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Old Dominion University

2014-2015 Catalog

Department of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education and Professional Studies

http://education.odu.edu/ots/

228 Education Building
757-683-4305

Robert Spina, Interim Chair

The Department of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Education and Professional Studies (STEMPS) is an academic leader in graduate studies related to education specialists, including career and technical education, instructional design and technology, marketing education, science education, mathematics education, technology education, STEM education, community college teaching, and business and industry training. It offers the M.S., M.S.Ed, and the Ph.D. in Education with programs in occupational and technical studies (OTS) and instructional design and technology (IDT). The Ed.S. is offered in conjunction with the educational leadership program. The department also offers licensure and teaching endorsement programs. Due to changing University requirements, national accreditation standards, and Commonwealth licensure regulations, the programs in the Darden College of Education are under constant revision. Any changes resulting from these factors supersede the program requirements described in the catalog. Students should obtain current program information from their advisors and the Darden College of Education website at http://education.odu.edu/.

Individual programs are described on the following pages.

Instructional Design and Technology Programs

  • Master of Science in Education - Elementary – Instructional Design and Technology
  • Master of Science in Education - Secondary – Instructional Design and Technology
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Education- Instructional Design and Technology
  • Certificate in Education and Training in Modeling and Simulation

Mathematics and Science Education Programs

  • Master of Science in Education with Mathematics Education Specialist Endorsement (PK-8)
  • Master of Science in Education with Initial Licensure 6-12 - Mathematics
  • Mathematics Education Specialist Endorsement (PK-8)
  • Master of Science in Education with Initial Licensure - Secondary - Science
  • Master of Science in Education for Licensed Teachers - Elementary – Science
  • Master of Science in Education for Licensed Teachers - Secondary – Science

Occupational and Technical Studies Programs

  • Master of Science, Occupational and Technical Studies Program, with concentrations in:
    • Business and Industry Training
    • Career and Technical Education
    • Community College Teaching
    • STEM Education
  • Master of Science, Occupational and Technical Studies, Technology Education concentration with Licensure
  • Endorsement Program in Industrial Cooperative Training
  • Marketing Teacher Education with Licensure
  • Education Specialist
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Education-Occupational and Technical Studies Concentration

Master of Science in Education - Elementary – Instructional Design and Technology Concentration

Ginger Watson, Program Coordinator

In the Master of Science in Education – Elementary-- instructional design and technology concentration, the core and support courses are combined, with students selecting 24 to 30 credits in instructional design and technology along with the problem paper or seminar research option. Working with an assigned advisor, students may take courses in the areas of distance education/telecommunications, instructional design and development, educational applications of instructional technology, and administration of instructional technology.

Admission

Students must:

  1. hold a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college/university;
  2. have a cumulative undergraduate grade point average of 2.80;
  3. take and receive satisfactory scores on either the Graduate Record Examination (score of 290 combined on verbal and quantitative with a minimum of 140 verbal for regular admission) or Miller Analogies Test (minimum score of 45 or 399 for regular admission); and
  4. have an interview with the graduate program director or his/her designee.

Performance in classes taken as a non-degree graduate student will not be taken into consideration in the admission process. No courses in the undergraduate academic major or professional education in which the student has made below a C- will be accepted for licensure in the Darden College of Education.

Under certain circumstances, applicants who do not fully meet the requirements for regular admission to the program may be admitted on a provisional basis subject to conditions specified by the graduate program director for elementary/middle education.

Continuance

Students must:

  1. maintain a grade point average of 3.00;
  2. maintain a grade point average of 3.00 in the major.

All ID&T students are expected to have regular and reliable access to a multimedia computer (headphones, microphone, and web cam) and a high speed Internet connection.

Exit

Students must:

  1. have a 3.00 grade point average;
  2. pass a written comprehensive examination;
  3. have an exit interview;
  4. have completed all course requirements; and
  5. submit an application for graduation.

Program Requirements

All courses in the core and elective blocks are offered via synchronous and asynchronous format.

Paper Option:  Area I (24 credits); Area II (6 credits); 30 credits total.
Seminar Option: Area I (30 credits); Area II (6 credits); 36 credits total.

Core Courses *24-30
Management of Technology Resources in the Classroom
Educational Measurement and Assessment
Foundations of Distance Education
Instructional Systems Design
Applied Instructional Design
Designing Online Instruction
PK-12 Instructional Technology
Digital Video Materials Development
Instructional Technology Trends in Curriculum and Instruction
Support Courses
Graduate electives approved by the Graduate Program Director may be substituted for technology courses when those courses complement personal and professional goals.
Research Courses6-12
Problem Paper Option (6 credits; 30 credits required for graduation)
Applied Research Methods in Education
Problems in Occupational and Technical Studies
Seminar Option (13 credits; 37 credits required for graduation)
Applied Research Methods in Education
Advanced Instructional Design Techniques
Electives
Total Hours30-42

Master of Science in Education - Secondary – Instructional Design and Technology Concentration

Ginger Watson, Program Coordinator

The Master of Science in Education – Secondary - instructional design and technology concentration is designed to meet the needs of professionals interested or involved in the design, development, and delivery of instruction. The courses are appropriate for a variety of venues, including preK-12, higher education, military, and business. In this specialization, student’s select 24 to 30 credits in instructional design and technology plus the problems paper or seminar research option. Working with an advisor, students select courses that complement their backgrounds and professional goals.

Admission

Students must:

  1. hold a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college/university;
  2. have a cumulative undergraduate grade point average of 2.80;
  3. take and receive satisfactory scores on either the Graduate Record Examination (score of 290 combined on verbal and quantitative with a minimum of 140 verbal for regular admission) or Miller Analogies Test (minimum score of 45 or 399 for regular admission); and
  4. have an interview with the graduate program director or his/her designee.

Performance in classes taken as a non-degree graduate student will not be taken into consideration in the admission process.

Continuance

Students must:

  1. maintain a grade point average of 3.00;
  2. maintain a grade point average of 3.00 in the major.

All ID&T students are expected to have regular and reliable access to a multimedia computer (headphones, microphone, and web cam) and a high speed Internet connection.

Exit

Students must:

  1. have a 3.00 grade point average;
  2. pass a written comprehensive examination;
  3. have an exit interview;
  4. have completed all course requirements; and
  5. submit an application for graduation.

Program Requirements

All courses in the core and elective blocks are offered via synchronous and asynchronous format.

