2084 Constant Hall
(757) 683-3961

http://www.odu.edu/sps

John Lombard, Chair
Meg Jones, Graduate Program Manager

Master of Public Administration

David Chapman, Graduate Program Director
Meg Jones, Graduate Program Manager

http://www.odu.edu/mpa

The mission of the Master of Public Administration program at Old Dominion University is to prepare students for careers as professionals in public service and to provide students - who have considerable experience in the public sector - an opportunity to enhance their professional knowledge, skills, and abilities, enabling them to advance their careers.

Curriculum

The MPA curriculum consists of 39 credit hours (13 courses). Courses are required in two categories:

  1. Core Concentration (seven required courses)
  2. Electives (six courses)

Core Curriculum

The following courses are required of all public administration students.

PADM 651Administrative Theory I: The Context of Public Administration3
PADM 652Administrative Theory II: The Process of Public Administration3
PADM 671Public Budgeting and Financial Management3
PADM 701Public Policy and Evaluation3
PADM 723Ethics in Public Administration3
PADM 753Research Methods in Public Administration3
PADM 746Capstone Seminar in Public Administration3
Total Hours21

Electives

Students may also choose to take their elective courses in the general area of public management. With the approval of the MPA Program Director students may take graduate-level courses outside of the Department.

MPA Elective courses include the following:
Select 6 of the following:18
Regional Planning
Wicked Problems in Public Administration
Public Financial Management
Advanced Topics *
Methods of Public Program Evaluation
Urban and Regional Economic Development
Tools of Government
Emergency Management and Policy
Fundraising for Nonprofit Organizations
Public-Private Partnerships
Management of Nonprofit Organizations
Introduction to Nonprofit Sector
Nonprofit Financial Management
Public Sector Contract Administration
Leadership
Public Personnel Administration
Transportation Policy
Administration of Human Services
Government, Society, and Business
Introduction to Public Procurement
Public Procurement and Project Management
Public Sector Contract Planning and Formation
Theoretical Conflict Resolution and Problem Solving
Public Sector Procurement Law and Ethics
Legal and Ethical Foundations of Public Administration
Negotiation and Dispute Resolution
Conflict Mediation and Arbitration
Cultural Competency
Community Participation and Civic Engagement
Managing Development and Change in Organizations
Performance Measurement and Management
Introduction to Statistics for Public Administration
Collaboration in Public Administration
Local Government Management
Intergovernmental Management
Social Marketing in the Public Sector
Public Sector Contract Administration
Introduction to Public Procurement
Public Sector Contract Planning and Formation
Public Sector Procurement Law and Ethics
Total Hours18
*

From time to time courses under the heading of PADM 695 “Advanced Topics” will be offered that students may choose to take as electives. Students may take more than one PADM 695, as long as the course is different.

Recommended Core Course Sequence

Students are required to enroll in Administrative Theory I: The Context of Public Administration (PADM 651) and Administrative Theory II: The Process of Public Administration (PADM 652) as early as possible in their program of study. The remaining core courses are not required to be taken in a specific order however, the Capstone Seminar (PADM 746) must be taken after the other core courses have been completed (or in the same semester as the last of the core courses are being completed). Students should note that core courses are rarely offered during the summer term and should plan accordingly.

Concentration in Multi-Sector Public Service

The Multi-Sector Public Service concentration will consist of one (1) required concentration course PADM 725 (Government, Society, and Business) and three (3) electives. 

Students will analyze, synthesize, think critically, solve problems, and make decisions from a multi-sectoral perspective. They will examine the impact of different social, economic, and political forces/phenomena on multi-sectoral management/policy issues. Students will understand how the changing public service landscape affects policy decision making, management, and governance.

The acceptable electives for the concentration are:

PADM 695Advanced Topics (Citizen Engagement course)1-3
PADM 708Urban and Regional Economic Development3
PADM 714Public-Private Partnerships3
PADM 716Introduction to Nonprofit Sector3
PADM 721Transportation Policy3
PADM 734Negotiation and Dispute Resolution3
PADM 760Collaboration in Public Administration3

Internship/Field Experience

Practical professional experience in a public or nonprofit agency setting is an important component of the MPA curriculum. A formal internship is required for students who lack significant experience in a public or nonprofit agency. Internships give students the opportunity to gain professional level experience and provide government or nonprofit agencies with the services of graduate students with high potential for future achievement. MPA students have the opportunity to earn three semester credits for internships and apply these credits as one of their electives. PADM 668 Internship/Field Experience is a 300-hour public service experience in an approved agency. Please contact Dr. Chapman with specific questions you may have regarding internships, dchapman@odu.edu.

The Application Package

The Old Dominion University Graduate Application can be downloaded from the website, https://www.odu.edu/admission/graduate, or a Graduate Application Package may be requested by calling (757) 683-3685. This package includes all forms necessary to apply to the Master of Public Administration program. To be considered for admission, applicants must submit the following:

  1. An official transcript of previous college degree program(s);
  2. A written statement describing how one’s experience in work and in other settings and the choice of graduate study in public administration will lead to achieving career goals;
  3. Scores on the aptitude section of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), taken within the past six years. The requirement for the GRE or GMAT may be waived for applicants with at least three years supervisory, managerial or professional level experience in a local, regional, state, federal, military or nonprofit agency. Applicants who wish to be exempted from the GRE or GMAT requirement should complete the “Request for GRE/GMAT Waiver” form and submit it with their application package for review by the admissions committee. The decision to waive the GRE or GMAT is the sole responsibility of the admissions committee and its decision is final;
  4. Two letters of recommendation (forms provided) from academic sources or employment supervisors; and
  5. Applicants whose native language is not English are required to submit an acceptable score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

Financial Assistance

Financial aid is available to graduate students at Old Dominion University. Financial aid may be available in the form of University fellowships, tuition grants, and research assistantships. The MPA program offers graduate research assistantships each semester. In addition to the financial aid offered by the University, graduate students may be eligible for aid and student loans administered by other agencies. For information about part-time employment, scholarships, and student loans, contact the Office of Student Financial Aid.

