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Old Dominion University

2013-2014 Catalog

Department of Educational Foundations and Leadership

120 Education Building
757-683-3287

Jay Scribner, Chair

Steve Myran, EFL Graduate Program Director

The Department of Educational Foundations and Leadership offers graduate programs in community college leadership (Ph.D.), educational leadership (M.S.Ed., Ed.S., Ph.D.), and higher education (M.S.Ed., Ed.S., Ph.D.).

Due to changing University requirements, national accreditation standards, and Commonwealth licensure regulations, the programs in the Darden College of Education are under constant revision. Any changes resulting from these factors supersede the program requirements described in the catalog. Students should obtain current program information from their advisors and the Darden College of Education website at http://education.odu.edu/.

Individual programs are described on the following pages.

Community College Leadership
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Community College Leadership
Educational Leadership
  • Master of Science in Education – Administration and Supervision ETMS (Education and Training Management Sub-Specialty Program)-Military Only
  • Master of Science in Education – Administration and Supervision with K-12 licensure
  • K-12 Licensure only
  • Education Specialist – Educational Leadership
  • Education Specialist – Educational Leadership with K-12 licensure
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Education – Educational Leadership Emphasis
Higher Education
  • Master of Science in Education – Higher Education
  • Student Affairs Administration
  • General Administration
  • International Higher Education Leadership
  • Education Specialist
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Education – Higher Education Emphasis

Doctor of Philosophy – Community College Leadership

120 Education Building
757-683-4375

Mitchell R. Williams, Program Coordinator

To meet the executive leadership workforce needs of the nation’s community colleges, Old Dominion University has developed a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Community College Leadership. The innovative quality of this program supports the University’s commitment to technology-delivered learning by implementing leadership graduate courses at each of the 23 VCCS community colleges and elsewhere in the United States through a variety of distance learning modalities including video conferencing, video streaming, asynchronous courses, and other emerging technological approaches as they are available and practical. The program is designed for working adults, and it utilizes synchronous and asynchronous course delivery to allow students to meet their personal and professional needs while pursuing a doctoral degree.

Some of the unique community college leadership issues that are addressed in this program are: the diversity of the student body, the role of the community college in higher education, community college finances, politics and policy development, and workforce preparation and the importance of workforce preparation provided by Community Colleges.

Admission

Criteria for admission to the Ph.D. in Community College Leadership are as follows:

  1. A completed master’s degree in an appropriate discipline from an accredited university. Degrees that are equivalent to a master’s degree such as L.L.B., J.D., and D.D.S. are also acceptable;
  2. A minimum GPA of 3.5 (on a 4.0 scale) overall for the master’s degree and in the major area of study in the master’s degree;
  3. A minimum of 1000 overall total score on the GRE with a minimum of 500 on both the verbal and quantitative sections of the GRE. Prospective students must score a minimum of 4.5 on the analytical writing portion of the GRE. These scores are minimums, so other portions of the total scores have a better chance of being accepted. Applicants should request to have their official GRE scores sent directly from the Educational Testing Service to Old Dominion University. Scores must have been earned in the last five years. In the event an applicant completes the GRE less than six weeks prior to the application deadline, the applicant should submit a letter that lists the unofficial GRE verbal and quantitative scores.
  4. Applicants whose native language is not English must submit a current score for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) of at least 600;
  5. Applicants must submit a 1500 word statement of their academic and professional goals with an emphasis on how the Ph.D. degree in community college leadership will contribute to the achievement of the stated goals;
  6. Three letters of reference from sources capable of commenting on the applicant’s readiness for advanced graduate study are required. At least one of these letters must be from a senior-level administrator in a community college;
  7. An interview with the Community College Leadership Program Admissions Committee may be required.

Prior course work is assumed in statistics, student development, workforce development, and leadership theory. If this assumption is not met, then additional course work may be added to the candidate’s graduate program of study. Please see prerequisites and additions at the bottom of the curriculum description for specifics.

Continuance Requirements

At the end of each semester – fall, spring, and summer – the graduate program director reviews records of students who do not maintain a 3.00 cumulative grade point average (GPA). Graduate students, whether degree or non-degree seeking, who do not have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00 will be placed on probation. Students who receive a grade of F in any course in the program of study or receive two C's or F grade in more than one class will be dismissed from the program by the Graduate Program Director. Students who are dissatisfied with their grades may follow the Grade Appeal Procedure found in the ODU Graduate Catalog. In the event a grade is appealed and changed to a B- or higher after a student has been dismissed from the program, the student will be reinstated.

The Ph.D. program in community college leadership is comprised of courses totaling a minimum of 48 academic credit hours beyond the master’s degree. The curriculum includes four parts: a content concentration totaling 18 credit hours, a research component including 15 credit hours, six credit hours of electives, and the dissertation which will include a minimum of nine credit hours depending on the length of time necessary for completion.

Students entering the program may also need to complete one introductory statistics course if they have not had such a course or cannot demonstrate competency at a satisfactory level. Entering students who have not served in a senior administrative or other leadership position in a community college for a minimum of three years, will need to complete two three credit hour internships as part of their elective requirements. Students who enter the Ph.D. program with a master’s degree in an academic field that is unrelated to higher education administration and/or who have not completed courses to develop competency in specified areas may need to complete specific courses in lieu of electives.

Under normal circumstances, admissions will be offered for the summer semester to build efficient cohort groups for this type of advanced study. To enhance the experience of the students and to increase the efficiency by which courses are offered, a cohort of up to 15 students will be admitted each year.

To build a cohesive cohort group, a series of intensive courses will be offered on the Old Dominion University campus each summer. Attendance is required for all newly admitted students. Residency at a second intensive on campus seminar the following summer is expected.

Applicants must submit completed applications and all related material no later than February 1 of each year, and students will be admitted for study beginning in May of the same year.

Program Completion and Exit

To complete the program students must fully comply with the following curriculum.

Prerequisites
FOUN 611Introduction to Research Methods in Education3
or FOUN 612 Applied Research Methods in Education
Community College Core (minimum 18 credits) *
CCL 820Community College Leadership3
CCL 824Community College Finance3
CCL 826Community College Curriculum and Program Development3
CCL 830Community College Politics and Policy Development3
HIED 866The Modern Community College3
SEPS 865Trends and Issues of Economic and Workforce Development3
Research and Statistics (minimum 12 credits)
FOUN 722Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis3
FOUN 813Advanced Program Evaluation in Education3
FOUN 822Applied Linear Models in Educational Research3
FOUN 812Advanced Research Design and Analysis3
FOUN 814Qualitative Research Design in Education3
Electives (minimum 6 credits)
COUN 807Adult and College Student Development3
HIED 808Contemporary Issues in Higher Education3
HIED 812Strategic Planning and Institutional Effectiveness3
HIED 837Academic Issues In Higher Education3
HIED 845Today’s College Student and Diversity3
HIED 852The Law of Higher Education3
HIED 856Higher Education Finance3
HIED 862Development and Fund Raising3
HIED 864College and the University Presidency3
HIED 865Adult and Continuing Education3
HIED 892Higher Education and Society3
HIED 893The History of Higher Education in the United States3
HIED 894Organization and Administration of Higher Education in the United States3
HIED 895Topics in Higher Education Administration1-6
SEPS 861Foundations of Adult Education and Training3
SEPS 862Administration and Management of Education and Training Programs3
Dissertation Seminar
FOUN 881Dissertation Seminar3
Dissertation (minimum 9 credits)
CCL 899Dissertation1-12
Experiential Requirements **
CCL 868Internship in Community College Leadership3

*

These six courses (18 credits) are required for all students who did not have them as part of a master’s degree program. If some or all of these courses were taken as part the student’s master’s program, the student may select alternate courses from the Electives List in consultation with the GPD.

**

One 3 credit hour internship is required for all doctoral students. Two internships are required of students who have not completed a minimum of three years of administrative experience in a Community College. It is expected that each intern will work with an administrator at the dean level or higher.

Educational Leadership

120 Education Building
757-683-5163
http://education.odu.edu/elc/academics/educational/ed_leadership_phd.shtml

Karen Sanzo, Program Coordinator

The purpose of graduate programs in educational leadership is to prepare individuals to assume leadership responsibilities in education, training, and other human service organizations.  Educational leadership offers the M.S.Ed. and the Ed.S. degrees for candidates seeking PK-12 administration and supervision licensure. Educational leadership also offers the Ed.S. degree without initial licensure and the Ph.D. in educational leadership. The programs prepare leaders who are visionary, who have depth of knowledge, and who can be effective and responsive organizational leaders. The programs develop graduates who can apply research-based knowledge, skills, and dispositions that translate into effective practice through innovative program instruction and authentic field-based experiences.  The emphasis area in educational administration and supervision is approved by the state of Virginia and are fully accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.

The administration and supervision emphasis area is based on the standards of the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education and approved by the Commonwealth of Virginia. Through this program participants will develop and demonstrate competence in the following areas.

  1. Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a school or district vision of learning supported by the school community.
  2. Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by promoting a positive school culture, providing an effective instructional program, applying best practice to student learning, and designing comprehensive professional growth plans for staff.
  3. Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by managing the organization, operations, and resources in a way that promotes a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.
  4. Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by collaborating with families and other community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources.
  5. Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by acting with integrity, fairly, and in an ethical manner.
  6. Candidates who complete the program are educational leaders who have the knowledge and ability to promote the success of all students by understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context.
  7. Internship. The internship provides significant opportunities for candidates to synthesize and apply the knowledge and practice and develop the skills identified in Standards 1 - 6 through substantial, sustained, standards-based work in real settings, planned and guided cooperatively by the institution and school district personnel for graduate credit.

Master of Science in Education - Administration and Supervision emphasis

120 Education Building
757-683-5163
http://education.odu.edu/elc/academics/educational/ed_leadership_phd.shtml

Karen Sanzo, Program Coordinator

Admission

To gain admission, applicants must:

  1. meet all University admissions requirements;
  2. have an undergraduate grade point average of 2.80 overall and 3.00 in the major;
  3. provide two letters of recommendation, including one from a school administrator; and,
  4. complete a one-page essay explaining why he/she should be admitted into the program.

In addition, all students who wish to enter the administration and supervision program with Commonwealth of Virginia accreditation must satisfactorily complete an administrative skills portfolio assessment process. ELS 600 must be the first course in which students enroll. Non-degree students may not take more than two ELS courses prior to admission. Performance in classes as a non-degree student will not guarantee admission into the program.