Area I: Emphasis Courses
Introductory Courses6
Foundations of Instructional Technology (*)
Instructional Systems Design
Elective Courses *18-24
Theory (Select at least one course)
Foundations of Distance Education
Cognition and Instructional Design
Instructional Design Theory
Theories and Research
Design (Select at least three courses)
Human Performance Assessment
Task Analysis Methods
Instructional Technology Product Evaluation
Applied Instructional Design
Advanced Instructional Design Techniques
Technology (Select at least one course)
Knowledge Management
Computer-Based Multi-Media Design
Diffusion and Adoption of Instructional Technology Innovations
Theory and Design of Instructional Simulation
Instructional Gaming: Theories and Practice
Designing Online Instruction
Human Performance Technology (Select at least one course)
Principals and Practice of Human Performance Technology
Consulting Skills for Instructional Designers
Needs Analysis and Assessment
Electives: From above, or from related areas (e.g., Modeling & Simulation, Psychology, Engingeering, Speech-communications, Business, I/O Psychology) with approval of advisor and GPD
Area II: Research Core Courses Required
Problem Paper Option6
Applied Research Methods in Education
Problems in Occupational and Technical Studies
* = Required Course
Total Hours30-36

Doctor of Philosophy in Education – Instructional Design and Technology Concentration

Gary Morrison, Program Coordinator

The Doctor of Philosophy in Education Instructional Design and Technology (ID&T) concentration prepares individuals to conduct research and assume leadership roles in the field of instructional technology. Students will master a number of instructional design skills, ranging from instructional problem identification, task and audience analysis, strategy design, assessment, evaluation, and implementation that they can use in a variety of settings including traditional classrooms, distance education, business, health care, military, K-12 and higher education, and government. Courses explore theories and research that provide a foundation for the field. Students are also expected to participate in and conduct research studies as part of their program. Completing the Ph.D. in ID&T will prepare students to take jobs as instructional design and human performance practitioners in business, military, government, health care, and educational settings. They are also prepared to take positions as faculty members in higher education and as researchers for private organizations.

Admission

For admission to this program, individuals should have completed master’s degree in an appropriate discipline from a regionally accredited university. Degrees that are equivalent to a master’s degree such as L.L.B., J.D., and D.D.S. are also acceptable. Prospective students should also have prior course work in statistics and instructional technology. If this requirement is not met, then additional course work may be added to the candidate’s graduate program of study at the discretion of the advisor and graduate program director. Please see prerequisites on the curriculum description for specifics.

Admission to the instructional design and technology Ph.D. program is competitive. A number of criteria are considered including graduate and undergraduate GPAs, GRE scores, writing ability, a personal interview, and the match between student interests and faculty expertise. Meeting the minimum requirements established by the department does not ensure admission to the program. A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.8 and a minimum graduate GPA of 3.25 are recommended.

Application requirements for the Ph.D. in instructional design and technology are as follows:

  1. a completed application which is available online or from the Office of Graduate Admissions.
  2. Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate courses and degrees completed.
  3. Official report scores from the Graduate Record Examination (verbal, quantitative, and analytical) taken within the last five years. GRE scores expire after five years; however, candidates who have completed the exam prior to five years before the application deadline may submit those scores for consideration if they are provided from an official source such as a transcript or form provided by the Educational Testing Service. Old Dominion University reserves the right to determine what is an “official source.”
  4. Applicants whose native language is not English (or who do not have a B.S. or M.S. degree from an accredited institution in a country where English is the native language) must submit a current score for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) of at least 600 (written) or 250 (computer based).
  5. Applicants must submit a 500 word statement of their academic and professional goals with an emphasis on how the Ph.D. degree in instructional design and technology will contribute to the achievement of the stated goals.
  6. Three letters of reference from sources capable of commenting on the applicant’s readiness for advanced graduate study. It is recommended that at least two of the letters come from university faculty members. Other letters may come from work supervisors or managers.
  7. An interview with the instructional design and technology program faculty. This committee will also review applications for admission.

Program Requirements

The Ph.D. program in Education with a concentration in instructional design and technology is comprised of courses totaling a minimum of 60 academic credit hours beyond the master’s degree. The curriculum includes an program core of 21 credit hours, 9 credit hours in the instructional design concentration, and a research core of 15 credit hours, the three credit dissertation seminar and the dissertation, which will include a minimum of 12 credit hours. The dissertation will often include more than 12 credit hours depending on the length of time necessary for completion. Students entering the program may also need to complete introductory statistics courses and an instructional technology foundations course if they have not had equivalent courses or cannot demonstrate competency at a satisfactory level. Students who enter the Ph.D. program with a master’s degree in an academic field that is unrelated to instructional design and technology and/or who have not completed courses to develop competency in specified areas may need to complete these courses in addition to the required courses. All courses are offered through distance learning. All students must complete the research residency project (IDT 879 and IDT 898) that results in a submission for publication or presentation to a nationally refereed journal or conference prior to taking comprehensive exams  The residency project must be completed within two years of the start of IDT 879.  If not, the student must repeat IDT 879 without credit.

All IDT students are expected to have regular and reliable access to a multimedia computer (headphones, microphone, and web cam) and a high speed Internet connection.

Under normal circumstances, admissions will be offered at least three times a year for the fall, spring, and summer semesters. Acceptance is competitive to assure that there is an adequate number of full-time faculty to serve the students through advising, mentoring, and other duties, particularly when individuals reach the dissertation stage of the program.

Students interested in attending full-time and applying for financial aid should submit their applications by February 1 prior to the fall semester they wish to start.

Applicants must submit completed applications and all related material no later than the following dates:

  • May 1st for the Fall Semester*
  • November 1st for the Spring Semester
  • March 1st for the Summer Semester

Program Continuance

After completing 12 hours in ID&T course work, students must maintain a 3.25 GPA in ID&T courses.  Failure to do so will result in one year probation.  If the student's GPA in ID&T courses is less than 3.25 at the end of the probation period, the student will be suspended.  Students who earn a grade of C+ or lower (including U) in a graduate course in their program of study are considered to be making unsatisfactory progress.  Students earning one or more grades of C+ or lower must meet with the program director prior to enrolling in courses in future semesters.  Students must provide a plan for making satisfactory progress or they will be suspended.  If a student earns three or more grades of C+ or lower, they will be suspended from the program.  Students wishing to be considered for reinstatement must follow the procedures set forth in the ODU Graduate Catalog.

In addition, the ODU Graduate Catalog states students who have less than a 3.0 GPA on courses at ODU will be placed on probation and may be suspended if conditions prescribed in the catalog are not met.

Continuous Enrollment and Exams

Doctoral students who do not meet the conditions for continuous enrollment and who do not have an approved leave of absence will be suspended from the degree program.  Doctoral students who fail the comprehensive exam (either oral or written) or the doctoral final examination (e.g., dissertation defense) twice will be suspended from the degree program.

