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Old Dominion University

2014-2015 Catalog

Academic Information, Resources and Policies

Academic Enhancement

Located in the Student Success Center, Academic Enhancement supports student learning in the classroom through programs, resources, and services that introduce and promote college-level learning from first-year through graduation.   Services include tutoring, mentoring, academic coaching, supplemental instruction, testing services, and writing for college success.  For information about additional resources at Old Dominion, visit http://www.odu.edu/ao/successcenter/.

Academic Advising for Undergraduate Students

http://www.odu.edu/success/academic/advising

All degree-seeking undergraduate students must meet with an advisor each semester to discuss future academic and career goals as well as course selection for the next term.  A hold is placed on each student’s account on April 1 and November 1 to prevent registration until the student and advisor meet.  Students are encouraged to talk with their advisors frequently throughout the year, rather than only during registration time periods. The advisor may, at her or his discretion, remove the registration hold for several semesters after the student has developed a long range degree plan.
Acceptance of a student for advising purposes does not guarantee acceptance into the department as a major.  In most instances, students begin their academic planning and advising by meeting with an advisor in one of the chosen college's advising center.   Upon successful completion of prerequisite courses, students must officially declare the major and be accepted by the department as a major by submitting the appropriate application or meeting with the chief departmental advisor.
The executive director of advising and transfer programs in Academic Affairs (located in the Student Success Center) directs the undergraduate advising system through the college advising center directors, associate deans, the chief departmental advisors (CDAs), faculty advisors, the Center for Major Exploration, and the director of advising services for Distance Learning, in coordination with the Career Management Center.

Academic Advising Centers

All undergraduate, degree-seeking students are assigned to an advisor in a college advising center, based on the planned academic program, or to the Center for Major Exploration during the initial term of enrollment. On-campus first year students will meet with the advisor during Preview Orientation, which is required of all freshmen students and campus freshmen-level transfers. All Strome College of Business students, including on-campus transfer students, are required to attend Preview. All transfer students are encouraged to attend Preview, in addition to participating in the online transfer orientation. Students who are undecided on a program of study or interested in exploring majors offered at Old Dominion University should schedule an appointment at the Center for Major Exploration (CME) in 1500 Webb Center. In addition, students who begin their studies in an academic college may become exploratory and utilize CME for major exploration advising. All other on-campus students who have decided on a major should see an advisor in the academic college advising office during the first semester of enrollment. Students will be assigned to a faculty advisor after the freshman year or upon completion of prerequisite courses for the major. Distance Learning students, regardless of major decision, should consult with a site director for advising purposes. Any off-campus students in online programs or not affiliated with a distance learning site should consult with a campus representative in Distance Learning for advising support.

Academic advisors will make every effort to give effective guidance to students in academic matters and to refer students to those qualified to help them in other matters, but the final responsibility for meeting all academic requirements for a selected program rests with the student.

How to Prepare for an Advising Session

All undergraduate, degree-seeking students are expected to utilize the online Degree Works program to make decisions about course registration. Prior to an advising appointment, students should review their Degree Works curriculum page and select courses for the next term. These selections may be indicated in the long range planning feature of Degree Works for record-keeping purposes. Students are encouraged to develop a complete long range plan prior to their sophomore year, knowing that the plan may change based on student elective choices and tracks within major programs. Printing out the long range plan and bringing it to the advising appointment will allow the student to have a more productive discussion with the advisor about elective choices and future goal planning. If a student requires assistance with utilizing the Degree Works system, the Peer Educator office in the Student Success Center offers individual and group tutorials on how to use the system and create a long range degree plan.  Information about each major and the possible careers is available through video clips at http://www.odu.edu/success/programs/finishin4.

Early Alert/Progress Report Success Advising

Academic success assistance is available to students who have progress grades at midterm (fall or spring semesters in 100-200 level courses) of C- or below. Students are contacted through ODU email by the first-year advisor in their academic major or by their Residence Life staff for individual consultation and referral to support services. Any student in academic difficulty may also receive individual academic coaching services from the Peer Educator office in the Student Success Center.

UNIV Coursework

Academic success coursework is available for all freshmen, sophomores, and transfer students who end their first semester in academic warning. All freshmen students are required to register for UNIV 110 in accordance with the Undergraduate Continuance Policy. Sophomores and transfer students may register for UNIV 111 or UNIV 112.

The Academic Advising Mission Statement and Goals

In keeping with the University’s mission, the primary purpose of the Old Dominion University academic advising program is to empower students to explore, experience, and engage in educational activities that assist them in the development of meaningful educational and career plans to meet their full potential.

Academic Advisor Goals and Teaching Outcomes:

GOAL 1. To assist students in developing suitable educational plans and programs of study that promote academic success.

GOAL 2. To help students explore and clarify individual academic and career goals.

GOAL 3. To teach students how to select appropriate courses and other educational opportunities that provide the experiences needed to develop their goals.

GOAL 4. To teach students to review and evaluate progress toward established educational goals and completion of requirements within individual programs of study using the degree evaluation system.

GOAL 5. To develop student awareness and understanding that decision-making in the advising process is based on student responsibility and to promote understanding of University values as articulated in the University’s mission statement.

GOAL 6. To encourage students to use University support services and related resources as needed (Undergraduate Catalog, Career Management Center, Counseling Services, Educational Accessibility, Writing Center, etc.).

GOAL 7. To participate in advisor training sessions, keeping current on University policies and procedures.

Student Goals and Learning Outcomes in the Academic Advising Process:

GOAL 1. To take full responsibility for learning about opportunities and resources that help formulate academic and career plans and to gather the information needed for the successful completion of all graduation requirements, including, but not limited to, course scheduling, program planning, and understanding the academic advising process.

GOAL 2. To define academic and career goals by exploring options through courses and other educational experiences.

GOAL 3. To be engaged in the course selection process and to actively seek and participate in other educational opportunities that help in the achievement of academic and career goals.

GOAL 4. To read and understand the University’s policies and procedures in relation to meeting University, College, and Departmental graduation requirements.

GOAL 5. To be responsible for new information provided through on-line resources and to be prepared with accurate information and relevant materials when contacting the academic advisor.

GOAL 6. To consult with the academic advisor on a mutually agreed upon schedule to review course choices, discuss academic and career goals, and assess progress towards degree completion.

Academic Testing and Placement

Academic Enhancement's University Testing Center is located in the Student Success Center. Personnel administer University placement tests, College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) exams, DANTES, the Miller Analogies Test (MAT), PRAXIS, professional certification exams and correspondence tests.  For information about testing services, please visit www.odu.edu/elt..

Writing Placement. All entering undergraduate students, including transfer students (with or without credit for freshman composition), must earn a passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test (WSPT).

A passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test (WSPT) is a prerequisite to registration for ENGL 110C.  Transfer students with credit for ENGL 110C will not lose that credit.  A transfer student with credit for ENGL 110C who has not passed the WSPT may not register for a writing intensive (W) course.  Please contact Academic Enhancement to develop a plan to correct writing deficiencies and earn a passing score on the WSPT.

Math Placement. All incoming freshman students and transfer students are eligible to enroll in MATH 101M or MATH 103M. Placement into MATH 102M, MATH 162M and above will be based on a student’s SAT or ACT score. Students who want to enroll in STAT 130MMATH 102M, MATH 162M and above and who do not have the qualifying SAT or ACT score can challenge their math placement and/or seek academic credit by making an appointment to take the COMPASS placement test at the University Testing Center. Students challenging their placement may take the COMPASS test up to the end of the first week of classes.

All students who have studied a foreign language in high school for three or more years must take a placement exam before continuing in that same language. Students with less than three years of foreign language study in high school may take the placement test if they wish to begin higher than 101F; otherwise, they must begin with the 101F course. This policy does not apply to students who have advanced placement credit. Foreign language courses below the 300 level are not open to native and heritage speakers; these students should consult a foreign language faculty member for advising.

Students whose native language is not English and who have satisfied English language proficiency requirements (see the section of this catalog on English Proficiency Requirements for Non-Native Speakers of English) are exempt from the foreign language requirements for General Education, including exemption from foreign language placement testing. Students pursuing degrees that require proficiency beyond the 100 level must be certified by the Foreign Languages and Literatures Department to obtain a waiver of the 200-400 level courses.

Exemptions. Students may satisfy the requirement for the first semester of General Education written communication based on their performance on one of two national examinations. Three hours of credit for ENGL 110C will be earned if the student receives either:

  1. a score of 3, 4, or 5 on the Advanced Placement Examination in English Language and Composition; or
  2. a score of 50 or higher on the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) English Composition with Essay Examination.

Students with superior scores on the COMPASS test receive credit for MATH 162M, or both MATH 162M and MATH 163, thus fulfilling the General Education Requirement. Students desiring credit by examination for STAT 130M should apply to take the DANTES test at the University Testing Center.

Students may be exempt from the General Education Foreign Language requirement (without credit) in one of the following ways:

  1. presentation of three high school credits in one foreign language;
  2. presentation of two high school credits in each of two foreign languages; or
  3. presentation of a score of 490 or above on the CEEB Foreign Language Achievement Test or its equivalent.