Continuance

Students must meet all University and program requirements including the internship requirements and portfolio and maintain a 3.00 grade average. Students who receive an F grade may be dismissed from the program. Those seeking the Administration and Supervision PreK-12 endorsement on their Commonwealth of Virginia Postgraduate Professional license beginning July 1, 2005 must take and pass the School Leaders Licensure Assessment (SLLA, #1010).

Exit

Students must successfully complete:

  1. the School Leaders Licensure Assessment (SLLA);
  2. the required course of study;
  3. three self assessments, one at the start of the program, one after the first internship, and one upon completion of all coursework;
  4. Two internships of 320 hours and 5 placements per VDOE administrative licensure regulations; and,
  5. have a minimum 3.00 grade point average in order to graduate.

Program Requirements

For the Master of Science in Education with an emphasis in administration and supervision, a student must have completed an approved 36-hour minimum graduate program including two internships and a culminating written comprehensive examination. Approved internship experiences are required by the Commomwealth of Virginia.

Administration and Supervision Preparation for Public School Pre K-12 Licensure

Requirements for this emphasis area are as follows.

Prerequisite
ELS 600Principal Orientation and Instructional Leadership *3
Curriculum
ELS 600Principal Orientation and Instructional Leadership *3
ELS 610School Community Relations and Politics3
ELS 621Curriculum Development and Assessment3
ELS 753Educational Finance and Budgeting3
ELS 754Human Resource Development and Evaluation3
ELS 787Pupil Personnel Services for Diverse Populations3
ELS 657Public School Law3
Clinical Experience
ELS 626Instructional Supervision, Staff Development, and Assessment3
ELS 668Internship in Educational Leadership3
ELS 669Instructional Internship3
Research Component
FOUN 722Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis3
ELS 673Critical Issues Research3

*

This course must be taken first and include the start of an Administration Portfolio Skills Assessment.


Education Specialist with Licensure Program

http://education.odu.edu/elc/academics/educational/ed_leadership_phd.shtml

Karen Sanzo, Program Coordinator

Students who have a master’s degree in another area and do not have a license in administration supervision PreK-12 may be accepted into the Ed.S. with Licensure Program. These students would complete the following 39 semester hours of coursework to lead to licensure as an administrator.

Curriculum

Course Requirements30
Principal Orientation and Instructional Leadership *
School Community Relations and Politics *
Curriculum Development and Assessment *
Instructional Supervision, Staff Development, and Assessment (not required for licensure) *
Public School Law *
Internship in Educational Leadership *
Instructional Internship *
Pupil Personnel Services for Diverse Populations *
Educational Finance and Budgeting *
Human Resource Development and Evaluation *
Electives **9
Leadership Theory for Educational Improvement
Organizational Theory and Behavior in Education
Educational Systems Planning and Futures
Advanced School Law
Leadership for Social Justice
Leadership for Teaching and Learning
Field Research in School Administration and Supervision
Total Hours39

*

The classes marked with an asterisk are required classes for licensure.

**

Other doctoral-level classes may be taken in consultation with your advisor.

Students must successfully complete the School Leaders Licensure Assessment (SLLA).

Education Specialist–Educational Leadership

120 Education Building
757-683-5163
http://education.odu.edu/elc/academics/educational/ed_leadership_phd.shtml

Karen Sanzo, Program Coordinator

The Education Specialist (Ed.S.) program is designed to provide further opportunities for holders of master’s degrees to develop expertise at a higher professional level. Emphasis is on continued development for leadership in policy formulation, planning, and executive action related to educational and training institutions and human service organizations. Individuals who aspire to advance in educational leadership will find in this program a meaningful base for building toward their professional objectives. The Ed.S. program in educational leadership includes emphasis areas in administration and supervision and in higher education.

Admission

Students must:

  1. meet all University requirements;
  2. provide two letters of recommendation;
  3. hold a master’s degree from an accredited institution (minimum 3.25 graduate grade point average on a 4.00 scale); and,
  4. provide a one-page essay explaining why he/she should be admitted into the program.
  5. Applicants whose admission credentials are slightly below the required minimum will be considered for provisional admission. Performance in classes as a non-degree student will not be taken into consideration in the admission process.

Continuance

Students must meet all University requirements and maintain a 3.00 or higher grade point average.

Exit

Students must successfully complete:

  1. a written comprehensive examination;
  2. the required course of study; and,
  3. have a 3.00 grade point average or above.

Education Specialist Program Requirements

The Ed.S. requires the completion of a minimum of 30 approved semester credit hours consisting of at least 18 hours at the 800 level.

Course Requirements
 

ELS 835Organizational Theory and Behavior in Education3
ELS 853Educational Finance and Budgeting3
ELS 871Educational Systems Planning and Futures3
ELS 876Leadership for Social Justice3
ELS 878Leadership for Teaching and Learning3
ELS 879Field Research in School Administration and Supervision3
FOUN 722Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis3
Select three Electives from the following:9
Leadership Theory for Educational Improvement
History and Philosophy of American Public School Reform
Advanced School Law
Multicultural Curriculum Leadership and Globalization
Contemporary Issues in Education
Total Hours30

 

Doctor of Philosophy in Education– Educational Leadership Emphasis

Karen Sanzo, Program Coordinator

http://education.odu.edu/elc/academics/educational/ed_leadership_phd.shtml

Program Requirements

The Ph.D. program in educational leadership consists of a minimum of 48 academic credit hours beyond the master’s degree and a minimum of 12 credits for the dissertation. The curriculum includes four parts: an introductory course (3 credits), elective (3 credits), the research core (15 credits), the ELS concentration specific courses (24 hours), and the capstone course (3 credits). The dissertation will include a minimum of 12 credit hours. Students entering the program may also need to complete one or more introductory statistics course if they have not had such a course or cannot demonstrate competency at a satisfactory level. Students who come into the Ph.D. program with a master’s degree in an academic field that is unrelated to educational leadership and/or who have not completed courses to develop competency in specified areas may need to complete other courses in lieu of electives.

Admission is on a rolling basis. Students can commence their programs of study during the semester immediately following admission.

Program Completion and Exit

In order to complete the program students must fully comply with the curriculum below and achieve a GPA of 3.00 or higher.

  • Educational Leadership Curriculum - 48 credits
  • Dissertation - 12 credits minimum
Prerequisites
ELS 660Program Evaluation, Research and Planning3
or FOUN 611 Introduction to Research Methods in Education
or FOUN 612 Applied Research Methods in Education
FOUN 722Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis (or equivalent)3
Research Core
ELS 831Accountability Systems in Public Education3
FOUN 822Applied Linear Models in Educational Research3
or FOUN 823 Analysis of Variance Applied to Educational Research
FOUN 812Advanced Research Design and Analysis3
FOUN 814Qualitative Research Design in Education3
FOUN 813Advanced Program Evaluation in Education3
Educational Leadership and Services Concentration Courses
ELS 811Leadership Theory for Educational Improvement3
ELS 815Leadership for Equity and Inclusive Education3
ELS 821Policy and Politics in Educational Leadership3
ELS 835Organizational Theory and Behavior in Education3
ELS 876Leadership for Social Justice3
ELS 878Leadership for Teaching and Learning3
Select three Electives from the following: *9
History and Philosophy of American Public School Reform
Educational Systems Planning and Futures
Advanced School Finance, and Operations
Multicultural Curriculum Leadership and Globalization
Contemporary Issues in Education
Capstone Course
FOUN 881Dissertation Seminar3
Dissertation (minimum 12 hours)12
Dissertation
Total Hours63

*

With advisor approval, two of these courses may be substituted with courses outside of the educational leadership program to allow students to form cognate areas.

Continuance Requirements

At the end of each semester – fall, spring, and summer – the graduate program director reviews records of students who do not maintain a 3.00 cumulative grade point average (GPA). Graduate students, whether degree or non-degree seeking, who do not have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00 will be placed on probation. In addition, students must be continuously enrolled in the cohort.

Higher Education

The department offers, emphasis areas in higher education in the M.S.Ed. and Ed.S. degrees as well as the Ph.D. in higher education.

Master of Science in Education - Higher Education Emphasis

120 Education Building
757-683-3702

Dennis Gregory, Program Coordinator

The purpose of the master’s degree program is to prepare individuals to assume professional administrative positions in institutions of postsecondary education. The program is focused upon student affairs, international, higher education leadership, and other higher education areas such as presidential leadership and external relations.  The program features a mix of theory and practice and offers students the opportunity to gain expertise in both administrative and counseling skills. The program is among those listed as meeting the requirements for graduate programs of the American College Personnel Association (ACPA) and is also listed among programs endorsed by the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA). The program meets standards established by the Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS).

Admission

Prospective students seeking admission to the master’s degree program in higher education must:

  1. meet all University admission requirements as listed in the Old Dominion University Catalog;
  2. have earned an undergraduate grade point average of 2.80 overall and 3.00 in the major;
  3. provide two letters of recommendation from an administrator or faculty member at the student’s undergraduate institution (one letter should come from a person who has supervised the student in a student leadership position or who can comment on the student’s potential for work in a higher education setting, the other may come from another person who can comment on the students' academic ability);
  4. provide a one page essay of at least 500 words describing goals to be achieved as a result of completion of a master’s degree in higher education; and
  5. have an acceptable score on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or Miller Analogies Test (MAT) for admission.

Continuance

Regularly accepted students and those who become “regular” students must:

  1. meet all University and program requirements;
  2. maintain a 3.00 grade point average; and
  3. complete internship requirements in a timely manner.

Exit

In order to graduate from the program, students must successfully complete:

  1. the required course of study for a total of at least 42 credit hours of coursework; and
  2. a written comprehensive examination.

Program Requirements

In order to complete the course of study for the degree of Master of in Higher Education, a student must fulfill the requirements noted above. This course of study includes satisfactory completion of 27 hours of required courses, 9 hours of cognate courses, and 6 hours of internship credit.

