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Old Dominion University

2014-2015 Catalog

Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering

http://odu.edu/emse

2201 Systems Research and Academic Building
757-683-4558
 

Adrian Gheorghe, Chair
M. Pilar Pazos-Lago, Graduate Program Director, Master's Programs
Andres Sousa-Poza, Graduate Program Director, Doctoral Programs

Degree Programs

The department offers the following graduate degrees:

  • Master of Engineering Management
  • Master of Science in Engineering Management
  • Master of Engineering with a concentration in Systems Engineering
  • Ph.D. in Engineering Management
  • Doctor of Engineering in Engineering Management and Systems Engineering

Degree Description

The Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering at Old Dominion University is the recipient of the American Society of Engineering Management’s 1995, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2007, and 2010 awards for Excellence in Leadership in Graduate Programs. The Master of Engineering Management (MEM) program at Old Dominion University is also one of the first three programs certified by the American Society for Engineering Management.  The program was initially certified in 2003 and has been re-certified in 2007 and 2012.

The Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering provides its graduates with the necessary skills, knowledge, and abilities required to design and manage the technology-based, project-driven enterprise. Fundamentally, the engineering management discipline addresses the problems, design, and management of projects and complex operations. The programs are grounded in solid principles of systems science and systems engineering while exploiting the tools of management science and project management. The Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering emphasizes the concept of technological leadership. Technological leadership focuses on the development of a professional perspective that anticipates opportunities for competitive advantages technology can provide to an enterprise.

Core course work in the engineering management and systems engineering programs concentrate on developing the knowledge and skills required by graduates to provide the project and program leadership and management necessary for an organization to develop and apply technologies. Technological leadership’s vision looks to the creation of new products, processes, and services which, in turn, will create new markets or enable domination of existing ones. Through design projects and exercises centered around complex system and technology, students are led through alternative ways of thinking and communicating.

The engineering management and systems engineering programs at Old Dominion University provide students opportunities in the classroom and involvement with industrial partners. This allows students to gain confidence and experience to effectively create, integrate, and apply technology in enterprise operations.

The following requirement is applicable for all Engineering Management and Systems Engineering degree programs (Master’s and Doctoral): All students admitted to Engineering Management and Systems Engineering programs must earn a grade of “C” or better in all courses required for the degree and in all Engineering Management prerequisite courses. A student may be removed from the program if he/she receives 2 (two) grades of “C” or lower.

Master’s Admission Information

Master of Engineering Management/Master of Science in Engineering Management

Admission to graduate programs in Engineering Management is in accordance with the general requirements for graduate degrees as specified in the Admission section of this Catalog. Applicants must have an undergraduate degree from an ABET-accredited program in engineering or engineering technology or from an accredited program in applied science with a GPA of 3.00 (out of 4.00) or better. Students with an undergraduate GPA between 2.70 and 3.00 may be admitted provisionally based on their academic preparation and GRE scores. The Department requires university- level TOEFL scores for all international students when English is not their first language. 

Master of Engineering—Systems Engineering

Admission to the graduate program in Systems Engineering is in accordance with the general requirements for graduate degrees as specified in this Catalog. Specific requirements for systems engineering include a bachelor’s degree in science, engineering, mathematics, computer science, or other related field. Applicants with a bachelor’s degree in a non-technical discipline with approved college-level calculus and five years experience are eligible for admission to the program. An undergraduate grade point average of 3.00 (out of 4.00) in both the major and overall is required. Students with a GPA between 2.70 and 3.00 may be admitted provisionally based upon their work record, academic preparation, and GRE scores. Students with a GPA below 2.70 must complete additional academic course work so their overall GPA is raised to the appropriate level for admission. A minimum TOEFL score of 550 is required for all international students when English is not their first language.

Master’s Degree Requirements

Master of Engineering Management/Master of Science in Engineering Management

The M.E.M and M.S. programs are oriented toward the design and management of technical projects, complex operations, and technology-based organizations. The Master of Science (M.S.) program requires thesis research, and the student is expected to identify an advisor and work with him/her starting from the first semester. Courses are scheduled in the evenings and at off-campus sites, including the Peninsula Higher Education Center in Hampton and the Virginia Beach Higher Education Center. A complete M.E.M. program is available through Old Dominion University’s TELETECHNET distance learning program and through the Commonwealth Graduate Engineering Program. Both systems transmit courses to educational, industrial, and government locations throughout Virginia.

The master’s degree programs in the Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering are in accordance with the general requirements for master’s degrees as specified in the Requirements for Graduate Degrees section of this Catalog. Specific requirements for the Master of Engineering Management and Master of Science in engineering management are as follows:

The Engineering Management and Systems Engineering Department requires 31 credit hours of course work (10 three-credit courses plus a one-credit capstone course) for the M.E.M. The M.S. degree requires 24 credit hours of course work and six credit hours of thesis research for a total of 30 credit hours. 

M.E.M. Courses:

Prerequisite *
Core15
Cost Estimating and Financial Analysis
Analysis of Organizational Systems
Operations Research
Project Management
Quality Systems Design
Select one of the following:3
Integrated Systems Engineering I
Systems Analysis
Risk Analysis
Electives **12
Capstone1
Program Capstone (required final semester)
Total Hours31

M.S. Courses:

Prerequisite *
Core18
Cost Estimating and Financial Analysis
Analysis of Organizational Systems
Operations Research
Project Management
Quality Systems Design
Systems Analysis
Foundations of Research
Electives *6
Thesis Research ***6
Total Hours30
*

All students must have mathematics course work through the level of integral calculus; matrix algebra or differential equations; and a course in calculus-based statistics (ENMA 420/ENMA 520 or equivalent).

 

**

ENMA 711 or ENMA 721 may be an elective required by the thesis advisor. At least three-fifths (3/5) of course work must be at the 600 or 700 level for the M.E.M. and M.S. degrees.