Satisfactory Progress

Doctoral students who do not complete at least 12 hours of course credits towards their degree each year with a grade of B- or higher prior to candidacy will be evaluated for continuation in the program.  If the program faculty do not feel the student is making adequate progress, the student will be placed on program probation for one year.  If the student has not ompleted 12 hours of course credits toward the degree with a grade of B- or higher, they will be suspended.

Research Residency and Dissertation

Doctoral students will be evaluated annually for their progress in completing their research residency or dissertation.  Students who have not made progress towards the completion as demonstrated evidence of a finished proposal, data collection, data analysis, or drafts of the manuscript/dissertation will be evaluated by faculty for continance in the program.  If faculty feel the student has not made adequate progress, the student will be placed on probation for one year.  If the student has not made adequate progress after one year of probation, faculty may recommend suspension from the program for failing to make adequate progress towards completion of the degree.

Plagiarism

Any student found guilty of plagiarism will be suspended immediately from the program.

Program Completion and Exit

To complete the program students must fully comply with the curriculum below and all requirements noted elsewhere in the University catalog for graduate students and within the Ph.D. in Education Handbook. It is the responsibility of the student to obtain these materials and complete required portions.

Curriculum

Prerequisites:  All students admitted into the Ph.D. in instructional design and technology must complete the following prerequisite courses unless they have previously completed equivalent graduate level coursework or have appropriate educational experience.

Prerequisites *
Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis
Foundations of Instructional Technology
ID&T Core Courses21
Principals and Practice of Human Performance Technology
Computer-Based Multi-Media Design
Cognition and Instructional Design
Advanced Instructional Design Techniques
Instructional Design and Technology Seminar
Trends and Issues in Instructional Design and Technology
Instructional Systems Design
Research Core15
Research Design and Analysis
Qualitative Research Design in Education
Analysis of Variance Applied to Educational Research
Human Performance Assessment
Research Residency in Instructional Design and Technology
Instructional Design Concentration 9
Choose courses from the following:
Design & Theory
Task Analysis Methods
Foundations of Distance Education
Instructional Technology Product Evaluation
Applied Instructional Design
Instructional Design Theory (IDT 863)
Theories and Research
Research Residency II
Technology
Management of Technology Resources in the Classroom
Diffusion and Adoption of Instructional Technology Innovations
Theory and Design of Instructional Simulation
Instructional Gaming: Theories and Practice
Designing Online Instruction
Connecting Research In Early Developmental Practice in Early Childhood Education
Human Performance Technology
Knowledge Management
Consulting Skills for Instructional Designers
Needs Analysis and Assessment
Electives **
Capstone Courses
Dissertation Seminar ***
Dissertation in Occupational Education
Total Hours45
*

All students admitted into the Ph.D. program in instructional design and technology must complete the prerequisite courses unless they have previously completed equivalent graduate level coursework or have appropriate educational experience.


**

Electives are chosen from the list above, or from related areas, e.g., modeling & simulation, psychology, engineering, speech-communications, business, IO psychology.

***

 If seminar is waived by the doctoral committee, the credits are added to the content.

Additional courses or substitutions may be used as approved by student’s advisory committee.

Education and Training Emphasis in Modeling & Simulation Certificate

Ginger Watson, Program Coordinator

The College of Education offers a certificate in Modeling &Simulation through the Instructional Design and Technology program, a graduate-level program that is part of the STEM Education and Professional Studies Department.

Simulation and gaming are used extensively as teaching tools and training environments in a variety of education and training applications. The certificate provides the student with a fundamental understanding of modeling and simulation techniques coupled with targeted coursework in the design and use of simulation and gaming technologies for instructional settings. This certificate was the first of its kind in the U.S. and is a natural concentration area in instructional design and technology given the widespread use of simulation and gaming as instructional tools in Pre-K-12 education, colleges, universities, and corporate and military training programs. This certificate is one of several such certificate programs offered as part of the M&S strategic plan of Virginia Modeling, Analysis and Simulation Center (VMASC) and ODU.

The Modeling and Simulation Certificate Program consists of a minimum of four, three credit graduate courses.  Courses include:

Core Courses3
Introduction to Modeling and Simulation
Related Elective Courses9
Theory and Design of Instructional Simulation
Instructional Gaming: Theories and Practice
Trends and Issues in Training: Modeling and Simulation
Total Hours12

For more information about the Master of Science in Engineering modeling and simulation concentration, refer to the Catalog section for the Batten College of Engineering and Technology.

Master of Science in Education - Elementary -  with Mathematics Education Specialist Endorsement (PK-8)

Mary Enderson, Program Coordinator
 

This graduate program leads to a Master’s of Science in Education degree. Elementary major,  with the Mathematics Specialist (PK-8) endorsement. This program is offered in partnership with the Department of Mathematics and Statistics in the College of Sciences.

Admission

Candidates must:
 
  • Have 3 years of successful classroom experience in teaching mathematics;
  • Hold a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college/university;
  • Hold the Virginia Collegiate Professional License or an equivalent license from another state.
  • Have an undergraduate grade point average of 2.80 and an average of 3.00 in the major;
  • Achieve a satisfactory score (as established by the Department of Educational Curriculum and Instruction) on the Graduate Record Examination or the Miller Analogies Test; and
  • Submit an application for graduate studies.
Performance in classes taken as a non-degree student will not be taken into consideration in the admission process. Under certain circumstances, applicants who do not fully meet the requirements for regular admission to the program may be admitted on a provisional basis subject to conditions specified by the graduate director for the program.

Continuance

Candidates must maintain a grade point average of 3.00.

Exit

Candidates must:
 
  • Have a 3.00 grade point average;
  • Have completed all course requirements;
  • Have completed a professional learning portfolio; and
  • Submit an application for graduation.

Curriculum

A minimum of 33 semester credits are required. The courses for completion of the degree program are listed below:

Education Content15
Differentiation of Mathematics Instruction for Diverse Student Populations
Action Research for Mathematics Specialists
Mathematics Specialists as Teacher Leaders
Mathematical Assessment for Data Driven Decisions
Internship for Mathematics Specialist
Mathematics Content15
Number and Operations for PK-8 Mathematics Specialists
Geometry and Measurement for PK-8 Mathematics Specialists
Rational Numbers and Proportional Reasoning for PK-8 Mathematics Specialists
Probability and Statistics for PK-8 Mathematics Specialists
Algebra and Functions for PK-8 Mathematics Specialists
Electives3
Developing Instructional Strategies PreK-6: Mathematics
Developing Instructional Strategies for Teaching in the Middle/High School: Mathematics
Other courses may be taken with permission from the Graduate Program Director.
Total Hours33

Master of Science in Education with Initial Licensure 6-12 - Mathematics

There are a number of individuals who have earned B.S. or B.A. degrees who now want to obtain a master’s degree leading to licensure as a secondary school teacher. In the program, students complete (or have completed) a minimum of 32 credits of undergraduate courses in one endorsement area (mathematics) and an additional 31-34 credits of education courses at the graduate level.