Curriculum

Higher Education - Student Affairs Administration

Required Courses
FOUN 611Introduction to Research Methods in Education3
COUN 707Adult and College Student Development3
HIED 708Contemporary Issues in Higher Education3
HIED 710Introduction to Student Affairs Administration3
HIED 733Professional Helping Skills in Higher Education3
HIED 745Today’s College Student and Diversity3
HIED 752The Law of Higher Education3
HIED 757The Multicultural University3
HIED 761Higher Education Capstone3
Select three from the following:9
Foundations of Career Development
Social and Cultural Issues in Counseling
Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis
The Private College and University
Introduction to International Higher Education Administration
Comparative Higher Education Systems
Higher Education Finance
The Multicultural University
Higher Education Leadership
Higher Education Curriculum
Development and Fund Raising
College and the University Presidency
The History of Higher Education in the United States
Organization and Administration of Higher Education in the United States
External and Internal Relations for Higher Education
Topics in Higher Education Administration
Advanced Program Evaluation in Education
Community College Leadership
Community College Finance
Community College Curriculum and Program Development
Internships
HIED 668Internship in Higher Education Administration (One)3
HIED 668Internship in Higher Education Administration (Two)3
Total Hours42

Higher Education - General Administration

Required27
Select nine from the following:
Introduction to Research Methods in Education
Contemporary Issues in Higher Education
Introduction to Student Affairs Administration
Professional Helping Skills in Higher Education
The Law of Higher Education
Higher Education Finance
The Multicultural University
Higher Education Capstone
The History of Higher Education in the United States
Organization and Administration of Higher Education in the United States
Cognate9
Select three from the following:
Counseling and Psychotherapy Techniques
Foundations of Career Development
Social and Cultural Issues in Counseling
Adult and College Student Development
Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis
The Private College and University
Professional Helping Skills in Higher Education
Introduction to International Higher Education Administration
Comparative Higher Education Systems
Today’s College Student and Diversity
Higher Education Leadership
Higher Education Curriculum
Development and Fund Raising
College and the University Presidency
The Modern Community College
Topics in Higher Education Administration
Community College Leadership
Community College Finance
Community College Curriculum and Program Development
Internships6
Internship in Higher Education Administration (One)
Internship in Higher Education Administration (Two)
Total Hours42

Higher Education - International Higher Education Leadership

Required27
Select nine from the following:
Intercultural Communication: History, Theory and Application
Language and Communication Across Cultures
Introduction to Research Methods in Education
Adult and College Student Development
Contemporary Issues in Higher Education
Introduction to International Higher Education Administration
Comparative Higher Education Systems
The Law of Higher Education
Higher Education Capstone
Cognate9
Select three from the following:
Professional Helping Skills in Higher Education
Today’s College Student and Diversity
Higher Education Finance
Higher Education Leadership
Higher Education Curriculum
The History of Higher Education in the United States
Counseling and Psychotherapy Techniques
Social and Cultural Issues in Counseling
Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis
Studies in International History
Personality Psychology: Theory and Research
The Euro-Atlantic Community
Global Political Economy
Globalization and Social Change in the World System
International Economics
Global Marketing Management
Internships6
Internship in Higher Education Administration ((One))
Internship in Higher Education Administration ((Two))
Total Hours42

Education Specialist – Emphasis in Higher Education

Dennis E. Gregory, Program Coordinator

The Education Specialist program is designed to provide further opportunities for holders of master’s degrees  in higher education and related disciplines to develop expertise at a higher professional level. Emphasis is on continued development for leadership in policy formulation, planning, and executive action related to educational and training institutions and human service organizations. Individuals who aspire to advance in higher education administration will find in this program a meaningful base for building toward their professional objectives.

Admission

Students must:

  1. meet all University requirements;
  2. provide two letters of recommendation;
  3. hold a master’s degree from an accredited institution (minimum 3.25 graduate grade point average on a 4.00 scale);
  4. provide a 1500 word essay explaining why he/she should be admitted into the program; and
  5. have an acceptable score on the general aptitude section of the Graduate Record Examination.

Applicants whose admission credentials are slightly below the required minimum will be considered for provisional admission. Performance in classes as a non-degree student will not be taken into consideration in the admission process.

Continuance

Students must meet all University requirements and maintain a 3.00 or higher grade point average.

Exit

Students must successfully complete:

  1. a written comprehensive examination;
  2. the required course of study; and
  3. have a 3.00 grade point average or above.

Program Requirements

The Education Specialist in higher education requires the completion of a minimum of 30 approved semester credit hours beyond the master’s degree. Because of the wide variation of backgrounds among students seeking this degree, the curricular requirements will be determined based upon the applicant’s background.

Required courses, if they have not been taken at the 700 level within a master’s degree program include:

COUN 807Adult and College Student Development3
HIED 808Contemporary Issues in Higher Education3
HIED 852The Law of Higher Education3
HIED 894Organization and Administration of Higher Education in the United States3
HIED 870External and Internal Relations for Higher Education3
Total Hours15

Education Specialist in Higher Education

Higher Education Core18
Select six from the following: *
Contemporary Issues in Higher Education
Introduction to Student Affairs Administration
The Private College and University
Professional Helping Skills in Higher Education
Introduction to International Higher Education Administration
Comparative Higher Education Systems
Today’s College Student and Diversity
The Law of Higher Education
Higher Education Finance
The Multicultural University
Higher Education Leadership
Higher Education Curriculum
College and the University Presidency
The Modern Community College
The History of Higher Education in the United States
Organization and Administration of Higher Education in the United States
Topics in Higher Education Administration
Community College Leadership
Community College Finance
Community College Curriculum and Program Development
Research Courses
FOUN 722Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis3
FOUN 813Advanced Program Evaluation in Education3
FOUN 812Advanced Research Design and Analysis3
Internship
HIED 868Internship: Higher Education Administration3
Total Hours30

*

Students will choose, with the assistance of their advisor, six courses, which do not repeat courses taken for the master's degree



Doctor of Philosophy in Education - Higher Education Emphasis

Dennis E. Gregory, Program Coordinator

The Doctor of Philosophy is the degree most often desired for those who aspire to senior administrative and faculty roles in institutions of higher education. Possession of this degree also provides those who have earned it with entry into business, government, research, and other leadership positions. The Ph.D. in higher education is intended to prepare individuals for administrative and faculty positions and to provide these students with the skills to carry out scholarly research, lead organizations, and create new knowledge. The curriculum described below contains elements that will, if completed successfully, provide research expertise, administrative skills and experience, and the ability to serve the nation’s colleges and universities and contribute to higher education elsewhere in the world.

Admission

Criteria for admission to the Ph.D. in higher education are as follows:

  1. A completed master’s degree in an appropriate discipline from a regionally accredited university. Degrees that are equivalent to a master’s degree such as L.L.B., J.D., and D.D.S. are also acceptable;
  2. A preferred minimum GPA of 3.5 (on a 4.0 scale) overall for the master’s degree and in the major area of study in the master’s degree;
  3. A minimum of 1000/297 overall total score on the GRE and a preferred score of 500/153 or above on the verbal and 500/144 on the quantitative sections of the GRE. Prospective students must score a minimum of 4.5 on the analytical writing portion of the GRE. GRE scores expire after five years; however, candidates who have completed the exam prior to five years before the application deadline may submit those scores for consideration if the scores meet the minimum expectations and they are provided from an official source such as a transcript or form provided by the Educational Testing Service. Old Dominion University reserves the right to determine what an “official source” is. While these scores are minimums, other portions of the total application package will be strongly considered to balance lower scores;
  4. Applicants whose native language is not English must submit a current score for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) of at least 600;
  5. Applicants must submit a 1500 word statement of their academic and professional goals with an emphasis on how the Ph.D. degree in higher education will contribute to the achievement of the stated goals;
  6. Three letters of reference from sources capable of commenting on the applicant’s readiness for advanced graduate study. At least one of these letters must be from a senior-level administrator in a college or university;
  7. An interview with the Higher Education Program Committee. This committee will also review applications for admission; and,
    Prior course work is assumed in statistics, student development, and leadership theory. If this assumption is not met, then additional course work will be added to the candidate’s graduate program of study. Please see prerequisites and additions at the bottom of the curriculum description for specifics.

Continuance

Students must meet all University requirements and maintain a 3.00 or higher grade point average. Students must be continuously enrolled in at least two courses each semester until all courses prior to the dissertation are completed. After completion of all such coursework, students must be enrolled in either a dissertation credit course or HIED 999 until graduation. Please see the Ph.D. in Education Handbook for more details.

Program Requirements

The Ph.D. program in higher education consists of courses totaling a minimum of 60 academic credit hours beyond the master’s degree. The curriculum includes four parts: a content concentration totaling 33 credit hours (including the higher education core – 21 credits and a cognate – 12 credits), a research component including 12 credit hours, and the dissertation seminar for three hours and the dissertation which will include a minimum of 12 credit hours. The dissertation will often include more than 12 credit hours depending on the length of time necessary for completion. Students entering the program may also need to complete one introductory statistics course and one research methods course if they have not had such courses or cannot demonstrate competency at a satisfactory level. If students have not yet served in an administrative or other leadership position in a college or university for a minimum of three years, completion of six credit hours of internship is required. Students who come into the Ph.D. program with a master’s degree in an academic field that is unrelated to higher education administration and/or who have not completed courses to develop competency in specified areas may need to complete these courses in lieu of electives.

Under normal circumstances, admissions will be offered once a year in order to build efficient cohort groups for this type of advanced study. In order to enhance the experience of the students and to increase the efficiency by which courses are offered, a cohort of 5-10 students will be admitted each year. This limited number of students is necessary to assure that there is an adequate number of full-time faculty members to serve the students through advising and other duties, particularly when the cohorts reach the dissertation stage of the program.

To build a cohesive cohort group, a series of intensive courses will be offered on the Old Dominion University campus each summer. It will be expected that all newly admitted students will come to campus for one of these seminars during the summer after they are admitted to the program and complete two courses together as a group. These courses will be selected from within the “content concentration” or “research” requirements. A third course will be available for regular study during the summer so that students may comply with one of the residency requirements. Residency at a second intensive seminar the following summer is recommended but not required.

A minimum of two semesters of full-time study is required of students in the program to meet program residency requirements. One of the semesters of full-time study (defined as completion of nine credit hours) must be accomplished by the completion of the intensive seminar noted above. The second semester of residency can be accomplished in several ways. Students may complete nine credit hours during Fall or Spring or three hours in the summer or may attend a second summer residency. Courses taken via TELETECHNET or other distance education methodologies are considered “resident” courses, so that taking three TELETECHNET courses during a semester may complete the second residency requirement.

