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Old Dominion University

2013-2014 Catalog

Community and Environmental Health

www.hs.odu.edu/commhealth/

Deanne Shuman, Interim Chair

The School of Community and Environmental Health offers undergraduate, graduate, and certificate programs that lead to careers in health services research, public health, community health, health care administration, environmental health, and occupational safety and health. Additionally, the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences (B.S.H.S.) and the Master of Public Health offer practicing health care professionals the opportunity to complete their degrees in a distance format.

Bachelor of Science in Environmental Health

www.hs.odu.edu/commhealth/academics/bs_enviro/

A. James English, Program Director

Environmental health is the study and management of factors that adversely affect the environment and the health and well-being of humans. The curriculum in environmental health, which is accredited by the National Environmental Health Science and Protection Accreditation Council, encompasses a variety of disciplines in the preparation of environmental health specialists, industrial hygienists, and occupational safety specialists.

Environmental health specialists are responsible for education, consultation, and enforcement relating to local, state and federal laws, regulations, and standards governing the safety and sanitation of air, water, milk, food, solid, hazardous and infectious wastes, sewage, housing, institutional environments, and other health hazards. They are actively involved in the overall environmental quality within a community and prevention of diseases associated with environmental factors. Industrial hygienists conduct health hazard evaluations, perform health effects/risk assessment research, and manage health programs in industries or governmental organizations. They anticipate, recognize, evaluate, control, and eliminate health hazards in industry, the community, or the environment. Occupational safety professionals similarly anticipate, identify and evaluate hazardous conditions and practices in the workplace. They develop, implement, administer, measure and evaluate the effectiveness of hazard control programs.

The program requires six credit hours of field practice or internship within an environmental health setting, either a governmental or industrial site. A variety of internship sites are available in the Hampton Roads area for these experiences. Internship sites elsewhere in the state, nation, or world can also be arranged if desired. Internships are typically taken the summer between the junior and senior year. Students are responsible for providing their own transportation to these sites.

Upon graduation, students are eligible to sit for the professional licensing examination in environmental health. With experience, students are eligible to take the certification examination in industrial hygiene and/or occupational safety.

A broad spectrum of employment opportunities is available to graduates whose employment success has been outstanding. Graduates have found positions in local, state, and federal health and environmental agencies such as the FDA, USDA, EPA, OSHA, NASA, and DOD. Many work in hospitals, industries, insurance companies, laboratories, consulting firms, waste and wastewater plants, and other organizations, agencies and firms.

Admission

Students may be admitted to the program on the satisfactory completion of 60 semester hours of recommended study of required prerequisite courses and with the approval of the program director. Applications to the program, including all materials, must be submitted no later than February 1 for consideration for admission the following fall. Exemptions may be appealed through the program director. Students who fail to meet the established deadline for formal admission will usually be allowed to take environmental health courses if space is available; however, permission must be granted by the program director prior to registration.

Requirements

Lower-Division General Education
Written Communication
ENGL 110CEnglish Composition (grade of C or better required)3
ENGL 231CIntroduction to Technical Writing (grade of C or better required) *3
Oral Communication
COMM 101RPublic Speaking *3
Mathematics
STAT 130MElementary Statistics *3
MATH 162MPrecalculus I *3
Language and Culture0-6
Information Literacy and Research **3
Human Creativity 3
Interpreting the Past3
Literature3
Philosophy and Ethics ***3
The Nature of Science12
Select one of the following sequences:
Environmental Sciences
   and Introduction to Human Biology *
General Biology I
   and General Biology II *
Select one of the following:
Conceptual Physics *
Conceptual Physics *
Introductory General Physics *
Introductory General Physics *
University Physics *
University Physics *
Human Behavior3
Impact of Technology (upper-division T course outside the College of Health Sciences)3
Departmental Requirements
BIOL 103Basic Bacteriology *4
CHEM 211
  & CHEM 212
Organic Chemistry Lecture
   and Organic Chemistry Laboratory *
5
CHEM 213Organic Chemistry Lecture *3
Select one of the following:4
Human Anatomy and Physiology I *
Human Anatomy and Physiology II *
Major Requirements43
Environmental Health ****
Occupational Health
Environmental Health Administration and Law ****
Environmental Health Internship I
Environmental Health Internship II
Environmental Health Internship III
Principles of Occupational Safety and Health
Communicable Diseases and Their Control
Water and Wastewater Technology
Industrial Hygiene
Principles of Toxicology
Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Environmental Risk Assessment and Decision Analysis
Environmental Health Senior Seminar
ENVH Electives *****13
Total Hours120-126

*

Must be completed prior to acceptance into the Environmental Health program.

**

HLTH 120G preferred.

***

PHIL 345E preferred.

****

 Grade of C or better required in one of the writing intensive courses

*****

 Consult with advisor for areas of specialization.

