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Old Dominion University

2014-2015 Catalog

Medical Diagnostic & Translational Sciences

www.hs.odu.edu/medlab/

Roy Ogle, Chair

The School of Medical Diagnostic and Translational Sciences offers a coordinated program of courses and clinical experiences leading to degrees of Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology, Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Medicine Technology,  and a post-baccalaureate certificate in cytotechnology. Students may also pursue a concentration in cytotechnology or ophthalmic technology through the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences. In addition, the school offers a minor in medical technology and an accelerated, weekend program (BSMT) for medical laboratory technicians (MLT). Post-baccalaureate courses are available in molecular pathology and clinical diagnostics.

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology

www.hs.odu.edu/medlab/academics/medtech

Faye E. Coleman, Program Director

The medical technologist/medical laboratory scientist performs a vital role in the diagnosis and treatment of disease by performing clinical laboratory tests on patients' blood, body fluids, and other specimens. This includes clinical tests within the areas of chemistry, microbiology, hematology, immunology/serology, urinalysis, immunohematology, and molecular pathology.

The program is nationally accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences, 5600 N River Road, Suite 720, Rosemont, IL 60018, 773 714-8880. Satisfactory completion of the program entitles graduates to write national certification examinations.

Admission

Admission to the University does not constitute admission to the medical technology program. Students are admitted to the program after completion of two years of college study, which includes all program prerequisite courses.  All program prerequisite courses must be completed with a grade of C (2.00) or better.  The students then enter two years of a combined didactic and clinical phase congruent with the 2 + 2 concept. A grade of C (2.00) or better is required in all medical technology course work for continuance in the program. The program does not offer just the final clinical phase to transfer applicants from 3 + 1 programs. Applications to the program, including all materials, must be submitted no later than February 1 for consideration for admission the following fall. Exemptions may be appealed only through the program director. Prospective students who fail to meet the February 1 deadline for formal admission will usually be allowed to take on-campus medical technology courses on a space-available basis. Permission must be first granted by the program director in advance of registration.

Requirements

Lower Division General Education

Skills
Written Communication (grade of C or better required in both courses)6
Oral Communication (satisfied through major course requirements)
Mathematics6
Elementary Statistics
College Algebra (Required for The Nature of Science courses)
College Algebra with Supplemental Instruction
Language and Culture0-6
Information Literacy and Research3
Ways of Knowing
Human Creativity3
Interpreting the Past3
Literature3
Philosophy and Ethics3
Bioethics (preferred)
The Nature of Science12
General Biology I
   and General Biology I Lab
Foundations of Chemistry I Lecture
   and Foundations of Chemistry I Laboratory
Foundations of Chemistry II Lecture
   and Foundations of Chemistry II Laboratory
Human Behavior3
Impact of Technology (any upper-division T course outside the College of Health Sciences)3
Total Hours45-51
Departmental Requirements
BIOL 250
  & BIOL 251
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
   and Human Anatomy and Physiology II
8
CHEM 211
  & CHEM 212
Organic Chemistry Lecture
   and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
5
Students must complete the following courses prior to entering the Medical Technology Program: BIOL 121N and BIOL 122N, BIOL 250 and BIOL 251, CHEM 121N and CHEM 122N, CHEM 123N and CHEM 124N, CHEM 211 and CHEM 212 and STAT 130M.
Total Hours13


Major Requirements

Third Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHoursSummer TermHours
MEDT 2101MEDT 3093MEDT 3202
MEDT 3072MEDT 3101Clinical Practica 5 to 6 credits from fourth year second term courses 
MEDT 3083MEDT 3131 
MEDT 3113MEDT 3192 
MEDT 3121MEDT 3263 
MEDT 3243MEDT 3361 
MEDT 3251MEDT 3271 
MEDT 3302MEDT 3371 
MEDT 3311MEDT 3391 
 MEDT 3401 
 MEDT 3513 
 17 18 2
Fourth Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHours 
MEDT 403W3MEDT 4044 
MEDT 4403MEDT 4065 
 MEDT 4525 
 MEDT 4544 
 MEDT 4571 
 MEDT 4581 
 6 20 
Total credit hours: 63

Upper Division General Education

  • Option A. Approved Disciplinary Minor, 12 hours minimum; also second degree or second major.
  • Option B. Interdisciplinary Minor (specifically 12 hours, 3 of which may be in the major)
  • Option C. International Business and Regional Courses or an approved Certification Program such as teaching licensure
  • Option D. Two Upper-Division Courses from outside the College of Health Sciences and not required by the major (6 hours)

Requirements for graduation include a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 overall and in the major, a minimum of 121 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours in upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, and completion of Senior Assessment.

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology—MLT to MT Weekend College Program

The B.S.M.T. Weekend Program is available for associate degree holders and former hospital or military program trainees. The curriculum is designed to meet the needs of local and distant practitioners. Program and University required courses are available on weekends and through distance learning.