Applicants must submit completed applications and all related material no later than February 1 of each year, and students will be admitted for study beginning in June of the same year.

Exit

In order to complete the program students must fully comply with the curriculum below and with all requirements noted elsewhere in the University catalog for graduate students and with requirements listed in the Ph.D. in Education Handbook. It is the responsibility of the student to obtain these materials and comply with required portions.

Curriculum

Prerequisites
FOUN 611Introduction to Research Methods in Education3
FOUN 722Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis3
Content Concentration
Higher Education Core (21 credits minimum) *
HIED 808Contemporary Issues in Higher Education3
HIED 852The Law of Higher Education3
HIED 856Higher Education Finance3
HIED 857The Multicultural University3
HIED 870External and Internal Relations for Higher Education3
HIED 893The History of Higher Education in the United States3
HIED 894Organization and Administration of Higher Education in the United States3
COUN 807Adult and College Student Development3
Cognate (12 credits minimum) **
Select one cognate option from the following:
Option A, Higher Education Policy and Administration:
HIED 812Strategic Planning and Institutional Effectiveness3
HIED 820The Private College and University3
HIED 859Higher Education Curriculum3
HIED 862Development and Fund Raising3
HIED 864College and the University Presidency3
Option B, Student Affairs:
HIED 810Introduction to Student Affairs Administration3
HIED 830Seminar in Student Affairs Administration3
HIED 831Group Dynamics in Higher Education3
HIED 833Professional Helping Skills in Higher Education3
HIED 845Today’s College Student and Diversity3
Option C, Community Colleges:
HIED 866The Modern Community College3
CCL 820Community College Leadership3
CCL 824Community College Finance3
CCL 830Community College Politics and Policy Development3
Option D, Athletic Administration:
SRM 738/838Fiscal Planning and Management in Sport and Recreation3
SRM 746/846Sport and Recreation Marketing3
SRM 750/850Ethics in Sport and Recreation Management3
SRM 752Facility Management for Sport and Recreation3
SRM 753/853Sponsorship and Event Planning3
SRM 760/860Legal Aspects of Sport and Recreation3
SRM 775/875Management and Leadership in Sport and Recreation3
Option E, International Higher Education Administration:
HIED 843Introduction to International Higher Education Administration3
HIED 844Comparative Higher Education Systems3
Two classes at the 800 level from the International Studies Department
Research and Statistics ***
FOUN 822Applied Linear Models in Educational Research3
or FOUN 823 Analysis of Variance Applied to Educational Research
FOUN 812Advanced Research Design and Analysis3
FOUN 814Qualitative Research Design in Education3
FOUN 813Advanced Program Evaluation in Education3
Dissertation Seminar
FOUN 881Dissertation Seminar3
Dissertation (12 credits minimum):
HIED 899Dissertation1-12

*

These seven courses (21 credits) are required for all students who did not have them as part of a master's degree program. If some or all of these courses were taken as part of the student's master's program, they and his or her advisor may choose alternate courses from those listed.

**

The graduate program director may allow other cognate areas to be developed and implemented by students and advisors upon request if a particular justification is made in writing.

***

Some courses may be waived based on previous study.

Additions

Internship in Higher Education Administration (6 credits) is required for all doctoral students who have not served in a full-time administrative position for at least three years prior to admission. Those students interested in community colleges may substitute CCL 868 – Internship in Community College Administration. It is expected that each intern will work with an administrator at the dean level or higher.

Special Courses

These courses may be used for a variety of specialized topical seminars and may fill requirements in one or more of the cognate areas noted above.

HIED 895Topics in Higher Education Administration1-6

COMMUNITY COLLEGE LEADERSHIP Courses

CCL 685. Topics in Community College Leadership. 1-3 Credits.

Topics in Community College Leadership.

CCL 695. Topics in Community College Leadership. 1-3 Credits.

TOPICS IN COMMUNITY COLLEGE LEADERSHIP.

CCL 720. Community College Leadership. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: acceptance into the doctoral program or permission of the instructor. A doctoral level seminar intended to provide theoretical and practical background on issues related to community college leadership and assist the student to develop the skills necessary to fulfill the responsibilities of a senior community college administrative leadership position. Of particular importance are skills needed for community college deans, vice presidents and presidents.

CCL 724. Community College Finance. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: acceptance into the doctoral program or permission of the instructor. A doctoral level seminar intended to provide information about the financing and budgeting processes that are practiced in community colleges. This will be accomplished by examining the budget development and budget planning process and a survey of sources and uses of funds as well as the functions and techniques of responsible management of resources.

CCL 726. Community College Curriculum and Program Development. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisite: acceptance into the doctoral program or permission of the instructor. A doctoral- level seminar intended to assist students to understand the development and management of the community college curriculum. It will do this by (1) examining processes practiced in the identification of courses and degree programs, (2) the review and approval processes of individual programs and courses, (3) assessment and other accountability activities, and (4) the authorizing processes and procedures for establishing or terminating courses or programs.

CCL 768. Internship in Community College Leadership. 3-6 Credits.

3 to 6 credits. Prerequisite: acceptance into the doctoral program or permission of the instructor. The purpose of this course is to allow students to obtain hands-on experience in a leadership role at a community college setting. The student will learn about leadership skills at the community college by observing his or her mentor/site supervisor and by being given leadership tasks associated with the site he or she has chosen.

CCL 795. Topics in Community College Leadership. 1-3 Credits.

1 to 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

CCL 820. Community College Leadership. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: acceptance into the doctoral program or permission of the instructor. A doctoral level seminar intended to provide theoretical and practical background on issues related to community college leadership and assist the student to develop the skills necessary to fulfill the responsibilities of a senior community college administrative leadership position. Of particular importance are skills needed for community college deans, vice presidents and presidents.

CCL 824. Community College Finance. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: acceptance into the doctoral program or permission of the instructor. A doctoral level seminar intended to provide information about the financing and budgeting processes that are practiced in community colleges. This will be accomplished by examining the budget development and budget planning process and a survey of sources and uses of funds as well as the functions and techniques of responsible management of resources.

CCL 826. Community College Curriculum and Program Development. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisite: acceptance into the doctoral program or permission of the instructor. A doctoral- level seminar intended to assist students to understand the development and management of the community college curriculum. It will do this by (1) examining processes practiced in the identification of courses and degree programs, (2) the review and approval processes of individual programs and courses, (3) assessment and other accountability activities, and (4) the authorizing processes and procedures for establishing or terminating courses or programs.

CCL 830. Community College Politics and Policy Development. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: acceptance into the doctoral program or permission of the instructor. This course will examine the political factors that may influence educational policy-decisions at community colleges and other institutions of higher education. This course will encourage students to pursue self-directed study of the relationships community college leaders build with community college boards of trustees, county commissioners, state legislators (with emphasis on the Commonwealth of Virginia), and federal representatives. The course also will require students to research and participate in debates on current political and ethical issues affecting the community college.

CCL 868. Internship in Community College Leadership. 3-6 Credits.

3 to 6 credits. Prerequisite: acceptance into the doctoral program or permission of the instructor. The purpose of this course is to allow students to obtain hands-on experience in a leadership role at a community college setting. The student will learn about leadership skills at the community college by observing his or her mentor/site supervisor and by being given leadership tasks associated with the site he or she has chosen.

CCL 881. Dissertation Seminar. 3 Credits.

3 credits. A seminar that focuses on the design, implementation, and evaluation of community colleges under real-life conditions in the field. Students and faculty work with community college decision makers utilizing problem solving skills and analysis.

CCL 895. Topics in Community College Leadership. 1-3 Credits.

1 to 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

CCL 899. Dissertation. 1-12 Credits.

1 to 12 credits.

CCL 999. Community College Leadership 999. 1 Credit.

1 credit. A one-hour pass/fail registration required of all graduate students to maintain active status during the final semester prior to graduation. After successfully passing the candidacy examination, all doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit each term until the degree is complete.

EDUC LEADERSHIP SERVICES Courses

ELS 596. Topics in Education. 1-3 Credits.

ELS 597. Topics in Education. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits each semester. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. The College of Education offers selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly.

ELS 598. Topics in Education. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits each semester. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. The College of Education offers selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly.

ELS 600. Principal Orientation and Instructional Leadership. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An introduction to educational leadership to develop a capacity for reflective practice which unifies theory and knowledge for the improvement of instruction. Students will begin to understand their leadership potential through reflection, self-analysis, and instructor feedback via diagnostic assessment and case studies for principals. Students develop an administrative portfolio skills assessment. Required entry level course.

ELS 610. School Community Relations and Politics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Pre- or Corequisite: ELS 600. An introduction for prospective administrators to the social, political context in which they work. Emphasis will be placed on: understanding and using leadership skills in designing programs around the needs and problems of the school and its special publics; relating with the media; improving communication skills; and using skills in negotiations and conflict management.

ELS 621. Curriculum Development and Assessment. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Pre- or Corequisite: ELS 600. A course designed to create a basic understanding of the comprehensive nature of the curriculum development process K-12, from a school leadership perspective. Students will explore theoretical, strategic, and organizational issues associated with curriculum development including multiculturalism, cognitive development, curricular patterns and connections, and assessment and evaluation.

ELS 623. Design of Service Delivery Plans to Meet the Needs of Military Connected Children and Families. 4 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; Service Learning, 1 hour. 4 credits. Prerequisite: COUN 605 and FOUN 662 and acceptance into the Military Child and Family Education Certificate Program. Students will apply their foundational and assessment knowledge for supporting military students to a capstone project in service delivery program design. This course will engage participants in surveying and considering a range of services, program elements, and strategies that may be employed to improve educational, social, and emotional school experiences for children of military-related families. Participants will engage in processes for selecting and preparing to implement optimal support strategies and structures to meet the identified needs of military students in their school setting. They will become familiar with and prepared to craft specific plans to utilize, for the benefit of military children, their peers and families: (a) various school, community, and government services; (b) classroom- and school-based programs designed to improve academic achievement and/or emotional well-being; and (c) classroom- and school-based strategies for designing and implementing programs and services that meet the needs of these children and their families. This course is required for completion of the Military Child and Family Education graduate certificate. Students must be accepted into the certificate program or receive approval from the certificate program director in order to enroll.