Students must select twelve credit hours of elective coursework for the M.E.M. and six credit hours of elective course work for the M.S. degree. The electives may be selected from the ENMA courses (and/or from courses in other departments with the approval of the Graduate Program Director). All electives must be at the graduate level.

 

***

M.S. students take six credits of thesis research, which must be spread over a minimum of two semesters.

Exceptions to these requirements must be approved by the Graduate Program Director.

Master of Engineering—Systems Engineering

The focus of this degree program is to provide students with in-depth, real-world practitioner expertise in engineering and the integration of complex systems for government and commercial clients. Students in the program are introduced to core competencies for systems engineering, complex systems, modeling, systems analysis, complex problem solving, and the engineering disciplines needed for successful delivery of system solutions.

The Master of Engineering degree program in systems engineering is in accordance with the general requirements for master’s degrees as specified in this Catalog. Specific requirements for the Master in Engineering with a concentration in systems engineering include the following:

The Engineering Management and Systems Engineering Department requires 31 graduate credit hours of course work (10 courses plus a one-credit capstone course) for the M.E. with a concentration in systems engineering program.

Prerequisite/Corequisite *
Core18
Systems Engineering Management
Integrated Systems Engineering I
Requirements Management, Verification and Validation
Systems Architecture and Modeling
Systems Analysis
Risk and Vulnerability Management of Complex Interdependent Systems
Capstone **1
Program Capstone
Preparation Seminar for Systems Engineering Certification
Electives ***12
Select four of the following:
Methods for Rational Decision Making
Optimization Methods
Modeling and Analysis of Systems
Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis and Decision Support Systems
Complex Adaptive Situations Environment
Cost Engineering
Enterprise and Complex System Dynamics
System of Systems Engineering
Complexity, Engineering and Management
Robust Engineering Design
Total Hours31
*

All students must have mathematics course work through the level of integral calculus, matrix algebra or differential equations, and ENMA 520 or equivalent calculus-based probability and statistics. Students who have not had a calculus-based probability and statistics course will be required to include ENMA 520, or equivalent, as part of their plan of study. 

**

Required for the Master of Engineering in systems engineering, is to be taken near the final semester of study.

***

Or others approved by the Graduate Program Director.

****

All students are expected to communicate effectively both orally and in written documents, that are correct in grammar, style, and mechanics. Those deemed insufficient may be required to take remedial speech or writing courses.

Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering Management

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) focuses on developing the necessary skills to perform and evaluate rigorous research in areas related to the design and management of projects, programs, and complex human-technological systems. The goal of the Ph.D. program is to prepare graduates for careers in teaching and research at academic institutions as well as in other public and private organizations characterized by innovation and technological leadership.

Ph.D. Admission Requirements

Admission to graduate programs in engineering management and systems engineering is in accordance with the general requirements for graduate degrees as specified in the Graduate Admission section of this catalog. Specific requirements for the Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering include the following: applicants for the Ph.D. must have a bachelor’s or master’s degree from an accredited institution in engineering, engineering technology, applied science or applied mathematics, and at least 24 semester hours of graduate study approved by the graduate program director. An undergraduate GPA of at least 3.00 and a graduate GPA of at least 3.50 (on a 4.00 basis) and GRE general aptitude scores are required. Students lacking adequate academic preparation may be required to complete coursework in addition to the graduate admission requirements. A minimum TOEFL score of 550 is required for all international students when English is not their first language. As part of the admission process, all applicants will go through an interview process. The applicant will be contacted by the Graduate Program Director once the application and credentials are received to initiate the interview process. Students must also secure a faculty advisor prior to admission.

Ph.D. Degree Requirements

Curriculum requirements in engineering management are in accordance with the general requirements for Ph.D. degrees as specified in the Requirements for Graduate Degrees section of this catalog.

Requirements in preparing for the Ph.D. program in engineering management include:

  1. Satisfactory completion of 51 credit hours of postmaster’s degree credit or equivalent level of performance course work, including 24 credit hours of dissertation credit, and a minimum of 27 credit hours of course work.
  2. Passing a written and oral candidacy examination at the end of the program of study course work.
  3. The successful defense of a written dissertation proposal before the completion of nine hours of dissertation research.
  4. The completion of a dissertation representing independent original research worthy of publication in a refereed scholarly journal.
  5. The successful public defense of the dissertation before an audience which includes an appropriately selected committee of faculty knowledgeable in the field of the project.

Master’s-Level Courses: As part of master’s-level course work, all students must have completed the following engineering management leveling courses or their equivalent: ENMA 600, ENMA 603, and ENMA 604. Students may be admitted to the Ph.D. program deficient in these leveling courses, but as part of their plan of study, the student must take and successfully complete these courses at the earliest possible opportunity.

Plan of Study: The Ph.D. program is governed by a Plan of Study that is established by the student in conjunction with his/her advisor and guidance committee within the first nine credit hours of course work and will follow the established course requirements (below) unless a substitution to one or more courses is agreed upon between the advisor and student and approved by the Graduate Program Director.

Prequisite *
Master's-Level **
Plan of Study ***
Core ****15
Methodology for Advanced Engineering Projects (required)
Foundations of Research (required)
Select one from the each of the following methods
Empirical Methods +
Robust Engineering Design
Equivalent Course (with GPD authorization)
Analytic Methods ++
Optimization Methods
Enterprise and Complex System Dynamics
Modeling and Analysis of Systems
Methods for Rational Decision Making
Social Research Methods +++
Systems Analysis
Complex Adaptive Situations Environment
Equivalent course (with GPD authorization)
Electives #12
Dissertation Research ##24
Exams ###
Total Hours51
*

All students must have mathematics course work through the level of integral calculus matrix algebra or differential equations and a course in statistics (ENMA 420/ENMA 520 or equivalent).

