2007 Student Recreation Center
757 683-4995
757 683-4270

Lynn L. Ridinger, Ph.D. - Chair

The Department of Human Movement Sciences offers programs leading to a Master of Science in Education degree with a major in Physical Education and concentrations in Curriculum & Instruction, Coaching Education, Initial Virginia Licensure in Health & Physical Education, Exercise Science & Wellness, and Sport Management.  We also offer a Doctor of Philosophy in Education - Human Movement Sciences concentration with emphasis areas in Applied Kinesiology and Sport & Recreation Management.

Due to changing University requirements, national accreditation standards, and Commonwealth licensure regulations, the programs in the Darden College of Education are under constant revision. Any changes resulting from these factors supersede the program requirements described in the catalog. Students should obtain current program information from their advisors and the Darden College of Education website at http://www.odu.edu/education.

Graduate Certificate in Adaptive Physical Education

The Graduate Certificate in adapted physical education is designed for individuals who are practicing or planning to teach in school-based physical education settings. This certificate aims to meet the professional advancement needs of at least three populations:

•  Existing student populations at ODU interested in acquiring requisite knowledge and skills to effectively teach children with disabilities in physical education. These are expected to include graduate students in each concentration area (i.e., coaching, curriculum & instruction, initial licensure, adapted physical education) of physical education, as well as others in different education-related areas. Graduate degree seeking students will be able to obtain the Certificate and degree simultaneously using the available four elective courses in their degree program.

•  Currently practicing physical education teachers looking to further enhance their knowledge and skills in teaching students with disabilities in their classes.

•  Non-degree seeking students seeking to enhance their employability in the physical education/ adapted physical education job acquisition search.

Admission

Degree seeking graduate-level students admitted to the certificate program must meet ODU requirements for graduate admission: an earned baccalaureate degree from a regionally-accredited institution or an equivalent degree from a foreign institution. Those whose native language is not English must submit a minimum score of 230 on the computer-based TOEFL or 80 on the TOEFL iBT.

Individuals not seeking graduate-level degrees admitted to the certificate program must have a completed baccalaureate degree (or equivalent).

Curriculum Requirements

The certificate requires four (4) three-hour courses for a total of twelve (12) credits. This includes three core courses and one elective course, as follows:
Core Courses9
Adapted Physical Education
Advanced Studies in Adapted Physical Education
Motor Learning and Development
Elective Courses (Select 3 credits from the following)3
Curriculum Development in Physical Education
Assessment/Evaluation and Technology in Sport/PE
Total Hours12

Master of Science in Education – Physical Education

Ed Gómez, Ph.D. - Departmental Graduate Program Director
2021 Student Recreation Center
757-683-6309
egomez@odu.edu

Within each concentration, there are thesis and non-thesis options.

Curriculum & Instruction Concentration

Xihe Zhu, Ph.D. - Graduate Coordinator
2010 Student Recreation Center
757-683-3545

Admission and Entrance Requirements

Students applying for admission with regular status must have:

  1. a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution with a cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of 2.80 and a GPA of 3.00 in the undergraduate major courses;
  2. a score of at least 291 (900 by former scoring standard) in the quantitative and verbal portions of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) - GRE scores are required for consideration of admission for all candidates. (In some circumstances, students who have either a low GPA or a low GRE score may be considered for admission with provisional status); and
  3. demonstrated computer literacy.

Continuance and Exit Requirements

Students must meet all requirements for continuance as outlined in the graduate continuance policy for the University. Students completing the program of study must:

  1. achieve an overall GPA of 3.0 and a GPA of 3.0 in the major courses;
  2. demonstrate writing proficiency;
  3. satisfy all course competencies;
  4. pass a comprehensive examination when required;
  5. complete an internship, research project, or thesis as a culminating experience;
  6. hold an exit interview with the program coordinator; and
  7. file the necessary paperwork for graduation.

Curriculum

Research Core6
Introduction to Research Methods in Education
Applied Research Methods in Education
Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis
Core Courses15
Applied Learning and Coaching Theory
Planning and Administration in PE and Sport Programs
Curriculum Development in Physical Education
Motor Learning and Development
Assessment/Evaluation and Technology in Sport/PE
Thesis6
Thesis
Thesis
Electives 6
Nutrition for Fitness and Sport
Motivational Issues in Sports
Youth Development in Recreation
*List is not comprehensive. Prior approval from graduate advisor is required for other possible electives.
Total Hours33

Coaching Education Concentration

This emphasis will offer additional theories and knowledge in the coaching profession providing advanced skills to those individuals pursuing a coaching career.  The courses selected for the Coaching Education emphasis area will meet accreditation standards, certify students as athletic coaches, and provide valuable knowledge and skills.

Xihe Zhu, Ph.D. - Graduate Coordinator
2010 Student Recreation Center
757-683-3545

Admission and Entrance Requirements

Students applying for admission with regular status must have:

  1. a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution with a cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of 2.80 and a GPA of 3.00 in the undergraduate major courses;
  2. a score of at least 291 (900 by former scoring standard) in the quantitative and verbal portions of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) - GRE scores are required for consideration of admission for all candidates; (In some circumstances, students who have either a low GPA or a low GRE score may be considered for admission with provisional status);
  3. demonstrated computer literacy.

Continuance and Exit Requirements

Students must meet all requirements for continuance as outlined in the graduate continuance policy for the University. Students completing the program of study must:

  1. achieve an overall GPA of 3.0 and a GPA of 3.0 in the major courses;
  2. demonstrate writing proficiency;
  3. satisfy all course competencies;
  4. pass a comprehensive examination when required;
  5. complete an internship, research project, or thesis as a culminating experience;
  6. hold an exit interview with the program coordinator; and
  7. file the necessary paperwork for graduation and teacher licensure.
Prerequisites *
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
Anatomical Kinesiology
Physiology of Exercise
* Students who do not have equivalent coursework or appropriate educational experiences must complete these prerequisite courses.
Research Core6
Introduction to Research Methods in Education
Applied Research Methods in Education
Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis
Core Courses15
Applied Learning and Coaching Theory
Planning and Administration in PE and Sport Programs
Motivational Issues in Sports
Motor Learning and Development
Assessment/Evaluation and Technology in Sport/PE
Capstone Experience: (9 credit hours required - Choose 1 of 2 Options)9
Internship Option (3-6 Credits) *
Internship in Health & Physical Education
Electives (3-6 credits)
*The hours for the internship and electives are variable depending on the student's interest for elective options and availablility of internship opportunities.
*Passing the comprehensive exams is required for the internship option
Thesis Option (3-6 Credits)
Thesis
Thesis
Electives (3-6 credits)
Electives
Nutrition for Fitness and Sport (pre-req EXSC 409 Ex Phys)
Exercise Physiology (recommended if you have not taken HPE 409 or equivalent as a prerequisite)
Curriculum Development in Physical Education
Sport Law
List of electives is not comprehensive. Prior approval from graduate advisor is required for other possible electives.
Total Hours30

Initial Virginia Licensure in Health & Physical Education**

Stephen Knott
2030 Student Recreation Center
757-683-3355

Admission and Entrance Requirements

Students applying for admission with regular status must have:

  1. a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution with a cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of 2.80 and a GPA of 3.00 in the undergraduate major courses;
  2. a score of at least 291 (900 by former scoring standard) in the quantitative and verbal portions of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) - GRE scores are required for consideration of admission for all candidates;
  3. VCLA Composite: >470 and Praxis Core Math: >150; Or Qualifying SAT/ACT scores; Or Praxis Core (Reading >156, Writing > 162, and Math >150); Composite Praxis I score (>532 prior to 12/31/13); and
  4. demonstrated computer literacy.

(In some circumstances, students who have either a low GPA or a low GRE score may be considered for admission with provisional status.)

Continuance and Exit Requirements

Students must meet all requirements for continuance as outlined in the graduate continuance policy for the University. Students completing the program of study must:

  1. achieve and maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 and a GPA of 3.0 in the major courses;
  2. demonstrate writing proficiency;
  3. satisfy all course competencies;
  4. pass a comprehensive examination when required;
  5. complete an internship, research project, or thesis as a culminating experience;
  6. hold an exit interview with the program coordinator; and
  7. file the necessary paperwork for graduation and teacher licensure.

Additional Information and Requirements

  • Passing score on PRAXIS II Test of Content Knowledge must be on file in the Teacher Education Services office before the teacher candidate internship can begin.
  • Passing Scores on the VCLA will be required by the Virginia DOE for Licensure.
  • With approval from the graduate advisor, the licensure requirements may be fulfilled by equivalent undergraduate courses where applicable.
  • PE 308 and PE 309 Driver's Education Endorsement is strongly advised for any candidate wishing to teach at the secondary level.