ELS 626. Instructional Supervision, Staff Development, and Assessment. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ELS 610 and ELS 621. Pre- or Corequisite: ELS 600.Through site-based projects, scripts, enactments, case study analysis, and reflection, course participants apply theories and best practices to develop the skills and strategies that leaders use with individuals and groups to facilitate excellence in teaching and learning.

ELS 657. Public School Law. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Pre- or Corequisite: ELS 600. This course is an introduction to law, particularly with respect to federal and state statutes and court decisions dealing with the public schools. The topics span the full spectrum of law-related concerns. By necessity, it is first a theoretical course; however, the outcomes are intended to be practical by providing the legal understanding necessary for a school administrator to negotiate his or her way through the maze of difficult legal matters commonly faced each day by school and district leaders.

ELS 660. Program Evaluation, Research and Planning. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ELS 600. In this course principal licensure candidates learn to identify organizational needs, develop research-based strategies to address those needs, and use data-driven planning to implement, monitor, and manage processes involved in implementing change strategies.

ELS 667. Cooperative Education. 1-3 Credits.

ELS 668. Internship in Educational Leadership. 3-6 Credits.

3-6 credits. Prerequisite: ELS 600 and ELS 669, passing scores on the appropriate PRAXIS II content examination or permission of instructor. The university and site supervisor will work with the educational leadership candidate in PreK through 12 and central office settings to provide the candidate with appropriate experiences to demonstrate competencies required by the Educational Leadership Constituent Council and the Virginia Department of Education.

ELS 669. Instructional Internship. 3 Credits.

Title credits 20 hrs; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ELS 673. Each internship course will require students to complete a minimum of 160 hours in each course. Course is designed to provide field experiences which will prepare them to serve as instructional and curriculum leadership in K-12 environments. Student must produce 1) a portfolio with required artifacts; 2) prepare a 10-12 reflective paper according to identified guidelines and 3) complete internship evaluation with mentor and college supervisor at least three times during the term.

ELS 673. Critical Issues Research. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ELS 600, ELS 610, ELS 621, ELS 626, and ELS 660. The student completes an in-depth study of a critical issue in his/her profession and documents the work in a critical issue paper. Student must be able to demonstrate written and oral communication skills and critical and analytical skills in dealing with a major issue in educational leadership. Course to be taken near completion of program.

ELS 697. Topics in Educational Leadership. 1-6 Credits.

1-6 credits. The study of selected topics in educational leadership. Arranged individually with students.

ELS 700. Leadership and Management for School Improvement. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to give students entering the ODU Licensure program an understanding of the complex roles and challenges of a school principal, while focusing on the constantly changing nature of administrative responsibility. Students develop an integrated view of the knowledge base, research and practice of administraton within a context of multiple perspectives and a wide range of thinking. The purpose of the course is to increase understanding of education, the role of educational administration, the forces that are moving education into a new era, the transitions that are occurring, and the use of the latest, best practices to improve the education of all children.

ELS 701. Accountability and Organizational Improvement. 3 Credits.

This course is an in-depth study of effective data based decision-making practices for contemporary school leaders. Formative and summative data based decision making practices will be explored, as well as how to work with large and small groups of staff meembers to analyze multiple measures of data and create school improvement designs for student and school success. An emphasis is placed on using data to make decisions at the division, school, and classroom levels. Prerequisite: ELS 700.

ELS 702. Educational Politics and Policymaking. 3 Credits.

This course teaches aspiring school leaders how politics and policy shapes school-based decision making and how school leaders can influence politics and policy processes to improve learning environments for children. The course focuses contemporary problems that confront school leaders as they work to improve the conditions of learning for their students, faculty and staff. To effectively address and solve problems school leaders need to understand the processes of policymaking at various educational levels and to develop the relevant skills of policymaking needed at the school level. Thus, this course addresses the following three essential principles of educational politics and policy as they apply to school level administrators: political and policy dynamics that influence their work in schools; accurately identify, diagnose, and develop the right solutions to the right problems in order to achieve instructional goals of the school and division; and confront, engage in, and effectively deal with conflict (i.e., politics) emanating from within the school, division, or community in order to achieve school and division learning goals. Prerequisite: ELS 700.

ELS 710. Strategic Communication and External Relations. 3 Credits.

This course serves as an introduction for prospective administrators to the social and political context of the educational environment. The underlying concept of this course is collaboration. Today's administrators face a variety of multifaceted challenges in their daily routines. Therefore, they must recongize the impact of political, socioeconomic situations, community diversity, equity issues, and school community relations on their leadership practices. Prerequisite: ELS 700.

ELS 727. Learning Theories and Professional Development. 3 Credits.

This course exposes students to the essential elements of instructional leadership. Central to the skills and knowledge necessary to be an effective instructional leader are a deep understanding of the learning sciences that inform us about the essence of effective teaching. Effective instructional leaders have a solid basis for assessing and promoting high quality instruction, giving them the tools to proactively build a school’s organizational capacity of sustained growth in student achievement. Students will engage in reading, reflection, dialog, writing, problem solving and field-work, designed to build an understanding of how these topics are intrinsically tied to supporting teachers in their classrooms through facilitating better understandings of standards and accountability, effective lesson planning and curriculum development, assessment and grading, classroom management and discipline. Prerequisite: ELS 700.

ELS 728. Instructional Leadership and Supervision. 3 Credits.

This course develops student’s skills, knowledge and dispositions in the area of instructional leadership. Students will explore how effective instructional leaders can use their integrated knowledge of quality instruction and the core principles of learning to set the mission and vision for the school, facilitate school improvement planning and professional development and finally how instructional supervision is used to integrate these activities and support the growth of individual teachers as well as building organizational capacity. Effective instructional leaders have a solid basis for assessing and promoting high quality instruction, giving them the tools to proactively build a school's organizational capacity for sustained growth in student achievement. Students will engage in reading, reflection, dialog, writing, problem solving and field-work, designed to help them build an integrated understanding of those leadership practices that help support teacher instructional growth and those that build organizational capacity for sustained improvement. Prerequisite: ELS 700.

ELS 753. Educational Finance and Budgeting. 3 Credits.

This course examines how public schools are financed, including an analysis of the sources of revenues, the distribution of revenue, and the budgeting and expenditure of revenue. Special emphasis will be placed on the Virginia funding formula, education as an investment in human capital, and how funding relates to student achievement. Students will learn the fiscal management skills and understandings necessary to manage the finances of a school or school system, including the study of system and school procedures related to budget planning, budget management, internal school account management, inventory control, and purchasing procedures. Prerequisite: ELS 700.

ELS 754. Human Resource Development and Evaluation. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ELS 600. This course focuses on the development of various staff personnel functions. Collaborative staff development and performance evaluation are linked to organizational goals, culture and learner achievement. Application of knowledge and skills via case study, simulation and oral and written demonstration projects is included.

ELS 757. Educational Law and Ethics. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to law, particularly with respect to federal and state statutes and court decisions dealing with the public schools. The topics span a wide spectrum of law-related concerns. The study of law is intended to be practical by providing the legal understanding necessary for a school administrator to negotiate his or her way through the maze of difficult legal and ethical matters commonly faced each day. Prerequisite: ELS 700.

ELS 764. History and Philosophy of American Public School Reform. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course covers the major historical movements, especially in school reform, and key American educational philosophers. This course will provide prospective school administrators with a historical and philosophical foundation of education.

ELS 787. Pupil Personnel Services for Diverse Populations. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ELS 600. This course focuses on the theories and skills that leaders need in order to administer the broad array of special services (i.e., special education, bilingual programming, counseling, and psychological, social work, and therapy services) so that students with all diverse needs are included in regular education.

ELS 795. Topics in Educational Leadership. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

ELS 797. Topics in Educational Leadership. 1-3 Credits.

ELS 800. Strategic Leadership and Management for School Improvement. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to give students entering the ODU Licensure program an understanding of the complex roles and challenges of a school principal, while focusing on the constantly changing nature of administrative responsibility. Students develop an integrated view of the knowledge base, research and practice of administraton within a context of multiple perspectives and a wide range of thinking. The purpose of the course is to increase understanding of education, the role of educational administration, the forces that are moving education into a new era, the transitions that are occurring, and the use of the latest, best practices to improve the education of all children.

ELS 801. Accountability and Organizational Improvement. 3 Credits.

This course is an in-depth study of effective data based decision-making practices for contemporary school leaders. Formative and summative data based decision making practices will be explored, as well as how to work with large and small groups of staff meembers to analyze multiple measures of data and create school improvement designs for student and school success. An emphasis is placed on using data to make decisions at the division, school, and classroom levels. Prerequisite: ELS 700/800.

ELS 802. Educational Politics and Policymaking. 3 Credits.

This course teaches aspiring school leaders how politics and policy shapes school-based decision making and how school leaders can influence politics and policy processes to improve learning environments for children. The course focuses contemporary problems that confront school leaders as they work to improve the conditions of learning for their students, faculty, and staff. To effectively address and solve problems school leaders need to understand the processes of policymaking at various educational levels and to develop the relevant skills of policymaking needed at the school level. Thus, this course addresses the following three essential principles of educational politics and policy as they apply to school level administrators: political and policy dynamics that influence their work in schools; accurately identify, diagnose, and develop the right solutions to the right problems in order to achieve instructional goals of the school and division; and confront, engage in, and effectively deal with conflict (i.e., politics) emanating from within the school, division, or community in order to achieve school and division learning goals. Prerequisite: ELS 700 or ELS 800.

ELS 806. The Urban System. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the graduate program director. Introduces students to the discipline of urban studies by focusing on various aspects of the city and cultural diversity. Provides an interdisciplinary overview of economic development and redevelopment, environmental factors, educational systems, health care systems, and government systems. Examines the extent to which urban systems impact diverse residents' lives.

ELS 810. Strategic Communication and External Relations. 3 Credits.

This course serves as an introduction for prospective administrators to the social and political context of the educational environment. The underlying concept of this course is collaboration. Today's administrators face a variety of multifaceted challenges in their daily routines. Therefore, they must recongize the impact of political, socioeconomic situations, community diversity, equity issues, and school community relations on their leadership practices. Prerequisite: ELS 700 or ELS 800.

ELS 811. Leadership Theory for Educational Improvement. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course provides the necessary knowledge to become an integral part of the educational improvement process at the school, division, and state levels. Students will analyze and relate the significant educational trends of the past 20 years to the political process, analyzing the impact on school planning. Students will take an active and vocal role in the discourse and debate about educational policy and practice. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing the context and implementing planning systems to develop mission, goals and programs that result in educational improvement.