For information and forms concerning application, contact:
Admissions Office
Old Dominion University
Norfolk, VA 23529
Phone: (757) 683-3685

For information concerning financial aid, contact:
Office of Student Financial Aid
Old Dominion University
Norfolk, VA 23529
Phone: (757) 683-3683

For information about on-campus housing, contact:
The Director of Housing Operations
Old Dominion University
Norfolk, VA 23529
Phone: (757) 683-4283

Visit the Old Dominion University MPA web site at http://www.odu.edu/mpa

Doctor of Philosophy - Public Administration & Policy

Meagan Jordan, Graduate Program Director
Meg Jones, Graduate Program Manager

http://odu.edu/business/departments/sps/academics/paup

The mission of the Ph.D. in Public Administration & Policy program is to develop expert leaders and scholars in public and non-profit administration and policy who are capable of creating and disseminating knowledge that advances public service in a multi-sector environment with 37 hours of doctoral level course work and 12 hours of dissertation credit.

Curriculum
Core Courses
PADM 800Colloquium - Public Administration and Policy1
PADM 801Policy Theory3
PADM 802Public Administration I3
PADM 803Public Administration II3
PADM 804Multi-Sector Administration3
Research Core
PADM 805Research Design3
FOUN 722Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis3
PADM 806Multivariate Analysis in Public Administration3
FOUN 814Qualitative Research Design in Education3
Research Electives3
Choose 1 course from the following list:
Multivariate Statistics in Criminological Research
Qualitative Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice
Advanced Quantitative Techniques in Criminology & Criminal Justice
Advanced Research Methods in Criminology & Criminal Justice
Advanced Statistical Models in Business Research
Research Design and Analysis
Advanced Qualitative Research
Analysis of Variance Applied to Educational Research
Applied Structural Equation Modeling in Educational Research
Educational Measurement and Assessment
Geographic Information Systems
Research Design and Application
Quantitative Research Methods in Health Care
Qualitative Research Methods
Measurement of Health Phenomena
Fundamentals of Survey Research
GPD approval required for alternative courses.
Electives9
Choose 3 courses from the following list:
Urban and Regional Economic Development
Policy and Program Evaluation
Public-Private Partnerships
Management of Nonprofit Organizations
Introduction to Nonprofit Sector
Public Personnel Administration
Ethics in Public Administration
Government, Society and Business
Theories of Conflict Resolution and Problem Solving
Performance Measurement and Management
Collaboration in Public Administration
Public Financial Management
Intergovernmental Relations
Advanced Topics
GPD approval required for alternative courses.
Dissertation
PADM 899Dissertation12
Total Hours49

Admission

Applications for admission to the program will be considered once per year in March.  Students begin classes in the fall.

Prospective students will submit the following for consideration:

  • An online graduate application.
  • Transcripts from a regionally-accredited institution or a comparable foreign institution showing completion of a master's degree by the time of enrollment with a minimum GPA of 3.25 on a 4.0 scale.
  • Scores at the 25th percentile or higher for quantitative and verbal components of the GRE or GMAT.
  • A 3-6 page essay that addresses academic and professional goals.
  • For students whose native language is not English, a minimum score of 550 on paper based TOEFL, 79 on internet based TOEFL, or 6.5 on the IELTS.

Prerequisites

Applicants who have insufficient background in Public Administration will be required to enroll in PADM 651 Administrative Theory I: The Context of Public Administration. This course must be completed with a grade of B or better. Depending on previous qualifications, students may be advised to take additional prerequisite courses as well. Prerequisite courses will not be included in the required credit hours to complete the doctoral program.

Requirements of Ph.D. Degree

The following are the minimum requirements for the Ph.D. degree and must be considered in preparing the student's plan of study:

  1. Satisfactory completion of 37 hours of coursework;
  2. Acceptable performance on written and oral comprehensive exams for advancement to candidacy;
  3. Completion of a dissertation representing the candidate's ability to conduct scholarly, original research; and
  4. Successful oral defense of the dissertation.

Retention Standards

In order to remain in good standing in the Ph.D. program, students must maintain a Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 3.25.  If a student falls below 3.25, they will be placed on probation for a period of one semester.  If, at the end of the probationary semester, the student’s GPA remains below 3.25, the student will be indefinitely suspended from the program.  If a student earns a grade of C+ or lower in a course, that course will not count toward the student’s degree, and must be repeated and a grade of at least B- recorded for that course. Students may earn no more than one grade lower than B- in course work attempted while enrolled in the Ph.D. program.  If a student earns a second grade lower than B-, the student will be indefinitely suspended from the Ph.D. program.  Likewise, any student who earns a grade of F in any course work attempted while enrolled in the Ph.D. program will be indefinitely suspended from the program.

Comprehensive Exams

Comprehensive exams take place at the end of coursework and prior to the writing of the dissertation prospectus. The proposed structure and format are intended to better support PhD students' transition from coursework to dissertation by focusing on written and oral exams in the form of an empirical research paper proposal that is specific to an individual student's planned dissertation topic, as opposed to more general concepts. It will be a committee-lead exam with the student identifying an exam committee comprising of at least two School of Public Service faculty members.  The student works with the committee during the exam process.  

Therefore, the entire comprehensive exam process requires the application of concepts, literature, and methodology of the public administration and public policy field to the distinctive research interests of the student. Furthermore, the exercise of completing the proposed comprehensive exam process provides a more valid testing of the student's ability to use the knowledge gained from coursework.

The exam consists of two portions, written and oral. The exam committee will evaluate both portions of the comprehensive exam. Written Exam - Students will write an empirical research paper with the following content: (1) introduction, (2) literature review, (3) theory/conceptual framework, (4) research design, data collection/availability, proposed analysis, limitations, and (5) contributions. Oral Exam - Presentation and oral defense of written exam to the exam committee.

Students have a maximum of 3 semesters (excluding summer) to submit the written exam following completion of coursework. The clock begins at the conclusion of the term where the student registered for his/her 37th credit hour.  Failure to meet this deadline will result in exam failure and dismissal from the PhD program.  Students may submit as many drafts to the committee as deemed appropriate by the committee but can only submit 1 official written exam to the Test Administrator (by the end of the 3rd semester, excluding summer, following coursework completion).  There is no re-take of the written exam.  The Test Administrator will test for plagiarism.  Any exam that fails the plagiarism test will result in exam failure and dismissal from the PhD program.   