** Background check clearance required for teaching licensure admission: https://www.odu.edu/success/academic/teacher-education/placement/background-checks.

Curriculum

Specific requirements for the program are as follows (33 total credits with additional credits up to 54 as needed to satisfy Virginia licensure requirements):

Prerequisites for VA Teaching Licensure
Biology for Nonscience Majors I
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
Anatomical Kinesiology
Foundations of Education, Physical Education and Health
Teaching of Team Sports
Teaching Individual Sports and Dance
Personal and Community Health
Teaching Injury Care for Sports
Teacher Candidate Seminar
Reading and Writing in Content Areas
Required Courses: 30 credit hours30
Master Level Core Course Requirements
Planning and Administration in PE and Sport Programs
Curriculum Development in Physical Education
Motor Learning and Development
Assessment/Evaluation and Technology in Sport/PE
VA Teaching Licensure Requirements
Methods and Materials in Health Education
Adapted Physical Education
Exercise Physiology
Nutrition and Fitness Education
Practicum Experience and Instructional Planning in Health and Physical Education (^)
^Field Observation and/or teaching experience required
Research Foundation - 3 credits
Introduction to Research Methods in Education
Applied Research Methods in Education
Internship Requirements - 6-9 credits6-9
Internship in Health & Physical Education
Electives when needed (advisor approval required)
Research Problems in Health & Physical Education
Motivational Issues in Sports
The following Driver's Education Endorsement courses are strongly advised for any candidate wishing to teach at the secondary level6
Driver Education Foundations of Traffic Safety
Principles and Methodologies of Classroom and In-Car Instruction
Total Hours42-45

Exercise Science & Wellness Concentration

David Swain, Ph.D. - Graduate Coordinator
2024 Student Recreation Center
757-683-6028
dswain@odu.edu

This concentration is designed for the student who desires to pursue advanced study in the science of exercise and health promotion. The course work will help to strengthen the background of those individuals already involved in conducting fitness programs for various age groups or to prepare individuals for careers in other health-related fields that utilize exercise as preventive medicine.

Admission and Entrance Requirements

Students applying for admission with regular status must have:

  1. a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution with a cumulative undergraduate GPA of 2.8 and a GPA of 3.0 in the undergraduate major courses; and
  2. have a score of at least 291 (900 by former scoring standard) between quantitative and verbal on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

Students who have either a low GPA or a low GRE score may be considered for admission to provisional status. GRE scores are required for consideration of admittance. Additionally, students must be computer literate. Prerequisites include two semesters of anatomy and physiology, one semester of exercise physiology, and one semester of biomechanics.

Continuance and Exit Requirements

Students must meet all requirements for continuance as outlined in the graduate continuance policy for the University. Students completing the program of study must:

  1. have an overall grade point average of 3.0;
  2. have a grade point average of 3.0 in the major;
  3. demonstrate writing proficiency;
  4. satisfy all course competencies;
  5. pass a comprehensive examination;
  6. complete an internship or research project/thesis;
  7. have an exit interview with the program director; and
  8. file the necessary paperwork for graduation.

Curriculum

Core Courses18
Exercise Prescription for Chronic Disease
Exercise Physiology
Clinical Exercise Testing and Prescription
Nutrition for Sports and Health
Advanced Biomechanics
Advanced Cardiovascular Exercise Physiology
Research Core6
Applied Research Methods in Education
Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis
Capstone Experience: (12 credit hours required – Choose 1 of 3 Options)12
Thesis Option
Thesis
Thesis
Electives (6 credit hours)
Non-Thesis Option - Research Problem
Research Problems in Exercise Science
Electives (9 credit hours)
Non-Thesis Option - Internship
Internship in Exercise Science
Electives (6 credits)
Supportive electives may be chosen from a restricted list of courses offered through the Department of Human Movement Sciences (EXSC, HPE, PRTS, SMGT) or other areas of relevant study, in consultation with the student's primary graduate advisor.
Total Hours36

Sport Management Concentration

Stephen Shapiro, Ph.D. - Graduate Coordinator
2012 Student Recreation Center
757-683-5078

This concentration is designed to prepare students for roles in sport management and administration.  Students enrolled in the program can pursue a number of sport career paths including college athletic administration, professional sport marketing and promotions, sport facility and event management, health club and fitness management, and amateur sport organization administration.

Admission and Entrance Requirements

Students applying for admission with regular status must have:

  1. a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution with a cumulative undergraduate GPA of 2.8 and a GPA of 3.00 in the undergraduate major courses; and
  2. have a score of at least 291 (900 by former scoring standard) between quantitative and verbal on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or a score of at least 400 on the GMAT or 400 on the MAT.

Students who have either a low GPA or a low GRE score may be considered for admission to provisional status. Additionally, students must be computer literate.

Continuance and Exit Requirements

Students must meet all requirements for continuance as outlined in the graduate continuance policy for the University. Students completing the program of study must:

  1. have an overall grade point average of 3.0;
  2. a grade point average of 3.0 in the major;
  3. demonstrate writing proficiency;
  4. satisfy all course competencies;
  5. pass a comprehensive examination;
  6. complete an internship or research project/thesis;
  7. have an exit interview with the program director; and
  8. file the necessary paperwork for graduation.

Curriculum

Core Courses (*required)24
Facility Management for Sport, Recreation and Entertainment
Sponsorship and Event Planning
Sport Finance ( *)
Strategic Marketing in Sport ( *)
Ethics in Sport Management
Social Issues in Sport
Sport Law ( *)
Management and Leadership in Sport ( *)
Research Core6
Introduction to Research Methods in Education
Applied Research Methods in Education
Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis
Capstone Experience: (6 credit hours required - Choose 1 of 3 Options)6
Thesis Option
Thesis
Thesis
Non-Thesis Option - Research Problem
Research Problems in Sport Management
Electives (3 credit hours)
Non-Thesis Option - Internship
Internship in Sport Management
Total Hours36

Master of Science in Park, Recreation and Tourism Studies

**The M.S. in Park, Recreation and Tourism Studies is planned for implementation in spring 2017 pending approval by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia.**

Ed Gómez, Ph.D. - Departmental Graduate Program Director
2021 Student Recreation Center
757-683-6309
egomez@odu.edu

The proposed program is designed to prepare students and practitioners for advanced study in the concepts, theories, research, management, and administration of park, recreation and tourism services. Course work (30 credit hours) is designed to prepare the students for the "bigger picture" which is often required of middle and top management in the recreation and tourism industry, including positions in public agencies, nonprofit organizations, and private businesses. The program combines social science and management concepts and theories with applied problem-solving techniques specific to parks, recreation and tourism. There is currently no graduate level program that has a park administration/management focus in the Commonwealth.

Admission and Entrance Requirements

Applicants for the M.S. in Park, Recreation and Tourism Studies are required to submit credentials to Old Dominion University for consideration. The criteria for acceptance include:

  • A completed online application via www.odu.edu/admission/graduate
  • A baccalaureate degree from a regionally-accredited institution or an equivalent degree from a foreign institution
  • An overall 2.8 (on a 4.0 scale) or higher cumulative GPA in the undergraduate degree *
  • A GPA of 3.0 or higher in the undergraduate major courses
  • A combined GRE score of 291 or higher (verbal and quantitative sections) *
  • Three letters of recommendation (from former faculty or employers)
  • An essay describing the applicant’s educational and career goals
  • Current copy of resume
  • A Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 550 on the paper-based test (or 79-80 on the iBT) for non-native English speakers

* Students who have a low GPA or a low GRE score may be considered for admission on provisional status.

Continuance and Exit Requirements

Students must meet all requirements for continuance as outlined in the graduate continuance policy for the University. Students completing the program of study must:

  1. have an overall grade point average of 3.0;
  2. a grade point average of 3.0 in the major;
  3. demonstrate writing proficiency;
  4. satisfy all course competencies;
  5. pass an oral thesis proposal defense (thesis option only);
  6. pass a comprehensive examination (research project option only);
  7. complete a thesis/research project;
  8. have an exit interview with the program director; and
  9. file the necessary paperwork for graduation.

Curriculum

Five required courses focus on areas in which the faculty believe are most important for each park, recreation and tourism graduate to be competent in. The choice of courses was instituted to allow for some personalization of the degree, as course selection will vary depending on whether the graduate is in a private or public agency.  Two research courses are required of all students, including one in applied statistics and the other in research methods. Lastly, students must choose from one of two capstone options — a 6-credit hour thesis and one 3-credit elective (Thesis Option), or a 3-credit hour research project and 6 credits of additional elective coursework (Research Project Option).  The thesis option requires a successful defense of the thesis prospectus. The non-thesis (research project) option requires successful completion of a comprehensive examination covering the five required PRTS core courses. The specific courses in the curriculum are as follows.