Students seeking this degree need to apply through the Department of Teaching and Learning.

Master of Science in Education with Initial Licensure 6-12 - Science

There are a number of individuals who have earned B.S. or B.A. degrees who now want to obtain a master’s degree leading to licensure as a secondary school teacher. In the program, students complete (or have completed) a minimum of 32 credits of undergraduate courses in one endorsement area (earth science, chemistry, biology, or physics) and an additional 31-34 credits of education courses at the graduate level.

Students seeking this degree need to apply through the Department of Teaching and Learning.

Mathematics Education Specialist Endorsement (PK-8)

Mary Enderson, Program Coordinator
 
This endorsement program leads to a Mathematics Specialist (PK-8) endorsement for individuals with a current Virginia license and a master's degree related to teaching elementary or middle school mathematics.This program is offered in partnership with the Department of Mathematics and Statistics in the College of Sciences.

Admission

Candidates must:
 
  • Have 3 years of successful classroom experience in teaching mathematics;
  • Hold a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college/university;
  • Hold the Virginia Collegiate Professional License or an equivalent license from another state.
  • Have an undergraduate grade point average of 2.80 and an average of 3.00 in the major;
  • Achieve a satisfactory score (as established by the Department of Teaching and Learning) on the Graduate Record Examination or the Miller Analogies Test; and
  • Submit an application for graduate studies.
Performance in classes taken as a non-degree student will not be taken into consideration in the admission process. Under certain circumstances, applicants who do not fully meet the requirements for regular admission to the program may be admitted on a provisional basis subject to conditions specified by the graduate director for the program.

Continuance

Candidates must maintain a grade point average of 3.00.

Exit

Candidates must:
 
  • Have a 3.00 grade point average;
  • Have completed all course requirements;
  • Have completed a professional learning portfolio; and
  • Submit an application for graduation.

Curriculum

A minimum of 21 semester credits are required. The courses for completion of the endorsement program are:

MAPD 601Number and Operations for PK-8 Mathematics Specialists3
MAPD 602Geometry and Measurement for PK-8 Mathematics Specialists3
MAPD 603Rational Numbers and Proportional Reasoning for PK-8 Mathematics Specialists3
MAPD 604Probability and Statistics for PK-8 Mathematics Specialists3
MAPD 605Algebra and Functions for PK-8 Mathematics Specialists3
STEM 661Mathematics Specialists as Teacher Leaders3
STEM 668Internship for Mathematics Specialist3
Total Hours21

Master of Science-Occupational and Technical Studies

Cynthia Tomovic, Graduate Program Director

This is an advanced master’s degree and requires prior academic work associated with this area of study. The M.S. occupational and technical studies program has four concentrations - career and technical education, business and industry training, community college teaching, and STEM education. These studies are designed to help teachers and trainers upgrade their knowledge and skills and prepare for leadership roles in education and training. These programs are all delivered at the Norfolk campus and through the University’s distance learning system.

Admission

Students are admitted to the program on a continuing basis. Applications can be obtained from the Admissions Office, distance learning sites, the department and online. Students are admitted for fall, spring, and summer on a rolling basis. Graduate students can complete up to 12 graduate hours with a non-degree application. All applicants to the Master of Science degree in occupational and technical studies must meet University, college, and department requirements. In addition, all applicants must:

  1. hold an undergraduate degree in a related field or have work experience in an occupational/technical area,
  2. have an overall grade point average of 2.80 with a 3.00 in major courses,
  3. complete the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) with a score in the 45th percentile (verbal and quantitative sections combined) or the Miller Analogy Test with a 45th percentile in the intended major, and
  4. submit two letters of recommendation.

Continuance

Students must:

  1. complete the Graduate Writing Proficiency Examination administered by the department prior to completing nine credit hours, and
  2. maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.00.

Exit

Students in the career and technical education, business and industry training, and STEM education concentrations must complete of 33 semester hours and students in the community college teaching concentration must complete 39 semester hours, as distributed in the M.S. curriculum. In addition, all students must:

  1. achieve an overall grade point average of 3.00;
  2. complete all competencies listed on course syllabi;
  3. pass the written comprehensive examination; and
  4. successfully complete a problems paper or thesis.

Curriculum (33-42)

Common Core9
Curriculum Development in Occupational Education and Training
Instructional Strategies for Innovation in Training and Occupational Education
Instructional Technology in Education and Training
Concentration Specific Courses6
Select one specialization from the following:
Career and Technical Education Teaching
Trends and Issues in Occupational Education
Administration and Management of Education and Training Programs
Business and Industry Training
Foundations of Adult Education and Training
Administration and Management of Education and Training Programs
Community College Teaching
Trends and Issues in Occupational Education
Foundations of Adult Education and Training
STEM Education
STEM Educational Foundations
Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Connection and Integration
Research Core6-9
Research Methods in Occupational and Technical Studies
Problems in Occupational and Technical Studies
Thesis in Occupational Education
Professional Technical Specialty12-18
Career and Technical Education (12 credits) *
Business and Industry Training (12 credits) *
Community College Teaching (18 credits) **
STEM Education (12 credits)
Total Hours33-42

Footnotes

*

Credits approved by advisor.

**

Credits in teaching specialty.

Doctor of Philosophy in Education – Occupational and Technical Studies Concentration

Cynthia Tomovic, Graduate Program Director

The Ph.D. in Education, occupational and technical studies concentration has three emphases: technology education, career and technical education, and human resources - training. The Ph.D. is delivered on campus and through the University’s distance learning system. All students must be on the Norfolk campus for two, two-week summer sessions. The focus of the degree is to prepare university faculty, directors/supervisors of career and technical education, and directors of training departments in business, industry, and government.

The curriculum associated with Old Dominion University’s Ph.D. in Education, occupational and technical studies concentration is intended to accomplish the following learning outcomes:

  • Every individual who completes this doctoral program, regardless of his/her concentration emphasis, will develop competencies for understanding and using research methods and statistics to make data-based decisions.
  • The concentration emphasis will offer courses that enable graduates to know and apply their knowledge in today’s complex educational, business, or industry environments and emerge as leaders in their chosen careers.

Note for students in Washington State from the Student Achievement Council (SAC) concerning the Doctor of Philosophy in Education - Occupational and Technical Studies concentration:  This program is not intended to lead to teacher certification.  Teachers are advised to contact their individual school districts as to whether this program may qualify for teacher advancement.