Upper Division General Education 

  • Option A. Approved Disciplinary Minor, 12-24 hours minimum; also second degree or second major.
  • Option B. Interdisciplinary Minor (specifically 12 hours, 3 of which may be in the major)
  • Option C. International Business and Regional Courses or an approved Certification Program such as teaching licensure
  • Option D. Two Upper-Division Courses from outside the College of Health Sciences and not required by the major (6 hours)

Requirements for graduation include a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 overall and in the major, minimum 120 credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours in upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University, completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better, and completion of Senior Assessment.

Minor in Environmental Health

A minor in environmental health requires a minimum of 12 semester hours of environmental health courses. Minor course requirements include ENVH 301W and three electives from the environmental health courses approved by the program director. For completion of the minor, students must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the minor exclusive of prerequisite courses and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University. Twelve semester hours of science courses are preferred.

Interdisciplinary Minor-Environmental Issues and Management

James English, Coordinator

Continuing environmental degradation is a worldwide problem threatening the quality of life and its viability. The problem can only be understood and addressed by drawing upon the resources of multidisciplinary approaches. The multidisciplinary perspective center of this minor focuses on the human dimensions of the human-environment equation and includes geographical and ecological approaches, scientific and technological methodologies, planning and public policy issues, and ethical, political, economic, and legal considerations.

Course options are as follows:

CEE 350Environmental Pollution and Control3
CEE 458Sustainable Development3
ECON 435Health Economics: A Global Perspective3
ECON 447WNatural Resource and Environmental Economics3
ENVH 301WEnvironmental Health3
ENVH 402WEnvironmental Health Administration and Law3
ENVH 420Communicable Diseases and Their Control3
ENVH 421Food Safety3
ENVH 422Water and Wastewater Technology3
GEOG 305World Resources3
GEOG 306THazards: Natural and Technological3
GEOG 400WSeminar in Geography3
GEOG 420Marine Geography3
GEOG 422WCoastal Geography3
OEAS 302Environmental Geology3
OEAS 310Global Earth Systems3
PAS 300Foundations of Public Service3
PHIL 344EEnvironmental Ethics3
PHIL 345EBioethics3
POLS 300Introduction to Public Policy3
POLS 335Environmental Politics3
POLS 401Global Environmental Policy3
PRTS 405Outdoor Recreation3
SOC 309Population and Society3
SOC 320Social Inequality3
SOC 325Social Welfare3
SOC 440Health, Illness, and Society3
SOC/CRJS 444Community Justice3

The interdisciplinary minor in environmental issues and management requires 12 credit hours of 300/400-level courses selected from at least two different disciplines with a maximum of six credits from any one discipline. For completion of the interdisciplinary minor, students must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the minor exclusive of lower-level courses and prerequisite courses. At least six hours of upper-level courses must be taken through courses offered by Old Dominion University. Three credit hours may be in the major, if a major course is listed as an option for the interdisciplinary minor. As such, it will be credited toward both the major and the interdisciplinary minor.

Accelerated Program-Bachelor of Science in Environmental Health (B.S.E.H.) to Master of Public Health

B.S.E.H. students who have a 3.00 GPA and have senior standing may apply for acceptance into the B.S.E.H. to Master of Public Health accelerated program. This program allows gifted undergraduate B.S.E.H. students the opportunity to take up to 12 semester hours of graduate course work and apply them to both degrees. Other restrictions apply. Consult with the B.S.E.H. program director for more information.

Minor in Occupational Safety

A minor in occupational safety is available in the environmental health program and requires a minimum of 12 semester hours of ENVH courses in safety. The minor in occupational safety is designed to prepare students to meet safety standards and guidelines in such areas as business, education and industry with the goal of managing operations to minimize financial losses resulting from accidents, health claims, legal actions and property damage. It is especially attractive to students in majors such as engineering, occupational and technical studies, and business who may reasonably anticipate assignment of safety as an additional duty.

Minor course requirements include:

ENVH 406Principles of Occupational Safety and Health3
ENVH 407Occupational Safety Standards, Laws and Regulations3
ENVH 425Occupational Safety and Health Program Management3
ENVH 426Physical Hazards and Their Control3
Total Hours12

For completion of the minor students must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the minor exclusive of prerequisite courses and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Certificate in Occupational Safety

The certificate program in occupational safety is designed to prepare students to meet safety standards and guidelines in such areas as business, education and industry with the goal of managing operations to minimize financial losses resulting from accidents, health claims, legal actions and property damage. It is especially attractive to students in majors such as engineering, occupational and technical studies, and business who may reasonably anticipate assignment of safety as an additional duty, or to individuals already employed in the environmental health and safety field. Courses taken in the certificate program may be applied to degree requirements at both the undergraduate and graduate levels in environmental health. For completion of the undergraduate certificate program students must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 (3.00 for the graduate certificate) in all courses taken toward the certificate. After successful completion of the program, a Certificate in Occupational Safety will be awarded.

A total of 15-16 semester hours is required comprised of three core courses and six to seven hours of electives. Core courses include:

ENVH 406/506Principles of Occupational Safety and Health3
ENVH 407/507Occupational Safety Standards, Laws and Regulations3
ENVH 425/525Occupational Safety and Health Program Management3
Electives may be selected from the following: 6-7
Occupational Health
Physical Hazards and Their Control
Principles of Ergonomics
Industrial Hygiene
Sampling and Analysis Laboratory
Physical Hazards Laboratory
Radiation Health
Total Hours15-16

 There are no prerequisites.

Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences (B.S.H.S.)

www.hs.odu.edu/commhealth/academics/bshs

Jacqueline E. Sharpe, Program Director

The Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences (B.S.H.S.) degree enables those new to health services administration to have the knowledge and ability to function in inpatient hospitals, ambulatory clinics/services, wellness/fitness centers, physician practices, skilled nursing centers/homes, retirement communities, assisted living facilities, home health agencies, and public health departments/community health centers. 

The B.S.H.S. program is also designed to offer advanced educational experiences to already practicing health professionals. This program builds upon the expertise of practicing health professionals and allows them the opportunity to enhance their formal learning. The program focuses on upper-level coursework and general education, along with a career choice chosen by the student. Areas of concentration within the program are health services administration, human services minor, or public health.

Admission

To be eligible for admission into the program, the student must first be admitted to Old Dominion University, prior to completing an application to the B.S.H.S. program.  Admission into ODU does not guarantee admission into the B.S.H.S. program.  Eligibility must be documented with a separate admission form to the B.S.H.S. program director. Lower-division general education requirements for both the concentration in health services administration and the minor in human services may also be satisfied by prior coursework completed as part of an associate degree or by an articulation agreement.  Students must complete ENGL 110C with a grade of C or better before declaring the major.  In addition, students who do not have licensure, an A.A.S. degree or certification must complete the following prerequisite courses before declaring the major:  CHP 200, CHP 328, CHP 335, and CHP 390.

Lower-Division General Education
Written Communication (grade of C or better required in both courses)6
Oral Communication *0-3
Mathematics **3-6
Language and Culture0-6
Information Literacy and Research 3
Human Creativity 3
Interpreting the Past3
Literature3
Philosophy and Ethics ***0-3
The Nature of Science ****8
Human Behavior *****3
Impact of Technology ******0-3
Total Hours32-50

*

Can be satisfied in the major with CHP 400, CHP 450, and CHP 415W or CHP 430W.

**

Both STAT 130M and MATH 162M are required for the public health concentration.   STAT 130M is recommended for students in the health services administration concentration and the human services minor.

***

Can be satisfied in the major with CHP 400.

****

BIOL 105N - BIOL 106N or  BIOL 108N - BIOL 109N or  BIOL 115NBIOL 116N required for public health concentration.

*****

 ECON 202S required for students without licensure, A.A.S. degree or certification

******

Can be satisfied  in the major with CHP 485.

B.S.H.S Professional Electives for both the Health Services Administration Concentration and the Human Services Minor

Students with Licensure, A.A.S. Degree and/or Certification

Current licensure as a health professional, an Associate of Applied Science degree, and/or certification will be used toward satisfying the professional elective requirements. A minimum of 15 professional elective credits will be awarded.  Certification refers to the passing of an exam upon completion of an educational program to demonstrate competency in a chosen profession.  The following programs are some that have been accepted: Radiation Technology, Nursing, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Dental Hygiene, Emergency Medical Technology, Respiratory Therapy, and Physical Therapy Assistant.  Consult the program director for specific information as additional programs may be considered.

Students without Licensure, A.A.S. Degree or Certification

Students who do not have a current license as a health professional, an Associate of Applied Science degree, or a certification must complete the following prerequisite courses and departmental requirements (34-36 credits). 

Prerequisite Courses
Course List
CHP 200Principles of Public Health3
CHP 328Public Health Science3
CHP 335Population Health3
CHP 390The U.S. Healthcare Delivery System3
Total Hours12

Departmental Requirements
CHP 368Internship1-3
CHP 415WCritical Issues in Public/Community Health Administration *3
or
Community Health Resources and Health Promotion *
CHP 440Finance and Budgeting in Healthcare3
CHP 445Health Services Research **3
CHP 450Public and Community Health Administration3
CHP 461Managerial Epidemiology **3
CHP 480Health Ethics and the Law3
ECON 435Health Economics: A Global Perspective ***3
Total Hours22-24

*

C or better required

**

 Prerequisite:  STAT 130M

***

 Prerequisite:  ECON 202S

B.S.H.S. Major Electives for Both the Health Services Administration Concentration and the Human Services Minor

Students with licensure, an A.A.S. degree or certification must complete CHP 368, at least one of the writing intensive courses (CHP 415W, CHP 430W) with a grade of C or better, and three additional three-credit CHP courses or related courses with permission of the program director.  Students without licensure, an A.A.S. degree or certification must select five CHP courses or related courses in addition to the courses selected to meet departmental requirements.