Students must complete the written and oral exams within 4 semesters (excluding summer) of completing coursework. This timeframe begins at the conclusion of the term where the student registered for his/her 37th credit hour. Failure to meet this deadline will result in exam failure and dismissal from the PhD program. A student who completes the oral exam and fails must retest prior to the end of the next semester.

Dissertation Committee

After the candidacy examination process has been completed, the collective responsibility of the faculty in guiding the student is transferred to the candidate’s dissertation committee. Refinement and final approval of the topic and the dissertation prospectus is the first responsibility of the dissertation committee. This committee is formed to supervise the dissertation research and is announced in writing to the Graduate Program Director and the Dean with the Ph.D. Dissertation Committee. Any changes to an approved committee must be initiated on a Request for Change in Ph.D. Dissertation Committee.

The dissertation committee may not be formed until all course work is completed and the qualifying and candidacy examinations have been successfully completed. The dissertation committee shall have at least three members, at least two of whom must serve on the faculty of the School of Public Service. A third member of the dissertation committee must be drawn from eligible faculty outside of the student’s department (or in exceptional circumstances, outside the university), and must meet the requirements to be certified as eligible to serve on graduate committees. All dissertation committee members must be certified for graduate instruction. Membership may be extended to a non-university person with special knowledge of the dissertation subject area.

Adjunct professors who are certified for graduate instruction also may be appointed as voting members of the committee.

Dissertation 

The format of the dissertation prospectus is up to the student and the dissertation committee. Consistent with University policy, students are ABD (All But Dissertation) once they have an approved topic. The candidate will select a topic for dissertation research under the guidance of his/her dissertation committee. The dissertation prospectus, a plan detailing the need for the study and methods and procedures to be employed in implementing it, should be prepared according to university guidelines and as discussed in the dissertation seminar class. In many cases, this may involve preparation of the first three chapters of the dissertation, but the specific style and content of the prospectus is left to the student’s dissertation committee.

The dissertation prospectus should show that the student has technical mastery of the subject area and is capable of doing independent, mature and scholarly work that will be in some respect a significant contribution to knowledge and practice and will modify or enlarge what has been previously known.

The candidate will present and defend the prospectus for the dissertation, demonstrating the originality of the research, its contribution to the literature of the discipline, requisite literature review, and the methodology that will be used in conducting the research. The committee will judge the merits of the proposal, making necessary suggestions and/or additions, and approve the proposal in writing, providing copies to the Graduate Program Director.

The candidate's program of study culminates in a dissertation representing a major research project that focuses on an issue directly related to public administration and/or public policy and offers new or unique insight; thus the work must make a clear contribution to knowledge in the discipline. Whether the dissertation is applied or theoretical in orientation, it must address some aspect of the field of public administration or public policy and must both document and respond to a managerial or policy problem in the field.  While the dissertation is guided by the candidate’s dissertation committee, the purpose of the dissertation process to allow the candidate to demonstrate the knowledge, skills, creativity, and ability to conceive and define a problem or research question, ground the work in the appropriate existing literature in the discipline, choose and apply appropriate methods to collect and analyze empirical data to address the research question, and place the findings in the broader context of the state of knowledge within the discipline.

The defense is chaired by the dissertation committee chair who, acting as moderator, rules on questions of procedure and protocol that may arise during the defense. The aim of the defense is to explore, with the candidate, research methodologies employed in conducting the study, findings and conclusions revealed by the study and contributions the study is expected to offer. In this way, the candidate and examiners reach a more extensive insight into the candidate's research area. During the oral defense, all members of the dissertation committee must render a judgment on the candidate's performance. In the case of extenuating circumstances, absent members of the committee may participate via teleconference.

Any final revisions must be made after the defense before the final copy of the dissertation is submitted to the dissertation committee, the GPD and the Dean for signature on the title page of the dissertation. In the event that the candidate fails to pass the dissertation defense, the dissertation committee may recommend that the candidate be allowed one additional chance at re-examination, or dismissed from the program.

Continued progress of dissertation will be based on dissertation chair’s approval of student’s written summary of progress in the term.

Time Limits for Degree Completion

All requirements for a doctoral degree must be completed within eight calendar years from the date of beginning the initial course of study following admission to the doctoral program.  This time limit may be extended under exceptional circumstances, but will require validation of any course credit more than eight years old at the time of graduation.

Certificate in Public Administration and Policy

Meg Jones, Graduate Program Manager

The School of Public Service in the Strome College of Business at Old Dominion University offers a Graduate Certificate in Public Administration and Policy. The objective of the program is to help working professionals upgrade their skills in the areas of policy analysis and public management, by developing analytical and management knowledge and capabilities.

Courses are available in a live or online setting, depending on semester and demand.

Curriculum

The curriculum consists of the courses listed below. Students are required to take four courses, totaling 12 credit hours, to complete the certificate program. There are three required courses and a choice of an elective.*

Required
Administrative Theory I: The Context of Public Administration
Public Policy and Evaluation
Ethics in Public Administration
Elective (choose 1)3
Administrative Theory II: The Process of Public Administration
Public Budgeting and Financial Management
Public Financial Management
Urban and Regional Economic Development
Public-Private Partnerships
Leadership
Administration of Human Services
Collaboration in Public Administration
Negotiation and Dispute Resolution
Intergovernmental Management
Total Hours3
*

Any alteration(s) in required or elective course selection require(s) prior faculty advisor approval.

Graduate Certificate in Public Procurement and Contract Management

Josh Steinfeld, Program Director

http://www.odu.edu/business/departments/sps/academics/procurement

This certificate program is designed for students to satisfy their elective requirements or it can be taken as a stand alone certificate program. This certificate program is designed for Public Administration graduate students, however, business administration students, engineering students, and students from other disciplines would also be eligible to participate in the program. The program consists of four required courses and one elective (15 credits total).

Admission Requirements

Admission to the certificate program will require a bachelor’s degree (or equivalent).