Admission

Students may enroll in this program full- or part-time. The program faculty reviews all applicants as their application packages are completed. The following weighted criteria are used for admittance:

  1. graduate grade point average (15%);
  2. undergraduate grade point average (15%);
  3. Graduate Record Examination (30%) – minimum combined verbal and quantitative score at 50th percentile or higher;
  4. essay, 1500 word, (10%); and
  5. goodness of fit with program goals and supporting references (30%).

Graduate assistantships and fellowships may be available. Contact the graduate program director for information.

Entrance

All applicants to the Doctor of Philosophy degree, occupational and technical studies concentration must meet University, college and department requirements. In addition, all applicants must:

  1. hold a master’s degree related to this field or have worked in occupations related to the degree’s outcomes;
  2. complete the graduate application with necessary fee;
  3. submit an essay statement of academic and professional goals with an emphasis on how the Ph.D. in Education concentration in occupational and technical studies will contribute to the achievement of career goals (meets departmental Graduate Writing Proficiency Examination Continuance requirement);
  4. submit three letters of reference from sources capable of commenting on readiness for advanced graduate study;
  5. submit a resume that shows your educational and professional background;
  6. submit academic transcripts from all undergraduate and graduate institutions previously attended or currently being attended with a minimum 3.00 graduate grade point average;
  7. submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination that have been earned within the past five years with a score at or above the 50th percentile on the verbal and quantitative components; and
  8. if the applicant’s primary language is not English, submit a current score for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) that meets the University’s current standard.

Applications for admission are on a rolling basis. Graduate assistantships are awarded in February annually.

Continuance

Students must:

  1. have their Ph.D. program approved;
  2. successfully complete annual progress reviews;
  3. meet faculty and University program expectations;
  4. complete the departmental Graduate Writing Proficiency Examination; and
  5. meet professional development and career preparation expectations.

Exit

Students must:

  1. complete a minimum of 60 credit hours beyond the master’s degree;
  2. complete all competencies listed on course syllabi;
  3. achieve an overall grade point average of 3.00;
  4. pass the written comprehensive examination;
  5. select a dissertation committee;
  6. prepare and defend a dissertation prospectus;
  7. successfully complete a dissertation with an oral defense; and
  8. complete the graduate student University assessment.

Prerequisites

A master’s degree in an appropriate field related to this concentration is required for admission to the Ph.D. program. Students who do not have equivalent coursework or appropriate educational experiences must complete the following prerequisite courses:

FOUN 612Applied Research Methods in Education3
FOUN 722Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis3
SEPS 785Curriculum Development in Occupational Education and Training3
SEPS 788Instructional Strategies for Innovation in Training and Occupational Education3
SEPS 789Instructional Technology in Education and Training3
Total Hours15

Curriculum (60 credits minimum)

Students in the occupational and technical studies concentration complete core courses in research, the occupational and technical studies concentration, and an emphasis in either career and technical education, human resources development, or technology education along with 6 credit hours of electives.

Research Core12
Research Design and Analysis
Program Evaluation in Education
Qualitative Research Design in Education
Applied Linear Models in Educational Research
Analysis of Variance Applied to Educational Research
Concentration18
Must be taken with one emphasis area-Technology Education, Career and Technical Education, or Human Resources-Training
Trends and Issues in Occupational Education
Administration and Management of Education and Training Programs
Trends and Issues of Economic and Workforce Development
Curriculum Development in Occupational Education and Training
Instructional Strategies for Innovation in Training and Occupational Education
Instructional Technology in Education and Training
Technology Education Emphasis12
Readings in Occupational and Technical Studies
Introduction to Technology
Technical Systems
Program Development for Technology Education
Career and Technical Education Emphasis12
Instructional Supervision, Staff Development, and Assessment
Readings in Occupational and Technical Studies
Internship
Career and Technical Education Curriculum
Human Resources - Training Emphasis12
Foundations of Distance Education
Readings in Occupational and Technical Studies
Trends and Issues in Training: Modeling and Simulation
Foundations of Adult Education and Training
Electives6
Electives are selected in consultation with the advisor. They should be planned and included in the student's program of study.
Capstone Courses12 -15
Dissertation Seminar
Dissertation in Occupational Education
Total Hours84-87

Endorsement Program in Industrial Cooperative Training

Philip Reed, Program Coordinator

The endorsement program in industrial cooperative training is designed to prepare a licensed teacher to be endorsed to teach industrial cooperative training in the public schools.

Admission

Students may enroll in this teaching endorsement program as a non-degree student. If an M.S. degree is sought, some graduate level courses may be applied toward professional technical studies in this component of the degree. Admission should be sought into the M.S. program in occupational and technical studies with a concentration in career and technical education teaching. Graduate students can complete up to 12 graduate hours with a non-degree application. Students should contact the program coordinator to discuss admissions options. Prior to entering this program, students must have or qualify for a Virginia Collegiate Professional or Postgraduate Professional License. Secondly, they must be interviewed and accepted by the program coordinator.

Continuance and Exit

Students must:

  1. complete the following courses:
    STEM 305Curriculum for Technology Education3
    or SEPS 400/500 Instructional Systems Development
    SEPS 401/501Foundations of Career and Technical Education3
    STEM 306Methods for Technology Education3
    SEPS 503Methods in Career and Technical Education3
    or SEPS 788 Instructional Strategies for Innovation in Training and Occupational Education
    SEPS 408/508Advanced Classroom Issues and Practices in Career and Technical Education3
    SEPS 450/550Assessment, Evaluation and Improvement3
    Total Hours18
  2. earn a 2.75 cumulative grade point average if licensure is at the undergraduate level and a 3.00 cumulative grade point average if licensure is at the graduate level; and
  3. document at least 4000 clock hours of acceptable employment in a trade, technical, or industrial education subject area completed within the past five years.

Twelve hours of 500/600 level courses may be applied toward the Master of Science in occupational and technical studies, career and technical education teaching concentration.

Marketing Teacher Education with Licensure

Michael F. Kosloski, Program Coordinator

The licensure program in marketing teacher education is designed to prepare a person who has a baccalaureate degree to be a marketing education teacher-coordinator. Participants who successfully complete this program will qualify to apply for a Virginia teaching license to teach marketing education.

Admission

Students can complete this licensure program through an undergraduate degree program, second undergraduate degree, graduate non-degree seeking level, or through the M.S. program. Students should meet with the program coordinator to discuss these options. Graduate students can complete up to 12 graduate hours with a non-degree application. Prior to entering this program students must hold a baccalaureate degree. Students must also have completed a rigorous general education program as outlined by the Commonwealth in its Licensure Regulations for Teachers. They must be interviewed and accepted by the program coordinator. Finally, students must successfully complete the required tests for seeking a Virginia teaching license (see advisor or Teacher Education Services).  Students must be admitted into the approved marketing education teacher preparation program prior to enrolling in practicum education courses.