Credit is granted for scores of 3, 4 and 5 on Advanced Placement (AP) language exams in Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, and Spanish and literature exams in French, Latin and Spanish. No more than nine credits will be awarded if both AP language and literature exams are submitted. Credit is also granted for scores of 4, 5, 6 and 7 on the A2 and B exams in French, German, Latin and Spanish of the International Baccalaureate (IB). Contact the Testing Center or the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures for additional information. Students receiving B.A. degrees must demonstrate foreign language proficiency through the 202 or 212 level regardless of high school credits completed.

All placement tests described above are administered by the University Testing Center. Contact information can be found at the center’s website at www.odu.edu/elt.

Advising and Transfer Programs – Transfer Student Services

Old Dominion University recognizes the unique needs of transfer students who require a wide array of campus resources. The Office of Advising and Transfer Programs in the Student Success Center assists transfer students with pre-enrollment advising and transition into college after admission to Old Dominion University. A variety of services and programs are offered to new students, and students are encouraged to take advantage of every opportunity - Explore, Experience, and Engage!

Students transferring from the Virginia Community College System may view information about Old Dominion University’s Guaranteed Admission Agreement, curriculum sheets, the letter of intent process and Articulation Agreements on the Transfer Advising website. The Office of Advising and Transfer Programs also assists academic advisors with providing transition, orientation, and programmatic services for undergraduate transfer students from community colleges and other four-year colleges.

Old Dominion University offers a number of articulated programs with the Virginia Community College System. These programs begin with course work taken at the community college and are completed at Old Dominion University with a baccalaureate degree. In accordance with the State Committee on Transfer Policy, these agreements are designed to minimize loss of credit due to transfer and to take maximum advantage of the lower tuition at the community colleges. See the Guaranteed Admission Agreement between Old Dominion University and the Virginia Community College System for more information on completing the Letter of Intent to Transfer. The Office of Advising and Transfer Programs is responsible for the development of these agreements with two- and four-year institutions, primarily within Virginia. Additionally, such agreements are developed with institutions in other states and countries.  The Office also aids in the interpretation, implementation and promotion of such agreements.  Further information regarding articulation and program agreements can be obtained from the Transfer Advising website.

Experiential Learning Credit Options at the Undergraduate Level

Old Dominion University offers a program for assessing college-level knowledge gained through work, life experience and self-study prior to attempting a specific ODU course. Students may initiate assessment of prior learning through a variety of assessment tools, including departmental examinations, portfolios, external examinations, performance assessment, or documented training programs, as determined by academic departments. The program, experiential learning, facilitates the assessment of such learning. A student may earn a maximum of 60 semester hours at the undergraduate level through experiential learning credit. However, in unusual situations when a student can demonstrate a more extensive knowledge base that would be applicable to a degree program, the student can apply to Advising and Transfer Program's experiential learning representative for an exception to the maximum of 60 credit hours. Requests will be forwarded to the appropriate department for review. Experiential learning credit may be granted through the following mechanisms:

  1. External Examinations. Satisfactory scores on the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support (DANTES), International Baccalaureate (IB), Advanced Placement (AP), Cambridge Advanced (A/AS Level) programs, and professional certification examinations evaluated by the American Council of Education (ACE) for college-level credit. It is strongly recommended that students who wish to challenge particular courses do so through CLEP or DANTES examinations for which Old Dominion University awards academic credit. Qualifying scores through the Advanced Placement Examinations Program, Cambridge Advanced (A/AS Level) programs, or Admissions Testing Program of the Educational Testing Service (ETS) are approved by departments. CLEP, DANTES, AP, IB, and Cambridge scores should be reported to the Office of Admissions.
  2. Departmental Examinations. Upon approval of the chair or dean (designee) of the college in which the course is offered, a student may take a comprehensive examination in an academic course in which he or she can demonstrate proficiency and upon passing the examination receive credit for that course. A request for testing should be made through the Experiential Learning Office, which forwards the request to the chair of the department involved. A course may be tested through departmental examination one time only.
  3. Credit for Training. Military and professional training is evaluated and recommended for college credit by the American Council on Education (ACE). The relevant academic department will recommend specific academic credit for posting to the student’s record.
  4. Portfolio Development. Upon approval of the chair or dean (designee) of the college in which the course is offered, a student may develop a portfolio for a course or courses offered by Old Dominion University to gain college-level credit. Portfolios are submitted to the experiential learning representative in Advising and Transfer Programs.

The following regulations for experiential learning credit will apply:

  1. All experiential learning options will be granted with credit.
  2. Experiential learning credit will be granted upon the written recommendation of the chair of the department or designated faculty assessor having jurisdiction over the courses involved with the chair’s approval.
  3. The applicability of experiential learning credit toward specific degree program requirements is subject to departmental approval.
  4. A student may not fail a course at Old Dominion University and later receive credit for the same course through an experiential learning option.
  5. A student may not enroll in a course for credit or audit at Old Dominion University and subsequently seek credit through an experiential learning option.
  6. No letter grades will be entered on the student’s transcript for experiential learning credit; this credit will be treated in the same way as transfer credit: a “P” (Pass) will be assigned and it will not count in the student’s grade point average.
  7. A student must request experiential learning credit as early as possible upon admission to degree status.
  8. Experiential learning credit does not count toward the University’s residency requirement. A student earning experiential credit must meet the minimum residency requirements of 25 percent of the total number of credits required for the degree at Old Dominion University, which shall include 12 residency hours of upper-level courses in the declared major program. The student should be aware that some program residency requirements exceed the University minimum residency requirements.
  9. A student in a certificate or endorsement area may earn a maximum of six credit hours through experiential learning credit to apply to a certificate, endorsement or teacher licensure program. Experiential learning hours gained in these programs would be applicable to approved degree programs at Old Dominion University. In an approved undergraduate degree program, a student who has previously earned six credit hours of experiential learning credit for a certificate area may be eligible to attempt additional experiential learning credit toward a degree program.

The privilege of seeking experiential learning credit is available to both full-time and part-time degree status students only. A student should consult with the degree program advisor, site director, distance learning representative, and the experiential learning representative at the beginning of his or her academic career at Old Dominion University to determine how experiential learning may be applicable to the degree. For further information, visit the experiential learning web site at www.uc.odu.edu/elt.

For information about experiential learning options for graduate students, please see the section of the Graduate Catalog on Experiential Learning Credit Options at the Graduate Level.

Procedures for Portfolio Development

Students wishing to receive academic credit through portfolio development should do the following:

  1. Consult the experiential learning representative in Advising and Transfer Programs for guidelines on preparing a portfolio documenting “experiential learning” experiences relating to the course for which credit is sought.
  2. Submit the portfolio to the experiential learning representative and include appropriate fees.
  3. The portfolio will be reviewed and forwarded to the appropriate department chair for evaluation.
  4. The department chair, or a designated faculty assessor(s), will examine the portfolio and determine an award of credit. The decision will be forwarded to the experiential learning representative who will then notify the student and the University Registrar of the results.

If the conclusion for the portfolio assessment process results in a negative decision of the award of credit, a student may appeal the decision to the college having the responsibility for the course(s) for which credit is sought. The basis for a portfolio assessment appeal is the student’s charge that the assessment decision was awarded through prejudice or caprice. The burden of proof rests with the student.

Students must initiate appeals in writing within three weeks of receiving the completed portfolio evaluation form. The appeal must be written to the experiential learning representative.

The experiential learning representative will forward the appeal letter to the appropriate department chair. The chair will review the student’s appeal. The chair will get input from the student and from the faculty assessor and may form an independent committee to review the appeal. The chair makes the decision on the validity of the appeal. If the chair concludes there is no cause for complaint, the student has the right to appeal to the dean of the college.

If the faculty assessor is the chair, the student may go directly to the dean. The dean will follow the procedures as outlined above. The decision of the dean of the college is final.

Experiential Learning Fees*

Students participating in the Experiential Learning program are responsible for assessment fees as follows:

  1. External Examination
    • Students are responsible for the testing fees for external examinations such as CLEP and DANTES, and should check with the University Testing Center at Old Dominion University for fee information. There is no additional experiential learning assessment fee for the granting of academic credit for external examinations.
  2. Departmental Examination
    • The experiential learning assessment fee is equal to 30% of the current approved in-state on-campus rate for undergraduate and graduate courses.
  3. Training Evaluation
    • The type of training determines the experiential learning assessment fee for training evaluations. For example, Old Dominion University already articulates military training, and therefore, there is no additional experiential learning assessment fee for the granting of academic credit. The assessment fee for training not previously evaluated by Old Dominion University is equal to 20% of the current approved in-state on-campus rate for undergraduate and graduate courses. For information about training programs that have been evaluated by Old Dominion University, see the experiential learning web site at www.odu.edu/ao/successcenter.
  4. Portfolio
    • A one-time workshop materials fee.
    • Portfolio assessment fee equal to 50% of the current approved in-state on-campus rate for undergraduate and graduate courses.