Program Requirements

The award of this certificate is based upon the student’s successful completion of 15 credit hours of graduate level courses in Public Administration:

PPCM/PADM 718Public Sector Contract Administration3
PPCM/PADM 726Introduction to Public Procurement3
PPCM/PADM 728Public Sector Contract Planning and Formation3
PPCM/PADM 731Public Sector Procurement Law and Ethics3
Select one from the following:3
Public Financial Management
Methods of Public Program Evaluation
Public-Private Partnerships
Leadership
Public Procurement and Project Management
Negotiation and Dispute Resolution
Intergovernmental Management
Total Hours15

Business and Public Administration Affiliates

The college has several external units which enhance and support the academic programs. These units, listed below, offer opportunities for faculty members and students to interact with representatives of business, industry and government in Eastern Virginia.

Center for Asian Business

The Center for Asian Business has been established to enhance the college’s capacity to teach and conduct research on the subjects related to Asian business practices. The center collects and disseminates information on Asian businesses, supports course offerings on Asian management, and publishes research monographs and articles on the subject. Also, the center provides managerial training and consulting services for Asian companies and executives.

The Center for Economic Education

The center is an integral part of the national effort dedicated to improving economic literacy and promoting a greater understanding of the free enterprise system. A nonpartisan, nonprofit organization, the center is an affiliate of the Virginia Council on Economic Education and the National Council on Economic Education. The center works cooperatively with school systems promoting increased effectiveness of economics instruction in grades K-12 through workshops, credit classes, and consultations.

Executive Development Center

The center’s mission is to provide businesses, organizations, and individuals with high quality professional development and continuing education programs in virtually all areas of business, management, and executive education. The center offers public programs for individuals seeking professional certificate programs, preparation for certification exams, career advancement, and career change. In addition, the center develops and delivers custom training programs and consulting services to meet specific organizational and employee development needs of businesses and organizations regionally, nationally and internationally.

Center for Economic Analysis and Policy

The primary objectives of the center are to conduct research and develop a knowledge base on regional issues in the Eastern Virginia area. In addition, it provides a forum for regional collaboration involving educational, business, and government organizations.

Insurance and Financial Services Center

The Insurance and Financial Services Center supports undergraduate and graduate curricula in the disciplines of professional financial planning and risk and insurance. In addition, it provides for active involvement with the Eastern Virginia financial services community as a placement, research, consultative, and resource agency. The center further supports educational programs and seminars for the profession including a professional development program for practitioners that leads to the designation of Professional Financial Planner (PFP).

E.V. Williams Center for Real Estate and Economic Development

The mission of the center is to provide information and resources for the Hampton Roads real estate and economic development communities in their quest to improve the regional economy through job creation and investment. The center fosters relationships with the development community by hosting topical seminars on key development issues affecting the region and works closely with all related professional service organizations. The center maintains a comprehensive collection of information including detailed demographic and real estate data and employs the latest in geographic information and mapping software. The center publishes annual real estate market reviews on the office, industrial, retail, single family and multi-family real estate markets, and sponsors the Hampton Roads Real Estate Market Review and Forecast.

PUBLIC ADMIN/URBAN POLICY Courses

PAUP 801. Theories of Public Policy. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Exploration of key theories and approaches to public policy. This course covers all phases of the policy process, from formulation to evaluation, with particular focus upon the substance, political dynamics, and evolution of public policy.

PAUP 802. Logic of Social Inquiry. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Social inquiry, the production and application of social science knowledge in the field of public administration/ public management and urban policy, is replete with contending philosophical and paradigmatic points of view. The goal of this course is to provide a forum for students to review and critique the major issues within social inquiry: ways of knowing (questions of epistemology and methodology), ways of deciding and ways of acting upon decisions.

PAUP 803. Multivariate Quantative Analysis for Public Administration. 3 Credits.

This course explores the proper use, calculation, and interpretation of multivariate statistics as commonly found in the literature in public administration. The course will prepare students to choose the appropriate statistical tools, generate testable hypotheses, correctly apply the statistical tool, analyze the results, and present and interpret the results of those tests in a manner appropriate for public in the field.

PAUP 804. Policy and Program Evaluation. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: PADM 753 or URBN 607. Examination of various methodologies for designing and conducting public urban program evaluation and research. Experimental, quasi-experimental and nonexperimental procedures will be covered.

PAUP 806. Urban Resource Allocation. 3 Credits.

PAUP 807. Urban Theory and Practice. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor or graduate program director. The purpose of this course is to convey an understanding of urban theory and practice in the culturally diverse urban environment. The course focuses on the process of urbanization, social differentiation, and social and political organization. Special emphasis is given to the role of technology in contributing to urban change.

PAUP 808. Intellectual Foundations of Public Administration. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The course reviews the broad topics of administration theory, behavior and practice in organizations and focuses on the development of management thoughts, as well as the macro and micro organizational processes in public and non-profit organizations.

PAUP 809. Public Organization Behavior and Theory. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course is intended to provide a forum for students to discuss and advance their knowledge of the broad classical and modern organizations theories and behavior. The goal is that in the process of discussing the theories of organization, students will develop expertise in specific, cutting edge areas of academic thoughts of the field.

PAUP 810. Governance and Accountability. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Public law defines the structure and authorized practices of public institutions in urban settings. The course reviews the legal powers of state and local government in the U.S., of cities, counties, public authorities and special districts, and of nontraditional forms of governance including principal-agent relations in the production of public services, regulatory governance, delegation of public authority to private entities, and citizen roles in governance.

PAUP 811. Urban Services Administration. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. Analysis of the range of administrative tools and strategies for the delivery of urban services. Emphasizes new administrative alternatives under conditions of urban change.

PAUP 812. Public Policy Formulation and Implementation. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course focuses on public policy formulation and implementation. The purpose of this course is to examine the bases upon which public policy discussions take place, both at the formulation and implementation stages of the policy process. The goal is to develop a solid understanding of theory and empirical research bearing on critical dimensions of policy and the policy process.

PAUP 813. Contemporary Public Administration Theory. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. The purpose of this course is to enhance the knowledge inventory of doctoral students and better prepare them for academic careers in the field of public administration in the long term. Students will be exposed to a discussion of the current literature on legitimacy issues, phenomenological issues, gender issues, and Postmodernism in public administration.