Park, Recreation & Tourism Studies Core: 15 credit hours required15
Contemporary Issues in Park, Recreation and Tourism Studies
Tourist Behavior and Consumption
Advanced Leisure Theories and their Applications
Recreation Management for Administrators
Grant Writing for Parks and Recreation
Research Core: 6 credit hours required6
Applied Research Methods in Education
Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis
Capstone Experience: 6 credit hours required – Choose 1 of 2 Options6
Thesis Option
Thesis Research in Park, Recreation and Tourism Studies
Thesis in Park, Recreation and Tourism Studies
Research Project Option
Research Problems in Park, Recreation and Toursim Studies +
Elective (3 credits)
+ Denotes an additional requirement of comprehensive exam based on core course requirements.
Electives: 3 credit hours *3
Strategic Marketing in Parks, Recreation and Tourism
Independent Study in Park, Recreation and Tourism Studies
Park Management for Professionals
Advanced Sustainable Tourism Management
Youth Development in Recreation
Public Budgeting and Financial Management
Urban Services Administration
Public-Private Partnerships
Management of Nonprofit Organizations
Managing Development and Change in Organizations
Facility Management for Sport, Recreation and Entertainment
Sponsorship and Event Planning
Sport Finance
Sport Law
* List of electives is not comprehensive. Prior approval from graduate advisor is required for other possible electives.
Total Hours30

Master of Science in Sport Management

**The M.S. in Sport Management is planned for implementation in fall 2016 pending approval by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia.**

Stephen Shapiro, Ph.D. - Graduate Coordinator
2012 Student Recreation Center
757-683-5078

This program is designed to prepare students for leadership roles within the sport industry.  Students are provided with theoretical and practical knowledge to face the opportunities and challenges associated with sport business careers.  The curriculum is consistent with current principles and practices of academic and sport marketplace standards.

Admissions Requirements:

Applicants for the graduate sport management program may submit credentials to Old Dominion University for consideration. The criteria for acceptance include:

  • A completed online application via www.odu.edu/admission/graduate
  • A baccalaureate degree from a regionally-accredited institution or an equivalent degree from a foreign institution
  • 2.8 cumulative GPA or higher (on a 4.0 scale)
  • 3.0 GPA or higher in the undergraduate major*
  • GRE score of 291 or higher (verbal and quantitative sections) or a score of 400 or higher on either the GMAT or MAT*
  • Three letters of recommendation (from former faculty or employers)
  • Current copy of resume
  • Transcripts from all prior postsecondary institutions
  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 550 on the paper-based test (or 79-80 on the iBT) for non-native English speakers

*Students who have a low GPA or a low GRE score may be considered for admission to provisional status.

*The program admissions committee will consider waiving the GRE/GMAT/MAT requirement for applicants with significant sport (or sport-related) industry experience. Applicants should contact the graduate program coordinator to indicate interest in being considered for a waiver.

Sport Management Core Courses: 12 credit hours required12
Sport Finance
Strategic Marketing in Sport
Sport Law
Management and Leadership in Sport
Research Core: 6 credit hours required6
Introduction to Research Methods in Education
Applied Research Methods in Education
Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis
Capstone Experience: 6 credit hours required – Choose 1 of 3 Options6
Thesis Option
Thesis Research in Sport Management
Thesis in Sport Management
Research Project Option +
Research Problems in Sport Management
Elective (3 credits)
Internship Option +
Internship in Sport Management
+ Denotes an additional requirement of comprehensive exam based on core course requirements.
Electives: 12 credit hours *12
Youth Development in Recreation
Facility Management for Sport, Recreation and Entertainment
Sponsorship and Event Planning
Ethics in Sport Management
Social Issues in Sport
* List of electives is not comprehensive. Prior approval from graduate advisor is required for other possible electives.
Total Hours36
 

Doctor of Philosophy, Education – Human Movement Sciences Concentration

Ed Gómez, Ph.D. - Departmental Graduate Program Director
2021 Student Recreation Center
757-683-6309
egomez@odu.edu

The goal of our doctoral program is to prepare professionals with research knowledge, critical thinking skills and problem solving abilities required to be successful leaders, scholars, and educators. The program provides a solid theoretical foundation, advanced methodological training, one-on-one mentorship, and opportunities to teach undergraduate courses.

We offer a Ph.D. in Education with a concentration in Human Movement Sciences. There are three emphasis areas within the HMS concentration. These include:

Applied Kinesiology Emphasis – this area focuses on Exercise Physiology and Biomechanics and prepares graduates for positions as post-doctoral research fellows, university faculty, and/or governmental research officials.

Sport & Recreation Management Emphasis – this area focuses on issues related to the administration of sport and recreation organizations. Graduates are prepared for careers as faculty or administrators in higher education, private organizations, public agencies, and/or other research-based institutions.

Health & Sport Pedagogy Emphasis – this area focuses on research, scholarship, and leadership opportunities in health and sport pedagogy. This program prepares individuals for academic positions in departments of physical education/ kinesiology at universities and colleges.

Admission and Entrance Requirements

Admission to the Human Movement Sciences concentration of the Ph.D. in Education is competitive and meeting the minimum requirements does not ensure admission to the program. The admissions committee reviews applications and considers a number of criteria, including a goodness of fit between student and faculty.

The deadline for applying is January 15. Applicants may be contacted to set up an interview as part of the final selection process.

Individuals interested in applying for the doctoral program with a concentration in Human Movement Sciences must submit the following:

  • An application to the University. Contact the Office of Graduate Admissions for applications. Applications for graduate study can be completed online or submitted to the Office of Graduate Admissions (757-683-3685). Apply for the Ph.D. Human Movement Sciences Concentration.
  • Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate courses and degrees completed. To be considered for the program, applicants must have completed a Bachelor's and a Master's degree from regionally accredited colleges/universities. At least one degree should be in a related discipline to the emphasis area. A minimum GPA of 3.5 (on a 4.0 scale) for the Master's degree is required.
  • Two writing samples. The first writing sample should be a research-based document that includes citations and a list of references. This could be a submitted manuscript or published article, a summary of your thesis, or a research paper from a graduate course. The second writing sample should be a personal statement that explains your qualifications, professional and career goals, and reasons for seeking the Ph.D. In this second essay, you must also identify the potential professor(s) at ODU with whom you share common research interests.
  • A current copy of your resume or Curriculum Vitae.
  • Three letters of recommendation from professional sources qualified to assess your suitability for study at the doctoral level. One letter of recommendation should be from a graduate advisor or faculty member and one should be from a current or former supervisor.
  • Official GRE scores taken within the last 5 years that indicate a total score of at least 297 (1000 by former scoring standard) for both the verbal reasoning and quantitative reasoning sections and a minimum of 4.5 on the analytical writing component. While these scores are recommended, other portions of the total application package will be considered. The Sport and Recreation Management emphasis area will also accept GMAT scores of 470 or higher.
  • Applicants whose native language is not English must also submit current scores for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) of at least 550.

After successful advancement to candidacy, all doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour each term (fall, spring, and summer) until the degree is completed, including the semester in which they graduate. Failure to comply with this requirement will result in charges to the student’s account for one graduate credit hour plus required fees for each semester after passing the candidacy examination. Students are not eligible for graduation until all charges are paid.

Continuance and Exit Requirements

Students completing the program of study must:
 
  • Have an overall grade point average of 3.0 or higher
  • Satisfy all course competencies
  • Pass comprehensive examinations
  • Complete a dissertation
  • Have an exit interview with the program director
  • File the necessary paperwork for graduation

Applied Kinesiology Emphasis Curriculum

Patrick Wilson, Ph.D
2003A Student Recreation Center
757-683-4783

Requirements for the emphasis are as follows (minimum of 60 credits):

Prerequisite Courses
Prerequisite Coursework *
Applied Research Methods in Education
Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis
Research Core12
Research Design and Analysis
Qualitative Research Design in Education
Applied Linear Models in Educational Research
Analysis of Variance Applied to Educational Research
Professional Preparation6
Doctoral Studies Seminar
Dissertation Seminar
Perspectives and Inquiry in Curriculum and Instruction
Instruction Theories and Models
Applied Kinesiology Emphasis21
Advanced Biomechanics
Advanced Cardiovascular Exercise Physiology
Exercise Endocrinology
Independent Study in Human Movement Sciences
Electives **9
Mathematical Modeling in Physiology I
Mathematical Modeling in Physiology II
Endocrinology
Neuromuscular Physiology
Gross Anatomy
Dissertation Capstone Courses12
Dissertation
Total Hours60
+

A master's degree in an appropriate field related to this concentration is required for regular admission to the Ph.D. in human movement science.


*

Students who do not have equivalent coursework or appropriate educational experiences must complete these prerequisite courses.