Lower Division General Education

Skills
Written Communication (grade of C or better required in both courses)6
Oral Communication (satisfied through major course requirements)
Mathematics6
Elementary Statistics
College Algebra (Required for the Nature of Science courses)
College Algebra with Supplemental Instruction
Language and Culture0-6
Information Literacy and Research3
Ways of Knowing
Human Creativity3
Interpreting the Past3
Literature3
Philosophy and Ethics3
Bioethics (preferred)
The Nature of Science12
General Biology I
   and General Biology I Lab
Foundations of Chemistry I Lecture
   and Foundations of Chemistry I Laboratory
Foundations of Chemistry II Lecture
   and Foundations of Chemistry II Laboratory
Human Behavior3
Impact of Technology (any upper-division T course outside the College of Health Sciences)3
Total Hours45-51
Departmental Requirements
BIOL 250
  & BIOL 251
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
   and Human Anatomy and Physiology II
8
CHEM 211
  & CHEM 212
Organic Chemistry Lecture
   and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
5
Students must complete the following courses prior to entering the Medical Technology Program: BIOL 121N and BIOL 122N, BIOL 250 and BIOL 251, CHEM 121N and CHEM 122N, CHEM 123N and CHEM 124N, CHEM 211 and CHEM 212 and STAT 130M.
Total Hours13

Major Requirements

Electives (including transfer and Experiential Learning Credit from MLT Training Program)
MEDT 309Medical Bacteriology3
MEDT 311Hematology3
MEDT 315Clinical Laboratory Diagnosis3
MEDT 324Clinical Instrumentation and Electronics3
MEDT 326Immunohematology3
MEDT 340Medical Parasitology, Mycology, and Virology1
MEDT 350Urinalysis1
MEDT 351Clinical Biochemistry3
MEDT 403WManagement in the Clinical Setting3
MEDT 440Statistical Applications and Data Analysis in the Clinical Laboratory3
MEDT 441Clinical Hematology Competencies1
MEDT 442Clinical Microbiology Competencies1
MEDT 443Clinical Chemistry Competencies1
MEDT 444Clinical Blood Bank Competencies1
MEDT 445Advanced Clinical Practicum3
MEDT 457Medical Technology Seminar1
Total Hours34

Upper Division General Education

  • Option A. Approved Disciplinary Minor, 12 hours minimum; also second degree or second major.
  • Option B. Interdisciplinary Minor (specifically 12 hours, 3 of which may be in the major)
  • Option C. International Business and Regional Courses or an approved Certification Program such as teaching licensure
  • Option D. Two Upper-Division Courses from outside the College of Health Sciences and not required by the major (6 hours)

Requirements for graduation include a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 overall and in the major, minimum 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours in upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, and completion of Senior Assessment.

Minor in Medical Technology

A minor in medical technology requires a minimum of 12 semester hours of 300/400-level MEDT courses. Students may choose courses from a specific laboratory science discipline (hematology, microbiology, clinical chemistry, and immunohematology) or from several disciplines. All prerequisite courses must be completed. Selection of a plan or program of study must be done in consultation with the program director. For completion of the minor, students must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the minor exclusive of prerequisite courses and a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement must be taken through courses offered by Old Dominion University. Substitutes of non-MEDT courses require the permission of the program director. Completion of the minor does not confer eligibility to write national certification examinations.

Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Medicine Technology

www.hs.odu.edu/medlab/academics/nmed/

Scott R. Sechrist, Program Director 

Nuclear medicine technology is the medical specialty that utilizes sealed and unsealed radioactive materials in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. The nuclear medicine technology program at Old Dominion University is designed to prepare individuals as entry-level nuclear medicine technologists. Upon successful completion of the program, graduates are eligible to sit for a national exam for certification as a nuclear medicine technologist.

 Nuclear medicine technologists are allied health professionals certified in nuclear medicine technology who, under the direction of an authorized physician user, are committed to applying the art and skill of diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine procedures through the safe and effective use of radionuclides. Responsibilities include but are not limited to: direct patient contact, the preparation and administration of radiopharmaceuticals, patient imaging procedures including computer processing, laboratory testing, patient preparation, quality control and radiation safety. Nuclear medicine technologists can be employed in hospitals and imaging centers.

The program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology.

A grade of C (2.00) or better in all nuclear medicine course work is required to continue in the program.

Admission

All admission materials must be received by October 15. Interviews are then scheduled for early November.

Requirements

Lower Division General Education

Skills
Written Communication (grade of C or better required in both courses)6
Oral Communication3
Mathematics6
Elementary Statistics
College Algebra
College Algebra with Supplemental Instruction
Language and Culture0-6
Information Literacy and Research3
Ways of Knowing
Human Creativity3
Interpreting the Past3
Literature3
Philosophy and Ethics3
Bioethics
The Nature of Science16
Introductory Chemistry
   and Introductory Chemistry Laboratory
Introductory Organic and Biochemistry
   and Introductory Organic and Biochemistry Laboratory
Conceptual Physics
   and Conceptual Physics
Human Behavior3
Impact of Technology3
History of Medicine, Disease, and Health Technology (or upper-division T course outside the College of Health Sciences)
Total Hours52-58
Departmental Requirements
BIOL 250
  & BIOL 251
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
   and Human Anatomy and Physiology II
8
Students must complete the following courses (or equivalent) prior to entering the nuclear medicine technology Program: BIOL 250 and BIOL 251, CHEM 105N, CHEM 106N, CHEM 107N and CHEM 108N, PHYS 101N and PHYS 102N, and MATH 102M and STAT 130M.
Total Hours8

Major Course Requirements

Third Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHoursSummer TermHours
NMED 3003NMED 3324NMED 4408
NMED 3314NMED 3353 
 NMED 4014 
 NURS 3932 
 7 13 8
Fourth Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHours 
NMED 4508NMED 4608 
NMED 4024NMED 4103 
NMED 4033NMED 475W3 
 15 14 
Total credit hours: 57

Elective credit may be needed to meet the minimum requirement of 120 credit hours.

Upper Division General Education

  • Option A. Approved Disciplinary Minor, 12 hours minimum; also second degree or second major.
  • Option B. Interdisciplinary Minor (specifically 12 hours, 3 of which may be in the major)
  • Option C. International Business and Regional Courses or an approved Certification Program such as teaching licensure
  • Option D. Two Upper-Division Courses from outside the College of Health Sciences and not required by the major (6 hours)

A variety of clinical facilities in the Hampton Roads area are utilized for clinical education experiences. Students are responsible for providing their own transportation to these sites. Students must meet established programmatic technical standards. Requirements for graduation include a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 overall and in the major, a minimum of 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours in upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, and completion of Senior Assessment.