Fees are based on the credit hours attempted and are not refundable if the student does not receive credit as a result of the evaluation. There is no appeal of the fee charge. The fees must be paid at the time the student submits the completed portfolio, departmental examination or training documentation for evaluation. 

For more information call (757) 683-3699, visit the web site at www.odu.edu/ao/successcenter or email advisor@odu.edu.

*  All fees are tentative and subject to final approval by the Board of Visitors and/or the president.  Current experiential learning fees are available on the website at http://www.odu.edu/ao/successcenter.

Orientation

Upon admission to the University, undergraduate students and their families and guests are invited to attend the University’s orientation program, Preview. Students entering the University as new freshmen (including transfer students with less than 24 hours) are required to participate in the Preview Orientation program. Preview is scheduled throughout the summer in a series of one-day sessions for incoming freshmen and transfer students. A Transition to College fee is included in the student tuition bill. For more information, see the web site at www.odu.edu/preview.

At Preview, students meet with academic advisors to plan and register for summer/fall semester classes and receive an introduction to University resources and campus life. A program for families and guests is scheduled concurrently.

A Preview is also scheduled in December and January for students enrolling in the spring semester. A program for families and guests is scheduled concurrently.

Peer Educator Program

The Peer Educator Program (PEP), a component of Academic Enhancement, consists of peer tutoring, mentoring, supplemental instruction, academic coaching, and peer support training.  In addition, PEP offers study space, workshops, and time management assistance to undergraduate students at all levels of study.  The program is facilitated by trained undergraduate and graduate student staff that is committed to the success of ODU students.  Morning, afternoon, evening and online hours are available by appointment for tutoring and mentoring, and all services and resources are available free of charge to all undergraduate students at ODU.  To make an appointment, visit http://uc.odu.edu/taa/tutortrac.shtml, or for more information, please call (757) 683-6396.

Peer Mentorship:  This formal mentorship program places a strong emphasis on increasing success behaviors through a combination of targeted academic coaching and less-structured social exchanges between the mentor and mentee.  Mentors are matched with students and meet regularly throughout the semester.

Peer Tutoring:  This program offers trained and certified academic assistance for students in nearly every subject area.  Students schedule tutoring sessions as frequently as necessary to receive support in their coursework, homework, projects, presentations, and exam preparations.  Students may schedule tutoring appointments through Tutortrac at: http://uc.odu.edu/taa/tutortrac.shtml.  Students who prefer web-based tutoring have full access to Adobe Connect and SmartThinking online tutoring services.  Visit http://ww2.odu.edu/ao/successcenter/ to link to these services, as well as additional tutoring resources across the campus.

Academic Coaching:  This program was created to assist students who are experiencing academic hardship and may benefit from the multifaceted intervention of tutoring, mentorship, and additional services.  Students are guided through a series of formal interactions with trained peer coaches to improve study skills, note-taking techniques, test-taking, motivation, and other elements of success.

Supplemental Instruction (SI):  Supplemental Instruction assists students in learning challenging course material through weekly meetings with students who have previously taken the course.  These student SI leaders serve as academic mentors and assist the professor by offering review sessions, study tips, and additional office hours to enhance study skills and comprehension of the course content.

Certified Peer Training Program:  Mentors and mentees are provided with ongoing support through engaging activities and assessment of mentors and staff.  Mentors are trained and certified through the College Reading and Learning Association (CRLA).  This service is offered to all peer programs and departments at ODU.

Student Success Center

A partnership between Academic Affairs, Learning Commons, and Student Engagement and Enrollment Services, the Student Success Center provides the tools for students to succeed at Old Dominion University.    Successful transitions to college life require a challenging, yet supportive environment that fosters academic discipline, intellectual curiosity, personal and civic responsibility, ethical behavior, campus involvement, and respect for diversity.   Individualized programs and services empower students to take responsibility for their learning experiences and build their academic success plans leading to graduation and beyond.   

Services include:

  • skills development and learning support through academic coaching, tutoring, mentoring, supplemental instruction, and writing support
  • writing, math, and foreign language placement assessments and national testing services
  • undergraduate research and honors opportunities/courses
  • first-year and second-year success programs
  • new student orientation (Preview) and family programs
  • assistance for financially-eligible and first-generation college students
  • assistance for students with disabilities (short- and long-term)
  • advising services for new students, transfer students, and students in academic difficulty
  • instructional support for faculty, including technology assistance
  • faculty development for improving writing in the disciplines
  • liaison for the awarding of academic credit for work and life experience

The Student Success Center houses Academic Enhancement, Advising and Transfer Programs, Educational Accessibility, Honors College, Student Transition and Family Programs, Writing and Faculty Development (QEP), and Undergraduate Research.  Visit http://www.odu.edu/ao/successcenter to link to these services, as well as additional resources across campus.

Student Support Services

Student Support Services is federally funded and provides academic support for students meeting the eligibility criteria established by the U.S. Department of Education. Student Support Services is designed to increase the retention and graduation rates of low-income, first-generation college students and students with disabilities. The following support services are available to students on a continuing basis: academic and financial aid advising, tutorial assistance, study skills support, and academic success workshops. For more information, please call 683-3582 or visit www.uc.odu.edu/sss.

Upward Bound Program

The federal TRIO Upward Bound Program at Old Dominion University is federally funded to serve low-income and first-generation college bound students. The program provides academic support and counseling services to develop the skills and motivation in participants who need assistance in order to complete high school and enter post-secondary school.

The program’s services are offered in two phases: an academic year phase and a summer residential phase.

During the academic year phase, students meet on campus on Saturdays to receive small group and individual tutoring in math, English, computer applications, foreign language, social studies, basic skills, and science as well as career, educational, and personal counseling.

The summer residential phase is a six-week experience. Students live on campus and receive classroom instruction in subject areas tutored in during the academic year phase. Cultural enrichment activities are also provided during both phases of the program.

Only students from Norfolk and Portsmouth who meet the program’s U.S. Department of Education eligibility guidelines can qualify to participate.

For more information, visit the website at www.studentaffairs.odu.edu/ub.

Writing Proficiency Program Requirements and Policies

www.odu.edu/ao/successcenter

Old Dominion University provides a comprehensive writing program. The program is implemented through faculty in the Department of English as well as by faculty members in all majors who teach writing intensive courses.  Academic Enhancement and the Writing Center support students as they work to improve their writing skills. Academic Enhancement's Writing for College Success Program (http://www.odu.edu/ao/successcenter) offers workshops for campus students who need to improve their writing skills and individual conferences for those students (campus and distance learning) with transfer credit for ENGL 110C but who did not pass the Writing Sample Placement (WSPT).  The Writing Center  (http://al.odu.edu/writingcenter/) works with both undergraduate and graduate students in all disciplines to prepare them for the challenges of composing essay assignments, test preparation, seminar papers, theses, dissertations, and application materials.

Undergraduate Writing Program Requirements

Entrance Examination—Writing Sample Placement Test (WSPT). All incoming students, including transfer students, will be tested for proficiency in writing. The test results determine the appropriate writing course for placement of each first-year student. A passing score on the Writing Sample Placement Test (WSPT) is a prerequisite to register for ENGL 110C or ENGL 126C. Freshman students unable to earn a passing score on the WSPT for placement into ENGL 110C or ENGL 126C may enroll into UNIV 150 Writing for College Success (3-credit elective course) or retake the WSPT. Successful completion of UNIV 150 meets the prerequisite for enrollment into ENGL 110C or ENGL 126C.

With the exception of those students holding baccalaureate or advanced degrees, all entering undergraduate students, including transfer students (with or without credit for freshman composition), must pass the Writing Sample Placement Test. Transfer students with credit for ENGL 110C will not lose that credit. A transfer student with credit for ENGL 110C who has not passed the WSPT may not register for a writing intensive (W) course. Please contact Academic Enhancement to develop a plan to correct writing deficiencies and earn a passing score on the WSPT.

Evaluation of Writing Proficiency. All students enrolled in undergraduate degree programs must pass ENGL 110C (or its transfer equivalency) with a grade of C (2.0) or better in order to register for ENGL 211C or ENGL 221C or ENGL 231C.  Students must also pass ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C (or their transfer equivalency) with a grade of C (2.0) or better in order to qualify to register for a writing intensive (W) course.  Finally all undergraduate students must complete their W course in the major at Old Dominion University and earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in order to earn a baccalaureate degree.

Transfer Students. Like all other students, transfer students must pass ENGL 110C (or its transfer equivalency) with a grade of C (2.0) or better in order to register for ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C and must also pass ENGL 211C or 221C or 231C (or their transfer equivalency) with a grade of C (2.0) or better in order to qualify to register for a writing intensive (W) course.  NOTE: This policy also applies to transfer students holding associate degrees; holding an associate degree does not fulfill the requirements of the Undergraduate Writing Program if students received a grade below C (2.0) in any 100- or 200-level Composition (C) course.
    Transfer students must also take a writing intensive (W) course in their major at ODU and must pass that W course at ODU with a grade of C (2.0) or better in order to earn a baccalaureate degree.