ELS 815. Leadership for Equity and Inclusive Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course focuses on the theories and practices that help educational leaders ensure that students with special needs receive an equitable and inclusive education. Emphasis is on perspectives of difference versus deviance, historical foundations of specialized programs, current social and legal contexts that influence programming, questions of social justice, and possibilities for the inclusion of all students. While this course addresses the needs of all students, concentration is on individuals with disabilities and the laws that safeguard their rights.

ELS 821. Policy and Politics in Educational Leadership. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ELS 811. This course focuses on the theories and practices needed to build relationships and support from the state political process, the local community, businesses, and media. Emphasis will be placed on the use of influence, and its impact on relationships, policies, and programs. Focus is placed on developing a shared vision to bring schools and communities together as partners in improving student learning. Two-way communication mechanisms for school improvement using political influence and power are examined.

ELS 827. Learning Theories and Professional Development. 3 Credits.

This course exposes students to the essential elements of instructional leadership. Central to the skills and knowledge necessary to be an effective instructional leader are a deep understanding of the learning sciences that inform us about the essence of effective teaching. Effective instructional leaders have a solid basis for assessing and promoting high quality instruction, giving them the tools to proactively build a school’s organizational capacity of sustained growth in student achievement. Students will engage in reading, reflection, dialog, writing, problem solving and field-work, designed to build an understanding of how these topics are intrinsically tied to supporting teachers in their classrooms through facilitating better understandings of standards and accountability, effective lesson planning and curriculum development, assessment and grading, classroom management and discipline. Prerequisite: ELS 700 or ELS 800.

ELS 828. Instructional Leadership and Supervision. 3 Credits.

This course develops student’s skills, knowledge and dispositions in the area of instructional leadership. Students will explore how effective instructional leaders can use their integrated knowledge of quality instruction and the core principles of learning to set the mission and vision for the school, facilitate school improvement planning and professional development and finally how instructional supervision is used to integrate these activities and support the growth of individual teachers as well as building organizational capacity. Effective instructional leaders have a solid basis for assessing and promoting high quality instruction, giving them the tools to proactively build a school's organizational capacity for sustained growth in student achievement. Students will engage in reading, reflection, dialog, writing, problem solving and field-work, designed to help them build an integrated understanding of those leadership practices that help support teacher instructional growth and those that build organizational capacity for sustained improvement. Prerequisite: ELS 700 or ELS 800.

ELS 831. Accountability Systems in Public Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ELS 660, 732 and 880. This course addresses the design, development, implementation, and alignment of public education accountability systems at the federal, state, and local levels. Particular attention is given to how the design and implementation of accountability systems affects educational equity and school reform efforts.

ELS 835. Organizational Theory and Behavior in Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course includes the psychology of organizational behaviors, theories of managing people, individual and organizational learning, individual motivation and organizational behavior, interpersonal communications and perceptions, group dynamics, problem management, managing multigroup work, managing diversity, leadership and organizational culture, leadership and decision making, the effective exercise of power and influence, supervision and employee development, organizational analysis, and managing change.

ELS 853. Educational Finance and Budgeting. 3 Credits.

This course examines how public schools are financed, including an analysis of the sources of revenues, the distribution of revenue, and the budgeting and expenditure of revenue. Special emphasis will be placed on the Virginia funding formula, education as an investment in human capital, and how funding relates to student achievement. Students will learn the fiscal management skills and understandings necessary to manage the finances of a school or school system, including the study of system and school procedures related to budget planning, budget management, internal school account management, inventory control, and purchasing procedures. Prerequisite: ELS 700 or ELS 800.

ELS 854. Human Resource Development and Evaluation. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ELS 600. This course focuses on the development of various staff personnel functions. Collaborative staff development and performance evaluation are linked to organizational goals, culture and learner achievement. Application of knowledge and skills via case study, simulation and oral and written demonstration projects is included.

ELS 857. Educational Law and Ethics. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to law, particularly with respect to federal and state statutes and court decisions dealing with the public schools. The topics span a wide spectrum of law-related concerns. The study of law is intended to be practical by providing the legal understanding necessary for a school administrator to negotiate his or her way through the maze of difficult legal and ethical matters commonly faced each day. Prerequisite: ELS 700 or ELS 800.

ELS 864. History and Philosophy of American Public School Reform. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course covers the major historical movements, especially in school reform, and key American educational philosophers. This course will provide prospective school administrators with a historical and philosophical foundation of education.

ELS 869. Instructional Internship. 3 Credits.

Title credits 20 hrs; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ELS 673. Each internship course will require students to complete a minimum of 160 hours in each course. Course is designed to provide field experiences which will prepare them to serve as instructional and curriculum leadership in K-12 environments. Student must produce 1) a portfolio with required artifacts; 2) prepare a 10-12 reflective paper according to identified guidelines and 3) complete internship evaluation with mentor and college supervisor at least three times during the term.

ELS 871. Educational Systems Planning and Futures. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The course covers the theoretical framework of strategic, operational, cooperative and future planning in education, leading to the development of a cyclic planning process which includes the appropriate tasks, steps and skills to effect administrative and policy change.

ELS 873. Advanced School Law. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. Advanced Education Law--doctoral level.

ELS 874. Advanced School Finance, and Operations. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ELS 753/853 or equivalent. This course examines social justice issues related to the financial, political, and operational aspects of America's public schools. The politics of current legislation, court cases, finances, and operations of the school system are included.

ELS 876. Leadership for Social Justice. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. In this course, students study and engage in dialogue related to the critical role of education in a democratic society in a rapidly changing and increasingly complex world. Through a focused discussion of theories and concepts such as democratic schools, social justice, critical theory and power, feminism, critical race theory, and difference/normalization, students come to understand the possible roles education can play in society and their need to continuously reflect on their own vision for leadership in public schools.

ELS 878. Leadership for Teaching and Learning. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. In this course, participants examine what is currently known and explore what needs to be known about pedagogy in a context of school renewal. The foundational perspective for the course is social justice in which course participants seek ways to transform teaching/instruction so that all schools work for all students particularly those students who historically have been disenfranchised from receiving an equitable education.

ELS 879. Field Research in School Administration and Supervision. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisite: a master’s degree. Field study approach to problems related to school administration and supervision.

ELS 880. Multicultural Curriculum Leadership and Globalization. 3 Credits.

This course examines social justice issues related to the curriculum leadership aspect of American’s public schools and abroad. This course is designed to provide advanced understanding of the curriculum development process through conception, implementation, and evaluation with a particular focus on multiculturalism. Theoretical and philosophical bases of curriculum development are addressed as well as current trends including brain-based learning, multiculturalism, globalization, organizational thinking and the strategic change process.

ELS 883. Contemporary Issues in Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course is a survey of current issues in education, as well as the political, financial, and social issues affecting education leadership. The course will explore relationships between current issues, historical perspectives, philosophical theories, and sociologic influences. The exploration of contemporary issues related to equity and achievement will serve as a critical component of the class.

ELS 895. Topics in Educational Leadership. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

ELS 896. Topics in Urban Educational Leadership. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Prerequisite: master’s degree and permission of the instructor.

ELS 897. Topics in Educational Leadership. 1-3 Credits.

ELS 899. Dissertation. 1-12 Credits.

1-12 credits. Prerequisite: permission of faculty advisor.

ELS 999. ELS 999. 1 Credit.

1 credit. This is a placeholder course for students who must be registered for a class and who are not registered for dissertation credit.

FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION Courses

FOUN 611. Introduction to Research Methods in Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Course can’t be repeated for credit. The primary goal of the course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to access, evaluate, and synthesize empirical research. The course examines types of educational research and criteria for evaluating empirical studies. It introduces various types of research questions and associated research designs, components of research reports, sampling, validity of measures, threats to internal and external validity, and simple statistics.

FOUN 612. Applied Research Methods in Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. The primary goal of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to write a research proposal and conduct research. It is intended for those students who are completing a thesis to meet their program requirements, those planning on pursuing a doctoral degree, or those who anticipate conducting research for any other reasons. The course examines types of educational research and criteria for selection of topics for research projects; describes criteria for effective collection and organization of data; review of literature, analysis of data and proposal writing.

FOUN 615. Research and Application of the Evolution of Education: History, Issues, Technology and Assessment. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Course focuses on foundations of U.S. education system; legal aspects for educational delivery in the U.S. and Virginia; use and contributions of technology integration to learning outcomes; formative and summative assessment for improving learning outcomes of urban children and youth.

FOUN 640. Fundamentals of Measurement and Assessment. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. This course stresses the use of measurement and assessment for evaluation and decision making focusing on basic concepts applicable to all types of assessment: statistical concepts, reliability, validity, and interpretive frameworks for cognitive and non-cognitive measures.

FOUN 641. Assessment and Evaluation of Student Learning. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. The valid use of formative and summative assessment and evaluation principles for monitoring and promoting students' learning and development will be addressed. Students will learn how to construct and use a variety of formal and informal teacher assessment procedures.

FOUN 650. Human Development and Student Learning. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. Corequisite: Student must be a participant in the Teacher Residency Grant. This course will focus on understanding children's and adolescents' physical, social, emotional, intellectual, and speech/language development; integrating and incorporating children and adolescent differences (economic, social, racial, ethnic, religious, physical, and mental) into understanding developmental issues as they relate to instruction, including the identification and instruction of students with exceptionalities as well as special needs. Research related to the classroom application of these theories is examined and evaluated based on principles of research design and interpretation.

FOUN 662. Assessment and Evaluation for Schools Serving Military Connected Children and Families. 4 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; Service learning, 1 hour. 4 credits. Prerequisite: COUN 605 and acceptance into the Military Child and Family Education Certificate Program. This course is designed to create educators and educational support service providers capable of assessing the needs of military children and able to self-assess their schools in terms of the comprehensive elements of a military conscious and supportive school. Students will become familiar with the Military Consciousness Assessment Toolkit (Mil-CAT), a comprehensive and dynamic self-assessment tool developed at ODU that provides a process and system for analyzing and prioritizing support structures and needs of military students across the school. Students will also apply basic constructs of assessment in order to develop skills for determining the individual academic, social, and emotional needs of military students and their families, as well as to design ways to assess classroom and school-wide interventions. Use of assessments of individual, group, and school-wide needs to design, implement, and evaluate contextually tailored interventions that support military connected students will be modeled and practices. This course is required for completion of the Military Child and Family Education graduate certificate. Students must be accepted to the certificate program or receive approval from the certificate program director in order to enroll.