Cytotechnology Concentration—Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences

www.hs.odu.edu/medlab/academics/cyto/

Sophie K. Thompson, Program Director

The School of Medical Diagnostic and Translational Sciences offers a program in cytotechnology through the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences.

Cytotechnologists are specially trained medical laboratory professionals who work with pathologists in detecting changes in cell samples from numerous body sites which allows the early diagnosis of cancer. This is done primarily with the use of the microscope to evaluate slide preparation of cell samples for abnormalities in structure, indicating cancer, precancerous lesions, benign tumors, infectious agents and inflammatory processes. They are also trained in specimen preparatory techniques.

The program of study is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), 1361 Park Street, Clearwater, FL 33756; phone: 727-210-2350; e-mail: mail@caahep.org; website: www.caahep.org, in association with the American Society of Cytopathology.

Theory is reinforced through an integrated clinical phase which allows the student direct experience in a hospital or lab setting providing additional training in screening techniques and diagnostic procedures. Graduates are eligible to sit for national certifying ASCP exams.

Application to the cytotechnology program must be submitted by February 1 for the fall semester.

Requirements

Lower Division General Education

Skills
Written Communication6
English Composition (grade of C or better required)
English Composition (grade of C or better required)
Oral Communication *
Mathematics3
College Algebra
College Algebra with Supplemental Instruction
Language and Culture0-6
Information Literacy and Research3
Information Literacy for Health Professions (preferred)
Ways of Knowing
Human Creativity3
Interpreting the Past3
Literature3
Philosophy and Ethics3
Bioethics (recommended)
The Nature of Science16
General Biology I
   and General Biology I Lab
General Biology II
   and General Biology II Lab
Introductory Chemistry
   and Introductory Chemistry Laboratory
Introductory Organic and Biochemistry
   and Introductory Organic and Biochemistry Laboratory
Human Behavior3
Impact of Technology3
History of Medicine, Disease, and Health Technology (preferred but any upper-division T course outside the College of Health Sciences accepted)
Total Hours46-52
*

Met in the major with CYTO 424 and CYTO 497.

Departmental Requirements
Health Sciences Core9
Critical Issues in Public/Community Health Administration *
Management in the Clinical Setting
Public and Community Health Administration
Research Methods in the Health Sciences
Medical Terminology
BIOL 250
  & BIOL 251
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
   and Human Anatomy and Physiology II
8
BIOL 103Basic Bacteriology4
Students must complete the following courses prior to entering the cytotechnology program: BIOL 121N and BIOL 122N, BIOL 123N and BIOL 124N, BIOL 250 and 251, BIOL 103, CHEM 105N and 106N, CHEM 107N and 108N and the nine hours from the health sciences core courses.
Total Hours21
*

Grade of C or better required in CHP 415W or MEDT 403W. 


Major Course Requirements

First Semester:
CYTO 407Clinical Histology (strongly recommended)3
CYTO 428Cytopreparatory Techniques and Procedures2
Second Semester:
CYTO 403Gynecological Screening Laboratory3
CYTO 404General Pathology3
CYTO 405Normal Gynecological Cytology3
CYTO 415Abnormal Gynecological Cytology4
CYTO 442Gastro-Intestinal Cytology2
CYTO 458Cytology Internship I4
Third Semester:
CYTO 424Respiratory Cytology3
CYTO 444Genitourinary Cytology2
CYTO 445Breast Cytology3
CYTO 446Body Fluids Cytology2
CYTO 448Non-Epithelial Cytology2
CYTO 468Cytology Internship II4
Fourth Semester:
CYTO 455Fine Needle Aspiration5
CYTO 478Cytology Internship III8
CYTO 497Cytology Senior Seminar2
Total Hours55

Upper Division General Education

  • Option A. Approved Disciplinary Minor, 12 hours minimum; also second degree or second major.
  • Option B. Interdisciplinary Minor (specifically 12 hours, 3 of which may be in the major)
  • Option C. International Business and Regional Courses or an approved Certification Program such as teaching licensure
  • Option D. Two Upper-Division Courses from outside the College of Health Sciences and not required by the major (6 hours)

Requirements for graduation include a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 overall and in the major, a minimum of 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours in upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, and completion of Senior Assessment.

Certificate Option/Second Degree

A certificate in cytotechnology or second degree in health sciences is available to students who have a Bachelor of Science degree, with a minimum of 20 credit hours in biology and eight credit hours in chemistry.

Ophthalmic Technology Concentration in the B.S.H.S.

http://hs.odu.edu/medlab/academics/ophttech.shtml

Lori J. Wood, MSEd., COMT, Assistant Professor, Program Director

The concentration in ophthalmic technology is designed to produce an ophthalmic technologist with a strong background in the basic sciences and a high degree of technical competence in ophthalmic technology. The 22-month program begins the end of August of each year and is fully accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Ophthalmic Medical Programs (CoA-OMP). The program is one of two in the country that grant college credits leading to a Bachelor of Science degree.

The pre-clinical and general-education courses are offered at or may be transferred into Old Dominion University. The clinical courses are offered through Old Dominion at the Tri-Cities Higher Education Center in Portsmouth, Virginia.  Students learn and work closely with ophthalmology residents and staff in clinical facilities in Sentara Norfolk General Hospital and many private ophthalmologists' offices.

As a condition of graduation, students are required to sit for the national board certification exams given by the Joint Commission on Allied Health Personnel in Ophthalmology (JCAHPO).