Distance Learners. Students may contact their site directors for information on the WSPT and Evaluation of Writing Proficiency. For those students not associated with an ODU site, please contact the Testing Center website at www.uc.odu.edu/testing or the Office of Distance Learning at 1-800-968-2638.

Students following the degree requirements in Catalogs prior to 2012-13 may elect to meet the writing requirement through this option.

The Honors College

The Honors College offers a four-year program where select incoming freshmen, current sophomores, and transfer students may enjoy low-enrollment general education courses designed exclusively for them. In their junior year, Honors College students have the opportunity to apply what they have learned at Old Dominion to solving real-world problems in the community by developing a one-credit civic or service learning project in consultation with the Dean of the Honors College. In their junior and senior years, Honors College students work one-on-one with ODU faculty to develop two upper-division courses as contract honors courses. In their senior year, Honors College students participate in a three-credit senior honors colloquium, departmental capstone course, or honors thesis, which provides them with the opportunity to hone their research skills and assess their academic strengths in preparation for graduate school, international scholarship opportunities, and future employment.

The online application for admission into the Honors College is available on the Honors College website: http://www.odu.edu/honors/about/apply.  Letters of recommendation attesting to the applicant's scholastic ability may be submitted to honorscollege@odu.edu.

Being an Honors College graduate is a prestigious accomplishment, one that is viewed favorably by graduate schools and potential employers everywhere. Additional benefits include:

  • Honors College students can apply to live in Honors Housing. Applications for Honors Housing must be made directly to the Office of Housing and Residence Life. The Office of Housing and Residence Life prioritizes requests based on the date BOTH the application and housing deposit are received.
  • Honors College students enjoy faculty privileges at the library.
  • All Honors College students may register for classes on the first day of the registration period.
  • Honors College students can apply for travel grants to offset the costs of travel to a national or international conference at which they are presenting.
  • Honors College students may apply for up to $300 to offset the costs of essential equipment and supplies for the completion of research related to a Student Honors Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP), honors contract course, or a senior honors thesis/project.
  • Upon completion of the requirements of the Honors College, students are awarded a certificate, a medal, and a silver tassel.

Competition for acceptance into the Honors College is keen. The criteria used to select the limited number of first-year students admitted annually include high school grade point average and curriculum, Scholastic Aptitude Test scores, class rank, letters of recommendation, and a written personal statement.

The minimum admission requirements for continuing and transfer students are as follows: a 3.8 college grade point average, the ability to complete at least 48 additional credit hours at Old Dominion University, and two letters of recommendation from college faculty members.

Honors College Requirements

Honors General Education and Honors Contract Course Requirements
Four honors courses *
Capstone Requirement (select one):
Senior Honors Colloquium
Capstone Course (Colloquium, Thesis, or Departmental Capstone Course)
Senior Honors Thesis
Experiential Learning Component (select one in addition to HNRS 387):
Honors Civic Learning Project
Honors College options for: Study Abroad, Teacher Preparation, Practicum, or Internship may be developed to fulfill the experiential learning component requirements.
Undergraduate Research: Complete two of the following
Undergraduate Research Learning Community Course
Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship
Out of Class Educational Poster or Oral Presentation
Successful application for and completion of an Undergraduate Research Grant Project
Publication of an article in a research journal
Monarch Think Tank I
Monarch Think Tank II
Honors Independent Study
Honors Independent Study
Campus Lectures **
*

Either honors general education or honors contract.

**

Honors College students are required to attend one lecture per semester for up to 8 semesters.

Undergraduate Research Program. The Honors College also supports the Student Honors Apprenticeship in Research Program (SHARP), which provides undergraduates with hands-on experience working with faculty on a wide variety of research projects. SHARP faculty mentors help students to acquire research skills early in their undergraduate careers. Later in their academic careers, SHARP students use and develop these skills through research-oriented course work, collaborative and faculty-sponsored research, as well as their own independent research projects that can be funded through Old Dominion’s Undergraduate Research Grant Program. The Undergraduate Research Symposium and Undergraduate Research Journal provide students with the opportunity to present and publish their work under the supervision of the University’s distinguished faculty. Additional information regarding undergraduate research opportunities is available on the Undergraduate Research Program’s website: http://www.odu.edu/ao/honors/academics/research/researchprog.shtml

For additional information about the Honors College, visit the web site at http://www.odu.edu/honors or contact:

Dr. David Metzger
Dean of The Honors College
Student Success Center
Old Dominion University
Norfolk VA 23529-0076
(757) 683-4865

Technical Standards

To successfully complete a program at Old Dominion University, students must meet all academic and technical standards required by the program. Technical standards are all nonacademic criteria or standards for admission to or participation in the program in question. A technical standard is a description of the physical and mental abilities required of students to perform successfully in an academic program. Students are responsible for knowing the technical standards of their intended major program. Technical standards are documents that can and should be used in the advising process, both when students are exploring different majors and when they want specific information on what is required in a particular program.

Copies of all technical standards are located in the following offices: Educational Accessibility, Institutional Equity and Diversity, and University Counsel. In addition, each department chair has a copy. For students requiring accommodations, please contact the Office of Educational Accessibility for assistance. webpage: http://www.odu.edu/educationalaccessibility.

Academic Credit For Extracurricular Activities

Extracurricular activities may be approved for credit for undergraduate students by academic departments, based on objectives, criteria, and evaluative procedures formally determined by the department and the student before the semester in which the activity is to take place. Such credit is subject to the review of the provost and vice president for academic affairs.

Guidelines

The following guidelines regarding the administration of the policy on granting credit for extracurricular activities will provide university-wide standards on this matter. Within these standards individual departments may establish credit activities appropriate to their particular discipline.

  1. A department may grant credit for extracurricular activities that fall within the academic interests of the department.
  2. The extracurricular activity for which credit is to be granted must have demonstrable academic value.
  3. A student desiring academic credit for extracurricular activity shall, prior to the semester the credit is to be granted, formally petition the chair of the department, describing the proposed project in detail and justifying its academic value.
  4. If the department chair considers that a petition has merit, the chair will refer the student to a faculty member with expertise in that area. The student and the proposed faculty supervisor will refine the student’s project. The faculty member will then make a recommendation to the chair concerning the validity of the project, the amount of credit to be awarded, and the grading system to be employed (pass/fail or letter grade). The recommended plan will include a description of the nature of the supervision and methods of evaluation to be used.
  5. A recommended project approved by the chair will then be sent to the dean for approval.
  6. If the project is approved, the student will then register for the appropriate course number and credit hours. Each department interested in granting credit for such activity will establish courses numbered “377, 378” for one to six credits each semester and titled “Extracurricular Studies.”
  7. After completion of an approved project, the student will submit a report to the faculty supervisor. This report will be retained by the faculty supervisor for examination by the department chair and/or other interested persons.
  8. The faculty supervisor will review the results of the project and submit the appropriate grade to the registrar.
  9. The burden of justifying a project and documenting the results rests on the student. It is also to be emphasized that credit will not be given retroactively.

Activity Credits

The University sets a limit of 12 credit hours earned in activity courses that may be applied to any undergraduate degree. The individual college will determine the maximum number of such credits that students may apply in fulfillment of their particular degree requirements. In unusual circumstances, activity credit beyond the established college maximum will require the approval of the appropriate dean. In any case, the total number authorized by the college shall not exceed the limit set by the University. (Students may be counseled but not required either to take or avoid specific activity courses outside their own fields of study. They are further advised to limit the number of activity credits taken until they have ascertained the limitation on such credits set by the colleges in which they propose to major.)

Activity courses are generally defined as those that are not predominantly academically oriented and that are service, skill, recreational, or craft in nature, such as performing ensembles and organizations in music, one-credit health and physical education service courses, theatre arts activity courses, and certain military and naval science courses. All activity courses shall be identified specifically in the catalog and the class schedule and can be recognized by the “+” symbol following the course number.

Activity credits required by a student’s major department will not be counted against the credit limitation, nor will the credits earned in courses numbered 377-378 that involve extracurricular studies.

Assignment Submissions

Coursework is to be delivered to the instructor using the method specified. Electronic and postal delivery may be required.

Attendance Policy

Regular classroom attendance is expected of all students and individual faculty may require class attendance. Course grades reflect not only performance on written assignments and exams, but also participation during class periods. As discussions cannot be reproduced, many times absences cannot truly be made up. Excessive absences therefore have a negative effect on the student’s learning and performance. Students are responsible for all class work, and a student who misses a class is expected to have the initiative necessary to cover properly the material missed. Students must meet all course deadlines and be present for all quizzes, tests, and examinations.

Syllabus information will include a statement of the attendance policy for each course and the effect of nonattendance on grades. Reasonable provisions should be made by the instructor for documented representation at University-sponsored athletic or academic functions, mandatory military training and documented illness. The granting of provisions for other documented absences is left to the discretion of the faculty member.