Examples of courses to select from are as follows:

Course List
Select five of the following:13-15
Internship *
Introduction to Global Health
Ethics in Health Administration
Critical Issues in Public/Community Health Administration **
Skills in Health Services Administration I
   and Skills in Health Services Administration II
Community Health Resources and Health Promotion **
Health Services Research
Public and Community Health Administration
Policy and Politics of Health
Healthcare Marketing
Health Ethics and the Law
Health Informatics
Environmental Health
Research Methods in the Health Sciences
Management in the Clinical Setting
Medical Terminology
Any other CHP course by permission
Total Hours13-15

 

*

 CHP 368 is required for students with licensure, an A.A.S. degree or certification.  Students without licensure, an A.A.S. degree or certification must complete the internship course as part of the departmental requirements.

**

 CHP 415W or CHP 430W is required and must be completed with a grade of C or better.

 

Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences with a Concentration in Health Services Administration

The curriculum consists of lower-division general education, major electives, professional electives, and upper-division general education courses. A minimum of 120 credits is required for the B.S.H.S. with a concentration in health services administration, at least 30 of which, including 12 upper level in the major, must be taken in the B.S.H.S. program at Old Dominion University. Requirements include courses in the following areas: community and public health, research methods, and health services administration and management.

Health Services Administration Concentration Electives
MGMT 325Contemporary Organizations and Management3
Select four MGMT 300-400 electives from the following: 12
Human Resources Management
Employee Relations Problems and Practices
Labor Management Relations
Employment Law
Advanced Human Resources Management: Contemporary Issues
Organizational Behavior
Organization Development
Comparative International Management
Total Hours15

Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences with a Human Services Minor

The curriculum consists of lower-division general education, major electives, professional electives, and upper-division general education courses. A minimum of 120 credits is required for the B.S.H.S. with a human services minor, at least 30 of which, including 12 upper level in the major, must be taken in the B.S.H.S. program at Old Dominion University. Requirements include courses in the following areas: community and public health, research methods, human services and counseling.

Human Services Minor
HMSV 339Interpersonal Relations3
HMSV 341Introduction to Human Services3
HMSV 343WHuman Services Methods3
HMSV 346Diversity Issues in Human Services3
Select one course from the following: 3
Career Development and Appraisal
Addictions: Theory and Intervention
Interventions and Advocacy with Children
Theory and Practice of Prevention in Human Services
Family Guidance
Total Hours15

Upper Division General Education

Upper-division general education requirements for both tracks are satisfied through program-required courses in either the concentration in health services administration or the minor in human services.

Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences with a Concentration in Public Health

According to the American Public Health Association (APHA), "Public health protects individuals, families and communities from serious health threats—ranging from diabetes to bird flu—that are often times preventable." The public health profession provides essential services that allow successful tracking of the spread of chronic and communicable diseases, provide needed community health education, and detect health problems in newborns. Public health professionals strive to improve society's quality of life. Public health officials have many responsibilities and work to increase access to healthcare, reduce substance abuse and control infectious diseases in human populations. A public health undergraduate degree is preferred to begin a career as a public health professional. Earning a public health undergraduate degree qualifies an individual for entry-level positions in fields such as health services administration, epidemiology and health education.

The purpose of the track in public health is to provide students the necessary skills to enter the public health profession. Public health is a rapidly expanding profession and is critical to the current workforce shortage and vital to global health.

Lower-division General Education requirements are as described in the B.S.H.S. program earlier in this section. The following are department requirements and are not automatically satisfied with an associate degree: BIOL 105N-BIOL 106N or BIOL 108N-BIOL 109N or BIOL 115N-BIOL 116N, MATH 162M, and STAT 130M.

Students must choose one of the following emphasis areas and complete 36 credit hours. Students must complete 18 hours from either area and then apply and be accepted to the program to be allowed to continue with the public health concentration.