Prior to consideration for admission to the ophthalmic technology program, each applicant must complete the required prerequisite courses, or equivalents, maintaining a grade point average of at least 2.00 (4.00 scale). For priority consideration, applications should be submitted no later than March 1 for the class starting in September. The program will accept applications until all slots are filled.

Requirements

First Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
ENGL 110C (grade of C or better required)3The Nature of Science4
The Nature of Science 4(Select any 'N' course; BIOL 116N preferred) 
(Select any 'N' course; BIOL 115N preferred) BIOL 2504
MATH 102M (or higher)3Human Behavior3
(Department requirement; not automatically satisfied by associate degree) (Select one 'S' course) 
Information Literacy 3
PSYC 201S (preferred)
 
HLTH 120G (preferred)
 Math or Science Elective3
Oral Communication 3
STAT 130M (preferred)
 
 Human Creativity 3
 16 17
Second Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHours
Math or Science Elective3-4CHP 4503
BIOL 103 (preferred)
 Choose one writing intensive course; grade of C or better required3
Select one3 
ENGL 211C (grade of C or better required)
  
ENGL 221C (grade of C or better required)
  
ENGL 231C (grade of C or better required)
 Philosophy3
Interpreting the Past (select one history course)3(Select one course) 
  
  
  
 
Any PHIL 'P" course
 
  The Impact of Technology3
 
HIST 304T (or other upper-division "T" course outside the College of Health Sciences)
 
Literature (select one course)3Electives if needed to total 120 credit hours 
  
  
  
NMED 300 or DNTH 4153 
 15-16 12
Total credit hours: 60-61

Upper Division General Education

  • Option A. Approved Disciplinary Minor, 12-24 hours minimum; also second degree or second major.
  • Option B. Interdisciplinary Minor (specifically 12 hours, 3 of which may be in the major)
  • Option C. International Business and Regional Courses or an approved Certification Program such as teaching licensure
  • Option D. Two Upper-Division Courses from outside the College of Health Sciences and not required by the major (6 hours). PHIL upper-division Ethics "E" course and upper-division Technology "T" course outside the College of Health Sciences can be used to meet this option. Select Associate degrees may satisfy the "T" requirement.
Third Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHoursSummer TermHours
OPHS 3114OPHS 3303OPHS 3505
OPHS 3123OPHS 3355OPHS 3522
OPHS 3205OPHS 3374 
OPHS 3213  
 15 12 7
Fourth Year
First TermHoursSecond TermHours 
OPHS 4205OPHS 4225 
OPHS 4215OPHS 4235 
OPHS 4303OPHS 4403 
 13 13 
Total credit hours: 60


Requirements for Graduation
Requirements for graduation include a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 overall and in the major, a minimum of 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours in upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C, and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, and completion of Senior Assessment. In addition, students must take the written National Board Exam with JCAHPO prior to graduation.

CYTOTECHNOLOGY Courses

CYTO 403. Gynecological Screening Laboratory. 3 Credits.

Laboratory experience in the screening of gynecological smears. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Cytotechnology Program and/or permission of the cytotechnology program director. Pre- or corequisite: CYTO 405 and CYTO 415.

CYTO 404. General Pathology. 3 Credits.

This course is an overview of general disease processes and causes in the human. All body systems will be covered including respiratory, gastrointestinal, circulatory, nervous, reproductive, and urinary. Aging, dietary, and stress factors will be discussed in the disease process. Bacteria, fungi, and viruses will be discussed in general and for each body system. Neoplasms will be covered for each body site. This course will be of benefit to anyone interested in diseases of the human body or entering the medical field. (cross listed with MEDT 401) Pre- or corequisite: BIOL 250 and BIOL 251 or equivalent.

CYTO 405. Normal Gynecological Cytology. 3 Credits.

Introduction to histological and cytological features of the normal female genital tract with emphasis on normal and non-neoplastic abnormalities. Principles of cytological diagnostic techniques will be discussed. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Cytotechnology Program or permission of program director. Pre- or corequisite: CYTO 403.

CYTO 407. Clinical Histology. 3 Credits.

This course consists of the systematic study of cellular components as well as the grouping/organization of tissues into major 'organ' systems. Microscopic and virtual identification and morphology of cells, tissues, and organ substructures will be emphasized. This course will be of benefit to anyone interested in diseases of the human body or entering the medical field. Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.

CYTO 415. Abnormal Gynecological Cytology. 4 Credits.

Introduction to diagnostic cytological techniques and pathology of the female reproductive tract with emphasis on premalignant and malignant changes. Pre- or corequisite: CYTO 403 and CYTO 405.

CYTO 424. Respiratory Cytology. 3 Credits.

Principles of diagnostic cytology and pathology of the respiratory tract, including benign conditions, inflammatory and infectious diseases, premalignant conditions and primary and metastatic malignancies. Pre- or corequisite: CYTO 405 and CYTO 415.

CYTO 428. Cytopreparatory Techniques and Procedures. 2 Credits.

Introduction to collection, processing, and preparation of cytologic samples from all body sites. Prerequisites: permission of program director.

CYTO 442. Gastro-Intestinal Cytology. 2 Credits.

Study of the pathology and cytology of the gastro-intestinal tract, including the oral cavity, esophagus, stomach, colon, and rectum. Emphasis on normal conditions, benign inflammatory, infections, parasitic conditions, gastric ulcers, premalignant and malignant lesions. Pre- or corequisite: CYTO 405 and CYTO 415.

CYTO 444. Genitourinary Cytology. 2 Credits.

Study of the pathology and cytology of the genitourinary tract, with emphasis in normal conditions, benign inflammatory and infectious conditions, crystals, premalignant and malignant lesions. Pre- or corequisite: CYTO 405 and CYTO 415.