**

As part of master’s-level course work, all students must have completed the following engineering management leveling courses or their equivalent: ENMA 600, ENMA 603, and ENMA 604. Students may be admitted to the Ph.D. program deficient in these leveling courses, but as part of their plan of study, the student must take and successfully complete these courses at the earliest possible opportunity.

***

The Ph.D. program is governed by a Plan of Study that is established by the student in conjunction with his/her advisor and guidance committee within the first nine credit hours of course work and will follow the established course requirements (below) unless a substitution to one or more courses is agreed upon between the advisor and student and approved by the Graduate Program Director.

****

At least three-fifths (3/5) of course work must be at the 800 level for the Ph.D. and D.Eng. degrees.

+

Statistical techniques and research approaches. The course should cover statistical techniques up to (at least) multivariate statistics covering techniques such as multivariate regression analysis, principal component factor analysis, cluster analysis, and canonical correlation analysis. If possible an introduction to structural equation modeling and non-parametric statistical analysis should be included.

++

Mathematical and other quantitative analytic techniques including modeling, analysis, and simulation approaches, and how they are applied within research. Methods such as system dynamics, agent based modeling, formal logic, and optimization methods should be addressed.

+++

Approaches common in the social sciences and humanities. Methods may include grounded theory (as used in social sciences), coding techniques, social (quasi-) experimentation, and fuzzy logic. Diverse data collection methods should be addressed including focus groups, interviews, surveys and questionnaires.

#

Engineering Management courses or courses form other departments in the Colleges of Engineering and Technology, Sciences, and Business and Public Administration. All electives must be at the graduate level and must be approved by the Ph.D. Guidance Committee and Graduate Program Director as part of the student’s plan of study.

##

Minimum of 24 credit hours

###

A candidacy exam, dissertation proposal defense, and a public dissertation defense are required after completing all course work.

Doctor of Engineering

The Department offers a Doctor of Engineering (D.Eng.) program with concentration in Engineering Management and Systems Engineering in accordance with the D.Eng. program requirements specified for the Batten College of Engineering and Technology in this catalog. Additional information on the admission procedure and criteria can be found at http://eng.odu.edu/enma/academics/dengapply.shtml.

Certificate Programs

Advanced Engineering Certificate

The Advanced Engineering Certificate Program consists of 12 credit hours of graduate level course work. The four courses comprising the certificate program are offered on a regular schedule to enable the completion of the program in two years. The program provides the opportunity for practicing engineers to further their knowledge and become more competent in their profession.

Program Requirements

Admission to the program requires a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering (or equivalent). The certificate consists of four pre-approved graduate level courses contributing to an emphasis area that can be interdisciplinary. A grade point average of 3.0 or better is required to earn the certificate.  Please refer to Frank Batten College of Engineering and Technology for more information.

ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT Courses

ENMA 510. Agile Project Management. 3 Credits.

This course focuses the management of projects using an agile approach to respond to the continuous changes that affect project capabilities and performance. Although any project can be manage using agile project management, projects with high degree of uncertainty obtain the most benefits from this approach (e.g., R&D projects). The course covers Scrum and expands it by articulating the human and business factors that make successful agile project management. Case studies and/or short-projects are required. Prerequisites: ENMA 401 or equivalent.

ENMA 515. Introduction to Systems Engineering. 3 Credits.

Introduces the principles, concepts and process of systems engineering. Examination of problem formulation, analysis, and interpretation as they apply to the study of complex systems. Emphasizes the design nature of systems engineering problem solving, and includes case studies stressing realistic problems. Development of system requirements, system objectives, and the evaluation of system alternatives.

ENMA 520. Statistical Concepts in Engineering Management. 3 Credits.

Introduction to concepts and tools in probability and statistics with applications to engineering design, systems analysis, manufacturing, and quality management problems.

ENMA 600. Cost Estimating and Financial Analysis. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the monetary aspects of engineering projects, including accounting principles; financial reports and analysis; capital budgeting; cost estimation and control; inventory management; depreciation; investment decisions. Knowledge of probability and statistics (ENMA 520 or equivalent) is assumed. Case studies and a term project are required. Pre- or corequisite: ENMA 420/ENMA 520 or equivalent.

ENMA 601. Analysis of Organizational Systems. 3 Credits.

This course introduces the student to fundamental concepts in the analysis of organizations. A systems approach is taken in the examination of social, structural, procedural and environmental aspects that are of consequence to technical professionals and managers. Modules covered include: History and Systems of Organizations and Management; Basic Organizational Systems and Models emphasizing rational, natural and open systems; Organizational Behavior Models; Organizational Structure Models; Integration of Systems Perspectives.

ENMA 602. Systems Engineering Management. 3 Credits.

Students develop a comprehensive set of techniques and methods to design, maintain and evolve the systems engineering function in support of strategic enterprise objectives and operations.

ENMA 603. Operations Research. 3 Credits.

Deterministic and stochastic models for decision making. Topics include: optimization methods; linear and other programming models; network analysis; inventory analysis; queuing theory. Knowledge of probability and statistics (ENMA 520 or equivalent) is assumed.

ENMA 604. Project Management. 3 Credits.

Exploration of the systems approach to planning, scheduling, control, design, evaluation, and leadership of projects in technology-based organizations. The fundamental tools and techniques of project management; role of the project manager; project management systems; project selection; project life cycle; project monitoring and control; project management evaluation and auditing; project risk and failure analysis; contextual nature of project management; project knowledge.

ENMA 605. Program Capstone. 1 Credit.

Comprehensive demonstration of the ME or MEM candidate’s competence in the fields covered by the program of study. Written submission is required, intended to fulfill the non-thesis Master’s Examination requirement. Prerequisites: Completion of minimum of the 18 core credit hours in program of study.

ENMA 606. Engineering Law. 3 Credits.

Basic legal concepts and procedures for understanding the implications of engineering management decisions. Major emphasis on contracts and liability.

ENMA 607. Stochastic Decision Methods. 3 Credits.