Due to the nature of asynchronous courses, students are expected to participate in class, but in formats that may not require attendance at regular intervals.

Extended illness. The student should notify the Office of Student Engagement and Enrollment Services when the student is going to be absent from classes for more than one week because of an illness. Student Engagement and Enrollment Services will notify the student’s course instructors of the absence on his or her behalf.

Class Attendance by Guests

Statement: The propriety for non-student presence in the classroom will vary dependent upon the nature of curricular offerings, dangers inherent to certain classrooms and labs, the optimum classroom environment for each class, and the preferences of each instructor. Guidelines specifying whether non-student guests will be permitted in the classroom, which are consistent with departmental policy, will be established for each class by the instructor and included in the syllabus for the course. These guidelines will apply to each site at which the class is offered.

Dean’s List

The Dean’s List is announced at the end of each term. Any undergraduate student taking 12 or more hours of degree credit for grade point credit who attains a grade point average of 3.40 or higher with no grade below C (2.00) is placed on the Dean’s list. The student must also receive a passing grade on any nondegree credit courses in which he or she is enrolled. Students who receive grades of I are not placed on the Dean’s List.

Duplicate Courses

An undergraduate student who has taken two courses that are designated by the department as duplicate may apply only one toward a degree. Courses considered to be duplicate are so designated in the course descriptions found elsewhere in this catalog. For example, a student receiving credit for BIOL 121N and BIOL 122N cannot receive credit for BIOL 110N and BIOL 111N.

Final Examinations

The University firmly believes that a comprehensive evaluation of a student’s achievement in a course is a vital part of the educational process. Final examinations, if given, are to be given at the time and in the location given on the Registrar’s Office website at www.odu.edu/registrar. Upon request of the instructor, exceptions to this regulation may be made only by the dean.

In the event that a final examination is changed to other than that of the scheduled time, provisions will be made by the instructor for any student who cannot comply with the schedule change.

Any student who has three examinations scheduled in one calendar day and is unable to resolve the problem informally with the instructor or instructors may petition the dean for relief.

All examinations are to be retained for one year by the faculty members. Students have the privilege of requesting conferences with the instructors in regard to their final grades.

Students enrolled in asynchronous, video streaming, CD Rom, or like courses that may not follow the traditional semester timetable will be required to adhere to the examination schedule set by the professor. In addition, students not associated with a distant learning site, higher education center, or with main campus will need to secure a Proctor to administer all tests, quizzes, and final exams. A postal fee will be incurred by the student for this service. For more information on proctoring, contact the Office of Distance Learning at 1-800-968-2638.

System of Grading

Grade Grade Points Undergraduate Graduate
A4.00SuperiorExcellent
A-3.70SuperiorExcellent
B+3.30GoodGood
B3.00GoodGood
B-2.70GoodFair
C+2.30SatisfactoryPoor
C2.00SatisfactoryPoor
C-1.70PassingPoor
D+1.30PassingNot Used
D1.00PassingNot Used
D-0.70PassingNot Used
F0.00FailingUnsatisfactory
WF0.00Unofficial WithdrawalUnofficial Withdrawal
PNonePassSee below
F (P/F)NoneFailSee below
ONoneAudit
INoneIncomplete
IINoneIncomplete not Subject to Time Limit
WNoneOfficial Withdrawal
QNoneProgress but not Proficiency
ZNoneNo Grade Reported

The use of plus and minus grades is at the discretion of the instructor.

The grade point average is calculated by dividing the accumulated number of grade points earned by the accumulated number of credit hours attempted. Grades of F and WF and repeats are included, but official withdrawals, audits, and grades on noncredit courses, nondegree credit courses, and pass/fail degree courses are not included.

For graduation, an undergraduate student must have a minimum grade average of C (grade point average of 2.00) in all courses taken and a grade point average of at least 2.00 in the major except for those programs requiring grade point averages above a 2.00.

A 3.00 average will be required for the awarding of a graduate degree or certificate. A student whose average falls below 3.00 following six or more graduate hours attempted shall be placed on probation or suspended in accordance with the continuance regulations for graduate students.

Grades in courses accepted for transfer credit are not counted in the computation of grade point averages.

Grades are available to students through the secure website. Grades are mailed to students only if a written request is submitted to the Office of the University Registrar.

WF and W Grades. The grades of WF and W indicate withdrawal from a course only under those conditions described in the sections entitled Class Schedule Change Procedure and Grading Policy for Withdrawal From Classes.

Incomplete Grades. A grade of I indicates assigned work yet to be completed in a given course or absence from the final examination and is assigned only upon instructor approval of a student request. The I grade may be awarded only in exceptional circumstances beyond the student’s control, such as illness, and only after 80% of the time allocated for the course has elapsed and substantial progress has been made toward completion of course requirements with the exception of courses that do not fit within the traditional semester calendar. In cases of exceptional circumstances beyond the student’s control, it is the responsibility of the student to approach the instructor to request an I grade and to provide documentation, including a written statement of when the work will be completed, to support the request. The authority to award an I grade rests with the instructor whose decision is final. Students whose requests for I grades are approved must not re-register for the class until the I grade has been resolved. The I grade becomes an F if not removed through the last day of classes of the following term (excluding the exam period) according to the following schedule: I grades from the fall semester become F’s if not removed by the last day of classes of the spring semester; I grades from the spring semester and the summer session become F’s if not removed by the last day of classes of the fall semester. An I grade may be changed to a W only in very unusual circumstances and when the student’s situation has changed since the I grade was awarded. In these cases, the request for a change to a W must be in writing, documented, and approved by the instructor, department chair and dean. Students will not be allowed to graduate until all grades of I have been resolved.

In the case of courses that do not fit within the traditional semester calendar, the faculty member assigns the I grade. The time periods for the removal of I grades before they become grades of F are the same as those stated in the previous paragraph.

Extension of the I time limitation normally will not be approved except for reasons beyond the student’s control and only if the supervising faculty member is available and willing to supervise the work beyond the normal time limit. Students should submit the request to the instructor, who should submit approval, via the chair, to the University Registrar in order to retain the I. The approval from the instructor should designate the expiration date of the extension.

A grade of II indicates incomplete work not subject to the time limits described above for I grades. The II grade can be used only in those courses directly related to the research for and preparation of the graduate thesis/dissertation.

Z Grades. A grade of Z indicates that no grade has been reported by the instructor and will convert to a grade of F if not removed through the last day of classes of the following term (excluding the exam period) according to the following schedule: Z grades from the fall semester become F’s if not removed by the last day of classes of the spring semester; Z grades from the spring semester and the summer session become F’s if not removed by the last day of classes of the fall semester. Students will not be allowed to graduate until all grades of Z have been resolved.

Interim Academic Evaluation. Faculty teaching 100- and 200-level undergraduate courses will provide specific feedback regarding progress in the course by posting an interim grade via Leo Online by the beginning of the fifth week of classes in the fall and spring semesters. Providing timely information to students on graded work makes students aware of their performance so they can determine whether to seek additional help from the faculty member, tutorial services when available, their academic advisor and/or withdraw from the course prior to the established deadline for withdrawal.

Mid-Semester Feedback. The University believes that regular assessment of students and feedback to them is essential to effective teaching and learning. Therefore, faculty members will provide all students with evaluation of their progress in a course prior to midsemester (or equivalent in a nonsemester course) so that students have information about their progress before the withdrawal deadline, which is the end of the tenth week of classes.

Grade Forgiveness

Under the Grade Forgiveness Policy, undergraduate students seeking a baccalaureate degree may improve their grade point average (GPA) by repeating up to five courses taken previously. Each repeated course must be the same course as taken previously and must be completed through Old Dominion University. The registrar automatically applies the Grade Forgiveness Policy to all eligible course repeats at the end of each semester. The Grade Forgiveness Policy became effective for the Fall 1997 semester. Courses repeated prior to the Fall 1997 semester are not eligible for grade forgiveness. Grade forgiveness will not be processed after a student graduates.

Grade Forgiveness Policy

Undergraduate students are subject to the following conditions and requirements.