CYTO 445. Breast Cytology. 3 Credits.

Study of pathology and cytology of the breast, with emphasis on benign, inflammatory conditions, premalignant and malignant disease in both breast smears and fine needle aspirations. Pre- or corequisite: CYTO 405 and CYTO 415.

CYTO 446. Body Fluids Cytology. 2 Credits.

Study of the pleural, peritoneal and pericardial cavity fluids, synovial and cerebral spinal fluids, with emphasis on benign, inflammatory conditions, and primary and metastatic malignancies. Pre- or corequisite: CYTO 405 and CYTO 415.

CYTO 448. Non-Epithelial Cytology. 2 Credits.

Study of the pathology and cytology of non-epithelial lesions with emphasis on benign, inflammatory, and malignant conditions. Pre- or corequisite: CYTO 405, CYTO 415, CYTO 424, CYTO 444, CYTO 445, and CYTO 446.

CYTO 455. Fine Needle Aspiration. 5 Credits.

Study of specialized collection techniques, processing and diagnosis of fine needle aspirations from various body sites, including, but not limited to, thyroid, liver, lymph nodes, pancreas, lung, kidney, etc. Emphasis will be on benign, inflammatory, primary, and metastatic malignancies of all sites. Clinical practical application of these principles will be continued at the clinical sites. Pre- or corequisite: CYTO 405, CYTO 415, CYTO 424, CYTO 444, CYTO 445, and CYTO 446.

CYTO 458. Cytology Internship I. 4 Credits.

Directly supervised experience in a clinical setting: includes evaluation of gynecologic smears and study set assignments. Students will be exposed to cytopreparatory techniques. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Pre- or corequisite: CYTO 405 and CYTO 415.

CYTO 468. Cytology Internship II. 4 Credits.

Directly supervised experience in a clinical setting. Includes evaluation of gynecologic and non-gynecologic specimen slides and study set assignments. Students will pre-screen gynecologic and non-gynecologic smears and study set assignments. Students will be exposed to cytopreparatory techniques. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Pre- or corequisite: CYTO 405, CYTO 415, CYTO 424, CYTO 444, CYTO 445, and CYTO 446.

CYTO 478. Cytology Internship III. 8 Credits.

Directly supervised experience in a clinical setting. Includes evaluation of gynecologic and non-gynecologic smears and study set assignments. Students will be exposed to cytopreparatory techniques. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Pre- or corequisite: CYTO 405, CYTO 415, CYTO 424, CYTO 444, CYTO 445, CYTO 446, and CYTO 455.

CYTO 495. Topics in Cytology. 1-3 Credits.

Independent study of selected topics in clinical cytology. Review of cytologic specimens from various body sites Prerequisites: permission of the program director.

CYTO 497. Cytology Senior Seminar. 2 Credits.

Supervised experience consists of clinical cases and seminar presentations into current advances within the specialty of clinical cytology. A student research project and oral presentation of current journal articles and the research paper are required. Prerequisites: permission of the program director.

CYTO 498. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Courses

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY Courses

MEDT 210. Orientation to Medical Technology. 1 Credit.

An introduction to the profession of medical technology. Professional, ethical and operational issues will be discussed.

MEDT 300. Phlebotomy Procedures of Nursing Personnel. 1 Credit.

This entry-level course, delivered in lecture/lab format, will provide direct instruction and practice in all phlebotomy techniques used in the collection of blood from infants, children, and adults. Techniques will include capillary and venipuncture methods that use multi-sampling devices as well as techniques used for special populations, patients in isolation, and ER trauma draws. Prerequisite: permission from the School of Nursing. Prerequisite: NURS 303.

MEDT 307. Clinical Methods in Microbiology. 2 Credits.

Laboratory techniques in the diagnosis of clinically relevant microorganisms. Corequisite: MEDT 308.

MEDT 308. Clinical Microbiology. 3 Credits.

A fundamental course in microbiology that includes bacterial growth, synthesis, differentiation, microbial nutrition and metabolism. Prerequisites: BIOL 115N and BIOL 116N or BIOL 121N, BIOL 122N, BIOL 123N, and BIOL 124N; CHEM 211 is recommended or permission of the instructor.

MEDT 309. Medical Bacteriology. 3 Credits.

A comprehensive survey of bacteria, including colonial morphology, cultural characteristics, biochemical identification, pathogenicity, epidemiology, and treatment. Prerequisites: MEDT 307 and MEDT 308.

MEDT 310. Urinalysis and Body Fluids. 1 Credit.

A study of the chemical, physical and microscopic analysis of human urine and other body fluids, with abnormal results interpreted and correlated to disease processes,and cancer cytology of the urinary tract. Corequisite: MEDT 313. Prerequisites: BIOL 250 and BIOL 251 or permission of the instructor.

MEDT 311. Hematology. 3 Credits.

The study of the principles of the formation and development of blood, including the interpretation of normal and abnormal blood morphology and diagnostic procedures in the investigation of hematological disorders. Corequisite: MEDT 312. Prerequisites: BIOL 250 and 251 or permission of the instructor.

MEDT 312. Hematology Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory methods utilizing microscopy and other analytical procedures in the diagnosis and investigation of hematological disorders. Corequisite: MEDT 311.

MEDT 313. Diagnostic Methods in Urinalysis. 1 Credit.

Laboratory experience in the chemical, physical, and microscopic examination of the urine and body fluids with emphasis on quality control, osmometry, and disease correlates. Corequisite: MEDT 310. Prerequisites: BIOL 250 or equivalent.

MEDT 315. Clinical Laboratory Diagnosis. 3 Credits.