Scientific Foundations Emphasis: (36 credit hours selected from the courses listed below)
Course List
BIOL 250Human Anatomy and Physiology I4
BIOL 251Human Anatomy and Physiology II4
CHEM 121N
  & CHEM 122N
Foundations of Chemistry I Lecture
   and Foundations of Chemistry I Laboratory
4
CHEM 123N
  & CHEM 124N
Foundations of Chemistry II Lecture
   and Foundations of Chemistry II Laboratory
4
CHEM 211
  & CHEM 212
Organic Chemistry Lecture
   and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
5
CHEM 213
  & CHEM 214
Organic Chemistry Lecture
   and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
5
PHYS 111NIntroductory General Physics4
or PHYS 101N Conceptual Physics
PHYS 112NIntroductory General Physics4
or PHYS 102N Conceptual Physics
MATH 163Precalculus II3
MATH 211
  & MATH 212
Calculus I
   and Calculus II
3-8
or MATH 200 Calculus for Business and Economics
MEDT 307
  & MEDT 308
Clinical Methods in Microbiology
   and Clinical Microbiology
5
CYTO 404General Pathology3
CYTO 407Clinical Histology3
MEDT 310
  & MEDT 313
Urinalysis and Body Fluids
   and Diagnostic Methods in Urinalysis
2
MEDT 339
  & MEDT 340
Medical Parasitology and Mycology Laboratory
   and Medical Parasitology, Mycology, and Virology
2
PSYC 201SIntroduction to Psychology3
or SOC 201S Introduction to Sociology
Administration Emphasis: (36 credit hours selected from the courses listed below)
ECON 201SPrinciples of Macroeconomics3
ECON 202SPrinciples of Microeconomics3
MATH 200Calculus for Business and Economics3
ACCT 201Principles of Financial Accounting3
ACCT 202Principles of Managerial Accounting3
FIN 331Legal Environment of Business3
IT 325Web Site and Web Page Design3
IT 360TPrinciples of Information Technology3
MATH 163Precalculus II3
MKTG 311Marketing Principles and Problems3
MGMT 325Contemporary Organizations and Management3
MGMT 340Human Resources Management3
MGMT 350Employee Relations Problems and Practices3
Select one of the following: 3-8
Basic Bacteriology
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
   and Human Anatomy and Physiology II
CHEM 105N
  & CHEM 106N
Introductory Chemistry
   and Introductory Chemistry Laboratory
4
CHEM 107N
  & CHEM 108N
Introductory Organic and Biochemistry
   and Introductory Organic and Biochemistry Laboratory
4
CYTO 404General Pathology3
PSYC 201SIntroduction to Psychology3
or SOC 201S Introduction to Sociology
Public Health Major Courses (Prerequisite or corequisite is CHP 200 and 18 hours from the courses below):
Course List
CHP 200Principles of Public Health3
CHP 360Introduction to Global Health3
CHP 368Internship1-3
CHP 450Public and Community Health Administration3
CHP 465Policy and Politics of Health3
DNTH 415Research Methods in the Health Sciences *3
ENVH 301WEnvironmental Health3
ENVH 448Epidemiology and Biostatistics3

*

Prerequisite STAT 130M.

Choose two major electives from below:
CHP 318Principles of Nutrition3
CHP 400Ethics in Health Administration3
CHP 415WCritical Issues in Public/Community Health Administration3
CHP 420Foundations of Gerontology3
CHP 430WCommunity Health Resources and Health Promotion3
CHP 480Health Ethics and the Law3
NMED 300Medical Terminology3
ENVH 420Communicable Diseases and Their Control3
Upper Division General Education
  • Option A. Approved Disciplinary Minor, 12 hours minimum; also second degree or second major.

  • Option B. Interdisciplinary Minor (specifically 12 hours, 3 of which may be in the major)

  • Option C. International Business and Regional Courses or an approved Certification Program such as teaching licensure

  • Option D. Two Upper-Division Courses from outside the College of Health Sciences and not required by the major (6 hours)

Electives: Elective credit will be needed to total 120 hours.
Graduation Requirements for all tracks
  • Completion of a minimum of 120 semester credit hours, which must include both a minimum of 30 credit hours overall and 12 credit hours in upper-level courses in the major program from Old Dominion University.

  • Completion of ENGL 110C, ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C and the writing intensive (W) course in the major with a grade of C or better.

  • Completion of Senior Assessment (during last semester)

  • Minimum grade point average of 2.0 overall and in the major

Accelerated Program–Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences (B.S.H.S.) to Master of Public Health

B.S.H.S. students who have a 3.00 GPA from each institution attended and who have senior standing may apply for acceptance into the B.S.H.S. to M.P.H. (Master of Public Health) accelerated program. This program allows gifted undergraduate B.S.H.S. students the opportunity to take up to 12 semester hours of graduate course work and apply them to both degrees. Other restrictions apply. Consult with the B.S.H.S. program director for more information.

Minor in Community Health

An undergraduate minor in community health can be obtained by the completion of 12 credit hours from the following courses:

CHP 318Principles of Nutrition3
CHP 360Introduction to Global Health3
CHP 400Ethics in Health Administration3
CHP 415WCritical Issues in Public/Community Health Administration3
CHP 420Foundations of Gerontology3
CHP 425Health Aspects of Aging3
CHP 426Skills in Health Services Administration I1-3
CHP 427Skills in Health Services Administration II1-3
CHP 430WCommunity Health Resources and Health Promotion3
CHP 440Finance and Budgeting in Healthcare3
CHP 445Health Services Research3
CHP 450Public and Community Health Administration3
CHP 455Interpersonal and Counseling Skills for Health Professionals3
CHP 456Substance Use and Abuse3
CHP 465Policy and Politics of Health3
CHP 470Death, Dying and Survivorship3
CHP 475Healthcare Marketing3
CHP 480Health Ethics and the Law3
CHP 485Health Informatics3
One of the following may be substituted for one CHP course: 3
Research Methods in the Health Sciences
Environmental Health
Occupational Health
Management in the Clinical Setting
Medical Terminology

For completion of the minor, a student must have a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the minor exclusive of prerequisite courses and complete a minimum of six hours in upper-level courses in the minor requirement through courses offered by Old Dominion University.

Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences (B.S.H.S.) Specialty Tracks

Through special agreements and curriculum design, courses for the certificate programs in cytotechnology, offered by the School of Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences, and ophthalmic technology, offered by the Eastern Virginia Medical School, may be applied as specialty tracks in the Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences. Both tracks can be found in the School of Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences section of this Catalog. Students pursuing cytotechnology or ophthalmic technology who already have baccalaureate degrees from accredited institutions may opt for a certificate in these programs rather than a second baccalaureate degree.