Continuation and Exit

Students must:

  1. complete the following courses:
    SEPS 297Observation and Participation1
    SEPS 400/500Instructional Systems Development3
    SEPS 401/501Foundations of Career and Technical Education3
    SEPS 408/508Advanced Classroom Issues and Practices in Career and Technical Education3
    SEPS 450/550Assessment, Evaluation and Improvement3
    SEPS 485Student Teaching12
    SPED 313Fundamentals of Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence3
    TLED 408Reading and Writing in Content Areas3
    or READ 680 Reading to Learn Across the Curriculum
    Total Hours31
  2. earn a 2.75 cumulative grade point average if licensure is at the undergraduate level and a 3.00 cumulative grade point average if licensure is at the graduate level;
  3. document at least 4000 clock hours of marketing-related work experience completed within the past five years or complete a directed field experience (SEPS 405);
  4. earn credit in marketing related courses to include the marketing process, economics, merchandising, advertising, personal selling, marketing math, communication, ethics, training, international marketing, and marketing technology;
  5. complete a university graduate student assessment if enrolled in the M.S. degree program.

Twelve hours of 500/600 level courses may be applied toward the Master of Science in occupational and technical studies, career and technical education teaching concentration.

M.S. Degree in Technology Education with Licensure

Philip Reed, Program Coordinator

The M.S. degree in in technology education with licensure is designed to prepare a person who has a baccalaureate degree and industrial/military related technical experience to be a technology education teacher. Participants who successfully complete this program will receive a Master of Science degree and qualify to apply for a Virginia teaching license to teach technology education.

Admission Information

To earn the M.S. with licensure to teach technology education, candidates have to be accepted into the M.S. concentration in career and technical education teaching. Graduate students can complete up to 12 graduate hours with a non-degree application. Student must meet with the program coordinator to have military and other technical content courses reviewed to determine their applicability toward licensure requirements. Prior to entering this program students must hold a baccalaureate degree with a major related to technology/engineering or have completed military schools equating to a minimum of 18 credits in industrial technology areas as evaluated by the American Council on Education (ACE Guide). Students must also have completed a rigorous general education program as outlined by the Commonwealth in its Licensure Regulations for Teachers. They must be interviewed and accepted by the program coordinator. Finally students must successfully complete the required tests for seeking a Virginia teaching license (see advisor or Teacher Education Services).  Students must be admitted into the approved technology education teacher preparation program prior to enrolling in any practicum education courses.

Continuance and Exit

Students must:

  1. complete the following courses:
    FOUN 612Applied Research Methods in Education3
    READ 680Reading to Learn Across the Curriculum3
    SEPS 508Advanced Classroom Issues and Practices in Career and Technical Education3
    SEPS 586Middle School Student Teaching for Technical Education6
    SEPS 596Topics in Career and Technical Education1-3
    SEPS 636Problems in Occupational and Technical Studies3
    SEPS 788Instructional Strategies for Innovation in Training and Occupational Education3
    SEPS 789Instructional Technology in Education and Training3
    SPED 313Fundamentals of Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence3
    STEM 231Materials and Processes Technology3
    STEM 320Manufacturing and Construction Technology3
    STEM 350Communication Technology Processes3
    STEM 351Communication Technology3
    STEM 730Introduction to Technology3
    TLED 608Foundations of Education and Instructional Assessment3
    TLED 616Design for Effective Instruction3
    Total Hours49-51
  2. earn a 2.75 cumulative grade point average on undergraduate level courses and a 3.00 cumulative grade point average at the graduate level,
  3. earn passing scores on Virginia LicensureTest before the teacher internship (see advisor or Teacher Education Services); and
  4. complete the graduate student University assessment.

Completing this licensure program and other departmental requirements will allow the candidate to earn the Master of Science in occupational and technical studies, career and technical education teaching concentration.

Education Specialist-Occupational and Technical Studies

Cynthia Tomovic, Graduate Program Director

The Department of STEM Education and Professional Studies jointly offers the education specialist (Ed.S.) with the Department of Educational Foundations and Leadership. The program offers a cohesive sequence of academic studies designed to help graduates deal effectively with administrative problems encountered in urban schools and agencies. Principalship can be planned into the educational specialist degree.

Admission

To be admitted to the Ed.S. program, an applicant must:

  1. Hold a master’s degree in career and technical education or related field;
  2. Have a successful experience as an administrator or teacher;
  3. Hold a teaching license or equivalent; and
  4. Have taken ELS 600 or its equivalent as a prerequisite.

Students seeking this degree need to apply through the Ed.S. program in the Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling.

Entrance

Students must:

  1. meet all University requirements,
  2. provide two letters of recommendation;
  3. hold a master’s degree from an accredited institution (minimum 3.25 graduate grade point average),
  4. provide a one-page essay explaining why he/she should be admitted to the program; and
  5. have an acceptable score on the GRE or Miller Analogies Test.

Continuance

Students must meet all University requirements and maintain a 3.00 or higher grade point average.

Exit

Students must successfully complete:

  1. a written comprehensive examination,
  2. the required course of study,
  3. have a 3.00 grade point average or above, and
  4. complete a university graduate student assessment.

Curriculum (33 credits)

Requirements for the Ed.S. with a specialty in occupational and technical studies include 30-33 semester hours (18 hours must be completed in 800-level courses in ELS), as follows:

Prerequisites *3-12
School Community Relations and Politics
Curriculum Development and Assessment
Public School Law
Educational Leadership 18
Educational Finance and Budgeting
Human Resource Development and Evaluation
Educational Systems Planning and Futures
Leadership for Social Justice
Leadership for Teaching and Learning
Field Research in School Administration and Supervision
Occupational and Technical Studies15
Trends and Issues in Occupational Education
Administration and Management of Education and Training Programs
Curriculum Development in Occupational Education and Training
Instructional Strategies for Innovation in Training and Occupational Education
Instructional Technology in Education and Training **
Total Hours36-45
*

ELS 610, ELS 621, and ELS 657 are prerequisites for the principalship endorsement.

**

 and/or other courses approved by the candidate's advisor

INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY Courses

IDT 575. Web Development for Educators. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Provides both a conceptual framework and hands-on experience in the design and development of online web resources for educators. The course introduces the student to the various uses and features of online tools and technologies, investigates online learning strategies, and explores best practices in the use of the web to enhance learning. Topics include fundamentals of web authoring: screen design, use of web page creation tools, and functional use of HTML and derivatives.