An introduction to clinical diagnostic principles utilized in immunology, serology, and hemostasis. Prerequisites: students must be graduates of a clinical laboratory training program.

MEDT 319. Medical Bacteriology Methods. 2 Credits.

Laboratory methods emphasizing isolation, identification and media requirements for pathogenic microorganisms. Corequisite: MEDT 309.

MEDT 320. Blood Collection Techniques. 2 Credits.

Laboratory methods in the procurement of blood by capillary, venipuncture and arterial draws, analytical variables, special phlebotomy tests, isolation techniques, safety, forensic, molecular, legal and ethical implications, pediatric, geriatric, and compromised patient concerns. All students must submit to venipuncture by fellow students. Prerequisites: BIOL 250 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.

MEDT 322. Phlebotomy Internship. 2 Credits.

A 120-hour clinical internship for those desiring to qualify for the ASCP certification exam. Prerequisites: MEDT 320.

MEDT 324. Clinical Instrumentation and Electronics. 3 Credits.

A course covering the theory, operation, selection, maintenance and quality control of instruments in the clinical laboratory. Instruments discussed include spectrophotometers, flame photometry, atomic absorption, fluorometry, gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectroscopy, chemiluminescence, immunochiemical and nephelometric methods, electrophoresis, radiation detection and dosimetry, osmometry, electrochemistry and applications to molecular diagnostic and forensic testing, and basic electronic applications. Statistical applications to data analysis of both instrument and method comparisons, trouble shooting and quality control in the clinical lab. Corequisite: MEDT 325. Prerequisites: CHEM 211 or CHEM 321, MATH 102M or permission of the instructor.

MEDT 325. Clinical Instrumentation Methods. 1 Credit.

A laboratory course designed for students entering the clinical laboratory field. The course includes the instrumental and data processing techniques required for the clinical analysis of body fluids as well as applied statistical techniques to the interpretation of laboratory data, and statistical comparison methods. Lab to include lab sessions in molecular diagnostic testing, comparison studies, quality control, calibration, maintenance, and trouble shooting of clinical chemistry analytics. Prerequisites: MATH 102M, CHEM 121N, CHEM 122N, CHEM 123N, CHEM 124N,and CHEM 211.

MEDT 326. Immunohematology. 3 Credits.

The study of the identification of blood group antigens and antibodies, standard testing procedures, decision criteria for component selection, and regulations of blood banks and transfusion services. Corequisite: MEDT 336. Prerequisites: MEDT 311, MEDT 330, MEDT 331,BIOL 250, and BIOL 251 or permission of the instructor.

MEDT 327. Hemostasis. 1 Credit.

The study of the fundamentals of hemostasis, emphasizing principles, evaluation techniques, and diagnostic applications. Class meets the first 7 weeks of the semester. Prerequisites: MEDT 311, MEDT 312 or permission of the instructor.

MEDT 330. Clinical Immunology/Serology. 2 Credits.

The study of the body's immune response, its cellular and non-cellular components, in-vitro manifestations, diagnostic techniques and interpretations related to the investigation and diagnosis of infectious and non-infectious disease states. Corequisite: MEDT 331. Prerequisites: BIOL 115N, BIOL 250 and BIOL 251 or permission of the instructor.

MEDT 331. Clinical Immunology/Serology Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory methods emphasizing in-vitro antigen and antibody reactions used to aid in the diagnosis of infectious and non-infectious disorders. Corequisite: MEDT 330.

MEDT 336. Immunohematology Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory methods emphasizing procedures that lead to the identification of blood group antigens and antibodies and the selection of therapeutic components necessary for making transfusion-related decisions. Corequisite: MEDT 326.

MEDT 337. Advanced Hematology. 1 Credit.

The microscopic study of blood cells in blood and body fluids, emphasizing morphologic identification and correlation of laboratory data in order to identify specific disease states. Class meets the second 7 weeks of the semester. Prerequisites: MEDT 311 and MEDT 312 or permission of the instructor.

MEDT 339. Medical Parasitology and Mycology Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Laboratory methods emphasizing the identification of medically relevant parasites and fungi. Corequisite: MEDT 340.

MEDT 340. Medical Parasitology, Mycology, and Virology. 1 Credit.

A study of the medically important parasites, fungi, and viruses, and their medical significance. Prerequisites: MEDT 307, 308 or permission of the instructor.

MEDT 350. Urinalysis. 1 Credit.

A study of the chemical, physical and microscopic analysis of human urine and body fluids, anatomy and physiology, and path physiology, with abnormal results interpreted and correlated to disease processes. Restricted to distance education students. Prerequisites: BIOL 250 and BIOL 251 or permission of the instructor.

MEDT 351. Clinical Biochemistry. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the applications of biochemistry and clinical testing in the diagnosis of human disease. Practice given in the interpretation of laboratory data in the areas of carbohydrate, protein, lipid, genetic disorders, liver, renal, pancreatic, G.I., enzymatic, and cardiac testing. Also enzyme kinetics, electrolytes, acid base physiology, tumor markers, endocrinology, pharmacokinetics, therapeutic drug monitoring, and molecular diagnostics. Special emphasis on specimen collecting, pre- and post-analytical variables, and case studies. Prerequisites: BIOL 250, BIOL 251, CHEM 211, and CHEM 212, or permission of the instructor.

MEDT 401. General Pathology. 3 Credits.

This course is an overview of general disease processes and causes in the human. All body systems will be covered including respiratory, gastrointestinal, circulatory, nervous, reproductive, and urinary. Aging, dietary, and stress factors will be discussed in the disease process. Bacteria, fungi, and viruses will be discussed in general and for each body system. Neoplasms will be covered for each body site. This course will be of benefit to anyone interested in diseases of the human body or entering the medical field. (cross listed with CYTO 404) Pre- or corequisite: BIOL 250 and BIOL 251 or equivalent.