Cytotechnology Track in the B.S.H.S.

Sophie K. Thompson, Program Director

This track is available to students who complete the requirements for the B.S.H.S. degree. Specific information on the cytotechnology program can be found in the School of Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences section of this Catalog.

Ophthalmic Technology Track in the B.S.H.S.

Lori J. Williams Program Director

Specific information on the ophthalmic technology program can be found in the School of Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences section of this Catalog.

COMMUNITY HEALTH PROFESSIONS Courses

CHP 200. Principles of Public Health. 3 Credits.

Overview of the principles and practices of public health in the world. What is public health? What are its origins, evolution, and how is it structured and administered globally? A discussion of the mission, concepts, principles and practices of population-based public health will predonimate. Topics will include global health and environmental health.

CHP 201. Public Health in the United States after 9/11. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on the changing practices of protecting the public's health in the United States. Topics include biosecurity, bioterrorism, food safety, disease surveillance, and the new threats of biological, chemical and physical hazards.

CHP 318. Principles of Nutrition. 3 Credits.

Course designed especially for those entering the health education or health care field, covering the physiology of each of the major body systems as a basis for understanding those aspects of its function that reflect the importance of various nutrients. Prerequisites: CHEM 105N-106N and CHEM 107N-108N or CHEM 121N-122N and 123N-124N; BIOL 250 or 251 or permission of the instructor.

CHP 328. Public Health Science. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to expand knowledge of the core functions of public health: biostatistics, environmental sciences, epidemiology, health policy and management sciences, and social and behavioral sciences. Prerequisite: CHP 200.

CHP 335. Population Health. 3 Credits.

This course provides a population-bsed approach to professional work in disease management, chronic care management and politics, in addition to students studying public health, health policy, quality and patient safety, health care administration, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, social work and other related clinical professions. Prerequisite: CHP 200.

CHP 360. Introduction to Global Health. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to health-care delivery systems of nonWestern countries, specifically developing countries. The various factors that influence health-care planning and delivery of health services are addressed. Prerequisite: CHP 200.

CHP 368. Internship. 1-3 Credits.

This course will allow a BSHS student to complete an internship for gaining basic job entry skills or to enhance a job skill. Prerequisites: CHP 200, 360, 450, and 465; ENVH 301W, 448; and DNTH 415.

CHP 369. Practicum in Health Sciences. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Prerequisites: junior standing and approval of the Health Sciences Advisor and the Career Management Center. This is a 1-3 credit course intended for the student in the College of Heath Sciences seeking a CAP experience. (qualifies as a CAP experience).

CHP 390. The U.S. Healthcare Delivery System. 3 Credits.

The uniqueness of the U.S. healthcare delivery system will be explored in terms of a systems framework and its complexity. The basic characteristics that differentiate the U.S. healthcare delivery system from that of other countries will be presented. An understanding of the U.S. health care system has specific implications for health services managers. Prerequisite: CHP 200.

CHP 395. Topics in Health. 1-3 Credits.

Study of selected topics. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

CHP 400/500. Ethics in Health Administration. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. A survey of philosophical problems common to health sciences, including an analysis of the nature of health in its historical and contemporary contexts.

CHP 415W/515. Critical Issues in Public/Community Health Administration. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C with a grade of C or better. Identification and analyses of critical issues currently facing public/community health and the American health care system. This is a writing intensive course.

CHP 420/520. Foundations of Gerontology. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Focuses on changes in the characteristics, status, and roles of the elderly; personality development, mental health, and adjustment of individuals with emphasis on biophysical and psychosocial processes as they influence capacity and performance in the elderly.

CHP 425/525. Health Aspects of Aging. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: CHP 420/520 or permission of the instructor. Identifies major issues and problems in meeting health care needs of the aged. Emphasis on role of social assets and supports in determining effects of life changes on the aging process.

CHP 426/526. Skills in Health Services Administration I. 1-3 Credits.

Lecture 2 hours; 1 hour web; 1-3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Introduction of basic concepts which will allow for development of critical skills in a variety of managerial areas pertinent to the delivery of health care. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Experts in various fields will provide students with useful strategies used in the administration of health care services.

CHP 427/527. Skills in Health Services Administration II. 1-3 Credits.

Lecture 2 hours; 1 hour web; 1-3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Continuation of basic concepts and development of critical management skills pertinent to the delivery of health care. Experts in various fields will provide students with useful strategies in the administration of health care services.

CHP 430W/530. Community Health Resources and Health Promotion. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C with a grade of C or better and permission of the instructor. Designed to provide information about community health resources. This is a writing intensive course.

CHP 440/540. Finance and Budgeting in Healthcare. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: junior standing. This course covers financial management functions in healhcare organizations including operating and capital budgeting processes along with budgeting and financial controls.