PAUP 814. Public-Private Partnerships. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An in-depth analysis of the forces behind the privatization movement. Examines the context of privatization, the theoretical and empirical arguments on both sides of the debate, and the different forms of privatization practiced in the U.S. The course draws on a wide range of disciplines in a quest for an understanding of the privatization phenomenon–political science, public administration, public policy, sociology, economics, management, and others.

PAUP 817. Nonprofit Financial Management & Fundraising. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with the knowledge to become effective financial managers by giving them practical applications of theory and skill-building in fiscal processes and fundraising of nonprofit organizations.

PAUP 820. Public Personnel Administration. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Examines the basic framework of the public personnel system beginning with the legal requirements imposed by federal and state laws and regulations. General considerations of policy and procedures development, the organization of the public personnel system, the adoption of the personnel ordinance, the determination of various levels of employee status and the coverage of the personnel system are included.

PAUP 821. Transportation Policy. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on surface transportation policy and planning, and highways and roads in particular. Topics include local, state and federal policies, public involvement in transportation planning, transportation and highway finance, privatization and public-private partnerships, critical issues and policy questions.

PAUP 823. Ethics in Public Administration. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: PADM 651. This course reviews the theory and application of ethics in the public sector, identifying public values and how they apply in the administration of government. It reviews sources of values employed in public sector decision-making, and reviews how values in public administration are managed and applied. Systems of professional ethics are reviewed in the context of public professions. Case studies and best practices are examined to help the student understand the application of administrative ethics in public management.

PAUP 824. Administration of Human Services. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Analysis of human services involving direct client/agency interaction. Problems of discretion and control are examined as alternative service delivery strategies which can deal with these problems.

PAUP 825. Business, Government, and Society. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: six completed hours of graduate work in MBA or MPA program. An overview of business-government-society interactions, with special attention to the influence of public policy and corporate strategy on corporate social responsibility. An important theme is the ethical component of management decision making.

PAUP 830. Theories of Conflict Resolution and Problem Solving. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An introduction to the field of alternative dispute resolution methods and problem solving. The first part of the course focuses on conflict theory at all levels of human social systems and the second part examines collaborative problem solving strategies.

PAUP 833. Legal Foundations of Public Administration. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Focus on the processes of law and law application by the executive departments of government and especially the independent regulatory agencies, and their control by legislature and court. Examination of the political origins and constitutional status of administrative agencies and of administration discretion.

PAUP 834. Negotiation and Dispute Resolution. 3 Credits.

The course provides conceptual and practical skills in negotiations. It examines the underlying cultural, legal, and organizational issues and problems that affect managing human resources in the workplace.

PAUP 837. Digital Government. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course provides public administrators knowledge of current technology issues in the public sector and familiarizes them with technological tools used in delivering public services. The course explores administrative responsibility and accountability in digital government, and problems in managing technology in the public sector. Issues concerning citizen privacy, freedom of information requirements, planning, coordinating and sharing information among public sector agencies and the private sector, and building community networks are reviewed.

PAUP 838. Conflict Mediation and Arbitration. 3 Credits.

Surveys the field of third-party intervention in dispute resolution. Provides practical skills in mediation and arbitration. Examines the nature and effectiveness of mediation in a wide variety of disputes including labor relations, community, family, environmental, and international conflicts.

PAUP 845. Managing Development and Change in Public Organizations. 3 Credits.

Lecture/cases/activities; 3 credits. Examination of the theory and practice of organization development. Participants will take the role of change agent and public manager and apply a range of organization development techniques to public agency situations while giving attention to the particular cultural, political, legal and organizational characteristics of public organizations.

PAUP 850. Performance Measurement and Management. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on performance-based management approaches in public and non-profit settings. It addresses the performance measurement and management process, the identification of appropriate performance measures, and the implementation of a performance measurement system, as well as managing for performance.

PAUP 853. Research and Evaluation Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The course examines advanced research design and evaluation methods used in public administration and management research. Experimental, quasi-experimental, and non-experimental procedures in the context of urban settings will be emphasized. Includes usage of various statistical software.

PAUP 854. Advanced Public Program Evaluation. 3 Credits.

PAUP 857. Advanced Public Research and Decision Making Methods. 3 Credits.

PAUP 860. Collaboration. 3 Credits.

An examination of the fundamental concepts of intra-sectoral and cross-sectoral collaboration. Emphasis is placed on the management and process of collaboration.

PAUP 868. Urban Services Internship. 3 Credits.

3 credit hours. Urban field experience for students in the Ph.D. in Public Administration and Urban Policy program. Supervised work experience in a public agency. A written report is required.

PAUP 881. Intergovernmental Relations. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Analysis of relationship among federal, state, and local governmental units in the delivery of governmental programs. Focus on intergovernmental issues in urban metropolitan regions.

PAUP 890. Dissertation Seminar. 3 Credits.

3 credit hours. A multidisciplinary seminar that focuses on the design, implementation, and evaluation of urban programs under real-life conditions in the field. Students and faculty work with urban decision makers utilizing problem-solving skills and analysis.

PAUP 895. Advanced Topics. 3 Credits.

Advanced topics in public administration.

PAUP 898. Directed Research. 1-6 Credits.

1-6 credits. Supervised research on a specific problem. A written report is required.

PAUP 899. Dissertation. 1-12 Credits.

1 to 12 credits. An approved research project, written under the supervision of a faculty advisor, in which the student demonstrates the capacity of design and completes independent applied research. The completed project must be approved by the dissertation committee.

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION Courses

PADM 634. Regional Planning. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The course analyzes the origins of regional planning agencies, current organizational structures, financing and functional activities. The focus is on the application of the systems approach to metropolitan planning issues. This latter objective is achieved through participation in exercises dealing with economics, transportation and land-use allocation modeling.

PADM 651. Administrative Theory I: The Context of Public Administration. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Introduction to the profession of public administration; the evolution and development of the field, the role of organizations in contemporary American government, and the roles of politics and administration. The course also provides an introduction to the necessary skills for successful graduate study.

PADM 652. Administrative Theory II: The Process of Public Administration. 3 Credits.

Introduction to management in the public sector. Topics include: organizing public agencies, managing people and work groups, introduction to organizational systems (human resources, budget, and information systems), and effective leadership and decision-making processes.

