maxwell's Equations. Topics include Maxwell's Equations, Conservation Laws, Electromagnetic Waves, Potentials and Fields, Radiation, and the interplay of electrodynamics and special relativity. Prerequisites: PHYS 425 or ECE 323 or PHYS 320 and MATH 312.

PHYS 454/554. Thermal and Statistical Physics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHYS 319 and PHYS 323. A study of the fundamental concepts of thermodynamics, kinetic theory, and statistical mechanics. Topics include the thermodynamics of simple systems, kinetic theory of gases, statistical mechanics of gases and an introduction to quantum statistics.

PHYS 456/556. Intermediate Quantum Mechanics. 3 Credits.

This course follows directly from PHYS 452. It includes a more detailed study of simple systems, an introduction to abstract quantum mechanics and Dirac notation, and applications to operator methods. Particular attention is paid to electron spin, angular momentum theory, operator treatment of the harmonic oscillator, the Pauli exclusion principle, perturbation theory, and scattering. Prerequisites: PHYS 323 and PHYS 452 or permission of the instructor.

PHYS 489W. Senior Thesis I. 1 Credit.

1 credit. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and a grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C. Part one of a two-semester option for completing the Senior Thesis. PHYS 489W plus PHYS 490W is equivalent to PHYS 499W.

PHYS 490W. Senior Thesis II. 2 Credits.

2 credits. Prerequisite: PHYS 489W. Part two of a two-semester option for completing the Senior Thesis. PHYS 489W plus PHYS 490W is equivalent to PHYS 499W. (This is a writing intensive course.).

PHYS 497/597. Special Problems and Research. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits each semester. Prerequisite: senior standing or permission of the instructor. These courses afford the student an opportunity to pursue individual study and research.

PHYS 499W. Senior Thesis. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C and permission of the instructor. Each student will undertake a research experience under the supervision of a department faculty member. The experience can be of an experimental, theoretical, or calculational type. A final oral and written report are required. The research may be completed on campus or at one of the department affiliated research organizations. (offered fall, spring, summer) (This is a writing intensive course.).