CHP 445/545. Health Services Research. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on health services research and its assessment abilities and application in health care. Topics include the use of EXCEL, SAS, and SPSS to analyze data. An exploration of the issues and challenges of health services research for health related organizations and other organizations. Statistical procedures and practices will also be conducted. Prerequisite: STAT 130M.

CHP 450/550. Public and Community Health Administration. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A review of the principles and practice of administering public and community health organizations and programs at federal, state, and local levels. Constitutional, statutory and administrative bases for organizing and conducting public/community health programs will be discussed. CHP 400, CHP 415W or CHP 430W, and CHP 450 meet the oral communication requirement in the major. All three courses must be taken to meet the requirement.

CHP 455/555. Interpersonal and Counseling Skills for Health Professionals. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Study and practice in human relations for health practitioners. The course is designed to incorporate the latest and best techniques from the health sciences with a 'therapeutic use of self.'.

CHP 456/556. Substance Use and Abuse. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Focuses on facts about drugs and drug abuse, on value judgments concerning drugs, and on interaction of facts and value judgments. Emphasis is on drug abuse prevention.

CHP 461/561. Managerial Epidemiology. 3 Credits.

This course will blend theory and application of epidemiology. This course will also provide a comprehensive introduction to epidemiology and explain how to use epidemiological concepts and tools to improve decisions about the management of health services. Prerequisite: CHP 200.

CHP 465/565. Policy and Politics of Health. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: junior standing. This course will explore both health policy and the politics of health. Students will develop an understanding of the systematic and analytical framework for developing health and health care policy issues.

CHP 470/570. Death, Dying and Survivorship. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Utilizes readings from sociology, psychology, literature, art, law, religion, and the medical and nursing sciences to explore death in its personal, cultural and professional significance. Audiovisual presentations and guest speakers will provoke thought and discussion to allow students to come to terms with their attitudes toward death and assist others in dealing with this important life experience.

CHP 475/575. Healthcare Marketing. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. This course provides a basic understanding of marketing in a health care setting. It will cover the following: the history of marketing in a health care setting, health care markets, marketing tchniques, and leadership skills in managing and supporting the marketing efforts.

CHP 480/580. Health Ethics and the Law. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. This course provides the students with a basic knowledge of health law and examines legal issues confronting health services administrators in various health care environments.

CHP 485/585. Health Informatics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: junior standing. This course focuses on healthcare informatics (information systems) and applications in health care organizations. It provides an overview of health information system concepts, management, and integration of technology in healthcare organizations.

CHP 495/595. Topics in Public/Community Health Administration. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. This course provides the opportunity for the study of selected topics in public/community health, including informatics, under the supervision of a faculty member.

CHP 496/596. Topics in Public/Community Health Administration. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. This course provides the opportunity for the study of selected topics in public/community health, including informatics, under the supervision of a faculty member.

CHP 497/597. Readings in Public/Community Health Administration. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. This course provides the opportunity for advanced investigations of selected issues/concerns in public/community health administration, under the supervision of a faculty member. It must be taken by students who wish to pursue topics not covered by regularly scheduled courses.

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH Courses

ENVH 301W. Environmental Health. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: junior standing and a grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C. An introduction to the chemical, physical and biological factors affecting human health and well-being. The emphasis is on application of controls to prevent disease and maximize environmental quality. (This is a writing intensive course.).

ENVH 395. Topics in Environmental Health. 1-3 Credits.

Advanced study of selected topics. Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.

ENVH 401/501. Occupational Health. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the industrial environment relative to health problems and the etiologically related agents. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 402W/502. Environmental Health Administration and Law. 3 Credits.

A review of the concepts and practice of administering environmental health control programs within agencies at the federal, state and local levels. The principles of administration and leadership of programs in the private sector are also discussed. The constitutional, statutory and administrative law bases for organizing and conducting such programs and developing environmental policy as well as the legal implications of enforcement will be addressed. A review of all major environmental statutes and their agencies that enforce them will be addressed. (This is a writing intensive course.) Prerequisites: junior standing and a grade of C or better in ENGL 110C and ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.

ENVH 403. Environmental Health Internship I. 3 Credits.

Includes placement in a health-related facility or industrial setting, prearranged with faculty instructor. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: ENVH 301W and permission of program director.

ENVH 404. Environmental Health Internship II. 3 Credits.

Includes placement in a health-related facility or industrial setting, prearranged with faculty instructor. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: ENVH 301W and permission of program director.

ENVH 405. Environmental Health Internship III. 6 Credits.

Includes placement in a health-related facility or industrial setting, prearranged with faculty instructor. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: ENVH 301W and permission of program director.

ENVH 406/506. Principles of Occupational Safety and Health. 3 Credits.

A broad overview of the field of safety. A study of the factors influencing the occurrence of accidents and incidents is set in the context of safety legislation, current issues in the practice of safety and the ethical and professional responsibilities of the safety practitioner. The course also includes discussions of product safety, fire prevention and protection systems safety and human elements in loss prevention. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 407/507. Occupational Safety Standards, Laws and Regulations. 3 Credits.