PADM 653. Wicked Problems in Public Administration. 3 Credits.

This course deals with some of the many complex, intractable, or “wicked” problems that public and non-profit sector professionals will struggle with during the course of their careers. In the context of public administration, a wicked problem is a set of conditions and circumstances that seems to defy resolution or even amelioration because of the incredibly complex nature of the situation.

PADM 668. Internship/Field Experience. 3-6 Credits.

3 or 6 credits. Required of all students without previous experience in government service. Supervised work experience in a public agency. A written report will be required.

PADM 671. Public Budgeting and Financial Management. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The purpose of this course is to examine the institutions, principles, and techniques of national, state, and local budgeting processes and financial administration. The course explores the allocation as well as the re-distributive role of government and the market. While applying information technology, students will analyze the practices and fundamental concepts of government budgeting, financial management, and public finance, with an emphasis on revenue, expenditure, capital budgeting and debt structures.

PADM 672. Public Financial Management. 3 Credits.

Examination of public sector financial management principles, practices and processes. Emphasis on financial auxiliary services employed in local government financial management. Introduction to governmental accounting practices and financial statements. Micro computer applications to public sector financial decision-making techniques. (Cross listed with PPCM 672).

PADM 695. Advanced Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion; 1-3 credits. Topics vary each semester.

PADM 696. Directed Readings. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Specifically planned readings for the graduate student who wishes to pursue special interests outside the scope of formal studies. Supervised on an individual basis.

PADM 698. Directed Research. 1-6 Credits.

1-6 credits. Supervised research on a specific program. A written report will be required.

PADM 699. Thesis. 3-6 Credits.

6 credits. An approved research project, written under the supervision of a faculty committee, in which the student demonstrates the capacity to design and complete independent scholarly investigation. The completed project must be approved by the thesis committee.

PADM 701. Public Policy and Evaluation. 3 Credits.

Exploration of key theories and approaches to public policy. This course covers all phases of the policy process, from formulation to evaluation, with particular focus upon the substance, political dynamics, and evolution of public policy.

PADM 704. Methods of Public Program Evaluation. 3 Credits.

Examination of various methodologies for designing and conducting program evaluation and research. Experimental, quasi-experimental and nonexperimental procedures will be covered. (Cross listed with PPCM 704) Prerequisites: PADM 753/PADM 853.

PADM 708. Urban and Regional Economic Development. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course examines the theory and practice of urban and regional economic development. The tools, institutions, and analytical techniques of urban and regional economic development are examined in light of relevant public policy issues.

PADM 711. Tools of Government. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the range of administrative tools and strategies for the delivery of government services. Emphasizes new administrative alternatives under conditions of constant change.

PADM 712. Emergency Management and Policy. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Explores policy and regulatory issues of emergency management; intergovernmental responsibilities and relationships among local, state and federal agencies in an “all hazards” approach to preparing and responding to manmade and natural disasters. Examines challenges faced by local, state, and federal managers during a large scale disaster.

PADM 713. Fundraising for Nonprofit Organizations. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to fundraising principles of nonprofit organizations with an emphasis on different types of philanthropy, fundraising theories and practices, and motivations of givers. They will develop skills in creative problem solving for fundraising practice while learning to analyze and evaluate the fundraising process and methods. Additionally, students will develop the ability to synthesize and integrate current information and emerging ideas into a fundraising strategy and to think critically and analytically about a variety of fundraising perspectives.

PADM 714. Public-Private Partnerships. 3 Credits.

An in-depth analysis of the forces behind the privatization movement. Examines the context of privatization, the theoretical and empirical arguments on both sides of the debate, and the different forms of privatization practiced in the U.S. The course draws on a wide range of disciplines in a quest for an understanding of the privatization phenomenon–political science, public administration, public policy, sociology, economics, management, and others. (Cross listed with PPCM 714).

PADM 715. Management of Nonprofit Organizations. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Successful nonprofit organizations require substantial capability in key areas of management such as developing a strong board of directors, recruiting and motivating talented staff and volunteers, creating a strategic plan and wisely managing fiscal and human resources. This course addresses these topics from theoretical and practitioner perspectives.

PADM 716. Introduction to Nonprofit Sector. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course offers a broad introduction to the study and practice of the nonprofit sector. The course explores the history, scope, and significance of the nonprofit sector as it relates to philanthropy, voluntary action, civil society, and civic engagement.

PADM 717. Nonprofit Financial Management. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with the knowledge to become effective financial managers by giving them practical applications of theory and skill-building in fiscal and accounting processes of nonprofit organizations.

PADM 718. Public Sector Contract Administration. 3 Credits.

Examines the actions that must be taken following the award of a contract, including assurance of required outcomes, assurance of compliance, proper contract launch, proper contract close-out, and documentation and carrying forward lessons learned. Connections to steps that must be taken in the other two phases of the procurement process are noted. (Course is cross listed with PPCM 718).

PADM 719. Leadership. 3 Credits.

Examines leadership through theoretical and practice-based frameworks. Offers analytical and intellectual examination and reflection on core issues in the practice of leadership. These objectives will be achieved through open discussion, honest self-assessment, experiential exercises, and observation of real-life leadership practice. (Cross listed with PPCM 719).

PADM 720. Public Personnel Administration. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Examines the basic framework of the public personnel system beginning with the legal requirements imposed by federal and state laws and regulations. General considerations of policy and procedures development, the organization of the public personnel system, the adoption of the personnel ordinance, the determination of various levels of employee status and the coverage of the personnel system are included.

PADM 721. Transportation Policy. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. This course focuses on surface transportation policy and planning, and highways and roads in particular. Topics include local, state and federal policies, public involvement in transportation planning, transportation and highway finance, privatization and public-private partnerships, critical issues and policy questions.

PADM 723. Ethics in Public Administration. 3 Credits.

This course reviews the theory and application of ethics in the public sector, identifying public values and how they apply in the administration of government. It reviews sources of values employed in public sector decision-making, and reviews how values in public administration are managed and applied. Systems of professional ethics are reviewed in the context of public professions. Case studies and best practices are examined to help the student understand the application of administrative ethics in public management.