**

Substitute other courses by permission of advisor.

Sport & Recreation Management Emphasis Curriculum

Eddie Hill, Ph.D.
2014 Student Recreation Center
757-683-4881

Requirements for the emphasis are as follows (minimum of 60 credits):

Prerequisite Courses
Applied Research Methods in Education
Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis
Research Core12
Research Design and Analysis
Qualitative Research Design in Education
Applied Linear Models in Educational Research
Analysis of Variance Applied to Educational Research
Professional Preparation (9 credits minimum)9
Doctoral Studies Seminar
Dissertation Seminar
Perspectives and Inquiry in Curriculum and Instruction
Instruction Theories and Models
Theories of Learning and Instruction
Sport and Recreation Management Emphasis (18 credits minimum)18
Advanced Leisure Theories and their Applications
Youth Development in Recreation
Sport Finance
Strategic Marketing in Sport
Ethics in Sport Management
Social Issues in Sport
Sport Law
Management and Leadership in Sport
Electives (9 credits minimum) *9
Organization Theory
Strategic Entrepreneurship Seminar
Seminar in Marketing Concepts and Issues
Seminar in Consumer Behavior
Theories of Public Policy
Policy and Program Evaluation
Theories of Conflict Resolution and Problem Solving
Managing Development and Change in Organizations
* List of electives is not comprehensive. Prior approval from graduate advisor is required for other possible electives.
Dissertation Capstone Courses12
Dissertation
Total Hours60

Health & Sport Pedagogy Emphasis Curriculum

Xihe Zhu, Ph.D.
2010 Student Recreation Center
757-683-3545

Requirements for the emphasis are as follows (minimum of 60 credits):

Research Core (12 credits minimum, required*)12
Research Design and Analysis *
Qualitative Research Design in Education *
Applied Linear Models in Educational Research *
Analysis of Variance Applied to Educational Research *
Advanced Qualitative Research
Applied Multilevel Modeling in Educational Research
Applied Structural Equation Modeling in Educational Research
Multivariate Methods for the Social/Behavioral Sciences
Health & Sport Pedagogy Emphasis21
Applied Learning and Coaching Theory
Planning and Administration in PE and Sport Programs
Motivational Issues in Sports
Advanced Studies in Adapted Physical Education
Curriculum Development in Physical Education
Motor Learning and Development
Assessment/Evaluation and Technology in Sport/PE
Professional Preparation (9 credits minimum, required*)9
Dissertation Seminar *
Doctoral Studies Seminar
Grant and Manuscript Writing
Instruction Theories and Models
Advisor Approved Electives (6 credits minimum)6
Other electives may be approved. Consult with your advisor.
Constructivist Teaching
Psychometric Theory
History and Philosophy of American Public School Reform
Sociocultural Contexts for Teaching and Learning
Health Psychology
Historical and Contemporary Research in Special Education
Single Subject Research Designs
Youth Development in Recreation
Dissertation Capstone Course (12 credits, required*)12
Dissertation *
Total Hours60

EXERCISE SCIENCE Courses

EXSC 508. Nutrition for Fitness and Sport. 3 Credits.

Emphasizes the role of nutrition as a means to enhance health and performance in sport. Topics covered include energy metabolism and nutrients, regulation of metabolism by vitamins and minerals, and weight control.

EXSC 515. Exercise Testing for Normal and Special Populations. 4 Credits.

The application of different methodologies in the measurement of physiologic responses to exercise. Emphasis is placed on understanding American College of Sports Medicine guidelines, appropriate experimental techniques, and equipment necessary to evaluate changes in body composition and various metabolic, cardiovascular, and respiratory adjustments during exercise.

EXSC 517. Biomechanics. 4 Credits.

Application of physical laws and mechanical principles to the human musculoskeletal system. Prerequisites: BIOL 250 and PHYS 111N.

EXSC 528. Exercise Prescription for Chronic Disease. 3 Credits.

A study of pathophysiology of common diseases with concentration in the design, implementation and administration of exercise prescription for a variety of chronic diseases.

EXSC 531. Wellness Programming and Administration. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the principles of administration and implementation of fitness and wellness programs to individuals, groups, centers and corporate settings.

EXSC 621. Strength and Conditioning Applications. 3 Credits.

A study of the principles and techniques utilized in optimizing physical performance and reducing injury through proper and effective strength and conditioning programs. Special emphasis will be placed on current research findings, breakthrough techniques and advanced weight training techniques, and popular conditioning practices.

EXSC 630. Exercise Physiology. 3 Credits.

Review of current physiological literature related to muscular exercise including the cardiovascular-respiratory system, metabolic effects of exercise, neuromuscular relationships, and the effects of training or diet, environment, ergogenic aids, temperature, attitude, and other factors on performance and health. Prerequisite: EXSC 509 or equivalent.

EXSC 636. Research Problems in Exercise Science. 3 Credits.

Practice in the use of statistical and analytical techniques in solving problems in exercise science; supervised student research.

EXSC 642. Clinical Exercise Testing and Prescription. 3 Credits.

Principles of diagnostic exercise assessment, cardiovascular physiology, electrocardiography, ACSM guidelines to exercise testing and prescription for symptomatic and asymptomatic populations. Prerequisite: HMS 630 or EXSC 630.

EXSC 661. Nutrition for Sports and Health. 3 Credits.

This course is an in-depth analysis of the role of nutrition in health and human physical and athletic performance. General areas covered include the role of the six major classes of nutrients in health and sport, physiologic and metabolic interrelationships, malnutrition, nutrition in growing and aging, and diet and nutrition in the prevention of disease.

EXSC 668. Internship in Exercise Science. 1-6 Credits.

Designed to provide detailed practical experience (400 clock hours) in an exercise science field setting. Prerequisite: completion of 75% of graduate work.

EXSC 695. Topics in Exercise Science. 1-3 Credits.

Selected topic courses in exercise science and wellness.

EXSC 697. Independent Study in Exercise Science. 1-3 Credits.

Investigations in exercise science. Problems approved in advance are investigated under the supervision of the faculty advisor.

EXSC 698. Thesis Research. 3-6 Credits.

Master's level research and thesis in topics related to Exercise Science. Prerequisite: permission of the advisor and committee.

EXSC 699. Thesis. 3-6 Credits.

Preparation and writing of the thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of the advisor and committee.

EXSC 727. Advanced Biomechanics. 3 Credits.

Study of the relationships among mechanics, energetics and control of human movement. Emphasis will be placed on the application of mechanical concepts in biomechanics research. Prerequisite: EXSC 417W or EXSC 517.

EXSC 730. Advanced Cardiovascular Exercise Physiology. 3 Credits.

A study of the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system. Effects of exercise on the system will also be discussed. Prerequisite: EXSC 630.

EXSC 738. Exercise Endocrinology. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on the endocrine responses to acute and chronic exercise and how neuroendocrine function relates to health and athletic performance. Emphasis is placed on the role of the endocrine system in regulating substrate utilization during exercise, energy balance, skeletal muscle plasticity, reproductive function, and the aging process. Prerequisite: EXSC 630.

EXSC 827. Advanced Biomechanics. 3 Credits.

Study of the relationships among mechanics, energetics and control of human movement. Emphasis will be placed on the application of mechanical concepts in biomechanics research. Prerequisite: EXSC 417W or EXSC 517.

EXSC 830. Advanced Cardiovascular Exercise Physiology. 3 Credits.

A study of the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system. Effects of exercise on the system will also be discussed. Prerequisite: EXSC 630.

EXSC 838. Exercise Endocrinology. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on the endocrine responses to acute and chronic exercise and how neuroendocrine function relates to health and athletic performance. Emphasis is placed on the role of the endocrine system in regulating substrate utilization during exercise, energy balance, skeletal muscle plasticity, reproductive function, and the aging process. Prerequisite: EXSC 630.

EXSC 999. Doctoral Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course doctoral students may take to maintain active status after successfully passing the candidacy examination. All doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour every semester until their graduation.

FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION Courses

FOUN 611. Introduction to Research Methods in Education. 3 Credits.

The primary goal of the course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to access, evaluate, and synthesize empirical research. The course examines types of educational research and criteria for evaluating empirical studies. It introduces various types of research questions and associated research designs, components of research reports, sampling, validity of measures, threats to internal and external validity, and simple statistics.

FOUN 612. Applied Research Methods in Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. The primary goal of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to write a research proposal and conduct research. It is intended for those students who are completing a thesis to meet their program requirements, those planning on pursuing a doctoral degree, or those who anticipate conducting research for any other reasons. The course examines types of educational research and criteria for selection of topics for research projects; describes criteria for effective collection and organization of data; review of literature, analysis of data and proposal writing.