FOUN 722. Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Introduction to basic topics in statistical analysis, including descriptive statistics and simple inferential statistics such as correlation, regression, t-tests, one-way analysis of variance, and chi-square.

FOUN 770. Formative Assessment of Student Learning for School Leaders and Curriculum Specialist. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Overview of advanced educational measurement and assessment ideologies as well as methods. Students will identify, critique, construct and administer educational measures. Psychometric topics such as reliability and validity will be explored as well as advanced assessment issues such as scale construction and item response theory.

FOUN 812. Advanced Research Design and Analysis. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. This course focuses on the application of advanced research design as it is applied in various educational disciplines. It provides an in-depth examination of quantitative research approaches, sampling techniques, threats to validity, ethical considerations and reviewing, writing quantitative methodology descriptions for research proposals and reports.

FOUN 813. Advanced Program Evaluation in Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Examines procedures and problems in the design and utilization of program evaluation in education. Identifies evaluation purposes and the methods of evaluation especially as affected by organizational behavior, ethical considerations, and political influences. Evaluation methodology includes, but is not limited to, design considerations, data utilization, and teacher evaluation. Both quantitative and qualitative strategies will be covered.

FOUN 814. Qualitative Research Design in Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. This course concentrates on the theoretical underpinnings of qualitative research; methodology and methods incuding identification of ways to collect and analyze qualitative data; examination of ethical issues; development of proposals; and writing up studies.

FOUN 815. Advanced Qualitative Research. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: FOUN 814 Qualitative Research. Instructor approval required. This advanced course focuses on various forms of interpretive inquiry and the purposes and methods of methodologies including phenomenology, hermeneutics, and ethnography.

FOUN 816. Single Subject Research Designs. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. This course is designed to provide the student knowledge and skills that relate to single subject methodology. It includes an overview of historical and philosophical foundations, basic issues in behavioral assessment, and single subject research and design methodology, including trend and statistical analysis in single subject research. Students will analyze critically empirical research and be able to plan, implement, and evaluate original research.

FOUN 822. Applied Linear Models in Educational Research. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Prerequisite: FOUN 722. Introduction to the general linear model with emphasis on concepts and applications of multiple linear regression (MLR) to problems in educational research. Topics include estimation and interpretation of MLR models, relationships between MLR and analysis of variance (ANOVA), logistic regression analysis, and trend analysis.

FOUN 823. Analysis of Variance Applied to Educational Research. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Prerequisite: FOUN 722. Introduction of analysis of variance models as applied in education and human services, including two-way and three-way factorial designs, analysis of covariance, repeated-measures, and mixed-model analysis.

FOUN 824. Design and Analysis for Causal Inference in Educational Contexts. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Prerequisites: FOUN 822 and 823 or permission of instructor. Introduction to research design and statistical analysis for studies intended to support causal inferences. Topics include experimental, quasi-experimental, and ex post facto design and appropriate models for data analysis.

FOUN 825. Applied Multilevel Modeling in Educational Research. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on advanced applications of statistics that are used in educational research in various educational disciplines. Specifically, the course will offer an introduction to hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) of nested data as applied to education. Topics include conceptual and statistical background of two- and three-level designs, cross-level interaction effects, and application of multilevel models for repeated measures designs. Emphasis is on estimation, interpretation, and diagnostics for multilevel models of continuous outcomes. Prerequisites: FOUN 822 and FOUN 823 or instructor permission.

FOUN 826. Applied Structural Equation Modeling in Educational Research. 3 Credits.

Introduction to structural equation modeling and related multivariate procedures applied to research problems in education. Topics include a brief review of exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory (structural) factor analysis, path analysis, and structural equation modeling with observed and latent variables. Prerequisite: FOUN 822 and FOUN 823 or permission of instructor.

FOUN 827. Applied Logistic Regression. 3 Credits.

A practical and conceptual introduction to applying logistic and probit) regression models to typical questions in the social sciences. Will utilize SPSS for practical applications covering simple and multiple regression models, interactions and curvilinear effects, multinomial models, testing of assumptions, and select advanced applications such as propensity score matching and missing data analysis. Prerequisites: FOUN 822 and FOUN 823 or permission of instructor.

FOUN 830. Theories of Learning and Instruction. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. The course consists of critical discussion and analysis of major learning theories that have influenced learning and instruction in today's schools. Applications of current research to instructional design will be emphasized.

FOUN 840. Advanced Educational Measurement and Assessment. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: FOUN 722. Instructor approval required. Overview of advanced educational measurement and assessment ideologies as well as methods. Students will identify, critique, construct and administer educational measures. Psychometric topics such as reliability and validity will be explored as well as advanced assessment issues such as scale construction and item response theory.

FOUN 848. Assessment and Evaluation in Content Areas. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits.

FOUN 870. Formative Assessment of Student Learning for School Leaders and Curriculum Specialist. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Overview of advanced educational measurement and assessment ideologies as well as methods. Students will identify, critique, construct and administer educational measures. Psychometric topics such as reliability and validity will be explored as well as advanced assessment issues such as scale construction and item response theory.

FOUN 881. Dissertation Seminar. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: FOUN 812, 814 and FOUN 822 or 823. Instructor approval required. The primary goal of the course is to develop a dissertation proposal. It is intended for doctoral students who have completed all other coursework. The course covers literature reviews, proposal writing, and obtaining approval from Human Subjects committees. Outlets for disseminating the research findings will be explored.

FOUN 897. Special Topics in Educational Foundations. 3 Credits.

Three hours; 3 credits. Special Topics in Educational Foundations will be used for independent studies with Foundations faculty members.

FOUN 899. Dissertation. 1-12 Credits.

Dissertation credit.

FOUN 999. Foundations of Education 999. 1 Credit.

1 credit. A one-hour pass/fail registration required of all graduate students to maintain active status during the final semester prior to graduation. After passing the candidacy examination, all doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit each term until the degree is complete.

HIGHER EDUCATION Courses

HIED 668. Internship in Higher Education Administration. 3-6 Credits.

Prerequisites: permission of instructor, COUN 633, 635, 707/807 and HIED 708/808 and 745/845. The university advisor and site supervisor will work with the student to develop and implement a set of objectives intended to familiarize the student with the operation of an administrative area within an institution of higher education, to assist the student to acquire practical skills in the operation of that office and to develop skills that are transferable to other administrative areas.

HIED 708. Contemporary Issues in Higher Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. This course is intended to present a broad exploration and generate greater understanding of contemporary issues influencing higher education that will involve discussion, written and oral reports and the integration of knowledge across the spectrum of issues relating to higher education.

HIED 710. Introduction to Student Affairs Administration. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: COUN 707. This course is intended to be an introduction to the practice of student affairs work in American Higher Education. It will introduce students to the theoretical foundations of student affairs. It will also provide students with a structural framework for student affairs organization, problems, issues and ideas.

HIED 712. Strategic Planning and Institutional Effectiveness. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Strategic Planning and institutional effectiveness is becoming more and more important to institutions as funding sources change and students demand quality. This course will examine how these processes can be carried out on American campuses.

HIED 720. The Private College and University. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The U.S. Higher Education system contains great diversity due to the inclusion of private institutions. This course will examine the structure and organization of Higher Education in the U.S. as well as differences and similarities between private and public institutions.

HIED 730. Seminar in Student Affairs Administration. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course provides synthesis, integration, and application of prior coursework; discussion topics include: college students and their environments, student learning and development, administrative issues, ethical decision-making, leadership and staff development, current “hot topics” in student affairs, and counseling and helping skills. A significant portion of the class is spent discussing and actively observing in student affairs areas that are engaged in program development and implementation, environmental needs and assessments, program evaluation, and advising student groups. The final part of the course coverst he transition to professional student affairs roles.

HIED 731. Group Dynamics in Higher Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: HIED 733 or permission of the instructor. This course examines the principles and dynamics of group interactions and processes while providing strategies for working with groups in higher education settings (ex. Focus groups; task groups; and student staff, faculty, and parent groups). Students will explore and develop their leadership skills specifically related to forming compatible groups capable of completing tasks that compliment the mission, vision, and goals of an institution of higher education.

HIED 733. Professional Helping Skills in Higher Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course will focus on developing the knowledge, attitude and skills essential to working with individuals seeking assistance with problems that they face while in college. Listening and interviewing skills will be addressed.

HIED 737. Academic Issues In Higher Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: HIED 759. This course involves various learning methods to develop an analysis of the academic core function in higher education and the roles and responsibilities involved in various forms of educational delivery.

HIED 743. Introduction to International Higher Education Administration. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course surveys key aspects of international higher education administration in an American university setting, including study abroad, recruitment and admission of international students, international student and scholar services, and English language preparation.

HIED 744. Comparative Higher Education Systems. 1,3 Credit.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course presents the development of the three primary systems of higher education in the world today: the U.S., British and European (Confidential) systems. It will also, as appropriate, examine other systems of higher education from around the world.

HIED 745. Today’s College Student and Diversity. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. This course is a sociological survey of theoretical and research literature describing college students from multiple views. These include demographic profiles; undergraduate student growth and development; cognitive and non-cognitive predictors of the impact of the collegiate experience; implications and outcomes of college attendance; and the specific characteristics of particular student populations.

HIED 752. The Law of Higher Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. Legal perspectives related to higher education will be discussed as a major part of the course. Among the topics to be discussed will be the bases from which higher education law comes, current (case, state and regulatory) law, as well as risk management and liability issues for higher education. The remainder of the course will focus upon the ethical issues that must be faced when shaping and implementing institutional policy, curriculum and procedures. Some emphasis will be placed on the areas in which legal and ethical issues come into conflict. This course should be taken near the end of the master’s program.

HIED 756. Higher Education Finance. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: HIED 708 and 794. Higher Education Finance is an intensive course devoted to the examination of concepts and management practices in higher education finance. The course is intended to provide prospective college and university administrators with both a theoretical and working knowledge of techniques, issues, policy, and practices as they are related to management and administration of colleges and universities in the U.S.