IDT 617. Foundations of Instructional Technology. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Required introductory overview to the field of instructional technology. Topics include a history of the field, basic instructional design, generally accepted theoretical practices and major formats of instructional media. Emphasis is given to instructional technology trends as applied to various industries, including K-12, military, industry training, and others.

IDT 715. Management of Technology Resources in the Classroom. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. Surveys computing technology with a focus on management in educational contexts. Implementation, integration and resourcing will be covered.

IDT 725. Human Performance Assessment. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FOUN 722 or equivalent. This course focuses on the theory, design, and evaluation of measurement instruments used to assess individual knowledge, performance, and attitudes. Topics include fundamentals of measurement, reliability, validity, and instrument selection, construction, and use. Students will develop and evaluate instruments for instructional and research purposes.

IDT 730. Principals and Practice of Human Performance Technology. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours. 3 credits. This course explores both the principles and practices of human performance technology, with roughly equal emphasis on both. Students will learn what HPT is, how it's applied in practice, and how and why instructional designers need to know about it. Particular emphasis is given to determining whether or not problems are best amenable to instructional solutions.

IDT 735. Knowledge Management. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 Credits. This seminar focuses on what knowledge management is and how and why knowledge management is relevant for instructional designers. Emphasis is placed on theoretical approaches to knowledge management, though we will touch upon the design of knowledge management systems.

IDT 737. Consulting Skills for Instructional Designers. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. This project-based course is designed to develop and enhance the ability of instructional designers to work as partners and consultants to clients and superiors. The focus is on consulting skills per se, and not any particular content. All students will be required to do an individual consulting project, supervised by the instructor.

IDT 739. Needs Analysis and Assessment. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. This project-based class will focus on the process of doing a needs analysis and assessment, from start to finish. Although theoretical considerations regarding needs analyses will be explored, the emphasis is on actually conducting the analysis. Students will work in teams under the supervision of the instructor to conduct a needs analysis for an external client.

IDT 742. Task Analysis Methods. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. This project-based course examines several different task analysis methodologies. Major methodologies common in the field will be explored as a class, and students will also be required to familiarize themselves with other methodologies of their choice. Emphasis will be on practical application of the methodologies, especially as regards instructional products or systems.

IDT 746. Foundations of Distance Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An analysis of the trends, issues, and theories of distance education in education, business, and military applications. Students will examine various distance education systems, policies and lessons from different perspectives.

IDT 748. Instructional Technology Product Evaluation. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: IDT 749/849. Provides an overview to the science of evaluation, both as a general field and as applied to instruction. Topics will include evaluating the effectiveness of learning technologies; building survey instruments; online and computer-assisted testing; reporting practices; as well as formative, summative program and performance evaluation and assessment. The unique demands of evaluating mediated education and learning environments will be considered.

IDT 749. Instructional Systems Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Students will gain hands-on experience applying a theoretical understanding of instructional design and development to actual projects. Students will learn and use the Instructional Systems Design Process from initial learner profile analysis to design and development through to evaluation. Students will work individually and in teams to gain experience similar to real-world instructional design situations. Students will master the fundamental practices upon which the instructional design process is based.

IDT 751. Computer-Based Multi-Media Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: IDT 749/849. This course covers the theory, design, and evaluation of computer-based multimedia instruction. Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding of instructional theory and design strategies for computer-based drills, tutorials, hypermedia, simulations, games, tools, open-ended learning environments, tests, and web-based instruction. Class projects will center on the design and development of instruction utilizing at least two of these methodologies.

IDT 752. Diffusion and Adoption of Instructional Technology Innovations. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course will explore theories, research, and strategies related to the diffusion and adoption of instructional technology innovations in education and training. The course will explore why and how individuals, groups, and organizations adopt or fail to adopt an innovation or change.

IDT 755. Theory and Design of Instructional Simulation. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course focuses on learning theory, design and evaluation of instructional simulations and simulators. Topics include history, instructional design, validation, and integration of instructional simulations.

IDT 756. Instructional Gaming: Theories and Practice. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Provides both a conceptual framework and experience in the design and development of instructional games. The course introduces the student to the history, research, theory, and practice of instructional games. Topics include discussions of relevant learning theories associated with instructional gaming, analysis and design of games and current research in instructional gaming.

IDT 760. Cognition and Instructional Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Students will be introduced to the theoretical frameworks that form the basis of instructional systems theory and design. Focus will be on learning theories, instructional psychology, and instructional system theory. Recent developments in cognition, learning and instruction for educators will also be considered. Topics include perspectives of behaviorism, social-historical constructivism, cognitive science, situated cognition, and cultural influences on cognition.

IDT 761. Applied Instructional Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: IDT 749/849. Problem-based course in which students gain experience applying knowledge from IDT 749/849 to real-world instructional and instructional technology problems. Project work is individual, paired, and in teams. Students demonstrate mastery of the instructional design and development process through production of tools, technologies, media or materials that successfully resolve an instructional problem. Focus is on rapid prototyping model.

IDT 763. Instructional Design Theory. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Students will investigate traditional and contemporary instructional design theories and models. Behavioral, cognitive, generative, problem-based learning, and constructivist theories as well as cognitive hierarchies will be examined, compared, contrasted and applied to various instructional situations.

IDT 764. Theories and Research. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. This course is a study of the application of perceptual and learning principles to the design of instructional media for use in educational and training applications. The focus is on the development and application of heuristics from the research literature. We will examine verbal and iconic signs as well as visual imagery, and their role in the instructional and learning processes.

IDT 773. Advanced Instructional Design Techniques. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Corequisite: IDT 749/849. Exploration and application of techniques, tools and competencies characteristic of expert designers. Topics may include: instructional strategies, use of design software, program design, advanced analysis techniques, motivation design, rapid prototyping, reducing design cycle time, and designing instruction for diverse learner populations.

IDT 775. Designing Online Instruction. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. An applied survey of online instruction, including relevant theory and design considerations. Topics include efficacy of online learning, design considerations when using course management systems and similar online learning technologies, research and future directions.

IDT 795. Topics in Instructional Design and Technology. 3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Provides opportunities for master’s and doctoral students to explore topics related to instructional design.

IDT 801. Instructional Design and Technology Seminar. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Introduces new Ph.D. students to the field of instructional design and technology and provides orientation to doctoral level study. The course includes reading, critiquing and analyzing empirical research, theories, and real-world instructional problems. Potential student research agendas consistent with faculty or programmatic research foci will be explored. Academic and technological expectations will be communicated and practiced.

IDT 810. Trends and Issues in Instructional Design and Technology. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: 9 hours IDT coursework. Exploration and discussion of trends and issues of current and historical significance to instructional design. Readings will include contributions of key scholars, past and present, in instructional design and related fields. Includes analysis of trends and issues to track and predict their impact on the future of the field.