Introduction to decision analysis and stochastic models; risk and uncertainty in decision making; probabilistic inventory problems; queuing theory; Markov processes; dynamic programming; Monte Carlo simulation of dynamic systems. Knowledge of probability and statistics (ENMA 520 or equivalent) is assumed.

ENMA 613. Logistics and Supply Chain Management. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Studying how logistical decisions impact the performance of the firm and the entire supply chain. Topics include strategic planning, facilities location and analysis, distribution and transportation networks, forecasting, inventory management, and information systems for supply chains. Knowledge of probability and statistics (ENMA 520 or equivalent) is assumed. The course includes case studies and/or a project. Prerequisites: ENMA 603; ENMA 420/ENMA 520 or equivalent.

ENMA 614. Quality Systems Design. 3 Credits.

Integrated analysis of the process quality assurance and improvement function. Quality Deming's way. Scientific sampling and control charting for quality assurance and control; the quality cost concept and economic aspects of quality decisions. Organization of the quality function for process quality improvement. Knowledge of probability and statistics (ENMA 520 or equivalent) is assumed. Prerequisites: ENMA 420/ENMA 520 or equivalent.

ENMA 616. The Entrepreneurial Engineering Manager. 3 Credits.

Globalization has increased competition among the planet’s enterprises. The quality of products and services has dramatically improved while prices have plummeted. Consumer expectations have risen to very high levels. This phenomenon has accelerated the need for large technical enterprises to become more agile, flexible and responsive to consumer demands. Government agencies are not exempt form this trend: U.S. Government agencies are now required to establish strategic plans for their enterprises and to develop business plans that illustrate the future directions of the enterprise and to define the resources required to realize the vision and strategy of the enterprise. This course introduces Engineering Management students to a wide range of approaches designed to facilitate start-up, enable growth and ensure the continued capability of emerging and mature technical enterprises.

ENMA 640. Integrated Systems Engineering I. 3 Credits.

This course examines the role and nature of systems engineering. It is specifically designed to provide the fundamental understanding of systems engineering and complex systems. This course examines a variety of systems engineering topics with emphasis on the: (1) development of the fundamentals of systems engineering, (2) systems engineering life-cycle models and phases, (3) systems design for operational feasibility, and (4) an introduction to planning for systems engineering and management. This course prepares students to assume the role of a systems engineer in planning, directing, conducting, and assessing systems engineering initiatives.

ENMA 641. Requirements Management, Verification and Validation. 3 Credits.

Comprehensive treatment of the nature and utility of requirements, verification, and validation in systems engineering processes. Topics include: establishing user requirements; traceability; baseline and evolving requirements; governing standards; requirements management; issues in requirements for complex systems; role and methods for verification and validation in systems engineering; data treatment and analysis; standards, practices, and issues for verification and validation in systems engineering.

ENMA 660. Systems Architecture and Modeling. 3 Credits.

Students learn the essential aspects of the systems architecture paradigm through development and analysis of multiple architecture frameworks and enterprise engineering. Emphasis is placed on systems modeling and enterprise engineering.

ENMA 667. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits.

Available for pass/fail grading only. Student participation for credit based on academic relevance of the work experience, criteria, and evaluative procedures as formally determined by the department and the Cooperative Education program prior to the semester in which the work experience is to take place.

ENMA 668. Internship. 1-3 Credits.

Academic requirements will be established by the graduate program director and will vary with the amount of credit desired. Allows students an opportunity to gain short-duration career-related experience. Meant to be used for one-time experience. Work may or may not be paid. Project is completed during the term.

ENMA 669. Practicum. 1-3 Credits.

Academic requirements will be established by the department and will vary with the amount of credit desired. Allows students an opportunity to gain short duration career related experience. Student is usually already employed - this is an additional project in the organization. Prerequisites: Approval by department and Career Management.

ENMA 670. Cyber Systems Engineering. 3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of functioning of cyber systems including how a computer interacts with the outside world. The composition of critical infrastructure and functioning of different engineered systems that form critical infrastructure are discussed. Mutual dependence and interactions between cyber systems and other engineered and the resulting security risks are also explored. Prerequisites: Undergraduate students in STEM fields or graduate students of STEM degree or instructor's approval.

ENMA 671. Knowledge Management and Decision Making. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the interrelationships between knowledge management and decision making. The course emphasizes the contributions of knowledge management in the decision making process and outcomes. The course describes the relationship of knowledge management with naturalistic decision making, robust decision making, and risk management. Case studies and/or short-projects are required.

ENMA 672. Fundamentals of Knowledge Management. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the concept of knowledge management, its basics and advanced processes and methods. Knowledge transfer, knowledge elicitation, knowledge creation, and knowledge representation are some of the knowledge processes covered. The course describes the relationship of knowledge management with innovation and organizational learning. Case studies and/or short-projects are required.

ENMA 673. Threat Modeling and Risk Analysis. 3 Credits.

This course discusses how to develop cyber threat models using attack graphs/trees, STRIDE, Universal Modeling Language (UML), attack graphs/trees and common of risk analysis tools. Course also discusses the need for quantitative security analysis and formal validation of security models and basic principles of formal model validation. Prerequisites: ENMA 670 or MSIM 670 and MSIM 672; undergraduate students in STEM fields or graduate students of STEM degree or instructor's approval.

ENMA 690. Preparation Seminar for Systems Engineering Certification. 1 Credit.

A comprehensive treatment and review of systems engineering in preparation for the International Council for Systems Engineering (INCOSE) systemse engineering certification. Students may elect this course to fulfill their program capstone requirement. Registration for the systems engineering certification examination is required for successful completion of this course. (The certification exam registration fee is not covered as a part of this course.).

ENMA 695. Topics in Engineering Management. 1-3 Credits.

Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on recent developments in engineering management. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

ENMA 696. Topics in Engineering Management. 1-3 Credits.

Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on recent developments in engineering management. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

ENMA 697. Independent Study in Engineering Management. 3 Credits.

Individual study selected by the student. Supervised and approved by a faculty member with the approval of the Graduate Program Director. Prerequisites: Permission of Graduate Program Director.

ENMA 698. Master's Project. 1-3 Credits.

The master's project is guided under the supervision of the course instructor. Projects must be approved by the Graduate Program Advisor. Prerequisites: Graduate Program Director permission is required.

ENMA 699. Thesis. 1-6 Credits.

Research leading to a Master of Science thesis. Prerequisites: ENMA 721 and permission of the Graduate Program Director.

ENMA 700. Economic Analysis of Capital Projects. 3 Credits.

This course is targeted at engineering managers who actively participate in the capital budgeting process and project justification. Topics include capital budgeting techniques (including multi-attribute decision making), utility theory, justification of new technologies, and current research in engineering economics. Reading and application of current research in the field is stressed. Case studies are used. Oral presentations and term project required. Prerequisites: ENMA 600.

ENMA 702. Methods for Rational Decision Making. 3 Credits.

The goal of this course is to enhance the student’s ability to make rational and strategic decisions in complex situations. The course is split in two modules: decision theory and game theory. The decision theory module focuses on how individuals make complex decisions, both from a prescriptive (ideal) and descriptive (actual) perspective. The game theory module focuses on strategic decision-making in situations where individuals must interact with one another.

ENMA 703. Optimization Methods. 3 Credits.

Covers advanced methods in Operations Research and Optimization. Focus will be on developing models and their applications in different domains including manufacturing and service. Modern optimization tools will be used to implement models for case studies, projects and research papers. The knowledge of programming and spreadsheets is expected. Contact instructor for more details.

ENMA 704. Design of Project Knowledge Systems. 3 Credits.

Graduate level research colloquium examining the application of a systems perspective to design, operation, analysis, and evaluation of project knowledge systems. Special emphasis will be placed on knowledge generation and generalization systems. Case studies, problems, and a course project.

ENMA 705. Financial Engineering. 3 Credits.

This course covers concepts in complex investments, how to deal with uncertainty in today’s global markets, and how to engineer and manage financial decisions. The main topics include: cash flows, portfolio theory, capital management, securities, hedge funds, optimal investment and financial engineering evaluations among others.

ENMA 710. Modeling and Analysis of Systems. 3 Credits.

Probability and statistics (or an equivalent course). Covers modern modeling paradigms for deterministic and stochastic complex and dynamic systems. This includes, but not limited to, Discrete Simulation, Queuing Systems, and Agent-based models among others. Great focus will be on system analysis using different developed models in different domains such as production, logistics, security, and service, military and social. The course entails up to two exams, multiple case studies, individual and group projects and research papers. Prerequisites: ENMA 420/ENMA 520 or equivalent.

ENMA 711. Methodology for Advanced Engineering Projects. 3 Credits.

The course covers general topics that are necessary for project execution. This includes problem scoping, data collection, hypothesis formulation and testing, experimentation, testing and evaluation, qualitative analysis, quantitative analysis, and validation methods.

ENMA 712. Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis and Decision Support Systems. 3 Credits.

Currently, complex engineering-economic-societal decisions are made by involving numerous sometimes conflicting criteria and attributes, different decision rules and in the presence of various stakeholders with individual preferences who are willing to go into negotiation procedures. A number of multi-criteria decisions tools involving quantitative as well as qualitative methods, together with adequate decision support tools will be introduced. Case studies on a variety of engineering, environmental and security related aspects will also be considered.

ENMA 713. Integrating Ethics and Engineering Management. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to expose prospective engineering managers to the theories and practices that are inherent in the ethical environment of modern organizations. Topics include definitions of ethical behavior and leadership, moral decision-making, the importance of values such as honesty, integrity, and trustworthiness. A full exploration of ethical autonomy, collaboration, communication and moral imagination will be conducted. A variety of methods will be used to facilitate learning, including a textbook, regular journaling, movies and videos, case studies, small work group activities, experiential activities and writing assignments. The successful student should gain a full understanding of the requirements for and the practice of ethical leadership and should be able to determine how to create and maintain a work environment that fosters openness and clear communication about issues and problems.

ENMA 714. Crisis Project Management. 3 Credits.

Graduate-level research colloquium examining the existing and potential role of project management approaches and analysis procedures in the handling of crisis-related activities. Emphasis will be placed on the management of organizational level processes and activities related to crisis preparation, handling and recovery. Case studies, problems and reports.

ENMA 715. Systems Analysis. 3 Credits.

The course is designed to provide an understanding of the interdisciplinary aspects of systems development, operation, and support. The course focuses on the application of scientific and engineering efforts to transform an operational need into a defined system configuration through the interactive process of design, test, and evaluation.

ENMA 716. Complex Adaptive Situations Environment. 3 Credits.

The course focuses on the manner in which information, knowledge, and awareness are processed to facilitate decision making, management and engineering in complex adaptive situations. Topics include: knowledge acquisition, formation of technical and contextual awareness, and the role of understanding.

ENMA 717. Cost Engineering. 3 Credits.

Introduction to parametric cost modeling techniques and methodologies; generation and application of statistical relationships between life cycle costs and measurable attributes of complex systems; sources of supporting data; quality function deployment; technology forecasting. Special emphasis on life cycle design for cost; cost risk analysis; and design optimization on cost bases. Case studies and a semester project.

ENMA 721. Foundations of Research. 3 Credits.

This course is intended to prepare students to undertake substantiated, rigorous, scholarly research, particularly theses or dissertations. The course will focus on the approaches necessary to integrate research intent, techniques and constraints. A variety of research approaches will be investigated. Emphasis on problem formulation, literature review, proposal preparation, oral presentation, experimentation and accepted canons of research. Knowledge of probability and statistics (ENMA 420/ENMA 520 or equivalent) is assumed. Research paper required. Prerequisites: ENMA 420/ENMA 520 or equivalent.