PADM 724. Administration of Human Services. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Analysis of human services involving direct client/agency interaction. Problems of discretion and control are examined as alternative service delivery strategies which can deal with these problems.

PADM 725. Government, Society, and Business. 3 Credits.

This course studies the interdependencies and interactions among three broad entities - business, government, and society - in the delivery of public services, paying special attention to their implications for public policy. Prerequisites: six completed hours of graduate work in MBA or MPA program.

PADM 726. Introduction to Public Procurement. 3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of procurement and contract management as a core function in public sector organizations. The course introduces the student to how properly-aligned, best practice acquisitions can support public entities' strategic goals. Challenges and opportunities for all stakeholders are addressed. Special attention is given to ongoing changes in public procurement. (Cross listed with PPCM 726).

PADM 727. Public Procurement and Project Management. 3 Credits.

Course covers each phase of the public procurement project cycle, with an emphasis on tools and techniques to manage a public procurement project. (Cross listed with PPCM 727).

PADM 728. Public Sector Contract Planning and Formation. 3 Credits.

This course provides insight into why and how public sector contracts should be planned and formed properly. A strong emphasis is placed on the strategic role that procurement can play in public sector organizations and how procurement planning and source selection, in particular, fit into that role. (Cross listed with PPCM 728.).

PADM 730. Theoretical Conflict Resolution and Problem Solving. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An introduction to the field of alternative dispute resolution methods and problem solving. The first part of the course focuses on conflict theory at all levels of human social systems and the second part examines collaborative problem solving strategies.

PADM 731. Public Sector Procurement Law and Ethics. 3 Credits.

This course surveys the laws and ethics applicable to public sector procurement and contract management. A theoretical and problem-based, interdisciplinary approach is used to address the major legal and ethical issues that arise when public sector organizations plan, form, and administer contracts. Attention is given to the role of professionalization in socializing appropriate ethics. (Cross listed with PPCM 731).

PADM 733. Legal and Ethical Foundations of Public Administration. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Introduces the role of law in ordering public administration through the application of constitutional values and administrative law principles in administrative practice. Introduces ethical theories and applications in the public sector, examining values within administrative environments. Topics include privacy in information systems management, whistleblowing, and other cases of applied ethical reasoning in the practice of public administration.

PADM 734. Negotiation and Dispute Resolution. 3 Credits.

The course provides conceptual and practical skills in negotiations. It examines the underlying cultural, legal, and organizational issues and problems that affect managing human resources in the workplace. (Cross listed with PPCM 734).

PADM 738. Conflict Mediation and Arbitration. 3 Credits.

Surveys the field of third-party intervention in dispute resolution. Provides practical skills in mediation and arbitration. Examines the nature and effectiveness of mediation in a wide variety of disputes including labor relations, community, family, environmental, and international conflicts.

PADM 739. Cultural Competency. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the growing challenges and opportunities created by our interconnected world and the knowledge and abilities necessary to lead through situations in which there are misunderstandings or conflicts rooted in differences. The course explores the structure and dynamics of all forms of diversity in public, non-profit, and governmental organizations, the resulting implications for organizational health, and the critical role of cultural-competent leadership.

PADM 740. Community Participation and Civic Engagement. 3 Credits.

This course examines the importance of social, economic, cultural, religious, and civic organizations in building or restoring communities. The course focuses on the revitalization, restoration, or upgrading of communities, cities, and localities or neighborhoods within or adjacent to cities, by the residents themselves. Viewed through the lens of social capital theory, the course further explores examples of short- and long-term change accomplished by community members on their own, within organizations, or in partnership with government officials.

PADM 745. Managing Development and Change in Organizations. 3 Credits.

Lecture/cases/activities; 3 credits. Examination of the theory and practice of organization development. Participants will take the role of change agent and public manager and apply a range of organization development techniques to public agency situations while giving attention to the particular cultural, political, legal and organizational characteristics of public organizations.

PADM 746. Capstone Seminar in Public Administration. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: completion of 30 hours in the MPA program or permission of instructor. Presents an integrated approach to the field of public administration, and examines the political, administrative, and social implications of administrative choices. The emphasis of the course will be a case approach to public administration and public management.

PADM 750. Performance Measurement and Management. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on performance-based management approaches in public and non-profit settings. It addresses the performance measurement and management process, the identification of appropriate performance measures, and the implementation of a performance measurement system, as well as managing for performance.

PADM 752. Introduction to Statistics for Public Administration. 3 Credits.

An introduction to statistics for students in Public Administration and related fields. Emphasis is placed on the quantitative analysis of demographics and factors affecting public administrators in the field.

PADM 753. Research Methods in Public Administration. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course examines various methods for designing and conducting research, collecting and organizing data, and disseminating results. Information technology and applications to practical management problems and public research topics are emphasized.

PADM 760. Collaboration in Public Administration. 3 Credits.

An examination of the fundamental concepts of collaborative governance in the field of public administration and public policy. Emphasis is placed on the government and/or nonprofit management and process of collaborative problem solving and policy implementation in cross-sector and intra-sector environments.

PADM 780. Local Government Management. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with the professional knowledge, skills, and abilities to engage successfully with local governments from the following perspectives: as a generalist public administrator, as a local government specialist, and as a citizen, non-profit leader, or businessperson. In addition, this course provides students with the theoretical and policy context within which local governments operate. Students will master that knowledge by researching how local governments use those concepts in every day administration.

PADM 781. Intergovernmental Management. 3 Credits.

Analysis of relationships among federal, state, and local governmental units in the delivery of governmental programs. Focus on intergovernmental issues in urban metropolitan regions. (Cross listed with PPCM 781).

PADM 785. Social Marketing in the Public Sector. 3 Credits.

The course is an examination of the principles, practices, and use of Social Marketing - the use of techniques to influence a target audience to voluntarily accept, reject, modify, or abandon a behavior for the benefit of individuals, groups, or society as a whole - in the public sector. In addition, the course will familiarize students with current and potential uses of Social Marketing to accomplish public sector goals.

PADM 800. Colloquium - Public Administration and Policy. 1 Credit.

This course introduces students to the field, the academy, the School of Public Service faculty, and university resources; it also sets program expectations for students. Topics include: research process, developing a research agenda, critical analysis of literature, professional development, comprehensive exams process, and academic v. nonacademic careers.