FOUN 615. Research and Application of the Evolution of Education: History, Issues, Technology and Assessment. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Course focuses on foundations of U.S. education system; legal aspects for educational delivery in the U.S. and Virginia; use and contributions of technology integration to learning outcomes; formative and summative assessment for improving learning outcomes of urban children and youth.

FOUN 640. Fundamentals of Measurement and Assessment. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. This course stresses the use of measurement and assessment for evaluation and decision making focusing on basic concepts applicable to all types of assessment: statistical concepts, reliability, validity, and interpretive frameworks for cognitive and non-cognitive measures.

FOUN 641. Assessment and Evaluation of Student Learning. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. The valid use of formative and summative assessment and evaluation principles for monitoring and promoting students' learning and development will be addressed. Students will learn how to construct and use a variety of formal and informal teacher assessment procedures.

FOUN 650. Human Development and Student Learning. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. Corequisite: Student must be a participant in the Teacher Residency Grant. This course will focus on understanding children's and adolescents' physical, social, emotional, intellectual, and speech/language development; integrating and incorporating children and adolescent differences (economic, social, racial, ethnic, religious, physical, and mental) into understanding developmental issues as they relate to instruction, including the identification and instruction of students with exceptionalities as well as special needs. Research related to the classroom application of these theories is examined and evaluated based on principles of research design and interpretation.

FOUN 662. Assessment and Evaluation for Schools Serving Military Connected Children and Families. 4 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; Service learning, 1 hour. 4 credits. Prerequisite: COUN 605 and acceptance into the Military Child and Family Education Certificate Program. This course is designed to create educators and educational support service providers capable of assessing the needs of military children and able to self-assess their schools in terms of the comprehensive elements of a military conscious and supportive school. Students will become familiar with the Military Consciousness Assessment Toolkit (Mil-CAT), a comprehensive and dynamic self-assessment tool developed at ODU that provides a process and system for analyzing and prioritizing support structures and needs of military students across the school. Students will also apply basic constructs of assessment in order to develop skills for determining the individual academic, social, and emotional needs of military students and their families, as well as to design ways to assess classroom and school-wide interventions. Use of assessments of individual, group, and school-wide needs to design, implement, and evaluate contextually tailored interventions that support military connected students will be modeled and practices. This course is required for completion of the Military Child and Family Education graduate certificate. Students must be accepted to the certificate program or receive approval from the certificate program director in order to enroll.

FOUN 722. Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Introduction to basic topics in statistical analysis, including descriptive statistics and simple inferential statistics such as correlation, regression, t-tests, one-way analysis of variance, and chi-square.

FOUN 812. Research Design and Analysis. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the application of advanced research design as it is applied in various educational disciplines. It provides an in-depth examination of quantitative research approaches, sampling techniques, threats to validity, ethical considerations and reviewing, writing quantitative methodology descriptions for research proposals and reports.

FOUN 813. Program Evaluation in Education. 3 Credits.

Examines procedures and problems in the design and utilization of program evaluation in education. Identifies evaluation purposes and the methods of evaluation especially as affected by organizational behavior, ethical considerations, and political influences. Evaluation methodology includes, but is not limited to, design considerations, data utilization, and teacher evaluation. Both quantitative and qualitative strategies will be covered.

FOUN 814. Qualitative Research Design in Education. 3 Credits.

This course concentrates on the theoretical underpinnings of qualitative research; methodology and methods incuding identification of ways to collect and analyze qualitative data; examination of ethical issues; development of proposals; and writing up studies.

FOUN 815. Advanced Qualitative Research. 3 Credits.

This advanced qualitative course is an introduction to emerging research approaches and alternative data collection methods and analyses in education, counseling and other related disciplines. Content addressed includes visual and audio research, historical movements in qualitative research, critical theory, feminism, queer theory, ethnomethodology, autoethnography, content analysis, and mixed methods research. Prerequisites: Instructor approval required.

FOUN 816. Single Subject Research Designs. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. This course is designed to provide the student knowledge and skills that relate to single subject methodology. It includes an overview of historical and philosophical foundations, basic issues in behavioral assessment, and single subject research and design methodology, including trend and statistical analysis in single subject research. Students will analyze critically empirical research and be able to plan, implement, and evaluate original research.

FOUN 818. Analysis with Large Datasets. 3 Credits.

This course concentrates on sample designs, design-based estimation/inference, data preparation, and analysis of complex survey data in education. Prerequisites: FOUN 822.

FOUN 822. Applied Linear Models in Educational Research. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the general linear model with emphasis on concepts and applications of multiple linear regression (MLR) to problems in educational research. Topics include estimation and interpretation of MLR models, relationships between MLR and analysis of variance (ANOVA), logistic regression analysis, and trend analysis. Prerequisite: FOUN 722.

FOUN 823. Analysis of Variance Applied to Educational Research. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Prerequisite: FOUN 722. Introduction of analysis of variance models as applied in education and human services, including two-way and three-way factorial designs, analysis of covariance, repeated-measures, and mixed-model analysis.

FOUN 824. Design and Analysis for Causal Inference in Educational Contexts. 3 Credits.

Introduction to research design and statistical analysis for studies intended to support causal inferences. Topics include experimental, quasi-experimental, and ex post facto design and appropriate models for data analysis. Prerequisites: FOUN 822 and FOUN 823 or permission of instructor.

FOUN 825. Applied Multilevel Modeling in Educational Research. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on advanced applications of statistics that are used in educational research in various educational disciplines. Specifically, the course will offer an introduction to hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) of nested data as applied to education. Topics include conceptual and statistical background of two- and three-level designs, cross-level interaction effects, and application of multilevel models for repeated measures designs. Emphasis is on estimation, interpretation, and diagnostics for multilevel models of continuous outcomes. Prerequisites: FOUN 822 and FOUN 823 or instructor permission.

FOUN 826. Applied Structural Equation Modeling in Educational Research. 3 Credits.

Introduction to structural equation modeling and related multivariate procedures applied to research problems in education. Topics include a brief review of exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory (structural) factor analysis, path analysis, and structural equation modeling with observed and latent variables. Prerequisite: FOUN 822 and FOUN 823 or permission of instructor.

FOUN 827. Applied Logistic Regression. 3 Credits.

A practical and conceptual introduction to applying logistic and probit regression models to typical questions in the social sciences. Will utilize SPSS for practical applications covering simple and multiple regression models, interactions and curvilinear effects, multinomial models, testing of assumptions, and select advanced applications such as propensity score matching and missing data analysis. Prerequisites: FOUN 822 and FOUN 823 or permission of instructor.

FOUN 830. Theories of Learning and Instruction. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. The course consists of critical discussion and analysis of major learning theories that have influenced learning and instruction in today's schools. Applications of current research to instructional design will be emphasized.

FOUN 831. Human Development in Education. 3 Credits.

This course introduces the domain of human development to education students by promoting their construction of a developmental perspective and adoption of a developmental theory to understand education-relevant phenomena. The course will cover central tenets of the developmental psychological perspective, several contemporary developmental approaches, and contexts of development relevant to educational processes. Furthermore, the course aims to promote students’ skills in pursuing scientific knowledge about educational topics of interest in human development. The course will address life-span processes; however, the primary emphasis will be on processes and ages associated with formal educational settings (K-16). Prerequisite: FOUN 830.

FOUN 835. Motivation in Education. 3 Credits.

The course consists of critical discussion and analysis of major theories of motivation and research supporting these theories. Applications to education and classroom instruction will be emphasized. Equity concerns related to how to motivate students placed at risk will also be examined. Prerequisites: FOUN 830 and FOUN 831.

FOUN 836. Metacognition and Self-regulated Learning. 3 Credits.

The course consists of critical discussion and analysis of major theories and research on metacognition and self-regulated learning. Applications to education and classroom instruction will be emphasized. Strategies to promote self-regulated learning among diverse and at-risk students will also be examined. Prerequisites: FOUN 830 and FOUN 831.

FOUN 840. Educational Measurement and Assessment. 3 Credits.

Overview of advanced educational measurement and assessment ideologies as well as methods. Students will identify, critique, construct and administer educational measures. Psychometric topics such as reliability and validity will be explored as well as advanced assessment issues such as scale construction and item response theory.

FOUN 848. Assessment and Evaluation in Content Areas. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits.

FOUN 850. Sociological and Philosophical Foundations of Education. 3 Credits.

Students examine the relationship between education and society by reviewing a variety of theoretical perspectives and empirical studies. Topics include: social mobility and stratification; social reproduction; the dynamics of race, class, and gender in education; social capital; the student-teacher relationship; teaching as a profession; and higher education.

FOUN 861. Ethnographic Research and Narrative & Historical Research Methods and Design. 3 Credits.