IDT 815. Management of Technology Resources in the Classroom. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. Surveys computing technology with a focus on management in educational contexts. Implementation, integration and resourcing will be covered.

IDT 825. Human Performance Assessment. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FOUN 722 or equivalent. This course focuses on the theory, design, and evaluation of measurement instruments used to assess individual knowledge, performance, and attitudes. Topics include fundamentals of measurement, reliability, validity, and instrument selection, construction, and use. Students will develop and evaluate instruments for instructional and research purposes.

IDT 830. Principals and Practice of Human Performance Technology. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours. 3 credits. This course explores both the principles and practices of human performance technology, with roughly equal emphasis on both. Students will learn what HPT is, how it's applied in practice, and how and why instructional designers need to know about it. Particular emphasis is given to determining whether or not problems are best amenable to instructional solutions.

IDT 835. Knowledge Management. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 Credits. This seminar focuses on what knowledge management is and how and why knowledge management is relevant for instructional designers. Emphasis is placed on theoretical approaches to knowledge management, though we will touch upon the design of knowledge management systems.

IDT 837. Consulting Skills for Instructional Designers. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. This project-based course is designed to develop and enhance the ability of instructional designers to work as partners and consultants to clients and superiors. The focus is on consulting skills per se, and not any particular content. All students will be required to do an individual consulting project, supervised by the instructor.

IDT 839. Needs Analysis and Assessment. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. This project-based class will focus on the process of doing a needs analysis and assessment, from start to finish. Although theoretical considerations regarding needs analyses will be explored, the emphasis is on actually conducting the analysis. Students will work in teams under the supervision of the instructor to conduct a needs analysis for an external client.

IDT 842. Task Analysis Methods. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. This project-based course examines several different task analysis methodologies. Major methodologies common in the field will be explored as a class, and students will also be required to familiarize themselves with other methodologies of their choice. Emphasis will be on practical application of the methodologies, especially as regards instructional products or systems.

IDT 846. Foundations of Distance Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An analysis of the trends, issues, and theories of distance education in education, business, and military applications. Students will examine various distance education systems, policies and lessons from different perspectives.

IDT 848. Instructional Technology Product Evaluation. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: IDT 749/849. Provides an overview to the science of evaluation, both as a general field and as applied to instruction. Topics will include evaluating the effectiveness of learning technologies; building survey instruments; online and computer-assisted testing; reporting practices; as well as formative, summative program and performance evaluation and assessment. The unique demands of evaluating mediated education and learning environments will be considered.

IDT 849. Instructional Systems Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Students will gain hands-on experience applying a theoretical understanding of instructional design and development to actual projects. Students will learn and use the Instructional Systems Design Process from initial learner profile analysis to design and development through to evaluation. Students will work individually and in teams to gain experience similar to real-world instructional design situations. Students will master the fundamental practices upon which the instructional design process is based.

IDT 851. Computer-Based Multi-Media Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: IDT 749/849. This course covers the theory, design, and evaluation of computer-based multimedia instruction. Students will demonstrate a thorough understanding of instructional theory and design strategies for computer-based drills, tutorials, hypermedia, simulations, games, tools, open-ended learning environments, tests, and web-based instruction. Class projects will center on the design and development of instruction utilizing at least two of these methodologies.

IDT 852. Diffusion and Adoption of Instructional Technology Innovations. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course will explore theories, research, and strategies related to the diffusion and adoption of instructional technology innovations in education and training. The course will explore why and how individuals, groups, and organizations adopt or fail to adopt an innovation or change.

IDT 855. Theory and Design of Instructional Simulation. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course focuses on learning theory, design and evaluation of instructional simulations and simulators. Topics include history, instructional design, validation, and integration of instructional simulations.

IDT 856. Instructional Gaming: Theories and Practice. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Provides both a conceptual framework and experience in the design and development of instructional games. The course introduces the student to the history, research, theory, and practice of instructional games. Topics include discussions of relevant learning theories associated with instructional gaming, analysis and design of games and current research in instructional gaming.

IDT 860. Cognition and Instructional Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Students will be introduced to the theoretical frameworks that form the basis of instructional systems theory and design. Focus will be on learning theories, instructional psychology, and instructional system theory. Recent developments in cognition, learning and instruction for educators will also be considered. Topics include perspectives of behaviorism, social-historical constructivism, cognitive science, situated cognition, and cultural influences on cognition.

IDT 861. Applied Instructional Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: IDT 749/849. Problem-based course in which students gain experience applying knowledge from IDT 749/849 to real-world instructional and instructional technology problems. Project work is individual, paired, and in teams. Students demonstrate mastery of the instructional design and development process through production of tools, technologies, media or materials that successfully resolve an instructional problem. Focus is on rapid prototyping model.

IDT 863. Instructional Design Theory. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Students will investigate traditional and contemporary instructional design theories and models. Behavioral, cognitive, generative, problem-based learning, and constructivist theories as well as cognitive hierarchies will be examined, compared, contrasted and applied to various instructional situations.

IDT 864. Theories and Research. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. This course is a study of the application of perceptual and learning principles to the design of instructional media for use in educational and training applications. The focus is on the development and application of heuristics from the research literature. We will examine verbal and iconic signs as well as visual imagery, and their role in the instructional and learning processes.

IDT 873. Advanced Instructional Design Techniques. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Corequisite: IDT 749/849. Exploration and application of techniques, tools and competencies characteristic of expert designers. Topics may include: instructional strategies, use of design software, program design, advanced analysis techniques, motivation design, rapid prototyping, reducing design cycle time, and designing instruction for diverse learner populations.

IDT 875. Designing Online Instruction. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. An applied survey of online instruction, including relevant theory and design considerations. Topics include efficacy of online learning, design considerations when using course management systems and similar online learning technologies, research and future directions.

IDT 879. Research Residency in Instructional Design and Technology. 3 Credits.

An introduction to conducting instructional technology research. Students will work in consultation with their advisor to develop a proposal for a study related to instructional technology as part of their research residency that will be submitted for presentation at a nationally refereed conference or to a refereed journal.

IDT 895. Topics in Instructional Design and Technology. 3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Provides opportunities for master’s and doctoral students to explore topics related to instructional design.

IDT 898. Research Residency II. 1-3 Credits.

A mentored research project by the student's advisor. Students work independently with their advisor to complete the research residency project. This course focuses on obtaining appropriate human subjects approval, collecting and analyzing data, and preparing a manuscript suitable for presentation or publication in nationally refereed journal or conference. Course may be repeated as needed, but only 3 hours may be counted toward degree requirements. Prerequisites: IDT 879.