ENMA 723. Enterprise and Complex System Dynamics. 3 Credits.

The use of system dynamics modeling and simulation in various enterprise and complex system application areas. Topics include: complex and hierarchical system dynamics, tools for systems thinking, the dynamics of growth, modeling and simulation tools, and model development, use and analysis.

ENMA 724. Risk Analysis. 3 Credits.

Approaches to the management of risk; probability assessment methods; risk modeling; use of software packages; extensions of decision analysis, including stochastic dominance and multiattribute methods; applications to project management, scheduling, and cost estimation.

ENMA 727. Engineering Management and Technology. 3 Credits.

ENMA 735. Team Performance and Decision Making in Engineering. 3 Credits.

This course explores and models the use of teams in organizations with a specific focus on the role of teams in decision making and problem solving. Key areas include team building, assessment of team outcomes, team learning, virtual teams and team decision making. Actual work on teams is required including team deliverables.

ENMA 742. Knowledge Management and Information Technology. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the enabling nature of communication and information technologies in managing knowledge. The course describes the relationship of knowledge management with library science and content management, network security, data mining, and database management. Case studies and/or short-projects are required.

ENMA 743. Reliability and Maintainability. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the theory and practice of reliability engineering, maintainability and availability. Reliability evaluation models and techniques; failure data collection and analysis; reliability testing and modeling; maintained systems; mechanical system reliability. Semester project. Prerequisites: ENMA 420/ENMA 520 or equivalent.

ENMA 744. Human Aspects of Knowledge Management. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the enabling nature of the individual, group, and organization factors in the management of knowledge. Performance metrics, team processes, and work structure are some of the topics covered in this course at the individual, group, and organization levels. The course describes the relationship of knowledge management with organizational behavior, change management, agile project management. Case studies and/or short-projects are required.

ENMA 750. System of Systems Engineering. 3 Credits.

Comprehensive treatment of System of Systems Engineering (SoSE), including; fundamental systems principles, concepts, and governing laws; complex and simple systems; underlying paradigms, methodologies and essential methods for SoSE analysis, design, and transformation; complex system transformation; current state of SoSE research and application challenges. Explores the range of technological, human/social, organizational/managerial, policy, and political dimensions of the SoSE problem domain.

ENMA 751. Complexity, Engineering and Management. 3 Credits.

This course examines management and engineering of complex systems as it is undertaken in complex situations. The student will develop an understanding of the unconditional attributes of complex systems and situations that become foundational in the development of robust methods to deal with the practical reality of working in dynamic, uncertain environments. Topics will include Complexity, Complex Systems, Complex Adaptive Systems, Complex Responsive Processes, Complex Adaptive Situations Methodology, SOSE, Reciprocality, and Sociotechnical Systems.

ENMA 752. Agent-Directed Simulation and Systems Engineering. 3 Credits.

The student will learn about methods and tools for agent-directed simulation in support of systems engineering as well as applications of systems engineering for the development of complex agent-directed simulation applications. Students should have knowledge of principles of systems engineering, modeling and simulation, and a higher programming language prior to registering.

ENMA 755. Human System Engineering. 3 Credits.

This course introduces concepts of Human System Engineering, focusing on designing systems that include human components. Human System Integration and Human Factors Engineering are discussed, as well as other human centered design approaches. The role of human data in systems and systems of systems design is explored, and methods to capture and represent human data, including architecture frameworks, are presented. Modeling and analysis of human centered systems is done through hands-on projects.

ENMA 763. Robust Engineering Design. 3 Credits.

Robust design approach based on "Taguchi Methods." Off-line quality engineering and applied design-of-experiments methods; full factorial and fractional factorial designs; response surface methods. The course is designed to enable engineers and engineering managers from all disciplines to recognize potential applications, formulate problems, plan experiments, and analyze data. Knowledge of probability and statistics (ENMA 420/ENMA 520 or equivalent) is assumed. Case studies. Semester project. Prerequisites: ENMA 420/ENMA 520 or equivalent.

ENMA 771. Risk and Vulnerability Management of Complex Interdependent Systems. 3 Credits.

Seminar discussions and team projects. A systematic approach to basic principles of design, economics and management of critical infrastructure systems, including issues of risk, vulnerability and risk governance. Development of advanced methodologies, e.g. system of systems, by use of complexity analysis, dynamic/chaotic behavior, threat analysis, resilient design and management under normal and stress conditions. Adopting an agent based modeling approach under conditions of uncertainty, dysfunctionality, malicious attacks and/or presence of natural perils.

ENMA 776. Engineering Principles of Combat Modeling and Distributed Simulation. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: ENMA 710, MSIM 601, or equivalent. This course introduces students to the engineering principles of model movement, effects, sensors, and command and control of military operations. An overview of standards for distributed simulation enabling global federations is provided as well as challenges of interoperability, composability, and integratability in C2 systems. Technical solutions are addressed.

ENMA 780. Leadership for Engineering Managers. 3 Credits.

Seminar discussions and team projects. This course is designed to expose students to the concepts, skills, characteristics and emotional composition of effective and successful leaders in the 21st century. The course is intensive and requires students to immerse themselves in the course material and classroom discussion to derive meaning and value from the topics. The course objectives will be achieved by classroom discussion of the assigned material, candid self-assessment, experimental exercises and analysis of the actions of leaders, as described in case studies and literature. Areas of exploration include the fundamentals of leadership, ethical leadership, social capital, emotional intelligence and three-dimensional leadership. Prerequisites: ENMA 601 or Ph.D. status.

ENMA 795. Topics in Engineering Management. 3 Credits.

Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on recent developments in engineering management.

ENMA 796. Topics in Engineering Management. 3 Credits.

Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on recent developments in engineering management.

ENMA 797. Independent Study in Engineering Management. 1-3 Credits.