  1. Students who receive a grade of C– or lower (grades of C-, D+, D, D-, F, and WF) may repeat up to five courses to improve the overall grade point average.  Only the first five repeated courses will be forgiven.  Students are not given an option to select which course might be forgiven.  A course may be repeated once with grade forgiveness applied. Grade forgiveness is automatically applied only to the first repeat of a course with an original grade of C- or less, regardless of how many times the student may elect to repeat the course for other reasons. The Grade Forgiveness Policy will not be applied to courses for which a grade of C or higher was ever earned. Additional courses that are not eligible for grade forgiveness include courses taken under the pass/fail option, courses taken under the audit option, courses for which a grade of W was the only grade awarded, courses that currently are incomplete (I grade), or courses for which a grade of F was awarded as a result of an act of academic dishonesty.
  2. The Grade Forgiveness Policy applies only to the repeat of the same course (same number, same title, same credit value, and, for topics courses, same subtitle and same credit value). Exceptions will be made where the course number or title is the only change and the change is documented in the Catalog and approved for grade forgiveness by the assistant vice president for undergraduate studies.
  3. The Grade Forgiveness Policy will not be extended to courses originally taken elsewhere, including Norfolk State University and institutions with which Old Dominion University has consortia arrangements. In addition, courses repeated at other institutions will not be used to forgive Old Dominion University courses.
  4. Students may not be able to repeat a course in the following cases: enrollment is restricted, the student no longer qualifies for admission to a course, the prerequisites are enforced, major or sequence requirements have been changed, or the curriculum has been revised. In such cases the decision of the assistant vice president for undergraduate studies in consultation with the appropriate academic department will prevail. Exceptions are granted only in rare instances. In any course or program where enrollment demand exceeds the resources to offer sufficient openings or sections to meet that demand, the academic unit may give registration priority to students taking the course for the first time.
  5. Students may elect to use both grade forgiveness and the Adjusted Resident Credit (ARC) policy. However, students cannot use grade forgiveness for individual courses for which adjusted resident credit already has been applied.
  6. Students who have graduated may not use the provisions of this policy to repeat for forgiveness a course taken prior to the date of graduation. Once a bachelor’s degree has been awarded, a student may not raise the undergraduate grade point average by repeating a course taken as an undergraduate.
  7. Under this policy, only the second grade earned, whether higher or lower than the original grade, will be calculated in the grade point average for the purposes of continuance, graduation, etc. Any repeats of a course after grade forgiveness has been applied will be averaged with other course work. All grades will remain on the student’s permanent record, but the record of a previous grade in the course will be marked to indicate that the course has been repeated. Academic suspensions will not be removed from student transcripts and Dean’s List status will not be added after grade forgiveness is applied to the student record in cases where the grade point average is improved sufficiently to change the student’s status for the semester in question.
  8. An enhanced grade point average using the Grade Forgiveness Policy does not determine eligibility for graduation with honors. To determine eligibility for graduation with honors, the student’s complete record, including grades (grade points and hours) for courses that have been forgiven, will be evaluated to calculate the final grade point average. If the student’s overall average is sufficient, graduation with honors will be posted to the student’s record.
  9. In cases where the student repeats a course in which a grade of C or better was awarded, all grades received, including the original grade, and all hours earned will be used for calculation of grade point averages. The course will count only one time toward graduation certification and degree completion.
  10. Students receiving financial aid should consult with their Financial Aid representative to determine how use of this policy may affect financial aid status.
  11. Other schools, including professional and graduate schools, may not honor this policy on repetition of courses with forgiveness.
  12. Veterans should consult the Office of the University Registrar to determine the impact of course repetition on their eligibility for benefits.

Grade Appeals

Grade Appeal Procedure

  1. The purpose of the grade appeal procedure is to serve the needs of graduate and undergraduate students who believe that they were unjustly awarded a final course grade by a faculty member through prejudice or caprice. This policy applies to the final grade for the award of academic credit and does not apply to graduate and undergraduate examinations that are administered as part of the degree progression and certification processes (such as comprehensive examinations and candidacy examinations at the graduate level). The basis for a grade appeal is the student’s charge that the final grade was awarded through prejudice or caprice. The burden of proof rests with the student.
  2. Students must initiate the appeal within the same time limitations that exist for removing a grade of I from a record (see the policy on System of Grading).
  3. The student will consult with the instructor first for an explanation of the method of evaluation and to determine whether an error has been made.
  4. If the student is not satisfied with the results of the conference with the instructor and the student wishes to pursue the appeal, the case must be presented in writing for a first-level appeal. The student’s grade appeal letter should (1) state specific reasons and give examples of faculty prejudice or caprice, (2) show that prejudice or caprice affected the awarding of the final course grade, and (3) be presented as a complete package and include all supporting documentation.
    1. The student will submit the grade appeal letter to the chair of the department.
    2. If the instructor is the chair, the student will submit the grade appeal letter to the dean.
    3. If the instructor is the dean, the student will submit the grade appeal letter to the chair of the department in which the dean is teaching the course.
  5. If it is concluded at the first-level appeal that there is no cause for complaint, the person to whom the appeal was submitted will notify the student in writing that the appeal is denied. The student may submit a second-level appeal as detailed below.
    1. If the chair initially concludes in the first-level appeal that there is no cause for complaint, the student has the right to appeal to the dean. The student should request in writing that the chair forward the grade appeal package to the dean to initiate the second-level appeal.
    2. If the instructor is the chair and the student has appealed directly to the dean and the dean concludes in the first-level appeal that there is no cause for complaint, the student has the right to appeal to the provost and vice president for academic affairs. The student should request in writing that the dean forward the grade appeal package to the provost and vice president for academic affairs to initiate the second-level appeal.
    3. If the instructor is the dean and the student has appealed to the chair of the department in which the dean is teaching the course and the chair has concluded in the first-level appeal that there is no cause for complaint, the student has the right to appeal to the provost and vice president for academic affairs. The student should request in writing that the chair forward the grade appeal package to the provost and vice president for academic affairs to initiate the second-level appeal.
  6. If the person to whom the second-level appeal is submitted concludes that there is no cause for complaint, the student will be notified in writing that the grade appeal process is complete and no further appeal is allowed.
  7. If during the first- or second-level appeal process it is concluded that there may be valid cause for the complaint, the person to whom the appeal has been submitted should consult with the instructor and student and attempt to mediate the dispute. Among the alternatives available for resolution of the case will be the assignment of the grade of P if the chair, the instructor, and the student express their agreement in writing. If mediation fails, the person to whom the appeal has been submitted will offer to form a committee to carry out an independent investigation and a hearing will be held.
    1. The person to whom the appeal has been submitted will appoint a committee from the department or college. The committee will consist of two faculty and one student. Both the instructor and the student will have the right to challenge, for valid cause, any or all of the members of the committee, and in that event replacements will be appointed and no further challenge will be permitted. The committee will hear the instructor, the student, and other pertinent witnesses. The hearing will be taped, but the tapes will be erased after one year following disposition of the case. The committee, after careful deliberation, will make its recommendation to the person to whom the appeal was submitted, who will relay the information to the instructor and the student.
    2. If the committee finds that there is no cause for complaint, the grade appeal process is complete and no further appeal on the merits of the case is allowed. Only one hearing on the merits of the case is allowed.
    3. If the committee finds on behalf of the student and recommends a change of grade and the instructor refuses to change the grade, then the person to whom the appeal was submitted will consult with the student about the advisability of accepting a P grade. Should the student consent to acceptance of a P grade, the person to whom the appeal was submitted is authorized to change the contested grade and will so inform the registrar. A P grade established under this policy will be given irrespective of the University policy on hours permitted for P grades or restrictions on when a P grade is permissible and will not prevent progression in the degree program or courses for which this course is a prerequisite.
    4. If either the instructor or the student believes that the established procedures for the appeal of grades have not been followed, an appeal for a rehearing may be to the person identified as the second level of appeal. The only basis for appeal will be the failure to have been provided due process as prescribed by the policy.

Guidelines and Procedures for Grade Adjustments for Nonacademic Reasons

  1. Errors in the assignment of grades (e.g., a C received instead of an A) must be brought to the attention of the faculty member immediately upon receipt of the grade. If confirmed, the instructor will submit a grade change through the chair to the University Registrar. An online process for grade changes is available if the grade to be changed is not older than two semesters. In these cases, the instructor of record makes the change online. The chair is notified by email of the change and may at that time deny the change of grade. If the grade to be changed is older than two semesters, then the instructor submits an Academic Record Change Form (H-1002) to the chair, who forwards it to the University Registrar if it is approved, and notifies the instructor of reasons for denial if it is not approved.
  2. Administrative errors (e.g., drop/add submitted but not processed) should be brought to the attention of the University Registrar immediately upon receipt of the grade.

Repeating Courses

Normally, undergraduate students may not repeat courses in which they have previously earned a C or better or in which they have received transfer credit. Exceptions to this should be made by the department chair or, in the case of graduate students, by the dean of the college in which the graduate student is enrolled, and should be allowed only under the following conditions:

  1. A student has a long delay (usually more than five years) between an introductory course (or the first half of a two-course sequence) and subsequent study, so that repeating the course is advisable for future success in the field.
  2. A department requires that grades higher than C be earned in particular courses or requires a cumulative grade point average greater than 2.00 and stipulates that students who earn less than the desired grades or grade point average retake the courses.

None of the credit hours earned in courses that have been repeated for credit under these conditions will be applicable toward the total hours required for the degree. Grades earned in both the original course (if C or above) and the repeated course will, however, be used in the calculation of the cumulative grade point average.

The Grade Forgiveness Policy does not apply when courses are repeated in which a grade of C or higher was earned originally nor does the Grade Forgiveness Policy apply to transfer courses. Please refer to the Grade Forgiveness Policy in this Catalog for information about repeating courses in which grades below C were earned.