A review of the important Occupational Safety and Health Standards and Codes with particular emphasis on application of these codes to typical work situations. Governmental enforcement methodologies are also discussed. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 420/520. Communicable Diseases and Their Control. 3 Credits.

An in-depth study of the communicable disease processes as they pertain to environmental sources. A detailed discussion of specific communicable diseases that are manifested by various environmental etiologic agents. Various environmental control measures to prevent the incidence of communicable diseases are presented. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 421/521. Food Safety. 3 Credits.

A comprehensive study of food and milk production, processing and preservation and controls exercised for the prevention of foodborne illnesses and spoilage. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 422/522. Water and Wastewater Technology. 3 Credits.

Introduction to water quality management and wastewater treatment technology. Topics include the effect of organic, inorganic and thermal pollutants in water quality streams, waterborne diseases, monitoring concepts, methods of water quality management, regulatory considerations, theory and application of wastewater treatment concepts, wastewater characterization, and treatment methods and disposal methods. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 423/523. Vector Control. 3 Credits.

A study of the vectors of human disease and the methods utilized in their control. (offered spring) Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 424/524. Residential and Institutional Environments. 3 Credits.

A study of the physical aspects of housing and institutions as they relate to human health and well-being. Coverage is also given to infection control in health-care facilities. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 425/525. Occupational Safety and Health Program Management. 3 Credits.

The establishment, implementation and maintenance of occupational safety and health programs. Paradigms of safety, techniques for safety training and creation of value for safety among business managers and employees are emphasized. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 426/526. Physical Hazards and Their Control. 3 Credits.

An in-depth examination of the varied types of physical hazards in the work environment and the methods of prevention, recognition and control. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 440/540. Principles of Ergonomics. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the terminology, concepts and applications of physiology, anthropometry, biomechanics and engineering to workplace and work methods design. Emphasis will be given to workplace design and work methods for job safety and health. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 441/541. Industrial Hygiene. 3 Credits.

An in-depth study of the chemical and physical agents responsible for occupational illness and the methods used for their measurement, evaluation and control. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 442/542. Sampling and Analysis Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Use and application of sampling and analytical equipment for measurement of chemical agents in the environment. Includes collecting media selection, sampling strategy, sample preparation and analysis. Prerequisites: ENVH 441 or permission of the instructor.

ENVH 443. Principles of Toxicology. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the fundamentals of toxicology with emphasis on the interaction of environmental and industrial chemicals with humans are studied. Exposure, dose response, kinetics and distribution of toxicants, metabolism of toxic agents, factors that affect toxicity and introductory chemical carcinogenesis are discussed. Prerequisites: junior standing and BIOL 250.

ENVH 445/545. Air Pollution and Its Control. 3 Credits.

The study of air pollution in relation to air quality criteria, pollutant production, atmospheric evolution, measurement and control techniques. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 446/546. Physical Hazards Laboratory. 2 Credits.

Use and application of sampling methods and equipment for measurement of physical hazards in the work environment. Includes aspects such as ergonomics, noise, vibration and radiation. Prerequisites: ENVH 441 or permission of the instructor.

ENVH 448/548. Epidemiology and Biostatistics. 3 Credits.

An introductory course in the principles and practices of epidemiology and the application of statistical and mathematical design and analysis of health research studies for the understanding and control of population health and disease with emphasis on environmental applications. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 461/561. Hazardous Waste Management. 3 Credits.

Description of the hazardous waste problem, the fundamentals of the chemistry involved with hazardous waste transport, methods of identification, assessment, control, and disposal of toxic and hazardous waste are discussed. In addition the relevant legal statutes, risk assessment emergency response and case studies are presented. Introduction to the toxicological effects of exposure to hazardous waste is discussed. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 465/565. Hazardous Materials Management. 3 Credits.

The management of hazardous materials includes a wide array of interlocking regulations addressing use, manufacturing, exposure, storage, shipping and disposal. A life cycle review of hazardous materials highlighting best practices and legislation is presented. Useful in preparation for CHMM examination. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 466/566. Environmental Risk Assessment and Decision Analysis. 3 Credits.

The principles of quantitative health risk assessment of toxicants are presented. Qualitative and quantitative skills necessary to evaluate the probability of injury, disease, or death in the general population from exposure to environmental contaminants are discussed. Hazardous identification, exposure assessment, dose-response evaluation and risk characterization are emphasized. Risk management group projects assessing some real environmental risks is an important segment of the class. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 470/570. Industrial Environmental Management. 3 Credits.

Course addresses day-to-day technical and management aspects of environmental compliance, as well as regulatory issues faced in industrial applications. Includes audits and inspections, air and water pollution and hazardous waste. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 495/595. Topics in Environmental Health. 1-3 Credits.

Advanced study of selected topics. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENVH 498/598. Independent Study in Environmental Health. 1-3 Credits.

An opportunity is afforded students to undertake independent study under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisites: permission of the Program Director.

ENVH 499. Environmental Health Senior Seminar. 1 Credit.

Advanced seminar Prerequisites: second semester senior standing and permission of the program director.