PADM 801. Policy Theory. 3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of theories of public policy. It provides a solid foundation for knowledge in this area. Students will be introduced to the leading theories, frameworks, and models that help describe and explain the policy process. The course examines the historical heritages of the policy sciences and the bases upon which public policy discussions take place at all stages of the policy process.

PADM 802. Public Administration I. 3 Credits.

The course reviews the history of administrative theory and the broad topics of administrative theory. The course is intended to address the impact that organizational structure and political/social environment have on administration. This course will not cover every theory, model, or framework relevant to public administration. However, this course is intended to provide the doctoral student with the theoretical foundations of public administration and understanding of their historical context in the field.

PADM 803. Public Administration II. 3 Credits.

This course is a continuation of PADM 802 and is intended to provide a framework for doctoral students to develop their understanding of public and nonprofit management organizational practices in the American context. The course is not exclusively directed to any one level of government, but includes national, state, and local management and organizational behavior. The course provides material on the concepts and perspectives on managerial rationale, responsibilities, decision making, and approaches to administration. Prerequisite: PADM 802.

PADM 804. Multi-Sector Administration. 3 Credits.

The course explores public administration from Neoliberalism and beyond to focus on the development of multi-sector administration, where multi-sector is defined as policy action across governments, nonprofit organizations, for-profit organizations, and/or grass-roots groups and individuals. The course is expected to cover the methods, challenges, and consequences of multi-sector administration. This course will also address the management and evaluation of multi-sector relationships. This is not an introduction to organizational structure or theory.

PADM 805. Research Design. 3 Credits.

The course examines advanced research design and evaluation methods used in public administration and management research. Experimental, quasi-experimental, and non­experimental procedures in the context of urban settings will be emphasized. Includes usage of various statistical software.

PADM 806. Multivariate Analysis in Public Administration. 3 Credits.

This course explores the proper use, calculation, and interpretation of multivariate statistics as commonly found in the literature in public administration. The course will prepare students to choose the appropriate statistical tools, generate testable hypotheses, correctly apply the statistical tool, analyze the results, and present and interpret the results of those tests in a manner appropriate for public administration in the field. Prerequisite: FOUN 722.

PADM 808. Urban and Regional Economic Development. 3 Credits.

This course examines the theory and practice of urban and regional economic development. The tools, institutions, and analytical techniques of urban and regional economic development are examined in light of relevant public policy issues.

PADM 810. Policy and Program Evaluation. 3 Credits.

Examination of various methodologies for designing and conducting public policy and program evaluation and research. Experimental, quasi-experimental and non-experimental procedures will be covered.

PADM 814. Public-Private Partnerships. 3 Credits.

An in-depth analysis of the forces behind the privatization movement. Examines the context of privatization, the theoretical and empirical arguments on both sides of the debate, and the different forms of privatization practiced in the U.S. The course draws on a wide range of disciplines in a quest for an understanding of the privatization phenomenon-political science, public administration, public policy, sociology, economics, management, and others.

PADM 815. Management of Nonprofit Organizations. 3 Credits.

Successful nonprofit organizations require substantial capability in key areas of management such as developing a strong board of directors, recruiting and motivating talented staff and volunteers, creating a strategic plan and wisely managing fiscal and human resources. This course addresses these topics from theoretical and practitioner perspectives.

PADM 816. Introduction to Nonprofit Sector. 3 Credits.

This course offers a broad introduction to the study and practice of the nonprofit sector. The course explores the history, scope, and significance of the nonprofit sector as it relates to philanthropy, voluntary action, civil society, and civic engagement.

PADM 820. Public Personnel Administration. 3 Credits.

Examines the basic framework of the public personnel system beginning with the legal requirements imposed by federal and state laws and regulations. General considerations of policy and procedures development, the organization of the public personnel system, the adoption of the personnel ordinance, the determination of various levels of employee status and the coverage of the personnel system are included.

PADM 823. Ethics in Public Administration. 3 Credits.

This course reviews the theory and application of ethics in the public sector, identifying public values and how they apply in the administration of government. It reviews sources of values employed in public sector decision­ making, and reviews how values in public administration are managed and applied. Systems of professional ethics are reviewed in the context of public professions. Case studies and best practices are examined to help the student understand the application of administrative ethics in public management.

PADM 825. Government, Society and Business. 3 Credits.

An overview of business-government society interactions, with special attention to the influence of public policy and corporate strategy on corporate social responsibility. An important theme is the ethical component of management decision making.

PADM 830. Theories of Conflict Resolution and Problem Solving. 3 Credits.

PADM 845. Managing Development and Change in Organizations. 3 Credits.

PADM 850. Performance Measurement and Management. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on performance-based management approaches in public and non-profit settings. It addresses the performance measurement and management process, the identification of appropriate performance measures, and the implementation of a performance measurement system, as well as managing for performance.

PADM 860. Collaboration in Public Administration. 3 Credits.

An examination of the fundamental concepts of collaborative governance in the field of public administration and public policy. Emphasis is placed on the government and/or nonprofit management and process of collaborative problem solving and policy implementation in cross-sector and intra-sector environments.

PADM 872. Public Financial Management. 3 Credits.

Examination of public sector financial management principles, practices and processes. Emphasis on financial management and reporting employed in local government financial management. Introduction to governmental accounting practices and financial statements.

PADM 881. Intergovernmental Relations. 3 Credits.

Analysis of relationship among federal, state, and local governmental units in the delivery of governmental programs. Focus on intergovernmental issues in urban metropolitan regions.

PADM 895. Advanced Topics. 3 Credits.

Advanced topics in public administration.

PADM 899. Dissertation. 1-12 Credits.

An approved research project, written under the supervision of a faculty advisor, in which the student demonstrates the capacity of design and completes independent applied research. The completed project must be approved by the dissertation committee.

PADM 998. Master’s Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course for master’s students in their final semester. It may be taken to fulfill the registration requirement necessary for graduation. All master’s students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour in the semester of their graduation.

PADM 999. Doctoral Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course doctoral students may take to maintain active status after successfully passing the candidacy examination. All doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour every semester until their graduation.