Regulations for Continuance: Undergraduate Students

Notification of Academic Status

It is the responsibility of every student to determine his or her academic status on-line at www.leoonline.odu.edu. The University makes every reasonable effort to notify undergraduate students who are not in good standing of their academic status. A first class letter is mailed to the permanent address of each undergraduate student (degree and non-degree seeking) placed on academic warning, academic probation and suspension. Additionally, an email containing the same information will be sent to the student’s Old Dominion University e-mail address in accordance with the Electronic Messaging Policy for Official University Communication. Non-receipt of a letter or e-mail by a suspended student will not be considered grounds for claiming eligibility to enroll for a subsequent semester. All academic status notices appear on the student’s transcript and will not be removed.

Undergraduate Continuance Regulations

At the end of each semester—fall, spring, and summer—the coordinator of academic continuance reviews the records of all students who do not maintain a 2.00 grade point average (GPA) and acts according to the following policies, which are summarized in the table below.

  1. ACADEMIC WARNING. A student will be placed on academic warning for one semester when the student’s cumulative GPA falls below 2.0 at the end of a semester, including summer sessions. A student on academic warning may not enroll in more than 14 credits per semester of attendance (no more than six credits in the summer sessions, and no more than one course in any single summer session) except under extenuating circumstances and with the permission of the dean or designee of the college in which the student is enrolled. A student on academic warning must achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 at the end of the next semester of attendance to be in good standing. Failure to achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 results in academic probation.

    Old Dominion University is committed to assisting students in achieving their academic goals. Therefore, freshman students on academic warning are required to participate in a success program sponsored by  the Student Success Center in their next semester of attendance. Failure to complete the requirements of the success program will result in cancellation of registration for the next fall or spring semester.
     
  2. ACADEMIC PROBATION. A student is placed on academic probation when the student’s cumulative GPA falls below 2.0 for two consecutive semesters of attendance, including summer sessions. Students on academic probation are expected to improve their cumulative GPA by achieving a semester GPA of 2.0 or better during each semester of attendance. A student who achieves a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 is removed from academic probation and placed in good academic standing.

    Students on academic probation are required to meet regularly with their advisor during their next semester of attendance. A student on academic probation may not enroll in more than 14 credits per semester of attendance (no more than six credits in the summer sessions, and no more than one course in any single summer session).

    Failure to achieve a 2.0 semester GPA at the end of a fall or spring semester while on probation results in academic suspension. Students who receive a 0.0 GPA for two consecutive semesters (fall, spring) will be suspended immediately.
     
  3. ACADEMIC SUSPENSION. Following a semester of academic probation, an undergraduate student will be suspended at the end of the fall or spring semester if the cumulative grade point average remains below a 2.0 AND the semester grade point average falls below 2.0. Old Dominion University does not suspend students at the end of the summer sessions. Students suspended at the end of the fall term must separate from the institution for spring term; students suspended at the end of the spring term must separate from the institution for summer and fall terms.

    A student may apply for readmssion to ODU for the semester following completion of the suspension period.  A student readmitted after suspension enrolls under the academic probation status and is subject to the provisions of that status.  If a student readmitted after suspension fails to obtain a semester GPA of 2.0 in any semester before achieving a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0, the student is placed on a five-year suspension.  The student may be considered for readmission after a minimum five-year separation from ODU.

    Although a student may be approved for readmission to ODU, the student is not automatically eligible to receive federal or state financial aid.  See the "Financial Aid" section of this catalog for information about Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) standards and suspension of aid eligibility.  Detailed information about the SAP appeals process can be found on the ODU Office of Financial Aid web site at http://odu.edu/af/finaid/sapPolicy.pdf.
     
    Academic Status Grade Point Average Requirements
    Good Standing2.00+ cumulative GPA
    Academic Warning (1st occurence)1.99 or less cumulative GPAInitial term of academic difficulty; student eligible to continue
    Academic Probation (1st occurence)1.99 or less cumulative GPASecond consecutive term of academic difficulty; student eligible to continue
    Academic Probation (2nd and subsequent occurences)Term GPA = 2.0 or above AND cumulative GPA = 1.99 or lessSecond consecutive and subsequent term(s) on academic probation; student eligible to continue with a minimum 2.0 term GPA
    First Suspension (see below)Term GPA AND cumulative GPA = 1.99 or lessAfter two consecutive semesters, one on academic warning and one on academic probation, first term of academic difficulty in which cumulative and term GPA are below 2.0; student NOT eligible to continue
    If suspension occurs during the: Fall term OR Spring termStudent must separate from ODU for the: Spring term OR Summer and Fall terms
    Second suspensionTerm GPA AND cumulative GPA = 1.99 or lessAfter academic warning, academic probation and first suspension occur, second term of academic difficulty in which cumulative and term GPA are below 2.0; student is placed on a mandatory five-year suspension

All academic status notices appear on the student’s transcript and will not be removed.

Guidelines for filing a suspension appeal for continuous enrollment:

2014 – 15 Suspension Appeal Deadlines:
Suspension Posted Appeal Application Deadline Appeal Decision Posted
December 2014January 5, 2015January 7, 2015
May 2015May 18, 2015May 20, 2015
  1. All students have the right to appeal their suspension if extenuating circumstances warrant such action. All appeals must be submitted in writing with the Suspension Appeal Form or on-line at www.odu.edu/advising by the deadline posted above. Suspension Appeal Forms must be delivered to the coordinator of academic continuance. Late appeals will not be reviewed.
  2. Appeals must be based on circumstances pertinent to the semesters in which academic difficulty occurred that were beyond the control of the student and for which official withdrawal from the course(s) was not an option. Appeal letters must be legible and authored by the suspended student. In order to be reviewed, an appeal letter must:
    • Document the extenuating circumstances such as work, poor study environment, finances, illness, or personal relationships that have adversely affected performance: i.e. statement or letter from physician, employer, family members, faculty, academic advisor, Counseling Center, Educational Accessibility.
    • Explain how the extenuating circumstances caused each semester of grades below the 2.0 minimum grade point average.
    • State reasons why official withdrawal was not requested.
    • Present a plan of action for subsequent enrollment, should the appeal be granted
      Appeal letters must provide sufficient detail and explanation regarding the aforementioned points because there is no face-to-face meeting with appeal committee members. The decision of the appeals committee is final.
  3. Students who do not file a suspension appeal may not re-enroll until the suspension period has been served and readmission has been granted.
  4. Students suspended for a second time who do not file an appeal for continuous enrollment may submit an appeal by the published deadline for subsequent enrollment. Students suspended for a second time whose appeals are denied are no longer eligible to attend Old Dominion University or any of its satellite campuses until readmission after the mandatory five-year separation has occurred.
  5. A student suspended a third time will no longer be eligible to attend Old Dominion University or any satellite campuses.  A student will not be eligible to appeal the suspension.
  6. If the student has pre-registered for a subsequent semester, all registration will be administratively dropped if the suspension appeal is denied. The Office of Finance will audit the accounts of students whose appeals are denied, and a tuition refund, if appropriate, will be issued. Students who choose not to appeal the academic suspension will be dropped from all courses before the tuition deadline.

Returning from Academic Suspension

  1. All students returning from suspension must submit an application for readmission from suspension at www.uc.odu.edu/continuance in order to re-enroll and must submit all necessary documentation. The student must include a formal letter explaining the circumstances that put the student in academic difficulty and what plans the student has made to ensure success. The deadlines to reapply for admission are as follows:

    Fall semester - second Friday in August
    Spring semester - third Friday in December
    Summer semester - second Friday in April

    Readmission requests received after the deadline will not be considered. Students must resubmit the application by the next deadline. No readmission application will be reviewed without the letter
  2. Each student returning from suspension must earn at least a 2.00 GPA for each semester. If the 2.0 semester GPA is not met, the returning student will be suspended again. Students returning from suspension should acquaint themselves with the options available under the Adjusted Resident Credit (ARC) policy and should note that use of the ARC policy requires a separation from Old Dominion University for at least one calendar year.
  3. All students readmitted after serving a suspension must attend a workshop conducted by the Office of Continuance prior to the start of classes to complete the readmission process. Students who fail to attend a workshop will be dropped from all classes if they are registered and their readmission will be revoked for the semester. Students in this situation will be eligible to reapply for the next semester, but must begin the readmission process again.
  4. Students who are suspended while under non-degree admission status, and who reapply and are readmitted, should be aware that they are readmitted to the non-degree status. Non-degree students are not eligible for financial aid.
  5. Students readmitted to the University from suspension or due to a successful suspension appeal do not automatically qualify for financial aid. Please refer to the Financial Aid section of the catalog for the Financial Aid Continuance policy. All students who are suspended should contact their financial aid counseling team immediately to discuss their options. It is important that students are aware from the outset that a minimum of six credit hours with a GPA of 2.00 or more is a prerequisite to the appeal to re-establish financial aid eligibility. The six credit hours must be completed during one term (semester).

Credits Earned While Under Suspension

Credits earned at another accredited institution at a grade level of C (2.00) or better while an undergraduate student was under suspension from Old Dominion University will be accepted upon receipt of official transcripts following readmission.