Designed for advanced individualized study into an engineering management topic area. Independent study projects will be related to engineering management and completed under the supervision of a certified faculty member. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and Graduate Program Director.

ENMA 800. Economic Analysis of Capital Projects. 3 Credits.

It is targeted at engineering managers who actively participate in the capital budgeting process and project justification. Topics include capital budgeting techniques (including multi-attribute decision making), utility theory, justification of new technologies, and current research in engineering economics. Reading and application of current research in the field is stressed. Case studies are used. Oral presentations and term project required. Prerequisites: ENMA 600.

ENMA 802. Methods for Rational Decision Making. 3 Credits.

The goal of this course is to enhance the student’s ability to make rational and strategic decisions in complex situations. The course is split in two modules: decision theory and game theory. The decision theory module focuses on how individuals make complex decisions, both from a prescriptive (ideal) and descriptive (actual) perspective. The game theory module focuses on strategic decision-making in situations where individuals must interact with one another.

ENMA 803. Optimization Methods. 3 Credits.

Covers advanced methods in Operations Research and Optimization. Focus will be on developing models and their applications in different domains including manufacturing and service. Modern optimization tools will be used to implement models for case studies, projects and research papers. The knowledge of programming and spreadsheets is expected. Contact instructor for more details.

ENMA 804. Design of Project Knowledge Systems. 3 Credits.

Graduate level research colloquium examining the application of a systems perspective to design, operation, analysis, and evaluation of project knowledge systems. Special emphasis will be placed on knowledge generation and generalization systems. Case studies, problems, and a course project.

ENMA 805. Financial Engineering. 3 Credits.

This course covers concepts in complex investments, how to deal with uncertainty in today’s global markets, and how to engineer and manage financial decisions. The main topics include: cash flows, portfolio theory, capital management, securities, hedge funds, optimal investment and financial engineering evaluations among others.

ENMA 810. Modeling and Analysis of Systems. 3 Credits.

Covers modern modeling paradigms for deterministic and stochastic complex and dynamic systems. This includes, but not limited to, Discrete Simulation, Queuing Systems, and Agent-based models among others. Great focus will be on system analysis using different developed models in different domains such as production, logistics, security, and service, military and social. The course entails up to two exams, multiple case studies, individual and group projects and research papers. Prerequisites: ENMA 420/ENMA 520 or equivalent.

ENMA 811. Methodology for Advanced Engineering Projects. 3 Credits.

The course covers general topics that are necessary for project execution. This includes problem scoping, data collection, hypothesis formulation and testing, experimentation, testing and evaluation, qualitative analysis, quantitative analysis, and validation methods.

ENMA 812. Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis and Decision Support Systems. 3 Credits.

Currently, complex engineering-economic-societal decisions are made by involving numerous sometimes conflicting criteria and attributes, different decision rules and in the presence of various stakeholders with individual preferences who are willing to go into negotiation procedures. A number of multi-criteria decisions tools involving quantitative as well as qualitative methods, together with adequate decision support tools will be introduced. Case studies on a variety of engineering, environmental and security related aspects will also be considered.

ENMA 813. Integrating Ethics and Engineering Management. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to expose prospective engineering managers to the theories and practices that are inherent in the ethical environment of modern organizations. Topics include definitions of ethical behavior and leadership, moral decision-making, the importance of values such as honesty, integrity, and trustworthiness. A full exploration of ethical autonomy, collaboration, communication and moral imagination will be conducted. A variety of methods will be used to facilitate learning, including a textbook, regular journaling, movies and videos, case studies, small work group activities, experiential activities and writing assignments. The successful student should gain a full understanding of the requirements for and the practice of ethical leadership and should be able to determine how to create and maintain a work environment that fosters openness and clear communication about issues and problems.

ENMA 814. Crisis Project Management. 3 Credits.

Graduate-level research colloquium examining the existing and potential role of project management approaches and analysis procedures in the handling of crisis-related activities. Emphasis will be placed on the management of organizational level processes and activities related to crisis preparation, handling and recovery. Case studies, problems and reports.

ENMA 815. Systems Analysis. 3 Credits.

The course is designed to provide an understanding of the interdisciplinary aspects of systems development, operation, and support. The course focuses on the application of scientific and engineering efforts to transform an operational need into a defined system configuration through the interactive process of design, test, and evaluation.

ENMA 816. Complex Adaptive Situations Environment. 3 Credits.

The course focuses on the manner in which information, knowledge, and awareness are processed to facilitate decision making, management and engineering in complex adaptive situations. Topics include: knowledge acquisition, formation of technical and contextual awareness, and the role of understanding.

ENMA 817. Cost Engineering. 3 Credits.

Introduction to parametric cost modeling techniques and methodologies; generation and application of statistical relationships between life cycle costs and measurable attributes of complex systems; sources of supporting data; quality function deployment; technology forecasting. Special emphasis on life cycle design for cost; cost risk analysis; and design optimization on cost bases. Case studies and a semester project.

ENMA 821. Foundations of Research. 3 Credits.

This course is intended to prepare students to undertake substantiated, rigorous, scholarly research, particularly theses or dissertations. The course will focus on the approaches necessary to integrate research intent, techniques and constraints. A variety of research approaches will be investigated. Emphasis on problem formulation, literature review, proposal preparation, oral presentation, experimentation and accepted canons of research. Research paper required. Prerequisites: ENMA 420/ENMA 520 or equivalent.

ENMA 823. Enterprise and Complex System Dynamics. 3 Credits.

The use of system dynamics modeling and simulation in various enterprise and complex system application areas. Topics include: complex and hierarchical system dynamics, tools for systems thinking, the dynamics of growth, modeling and simulation tools, and model development, use and analysis.

ENMA 824. Risk Analysis. 3 Credits.

Approaches to the management of risk; probability assessment methods; risk modeling; use of software packages; extensions of decision analysis, including stochastic dominance and multiattribute methods; applications to project management, scheduling, and cost estimation.