In this advanced qualitative research course, we invite students to focus on ethnographic methods such as ethnography, ethnomethodology, and autoethnomethodology. Students will also learn about participatory research methods. The course will examine narrative and historical research approaches including biography and autobiography. Prerequisites: FOUN 815.

FOUN 862. Critical and Indigenous Research Methods and Design. 3 Credits.

In this advanced qualitative methods course, we invite students to explore readings related to critical and indigenous research, methodologies and paradigms as well as engage in activities to decolonize traditional research approaches with specific groups. In this course we refer to Indigenous peoples as individuals and groups belonging to developing or underdeveloped regions nationally or internationally. Prerequisites: FOUN 815.

FOUN 863. Emerging Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Credits.

This advanced qualitative research course examines emerging and lesser known qualitative research methods such as self-study, portraiture, arts-based research, photovoice, rhizomatic analysis and critical policy analysis. Prerequisites: FOUN 815.

FOUN 864. Case Study, Grounded Theory & Phenomenological Research Methods & Design. 3 Credits.

This advanced qualitative research course examines the intricacies of case study methods. It also delves into the various qualitative research methods surrounding experience and theory formation such as Grounded Theory, Phenomenology, Heuristic Inquiry and Consensual Qualitative Research. Prerequisites: FOUN 815.

FOUN 865. Independent Qualitative Research. 3 Credits.

This capstone course involves the student developing and completing an original qualitative research project independent from the dissertation. Prerequisites: FOUN 815.

FOUN 867. Teaching and Research Practicum. 3 Credits.

Advanced graduate students in the Ph.D. Educational Psychology, Research and Evaluation program or other Ph.D. programs will have the opportunity to participate in research, consulting, an internship, or assisting in teaching research and statistics courses. Prerequisites: FOUN 822 and FOUN 823.

FOUN 869. Teaching Statistics Practicum. 3 Credits.

Advanced graduate students in the Ph.D. Educational Research, Evaluation and Educational Psychology concentration or other Ph.D. concentrations will have the opportunity to participate in research, consulting, internship, or assisting in teaching research methods and statistics courses. Prerequisites: FOUN 822 and FOUN 823.

FOUN 870. Formative Assessment of Student Learning for School Leaders and Curriculum Specialist. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Overview of advanced educational measurement and assessment ideologies as well as methods. Students will identify, critique, construct and administer educational measures. Psychometric topics such as reliability and validity will be explored as well as advanced assessment issues such as scale construction and item response theory.

FOUN 881. Dissertation Seminar. 3 Credits.

Instructor approval required. The primary goal of the course is to develop a dissertation proposal. It is intended for doctoral students who have completed all other coursework. The course covers literature reviews, proposal writing, and obtaining approval from Human Subjects committees. Outlets for disseminating the research findings will be explored. Prerequisites: FOUN 812, FOUN 814 and FOUN 822 or FOUN 823.

FOUN 897. Special Topics in Educational Foundations. 3 Credits.

Three hours; 3 credits. Special Topics in Educational Foundations will be used for independent studies with Foundations faculty members.

FOUN 899. Dissertation. 1-12 Credits.

Dissertation credit.

FOUN 999. Doctoral Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course doctoral students may take to maintain active status after successfully passing the candidacy examination. All doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour every semester until their graduation.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Courses

HPE 502. Methods and Materials in Health Education. 3 Credits.

This course will enable teacher candidates to gain insight into the techniques, methodology, and philosophy of field-based health and physical education. Teacher candidates will be expected to observe and participate in the teaching of simple lessons.

HPE 504. Adapted Physical Education. 3 Credits.

Students will become acquainted with the practices and researching of different disabilities, the learning modes of the exceptional child, and IDEA (the law that advocates free and appropriate education). The course will also examine how to work within the ecosystem surrounding a child with disabilities. A vital component of the course will be the practical application of theory.

HPE 506. Tests and Measurement in Physical Education and Health. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to acquaint the student with tests and measurement in the fields of health and physical education, test construction, scoring, and methods of using results.

HPE 509. Exercise Physiology. 3 Credits.

An investigation into the physiological adjustments of the human organism to exercise, including systematic and biochemical molecular changes. Major areas of concern include neuromuscular, metabolic, and cardiorespiratory changes during exercise and the influence of such variables as nutrition, drugs, environment, age, sex, training and body weight. Prerequisites: BIOL 250.

HPE 530. Nutrition and Fitness Education. 3 Credits.

The study of techniques for the teaching of nutrition and health-related fitness. Content to be covered includes nutrition and various aspects of fitness training appropriate for the teaching of PreK-12 physical education and health.

HPE 569. Practicum Experience and Instructional Planning in Health and Physical Education. 3 Credits.

A clinical experience that allows the teaching candidate to teach and observe professionals in a field-based setting. Portfolio development, reflective assessment of teaching, and student assessment techniques will be emphasized. This course requires a completed ODU clearance/background check prior to entering a school or community agency. Visit: www.odu.edu/TES for clearance procedures. If students do not have the clearance by the first week of classes, they will be dropped. Prerequisites: passing scores on PRAXIS Core or State Board of Education-approved SAT or ACT scores and admission into teacher education.

HPE 587. Teacher Candidate Seminar. 1 Credit.

Prerequisites: acceptance into teacher education and approval of the program advisor. Study and group discussion of problems growing out of the student teaching (teacher candidate internship) experience. Students must pass Praxis II to complete this course.

HPE 601. Adapted Physical Education Design and Supervision. 3 Credits.

This course is divided into three sections. The first section deals with learning how to administer and interpret several evaluation tools. The second section concentrates on developing computer, video taping, and other technology skills for adapted PE. The third section focuses on overall supervision of adapted PE programs in various school and institutional environments.

HPE 607. Movement Analysis of Individual and Team Sports. 3 Credits.

This laboratory and methods class focuses on the skills and strategies of teaching individual sports (e.g., bowling, badminton, golf, and tennis) and team sports (e.g., football, basketball, volleyball, and softball), using a tactical approach.

HPE 609. Principles of Movement Analysis in Dance and Rhythmic Activities for Physical Education. 3 Credits.

The course is designed to help teachers and coaches improve their skills in analyzing movement skills in dance and rhythmic activities. Such skill analysis is necessary to effectively diagnose movement deficiencies, prescribe techniques for improving performance, and modifying activities for the adaptive program.

HPE 636. Research Problems in Health & Physical Education. 3 Credits.

Practice in the use of statistical and analytical techniques in solving problems in health and physical education; supervised student research.

HPE 668. Internship in Health & Physical Education. 1-6 Credits.

Designed to provide detailed practical experience (400 clock hours) in a health and physical education field setting. Prerequisite: completion of 75% of graduate work.

HPE 680. Problems in Health Education. 3 Credits.

Problems in teaching health education on the elementary and secondary level; family life education, substance use and abuse, and mental and emotional health.

HPE 695. Topics in Health & Physical Education. 1-3 Credits.

Selected topic courses in health and physical education.

HPE 697. Independent Study In Health & Physical Education. 1-3 Credits.

Investigations in health, physical education. Problems approved in advance are investigated under the supervision of the faculty advisor.

HPE 698. Thesis. 3 Credits.

HPE 699. Thesis. 3 Credits.

HPE 704. Advanced Studies in Adapted Physical Education. 3 Credits.

This course provides experiences of teaching adapted physical education content in lecture and gymnasium settings. Students will develop an understanding of a broad spectrum of disability related content that is applicable to physical education, and gain a deep knowledge of specific topics within disability studies. General and disability specific teaching strategies will be discussed.

HPE 718. Applied Learning and Coaching Theory. 3 Credits.

This course examines applied theories of learning and coaching in sport and physical education. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the differing coaching/learning theories and strategies, designing effective practice and game plans, and learning the different learning levels and styles through observing, analyzing, and critiquing skills. Current research and practice will be emphasized.

HPE 719. Planning and Administration in PE and Sport Programs. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide in-depth information about the planning and administrative aspects of sport/physical education programs. Content includes, but is not limited to, teaching/training planning, safety and injury prevention, behavioral management, field/facility maintenance, budgetary considerations, public relations, and legal and risk management procedures associated with coaching/teaching PE.

HPE 720. Curriculum Development in Physical Education. 3 Credits.

A course designed to acquaint the student with the basic principles and practices in curriculum development. Curriculum development methodologies for both K-12 and college curricula will be addressed.

HPE 721. Motivational Issues in Sports. 3 Credits.

Motivational and psychological issues relate with sport performance enhancement, athlete/student wellbeing, and clinical issues with specific populations.

HPE 740. Motor Learning and Development. 3 Credits.