Adjusted Resident Credit

Any undergraduate student who leaves Old Dominion University for at least one calendar year will be given the option of requesting a grade-point-average status equivalent to that of a student admitted as a transfer according to the following conditions and regulations.

  1. Prior to the one year’s absence, the student must have a cumulative grade point average less than 2.00.
  2. The student must have separated from the institution for at least one calendar year.  A term in which the student received W grades cannot be counted as part of the calendar year separation.
  3. Upon returning to the University, the student must earn a minimum of 30 credits at Old Dominion University to be eligible for a degree. This must include twelve hours of upper-level courses in the declared major program.
  4. Upon return, a full-time student must have attained a 2.00 grade point average for all work attempted since his or her return and must have completed a minimum of 12 semester hours.  There may be no incomplete grades in the record.  Courses that do not compute in the grade point average will not count toward the minimum of 12 semester hours.
  5. Upon satisfying the above requirements, the student must submit the application for Adjusted Resident Credit to the Office of the University Registrar.
  6. This option will be available only once during the student’s career at Old Dominion University. In all cases, the Adjusted Resident Credit option must be elected and the student’s record adjusted prior to graduation. Waivers of the requirement that students have less than a 2.00 grade point average can be made only in those programs that require greater than a 2.00 for admission.
  7. Consultation and approval by the appropriate department and approval of the dean(s) of the college(s) in which the student’s major program resides will be required. Once an application for Adjusted Resident Credit is approved and applied to the student's record, this action is final.
  8. Students may elect to use both grade forgiveness and the Adjusted Resident Credit Policy.  However, students cannot use grade forgiveness for individual courses for which adjusted resident credit already has been applied.  In addition, the application of adjusted resident credit will not change the number of times a student can elect to use grade forgiveness.
  9. Under this option: (1) eligible students will receive degree credit only for those courses in which grades of C (2.00) or better were earned prior to readmission; (2) likewise, hours attempted for courses in which grades of C-, D+, D, D- or F were received prior to readmission will not be considered in computing the student’s new cumulative grade point average; and (3) grade points earned for any course completed prior to readmission will not count in determining the student’s new cumulative grade point average.
  10. All grades received at the University will be part of the individual's official transcript and will be used to determine honor awards.  However, computation of a new grade point average for graduation and continuance will be based on work performed subsequent to reinstatement.
  11. In cases of dual jurisdiction, University continuance regulations will prevail.

Before making the request for the Adjusted Resident Credit process, all students should consult their academic advisor.  In addition, any student who is a financial aid recipient should consult his or her financial aid counselor in the Office of Financial Aid.  Application of the Adjusted Resident Credit Policy may adversely impact the student's Satisfactory Academic Progress and subsequent eligibility for federally funded financial aid.

Students wishing to avail themselves of this policy may receive procedural information from the Office of the University Registrar.

Student Technology Skills

It is assumed that students entering Old Dominion University have basic productivity software proficiency, possess e-mail skills, and know how to navigate the Web. Some courses, particularly online courses, will require technology proficiency at levels higher than this. It is the student’s responsibility to insure that he or she possesses the technology skills and proficiency required for each enrolled course or program of study.

Submission of Written Work To More Than One Class

In general, it is not acceptable for a piece of work such as a term paper to be submitted to more than one class for credit. In cases where submission of the same paper is appropriate, prior approval must always be obtained.

An example of a situation in which the same paper might appropriately be submitted would be one in which a student was enrolled in two classes, in both of which a given research topic was not only of interest to the student but was completely appropriate to both classes. In such circumstances, the student would approach the instructors of the two classes and obtain approval to submit the same term paper to both classes, based on prior agreement concerning the depth of the study, amount of material covered, and the length of the paper to be submitted (which should be longer than a paper submitted to one class).

HONORS Courses

HNRS 200. Peer Education and Leadership. 3 Credits.

This course prepares students for work as peer mentors and tutors. Students will develop skills in information literacy and research as they learn how to create and implement individualized student success/academic plans for themselves and others.

HNRS 201. Monarch Think Tank I. 3 Credits.

The Monarch Think Tank draws students from all disciplines to collaborate with each other, faculty and community members as they design project-based solutions to pertinent social issues. Think Tank topics vary each year. Guided by distinguished faculty, students analyze their topic through in-depth classroom and field research, readings and off-campus trips.

HNRS 226. Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship. 1-3 Credits.

The Research Apprenticeship offers students the opportunity to develop and acquire skills in research and information literacy through active involvement in ongoing research programs or in research projects under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Experiences may include but are not limited to gathering and analyzing information to develop proposals, survey construction, stakeholder identification, stimulus development, quantitative and qualitative data collection, statistical analysis, writing reports, and presenting results. Available research projects/programs will vary each semester. Interested students should consult with the Honors College Dean and visit the Honors College website for more information about research apprenticeship opportunities: http://www.odu.edu/ao/honors. Prerequisite: approval of Honors College Dean.

HNRS 301. Monarch Think Tank II. 3 Credits.

The Monarch Think Tank draws students from all disciplines to collaborate with each other, faculty and community members as they design project-based solutions to pertinent social issues. Think Tank topics vary each year. Guided by distinguished faculty, students analyze their topic through in-depth classroom and field research, readings and off-campus trips. Prerequisite: ENGL 211C or equivalent.

HNRS 326. Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship II. 3 Credits.

Research apprenticeship with a faculty member, assisting a faculty member in the development and execution of research. May be repeated to 9 credit hours maximum. Prerequisites: Honors College, permission of the instructor and 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

HNRS 387. Honors Civic Learning Project. 1 Credit.

Students volunteer for 45 hours of work, keep a work experience journal reflecting on their day-to-day experiences as a volunteer, and write a short paper detailing how the experience helped them to identify, revise and accomplish future learning and career goals. Prerequisite: junior standing in the Honors College.

HNRS 487. Senior Honors Colloquium. 3 Credits.

Fulfills the Honors College capstone requirement. The purpose of the course is to give students experience in working as a group of “consultants” who collaboratively undertake secondary and primary research and report preparation on behalf of a “client.” Prerequisite: senior standing in the Honors College or permission of the dean.

HNRS 497. Honors Independent Study. 1-3 Credits.

Offered upon request each semester. This course is an opportunity for students to engage in directed readings and/or research in a topic with which they are familiar. Prerequisite: open to juniors and seniors in the Honors College.

HNRS 498. Honors Independent Study. 1-3 Credits.

Offered upon request each semester. This course is an opportunity for students to engage in directed readings and/or research in a topic with which they are familiar. Prerequisite: open to juniors and seniors in the Honors College.

HNRS 499. Senior Honors Thesis. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisites: permission of the Honors College Dean, 3.25 cumulative GPA. Each student will undertake a research experience under the supervision of a faculty member. A research proposal and research report are required.

UNIVERSITY Courses

UNIV 100. University Orientation. 1 Credit.

UNIV 110. Academic Success. 0 Credits.

UNIV 111. Sophomore Seminar. 0 Credits.

This seminar provides resources and opportunities for students to build relationships with other sophomores and faculty and to explore individual strengths, values, skills, and interests.

UNIV 112. Transfer Seminar. 0 Credits.

This seminar provides resources and opportunities for students to build relationships with other transfer students and faculty and to explore individual strengths, values, skills, and interests.

UNIV 120. Career Exploration. 1 Credit.

A systematic exploration of individual interests and skills and career resources. Emphasis is placed on defining goals and developing strategies to achieve goals. Career testing and individual conferences are included.

UNIV 130. Learn and Earn Advantage Program. 1 Credit.

The purpose of this course is to engage students in self-reflection and work place skill enhancement, applicable to experiences encountered as part of the LEAP, as well as in the world of work. The course will help students to develop and be able to apply skills in the areas of self-presentation, work ethic, team membership, professional communication, independence and initiative, and seeing the “Big Picture” in relation to everyday workplace issues.

UNIV 150. Writing for College Success. 3 Credits.

Students learn the key features of college writing and use writing to learn important success strategies that will help them to transition into University life.

UNIV 195. Topics in Career Management. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected career-related topics. Titles for specific course offerings will appear in the course schedule.

UNIV 200. Career Implementation. 1 Credit.

A practical examination and application of resume and cover letter writing, job search strategies, including electronic job search and networking, interview skills, and evaluating employment offers. Designed to prepare students for internships or cooperative education experiences and/or for post graduation employment.

UNIV 295. Topics in Career Management. 1 Credit.

A study of selected career-related topics. Titles for specific course offerings will appear in the course schedule.

UNIV 395. Topics in Career Management. 1 Credit.

A study of selected career-related topics. Titles for specific course offerings will appear in the course schedule.

UNIV 400. Career Engagement. 1 Credit.

A practical examination and application of resume and cover letter writing, job search strategies including the electronic job search, networking, interview skills, and negotiating a job offer. Topics will also include the transition to the world of work and professional development. Designed for students seeking post-graduation employment.

UNIV 495. Topics in Career Management. 1-3 Credits.

A study of selected career-related topics. Titles for specific course offerings will appear in the course schedule.