MEDT 403W/503. Management in the Clinical Setting. 3 Credits.

A course concerned with organization and management in the clinical setting including personnel supervision, planning, equipment justification, quality assurance, data processing, budgeting, fiscal techniques, marketing, regulatory agencies, educational methodologies, current issues, as well as legal and ethical considerations. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: junior standing and a grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

MEDT 404. Clinical Hematology Practicum. 4 Credits.

Direct clinical experience offered in automated and manual hematology procedures used in distinguishing blood dyscrasias and coagulation abnormalities. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: MEDT 311, MEDT 312, MEDT 327, MEDT 337, and permission of the program director.

MEDT 406. Clinical Microbiology Practicum. 5 Credits.

Direct clinical experience offered in isolating and identifying human pathogens such as bacteria, fungi, and parasites from various clinical specimens. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: MEDT 307, MEDT 308, MEDT 309, MEDT 319 and permission of the program director.

MEDT 440/540. Statistical Applications and Data Analysis in the Clinical Laboratory. 3 Credits.

Topics include review of basic statistics used in the laboratory; use of statistics for quality control, reference range determination, method comparisons, test utility assessment, techniques for searching the literature and assessing quality and applicability of published studies; and data organization and retrieval via queries. Students will perform projects, preferably using actual laboratory data, that relate to lecture topics. Prerequisites: STAT 130M and permission of the instructor.

MEDT 441. Clinical Hematology Competencies. 1 Credit.

Demonstration of stated clinical laboratory competencies in an approved laboratory setting within the discipline of hematology. Prerequisites: MEDT 311 and MEDT 315.

MEDT 442. Clinical Microbiology Competencies. 1 Credit.

Demonstration of stated clinical laboratory competencies in an approved laboratory setting within the discipline of clinical microbiology. Prerequisites: MEDT 309.

MEDT 443. Clinical Chemistry Competencies. 1 Credit.

Demonstration of stated clinical laboratory competencies in an approved laboratory setting within the discipline of clinical chemistry. Prerequisites: MEDT 324 and MEDT 351.

MEDT 444. Clinical Blood Bank Competencies. 1 Credit.

Demonstration of stated clinical laboratory competencies in an approved laboratory setting within the discipline of blood banking. Prerequisites: MEDT 315 and MEDT 326.

MEDT 445. Advanced Clinical Practicum. 3 Credits.

A project-based advanced clinical experience for laboratory practitioners emphasizing enhancement of basic procedures and techniques and development of management, research, computer and educational skills, resulting in a written paper and oral presentation. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: MEDT 440 or approved research methods course; or permission of instructor.

MEDT 452. Clinical Biochemistry Practicum. 5 Credits.

Direct clinical experience offered in automated and manual clinical chemistry determinations with emphasis on the principles, instrumentation, interpretation, and diagnostic significance. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: MEDT 324, MEDT 325, MEDT 351, and permission of the program director.

MEDT 454. Clinical Blood Bank Practicum. 4 Credits.

Direct clinical experience offered in the theories and principles of blood banking with emphasis on the instruction of technical procedures used in an AABB approved blood bank. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: MEDT 311, MEDT 312, MEDT 326, MEDT 336, and permission of the program director.

MEDT 457. Medical Technology Seminar. 1 Credit.

Independent study in all the areas of the clinical laboratory, culminating in a comprehensive final exam in all areas of medical technology. Excellent review for certification exams. Prerequisites: permission of the program director.

MEDT 458. Clinical Elective Practicum. 1 Credit.

Directed internship in any clinical area of interest approved by the clinical instructor and program director. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: permission of the program director.

MEDT 495. Special Topics in Medical Technology. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics within the medical field. Prerequisites: permission of the program director.

MEDT 497. Directed Study in Medical Technology. 1-3 Credits.

Supervised experience in medical technology specialties, allowing students to pursue areas of interest under faculty direction. Prerequisites: permission of the program director.

MEDT 498. Clinical Research Methods. 3 Credits.

An introduction to clinical research methods to include sampling techniques, data collection and analysis, inferential statistics, multivariate analysis, hypothesis testing and research design. The student will be expected to develop a research proposal based upon a critical review of the literature. Prerequisites: STAT 130M or permission of the instructor.

NUCLEAR MEDICINE TECHNOLOGY Courses

NMED 300. Medical Terminology. 3 Credits.

A course designed to cover the terminology and abbreviations used in the clinical sciences. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C or equivalent.

NMED 331. Fundamental Concepts in Nuclear Medicine Technology. 4 Credits.

A course designed to cover the physical principles related to nuclear medicine technology. The methods and mathematics of radioactive decay, types of radiation, radiation interactions, origins of radionuclides, including SPECT and PET/CT radionuclides also presented. Prerequisites: PHYS 101N and PHYS 102N or equivalent.

NMED 332. Nuclear Instrumentation. 4 Credits.

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the theory, operation and quality assurance associated with the instrumentation found in a typical nuclear medicine department. Prerequisites: NMED 331 or permission of program director.

NMED 335. Radiation Health. 3 Credits.

Discussions of radiation effects on cellular systems as well as guidelines for radiation protection and safe handling of radioactive materials in the nuclear medicine clinical setting. Prerequisites: NMED 331 or permission of the instructor.

NMED 401. Nuclear Medicine Technology I. 4 Credits.

A course designed to cover the nuclear medicine procedures and protocols of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary, central nervous, skeletal systems. Other current or emerging clinical nuclear medicine procedures are also covered. Prerequisites: BIOL 250-BIOL 251 or permission of the program director.

NMED 402. Nuclear Medicine Technology II. 4 Credits.