ENMA 827. Engineering Management and Technology. 3 Credits.

ENMA 835. Team Performance and Decision Making in Engineering. 3 Credits.

This course explores and models the use of teams in organizations with a specific focus on the role of teams in decision making and problem solving. Key areas include team building, assessment of team outcomes, team learning, virtual teams and team decision making. Actual work on teams is required including team deliverables.

ENMA 843. Reliability and Maintainability. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the theory and practice of reliability engineering, maintainability and availability. Reliability evaluation models and techniques; failure data collection and analysis; reliability testing and modeling; maintained systems; mechanical system reliability. Semester project. Prerequisites: ENMA 420/ENMA 520 or equivalent.

ENMA 850. System of Systems Engineering. 3 Credits.

Comprehensive treatment of System of Systems Engineering (SoSE), including; fundamental systems principles, concepts, and governing laws; complex and simple systems; underlying paradigms, methodologies and essential methods for SoSE analysis, design, and transformation; complex system transformation; current state of SoSE research and application challenges. Explores the range of technological, human/social, organizational/managerial, policy, and political dimensions of the SoSE problem domain.

ENMA 851. Complexity, Engineering and Management. 3 Credits.

This course examines management and engineering of complex systems as it is undertaken in complex situations. The student will develop an understanding of the unconditional attributes of complex systems and situations that become foundational in the development of robust methods to deal with the practical reality of working in dynamic, uncertain environments. Topics will include Complexity, Complex Systems, Complex Adaptive Systems, Complex Responsive Processes, Complex Adaptive Situations Methodology, SOSE, Reciprocality, and Sociotechnical Systems.

ENMA 852. Agent-Directed Simulation and Systems Engineering. 3 Credits.

The student will learn about methods and tools for agent-directed simulation in support of systems engineering as well as applications of systems engineering for the development of complex agent-directed simulation applications. Students should have knowledge of principles of systems engineering, modeling and simulation, and a higher programming language prior to registering.

ENMA 855. Human System Engineering. 3 Credits.

This course introduces concepts of Human System Engineering, focusing on designing systems that include human components. Human System Integration and Human Factors Engineering are discussed, as well as other human centered design approaches. The role of human data in systems and systems of systems design is explored, and methods to capture and represent human data, including architecture frameworks, are presented. Modeling and analysis of human centered systems is done through hands-on projects.

ENMA 863. Robust Engineering Design. 3 Credits.

Robust design approach based on "Taguchi Methods." Off-line quality engineering and applied design-of-experiments methods; full factorial and fractional factorial designs; response surface methods. The course is designed to enable engineers and engineering managers from all disciplines to recognize potential applications, formulate problems, plan experiments, and analyze data. Case studies. Semester project. Prerequisites: ENMA 420/ENMA 520 or equivalent.

ENMA 871. Risk and Vulnerability Management of Complex Interdependent Systems. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Seminar discussions and team projects. A systematic approach to basic principles of design, economics and management of critical infrastructure systems, including issues of risk, vulnerability and risk governance. Development of advanced methodologies, e.g. system of systems, by use of complexity analysis, dynamic/chaotic behavior, threat analysis, resilient design and management under normal and stress conditions. Adopting an agent based modeling approach under conditions of uncertainty, dysfunctionality, malicious attacks and/or presence of natural perils.

ENMA 876. Engineering Principles of Combat Modeling and Distributed Simulation. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: ENMA 710, MSIM 601, or equivalent. This course introduces students to the engineering principles of model movement, effects, sensors, and command and control of military operations. An overview of standards for distributed simulation enabling global federations is provided as well as challenges of interoperability, composability, and integratability in C2 systems. Technical solutions are addressed.

ENMA 880. Leadership for Engineering Managers. 3 Credits.

Seminar discussions and team projects. This course is designed to expose students to the concepts, skills, characteristics and emotional composition of effective and successful leaders in the 21st century. The course is intensive and requires students to immerse themselves in the course material and classroom discussion to derive meaning and value from the topics. The course objectives will be achieved by classroom discussion of the assigned material, candid self-assessment, experimental exercises and analysis of the actions of leaders, as described in case studies and literature. Areas of exploration include the fundamentals of leadership, ethical leadership, social capital, emotional intelligence and three-dimensional leadership. Prerequisites: ENMA 601 or Ph.D. standing.

ENMA 888. Ph.D. Seminar. 1 Credit.

Discussion of research projects, topics, and problems of Engineering Management faculty, researchers, and students. A weekly exchange of ideas and issues between faculty and Ph.D. students focused on doctoral research.

ENMA 892. Doctor of Engineering Project. 1-12 Credits.

Directed individual study applying advanced-level technical knowledge to identify, formulate, and solve a complex, novel problem in Engineering Management.

ENMA 895. Topics in Engineering Management. 3 Credits.

Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on recent developments in engineering management.

ENMA 896. Topics in Engineering Management. 3 Credits.

Special topics of interest with emphasis placed on recent developments in engineering management.

ENMA 897. Independent Study in Engineering Management. 1-3 Credits.

Designed for advanced individualized study into an engineering management topic area. Independent study projects will be related to engineering management and completed under the supervision of a certified faculty member. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and Graduate Program Director.

ENMA 898. Research in Engineering Management. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised research prior to passing Ph.D. candidacy exam. Prerequisites: ENMA 721/ENMA 821 and permission of Graduate Program Director.

ENMA 899. Doctoral Research. 1-12 Credits.

Doctoral research hours. After successfully passing the candidacy examination, all doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit each term until the degree is complete. Prerequisites: ENMA 821 and permission of instructor.

ENMA 999. Engineering Management 999. 1 Credit.

A one-hour pass/fail registration required of all graduate students to maintain active status during the final semester prior to graduation. After successfully passing the candidacy examination, all doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit each term until the degree is complete.