This course covers a combination of motor development and motor learning topics. The course information and structure are designed to optimize practitioners’ effectiveness in the classroom and on the field via practical application of motor behavior theories, concepts and principles. Attention is directed toward understanding the acquisition of skills from the fundamental, initial level to the sport-specific, more advanced level, toward optimal age and skill-level practices and developing appropriate motor skill assessments for infants through older adulthood. Past and current research findings are incorporated into each of the course topics.

HPE 745. Assessment/Evaluation and Technology in Sport/PE. 3 Credits.

This course covers assessment/evaluation theory and practices in PE/Sport. Multiple evaluation designs and techniques in different domains such as teaching/coaching, learning, and performance will be discussed along with technology applications in PE/Sport.

HPE 804. Advanced Studies in Adapted Physical Education. 3 Credits.

This course provides experiences of teaching adapted physical education content in lecture and gymnasium settings. Students will develop an understanding of a broad spectrum of disability related content that is applicable to physical education, and gain a deep knowledge of specific topics within disability studies. General and disability specific teaching strategies will be discussed.

HPE 820. Curriculum Development in Physical Education. 3 Credits.

A course designed to acquaint the student with the basic principles and practices in curriculum development. Curriculum development methodologies for both K-12 and college curricula will be addressed.

HPE 840. Motor Learning and Development. 3 Credits.

This course covers a combination of motor development and motor learning topics. The course information and structure are designed to optimize practitioners’ effectiveness in the classroom and on the field via practical application of motor behavior theories, concepts and principles. Attention is directed toward understanding the acquisition of skills from the fundamental, initial level to the sport-specific, more advanced level, toward optimal age and skill-level practices and developing appropriate motor skill assessments for infants through older adulthood. Past and current research findings are incorporated into each of the course topics.

HPE 845. Assessment/Evaluation and Technology in Sport/PE. 3 Credits.

This course covers assessment/evaluation theory and practices in PE/Sport. Multiple evaluation designs and techniques in different domains such as teaching/coaching, learning, and performance will be discussed along with technology applications in PE/Sport.

HUMAN MOVEMENT SCIENCES Courses

HMS 697. Independent Study. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Investigations in health, physical education, recreation, and sport. Problems approved in advance are investigated under the supervision of the faculty advisor.

HMS 698. Thesis. 3-6 Credits.

3-6 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the advisor and committee.

HMS 699. Thesis. 3-6 Credits.

3-6 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the advisor and committee.

HMS 815. Introduction to Doctoral Study Seminar. 3 Credits.

This course explores current issues and trends in all aspects of human movement science and relates theory to practice.

HMS 816. Research Experience I. 3 Credits.

Determination of a research project through the review of literature. Course encompasses formulation of a topic along with the design of a research study.

HMS 817. Research Experience II. 3 Credits.

Supervised research implementation, data collection, and project completion of specific topic within curriculum and instruction or applied kinesiology concepts.

HMS 890. Doctoral Studies Seminar. 3 Credits.

Students will be introduced to expectations of conducting research, explore concepts associated with becoming a faculty member or practitioner with an earned doctorate, and become familiar with campus resources. Students will learn and apply concepts related to scientific writing. This course will include extensive reading of research articles, grant applications, and other scholarly work. Also, this course will investigate the need for professional development. This will include familiarizing oneself with appropriate professional organizations, exploring the benefits and challenges of collaboration, interviewing and preparing for job placements, and preparing a curricular vitae and teaching philosophy.

HMS 891. Doctoral Research Seminar. 3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the main philosophical traditions of research and scholarship that currently inform scientific inquiry in Human Movement Sciences with a specific focus on the preparation of a research proposal.

HMS 895. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 1-3 credits.

HMS 897. Independent Study in Human Movement Sciences. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study under the direction of a faculty member on a topic in the Human Movement Sciences.

HMS 898. Independent Research in Human Movement Sciences. 1-9 Credits.

Independent research project under the direction of a faculty member that will expose students to a broad range of research topics and research environments in the human movement sciences.

HMS 899. Dissertation. 1-12 Credits.

1-12 credits. Prerequisite: permission of dissertation committee chair. Work on pre-selected dissertation topic under the direction of dissertation chair.

HMS 998. Master's Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fall course for master's students in their final semester. It may be taken to fulfill the registration requirement necessary for graduation. All master's students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour in the semester of graduation.

HMS 999. Doctoral Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course doctoral students may take to maintain active status after successfully passing the candidacy examination. All doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour every semester until their graduation.

PARKS, RECREATION AND TOURISM STUDIES Courses

PRTS 561. The Tourism and Hospitality Industry. 3 Credits.

This course explores tourism from a social perspective. The focus of the course will be on economic and social dimensions of tourism, tourism development strategies, and current research in hospitality from national and international case studies. Prerequisites: permission of instructor.

PRTS 575. Sustainable Tourism Management. 3 Credits.

This course examines the principles and practices of planning, marketing, and managing sustainable tourism. Assessment, development, and maintenance of sustainable tourism products are explored. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

PRTS 595. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

This course provides an opportunity for in-depth study of selected topics in the variety of areas comprising parks, recreation and tourism studies.

PRTS 619. Strategic Marketing in Parks, Recreation and Tourism. 3 Credits.

Course is designed to examine the principles and practices of strategic marketing as it pertains to tourism planning and development. The course will explore market analysis in segmenting and identifying specified tourist markets.

PRTS 636. Research Problems in Park, Recreation and Toursim Studies. 3 Credits.

Practice in the use of statistical and analytical techniques in solving problems in Park, Recreation and Tourism Studies; supervised student research.

PRTS 650. Contemporary Issues in Park, Recreation and Tourism Studies. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to increase the student’s ability to critically analyze and discuss the contemporary issues and trends in parks, recreation and tourism. This course will require students to describe, evaluate, and critique the current research in the field; evaluate the future trajectory of park, recreation and tourism studies; and assess both personal and professional philosophies to elucidate his/her role as an advanced-level practitioner in parks, recreation or tourism industry.

PRTS 668. Internship in Park, Recreation and Tourism Studies. 1-6 Credits.

Designed to provide detailed practical experience (400 clock hours) in a park, recreation or tourism field setting. Prerequisite: completion of 75% of graduate work.

PRTS 695. Topics in Park, Recreation and Tourism Studies. 1-3 Credits.

Selected topic courses in Park, Recreation and Tourism Studies.

PRTS 697. Independent Study in Park, Recreation and Tourism Studies. 1-3 Credits.

Investigations in park, recreation, and tourism studies. Problems approved in advance are investigated under the supervision of the faculty advisor.

PRTS 698. Thesis Research in Park, Recreation and Tourism Studies. 3-6 Credits.

Students work independently with a faculty member to conduct research for their thesis on a topic related to Park, Recreation, and Tourism Studies. Prerequisite: Permission of the advisor and committee.

PRTS 699. Thesis in Park, Recreation and Tourism Studies. 3-6 Credits.

Students work independently with a faculty member to complete their thesis on a topic related to Park, Recreation and Tourism Studies. Prerequisite: permission of the advisor and committee.

PRTS 710. Tourist Behavior and Consumption. 3 Credits.

This course explores the complexities and evolution of tourism consumer behavior from a multidisciplinary perspective. Choosing, buying and consuming tourism/travel products and services includes a range of psycho-social processes, individual and environmental influences, motivations, and meanings that researchers and managers of national parks and tourism destinations should take into account when evaluating the tourism experience. This course provides an overview of such processes and influences and explains the basic and advanced concepts and theories that underlie tourist decision-making and behavior.

PRTS 720. Advanced Leisure Theories and their Applications. 3 Credits.

The course examines the concepts, theories and philosophies related to outdoor recreation, travel and tourism, and community recreation. Discussion will focus on the application of social science theories to the study of leisure, parks, recreation and tourism.

PRTS 730. Park Management for Professionals. 3 Credits.

This course targets research related to outdoor recreation in parks and open spaces. Empirical studies investigating sense of place, motivations for outdoor recreation, carrying capacity, crowding, recreation opportunity spectrum, and other sensitive issues will be covered. The course will also provide a historical overview of social sciences in outdoor recreation, and the principles guiding park management.

PRTS 740. Recreation Management for Administrators. 3 Credits.

This course provides preparation for upper-level recreation administration. National standards for managerial, administrative and executive decision-making for parks and recreation professionals will be discussed, in addition to practical knowledge and current real-world skills necessary in today’s changing park and recreation environment. The course is designed to prepare professionals to sit for the Certified Park and Recreation Professionals (CPRP) or Certified Park and Recreation Executive (CPRE) exam.

PRTS 760. Advanced Sustainable Tourism Management. 3 Credits.

This course examines the planning, development and management of the tourism industry with regard to economic, social, cultural and environmental sustainability. Current theory and research in the field of sustainable tourism will also be explored in order for students to develop a critical perspective on sustainable tourism development.