A course designed to cover the nuclear medicine procedures of the respiratory, cardiovascular and endocrine systems. Other current and emerging clinical nuclear medicine procedures and protocols are also presented. Prerequisites: NMED 401 or permission of the program director.

NMED 403. Radiopharmacy. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to cover the concepts and techniques related to the field of radiopharmacy for nuclear medicine technology practice. The production, preparation, uses and quality assurance of radiopharmaceuticals are presented. Prerequisites: NMED 331, CHEM 105N-CHEM 106N and CHEM 107N-CHEM 108N or equivalent and permission of the program director.

NMED 410. Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. 3 Credits.

This course covers the concepts, instrumentation and procedures pertaining to molecular imaging as related to nuclear medicine. Topics include: Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Computed Tomography (CT), PET/CT, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and other emerging technologies. Cross-sectional anatomy and radionuclide therapy, including monoclonal antibodies are also discussed. Prerequisites: NMED 401 and NMED 402.

NMED 440. Clinical Nuclear Medicine Technology I. 8 Credits.

Clinical instruction in patient care, radiation safety, radiopharmaceutical administration, imaging and nonimaging techniques and quality assurance procedures. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: NMED 401, NMED 402 and permission of the program director.

NMED 450. Clinical Nuclear Medicine Technology II. 8 Credits.

Continued clinical instruction in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine procedures, including PET/CT. The correlation of nuclear medicine procedures is also presented. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: NMED 440 and permission of the program director.

NMED 460. Clinical Nuclear Medicine Technology III. 8 Credits.

Advanced clinical instruction in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine procedures, including PET/CT. The correlation of nuclear medicine procedures is also presented. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: NMED 450 and permission of the program director.

NMED 475W. Administration and Management in Nuclear Medicine Technology. 3 Credits.

This writing intensive course is designed to provide a review of the administration, management, policies, and practices relevant to nuclear medicine technology. The leadership, legal, ethical and planning aspects of operating a nuclear medicine department are covered. Prerequisites: admission to the NMED program and a grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

NMED 495. Special Topics in Nuclear Medicine Technology. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected current topics in nuclear medicine technology. Prerequisites: permission of the program director.

NMED 497. Directed Study in Nuclear Medicine Technology. 1-3 Credits.

Directed study in a topic relevant to nuclear medicine technology. Prerequisites: Permission of the program director.

OPHTHALMIC SCIENCE Courses

OPHS 311. Motility. 4 Credits.

Fundamental study of muscle anatomy and physiology, vision testing for infants and children, and ocular motor evaluation. Prerequisite: admission in the ophthalmic technology program.

OPHS 312. Ocular Anatomy. 3 Credits.

In-depth study of the anatomy and physiology of the ocular system and medical terminology. Prerequisites: admission in the ophthalmic technology program.

OPHS 320. Optics and Refraction. 5 Credits.

Lensometry, visual function and testing, retinoscopy, refractometry, and basic optics. Prerequisite: admission in the ophthalmic technology program.

OPHS 321. Visual Pathway. 3 Credits.

Manual and Automated Perimetry, visual pathway, associated lesions, glaucoma and tonometry. Prerequisite: admission in the ophthalmic technology program.

OPHS 330. Pharmacology and Systemic Disease. 3 Credits.

General technical skills, systemic disease, case histories, basic pharmacology. Prerequisite: admission in the ophthalmic technology program.

OPHS 335. Technical Skills. 5 Credits.

Advanced retinoscopy and refractometry, continuation of optics, basic contact lens fitting, photography, and introduction to fluorescein angiography. Prerequisites: admission in the ophthalmic technology program.

OPHS 337. Advanced Motility. 4 Credits.

Clinical experience. Advanced motility with sensory evaluation. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisite: admission in the ophthalmic technology program.

OPHS 350. Advanced Technical Skills. 5 Credits.

Continuation of technical skills with topics to include: low vision, opticianry, ultrasonography, electrophysiology, and introduction to the OR setting (qualifies as a CAP experience.) Prerequisites: admission in the ophthalmic technology program.

OPHS 352. Education in Private Practice Methods. 2 Credits.

Externship in private ophthalmologist's office. Prerequisites: admission in the ophthalmic technology program.

OPHS 420. Specialty Rotation I. 5 Credits.

Clinical experience. Ten-week rotation in each of the following: pediatric ophthalmology, contact lenses, low vision, ophthalmic surgical assisting, and advanced diagnostic testing. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisite: admission in the ophthalmic technology program.

OPHS 421. Specialty Rotation II. 5 Credits.

Clinical experience. Ten-week rotation in each of the following: pediatric ophthalmology, contact lenses, low vision, ophthalmic surgical assisting, and advanced diagnostic testing. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisite: admission in the ophthalmic technology program.

OPHS 422. Specialty Rotation III. 5 Credits.

Clinical experience. Ten-week rotation in each of the following: pediatric ophthalmology, contact lenses, low vision, ophthalmic surgical assisting, and advanced diagnostic testing. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisite: admission in the ophthalmic technology program.

OPHS 423. Specialty Rotation IV. 5 Credits.

Clinical experience. Ten-week rotation in each of the following: pediatric ophthalmology, contact lenses, low vision, ophthalmic surgical assisting, and advanced diagnostic testing. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisite: admission in the ophthalmic technology program.

OPHS 430. Advanced Topics I. 3 Credits.

Lectures on various advanced topics in ophthalmic disease and special testing. Prerequisite: admission in the ophthalmic technology program.

OPHS 440. Advanced Topics II. 3 Credits.

Lectures on various advanced topics in ophthalmology and Board Exam review. Prerequisite: admission in the ophthalmic technology program.