PRTS 770. Grant Writing for Parks and Recreation. 3 Credits.

Grant writing is an essential skill for the park and recreation professional. This course examines the grant writing process. This includes, but is not limited to, The Office of Research, the ODU Research Foundation, budgeting, human subjects, and partnerships. Students will be expected to submit a grant application by the end of the course.

PRTS 780. Youth Development in Recreation. 3 Credits.

The Positive Youth Development (PYD) movement has been greatly influenced by sport and recreation. With the recent increase of diabetes, obesity, sedentary lifestyles, and risky behaviors among youth, sport and recreation professionals are charged to help alleviate these societal issues. More specifically, practitioners need to target the socio-emotional needs of our youth through the sport and recreation experience. By using class lectures, technology, video, and self-directed research, students will explore research, theory, practice, and techniques of structuring positive experiences for youth. This course includes the examination of theories on youth development, behavior management, motivation, resiliency, and social skills as they relate to the sport and recreation experience.

PRTS 810. Tourist Behavior and Consumption. 3 Credits.

This course explores the complexities and evolution of tourism consumer behavior from a multidisciplinary perspective. Choosing, buying and consuming tourism/travel products and services includes a range of psycho-social processes, individual and environmental influences, motivations, and meanings that researchers and managers of national parks and tourism destinations should take into account when evaluating the tourism experience. This course provides an overview of such processes and influences and explains the basic and advanced concepts and theories that underlie tourist decision-making and behavior.

PRTS 820. Advanced Leisure Theories and their Applications. 3 Credits.

The course examines the concepts, theories and philosophies related to outdoor recreation, travel and tourism, and community recreation. Discussion will focus on the application of social science theories to the study of leisure, parks, recreation and tourism.

PRTS 830. Park Management for Professionals. 3 Credits.

This course targets the pursued and needed research of outdoor recreation in parks and open space. Empirical studies investigating areas such as: sense of place, motivations for outdoor recreation, carrying capacity, crowding, recreation opportunity spectrum, and other sensitive issues will be covered. The course will also include an historical overview of social sciences in outdoor recreation. The course will also cover principles to guide park management.

PRTS 840. Recreation Management for Administrators. 3 Credits.

This course provides preparation for upper-level recreation administration. National standards for managerial, administrative and executive decision-making for parks and recreation professionals will be discussed, in addition to practical knowledge and current real-world skills necessary in today’s changing park and recreation environment. The course is designed to prepare professionals to sit for the Certified Park and Recreation Professionals (CPRP) or Certified Park and Recreation Executive (CPRE) exam.

PRTS 860. Advanced Sustainable Tourism Management. 3 Credits.

This course examines the planning, development and management of the tourism industry with regard to economic, social, cultural and environmental sustainability. Current theory and research in the field of sustainable tourism will also be explored in order for students to develop a critical perspective on sustainable tourism development.

PRTS 880. Youth Development in Recreation. 3 Credits.

The Positive Youth Development (PYD) movement has been greatly influenced by sport and recreation. With the recent increase of diabetes, obesity, sedentary lifestyles, and risky behaviors among youth, sport and recreation professionals are charged to help alleviate these societal issues. More specifically, practitioners need to target the socio-emotional needs of our youth through the sport and recreation experience. By using class lectures, technology, video, and self-directed research, students will explore research, theory, practice, and techniques of structuring positive experiences for youth. This course includes the examination of theories on youth development, behavior management, motivation, resiliency, and social skills as they relate to the sport and recreation experience.

SPORT MANAGEMENT Courses

SMGT 556. Sport Psychology. 3 Credits.

Study of the psychological bases of coaching strategies and methodologies. Emphasis is placed on applying knowledge in field settings.

SMGT 595. Topics in Sport Management. 3 Credits.

This course provides an opportunity for in-depth study of selected topics in sport management. Pre- or corequisite: Permission from the instructor.

SMGT 636. Research Problems in Sport Management. 3 Credits.

Practice in the use of statistical and analytical techniques in solving problems in sport management; supervised student research. Prerequisites: HMS 635 or FOUN 612; taken in the last semester of graduate work.

SMGT 652. Facility Management for Sport, Recreation and Entertainment. 3 Credits.

This course examines the principles of facility operation for sport, recreation, and entertainment events. It will provide students with an understanding of the unique challenges and opportunities commonly faced by facility managers and how to effectively manage a sport facility. Students will analyze current research related to planning, funding, and operating facilities for sport, recreation, and entertainment.

SMGT 653. Sponsorship and Event Planning. 3 Credits.

This course examines the theory and practice of securing sponsorships and planning events. Students will analyze partnerships created between sport events and corporate sponsors. In addition, students will gain experience in planning and implementing a sport or leisure event.

SMGT 668. Internship in Sport Management. 6 Credits.

Designed to provide detailed practical experience (400 clock hours) in a sport management field setting.

SMGT 695. Topics in Sport Management. 1-3 Credits.

Selected topic courses in Sport Management.

SMGT 697. Independent Study in Sports Management. 1-3 Credits.

Individualized instruction to include research, specialized studies, or other scholarly writing.

SMGT 698. Thesis Research in Sport Management. 3-6 Credits.

Students work independently with a faculty member to conduct research for their thesis on a topic related to sport management. Prerequisite: Permission of the advisor and committee.

SMGT 699. Thesis in Sport Management. 3-6 Credits.

Students work independently with a faculty member to complete their thesis on a topic related to sport management. Prerequisite: Permission of the advisor and committee.

SMGT 738. Sport Finance. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to examine the principles and practices of financial management in diverse sport service settings. This course will explore the basic concepts of financial planning and analysis required to effectively manage a successful sport operation. The concepts covered in this course include finance, economics, accounting, and general business practices. The course is intended to offer a broad perspective of sport finance along with the basic skills associated with fiscal planning and management. Students will gain an understanding of the core principles associated with the financial management of sport enterprises.

SMGT 746. Strategic Marketing in Sport. 3 Credits.

This course will familiarize the student with theoretical and practical aspects of sport marketing including the dynamic nature of sport and the importance of branding. Through lecture and case-study analysis, the course will provide students with an understanding of the importance of marketing and consumer behavior theory and fundamentals specific to strategic marketing in the sport industry.

SMGT 750. Ethics in Sport Management. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of ethics and morals and how they apply in sport management settings. Teleological and deontological theories of ethics are examined with special application made to sport environments. Models of moral development, ethical decision making, and codes of ethics are emphasized.

SMGT 755. Social Issues in Sport. 3 Credits.

The course will examine the nature and scope of sport from sociological, historical, economic, and philosophical perspectives. Special emphasis will be placed on studying selected issues and topics that impact sport managers and their understanding of the role that sport plays in society.

SMGT 760. Sport Law. 3 Credits.

This course will examine the theory and practice of sport law as it relates to the management and supervision of sport and recreation facilities, programs, participants, spectators and events.

SMGT 775. Management and Leadership in Sport. 3 Credits.

This course will examine various management principles as they apply to sport settings. Special emphasis will be placed on studying leadership theories, human resource management, strategic planning, decision making, problem-solving, and employee motivation.

SMGT 838. Sport Finance. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to examine the principles and practices of financial management in diverse sport service settings. This course will explore the basic concepts of financial planning and analysis required to effectively manage a successful sport operation. The concepts covered in this course include finance, economics, accounting, and general business practices. The course is intended to offer a broad perspective of sport finance along with the basic skills associated with fiscal planning and management. Students will gain an understanding of the core principles associated with the financial management of sport enterprises.

SMGT 846. Strategic Marketing in Sport. 3 Credits.

This course will familiarize the student with theoretical and practical aspects of sport marketing, including the dynamic nature of sport and the importance of branding. Through lecture and case-study analysis, the course will provide students with an understanding of the importance of marketing and consumer behavior theory and fundamentals specific to strategic marketing in the sport industry.

SMGT 850. Ethics in Sport Management. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of ethics and morals and how they apply in sport management settings. Teleological and deontological theories of ethics are examined with special application made to sport environments. Models of moral development, ethical decision making, and codes of ethics are emphasized.

SMGT 855. Social Issues in Sport. 3 Credits.

The course will examine the nature and scope of sport from sociological, historical, economic, and philosophical perspectives. Special emphasis will be placed on studying selected issues and topics that impact sport managers and their understanding of the role that sport plays in society.

SMGT 860. Sport Law. 3 Credits.

This course will examine the theory and practice of sport law as it relates to the management and supervision of sport and recreation facilities, programs, participants, spectators and events.

SMGT 875. Management and Leadership in Sport. 3 Credits.

This course will examine various management principles as they apply to sport settings. Special emphasis will be placed on studying leadership theories, human resource management, strategic planning, decision making, problem-solving, and employee motivation.