HIED 757. The Multicultural University. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Research, philosophical, and policy literature on multiculturalism in higher education administration and leadership is surveyed. Topics covered include demographics and multiculturalism, university mission, admission, program and student assessment and evaluation, benefits of multiculturalism, faculty roles and responsibilities, teaching and learning outcomes, recruiting and graduating multicultural students, inclusive curriculum design, and student services.

HIED 758. Higher Education Leadership. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The course will provide students with the basic theory, knowledge and skills needed to be an effective leader within post-secondary educational institutions, with a primary focus on public, private and non-traditional four-year colleges and universities.

HIED 759. Higher Education Curriculum. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: COUN 707/807, HIED 708/808. This course provides an introduction to the development and management of the curriculum within institutions of higher education.

HIED 761. Higher Education Capstone. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The course is a culminating experience for the master’s degree intended to integrate and apply the knowledge gained in the degree programs to complex issues with policy and practice in higher education.

HIED 762. Development and Fund Raising. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The major areas of institutional advancement and fund-raising form the fundamental outline for the course. Students will explore the professional literature and hear lectures from experts in the areas of: institutional marketing, event management, developing a campaign, use of the internet, donor identification and cultivation, planned giving, developing corporate partners, and foundation management.

HIED 763. Case Studies in Higher Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course consists of a thorough analysis and dissection of case studies which cover a broad range of higher education administrative areas. For each case, students will examine the facts, including relevant benchmark law; contemporary issues; historical perspective; political realities; institutional mission and culture; ethical considerations; leadership and management approaches; and an analysis of courses of action available to decision-makers.

HIED 764. College and the University Presidency. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide greater understanding of the leadership role of college and university presidents and the multiplex of issues associated with the office of the presidency at the various types of American institutions. The course will utilize case study analysis, guest presentation, and review of the literature. There will be rigorous discussion, readings, and analyses in a collegial and reciprocal learning environment.

HIED 765. Adult and Continuing Education. 3 Credits.

An advanced seminar emphasizing the historical, philosophical, and institutional analyses of the development and status of adult and continuing education within the higher education community.

HIED 766. The Modern Community College. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course is a study of the institutional characteristics of the community college, including a review of the history, purpose, students, faculty, administration and organization, finance, and social functions. Considerable attention will be given to current issues facing community colleges. This course is an elective within the master’s program and a required course in the Ph.D. in Community College Leadership.

HIED 770. External and Internal Relations for Higher Education. 3 Credits.

Lectue, 3 hours. 3 credits. This course serves as an introduction for prospective and current administrators to the social and political context of the higher education environment and its various constituencies. It will teach them to recognize the impact of politics, socioeconomic situations, diversity, media, monetary issues, and equity issues on their leadership pratices.

HIED 771. American Higher Education in a Global Context. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to broaden and deepen students' understanding of contemporary developments in global higher education and to develop analytic skills for understanding the global social, political, and economic processes shaping U.S. higher education in particular. Research and policy literature on current issues in global higher education is used to examine topics including cross-border higher education, student and scholar mobility patterns, the impact of emerging technologies, and transnational research and development partnerships.

HIED 792. Higher Education and Society. 3 Credits.

3 credits. A graduate seminar that focuses on the sociopolitical contexts within which public policy for higher education is developed in the U.S. It examines who makes policy for higher education, how competing policy agendas are negotiated,and what broader forces affect the policy process.

HIED 793. The History of Higher Education in the United States. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the historical development of higher education with a concentration on American higher education and its growth and development since the founding of Harvard in 1636. Because of its importance within the spectrum of higher education in the United States, some concentration will be spent upon the development of higher education in Virginia as well.

HIED 794. Organization and Administration of Higher Education in the United States. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. Through lectures, visiting presenters, student presentations of literature, and projects and readings, this course is designed to be an introduction/survey of administration, organization and governance of higher education institutions in the United States. In addition to introducing students to the issues, this experience is intended to help students understand the competencies and training necessary to undertake various operational roles in higher education.

HIED 795. Topics in Higher Education Administration. 1-6 Credits.

1-3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

HIED 808. Contemporary Issues in Higher Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. This course is intended to present a broad exploration and generate greater understanding of contemporary issues influencing higher education that will involve discussion, written and oral reports and the integration of knowledge across the spectrum of issues relating to higher education.

HIED 810. Introduction to Student Affairs Administration. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: COUN 807. This course is intended to be an introduction to the practice of student affairs work in American Higher Education. It will introduce students to the theoretical foundations of student affairs. It will also provide students with a structural framework for student affairs organization, problems, issues and ideas.

HIED 812. Strategic Planning and Institutional Effectiveness. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Strategic Planning and institutional effectiveness is becoming more and more important to institutions as funding sources change and students demand quality. This course will examine how these processes can be carried out on American campuses.

HIED 820. The Private College and University. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The U.S. Higher Education system contains great diversity due to the inclusion of private institutions. This course will examine the structure and organization of Higher Education in the U.S. as well as differences and similarities between private and public institutions.

HIED 830. Seminar in Student Affairs Administration. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course provides synthesis, integration, and application of prior coursework; discussion topics include: college students and their environments, student learning and development, administrative issues, ethical decision-making, leadership and staff development, current “hot topics” in student affairs, and counseling and helping skills. A significant portion of the class is spent discussing and actively observing in student affairs areas that are engaged in program development and implementation, environmental needs and assessments, program evaluation, and advising student groups. The final part of the course coverst he transition to professional student affairs roles.

HIED 831. Group Dynamics in Higher Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: HIED 833 or permission of the instructor. This course examines the principles and dynamics of group interactions and processes while providing strategies for working with groups in higher education settings (ex. Focus groups; task groups; and student staff, faculty, and parent groups). Students will explore and develop their leadership skills specifically related to forming compatible groups capable of completing tasks that compliment the mission, vision, and goals of an institution of higher education.

HIED 833. Professional Helping Skills in Higher Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course will focus on developing the knowledge, attitude and skills essential to working with individuals seeking assistance with problems that they face while in college. Listening and interviewing skills will be addressed.

HIED 837. Academic Issues In Higher Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: HIED 859. This course involves various learning methods to develop an analysis of the academic core function in higher education and the roles and responsibilities involved in various forms of educational delivery.

HIED 843. Introduction to International Higher Education Administration. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course surveys key aspects of international higher education administration in an American university setting, including study abroad, recruitment and admission of international students, international student and scholar services, and English language preparation.

HIED 844. Comparative Higher Education Systems. 1,3 Credit.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course presents the development of the three primary systems of higher education in the world today: the U.S., British and European (Confidential) systems. It will also, as appropriate, examine other systems of higher education from around the world.

HIED 845. Today’s College Student and Diversity. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. This course is a sociological survey of theoretical and research literature describing college students from multiple views. These include demographic profiles; undergraduate student growth and development; cognitive and non-cognitive predictors of the impact of the collegiate experience; implications and outcomes of college attendance; and the specific characteristics of particular student populations.

HIED 852. The Law of Higher Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. Legal perspectives related to higher education will be discussed as a major part of the course. Among the topics to be discussed will be the bases from which higher education law comes, current (case, state and regulatory) law, as well as risk management and liability issues for higher education. The remainder of the course will focus upon the ethical issues that must be faced when shaping and implementing institutional policy, curriculum and procedures. Some emphasis will be placed on the areas in which legal and ethical issues come into conflict. This course should be taken near the end of the master’s program.

HIED 856. Higher Education Finance. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: HIED 808 and 894. Higher Education Finance is an intensive course devoted to the examination of concepts and management practices in higher education finance. The course is intended to provide prospective college and university administrators with both a theoretical and working knowledge of techniques, issues, policy, and practices as they are related to management and administration of colleges and universities in the U.S.

HIED 857. The Multicultural University. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Research, philosophical, and policy literature on multiculturalism in higher education administration and leadership is surveyed. Topics covered include demographics and multiculturalism, university mission, admission, program and student assessment and evaluation, benefits of multiculturalism, faculty roles and responsibilities, teaching and learning outcomes, recruiting and graduating multicultural students, inclusive curriculum design, and student services.

HIED 858. Higher Education Leadership. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The course will provide students with the basic theory, knowledge and skills needed to be an effective leader within post-secondary educational institutions, with a primary focus on public, private and non-traditional four-year colleges and universities.

HIED 859. Higher Education Curriculum. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: COUN 707/807, HIED 708/808. This course provides an introduction to the development and management of the curriculum within institutions of higher education.

HIED 862. Development and Fund Raising. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The major areas of institutional advancement and fund-raising form the fundamental outline for the course. Students will explore the professional literature and hear lectures from experts in the areas of: institutional marketing, event management, developing a campaign, use of the internet, donor identification and cultivation, planned giving, developing corporate partners, and foundation management.

HIED 863. Case Studies in Higher Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course consists of a thorough analysis and dissection of case studies which cover a broad range of higher education administrative areas. For each case, students will examine the facts, including relevant benchmark law; contemporary issues; historical perspective; political realities; institutional mission and culture; ethical considerations; leadership and management approaches; and an analysis of courses of action available to decision-makers.

HIED 864. College and the University Presidency. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide greater understanding of the leadership role of college and university presidents and the multiplex of issues associated with the office of the presidency at the various types of American institutions. The course will utilize case study analysis, guest presentation, and review of the literature. There will be rigorous discussion, readings, and analyses in a collegial and reciprocal learning environment.

HIED 865. Adult and Continuing Education. 3 Credits.

An advanced seminar emphasizing the historical, philosophical, and institutional analyses of the development and status of adult and continuing education within the higher education community.

HIED 866. The Modern Community College. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course is a study of the institutional characteristics of the community college, including a review of the history, purpose, students, faculty, administration and organization, finance, and social functions. Considerable attention will be given to current issues facing community colleges. This course is an elective within the master’s program and a required course in the Ph.D. in Community College Leadership.

HIED 868. Internship: Higher Education Administration. 3 Credits.

3 credits. This internship provides Education Specialist and doctoral students an opportunity to gain practicum experience in mid-level or senior administrative settings in higher education.

HIED 870. External and Internal Relations for Higher Education. 3 Credits.

Lectue, 3 hours. 3 credits. This course serves as an introduction for prospective and current administrators to the social and political context of the higher education environment and its various constituencies. It will teach them to recognize the impact of politics, socioeconomic situations, diversity, media, monetary issues, and equity issues on their leadership pratices.

HIED 871. American Higher Education in a Global Context. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to broaden and deepen students' understanding of contemporary developments in global higher education and to develop analytic skills for understanding the global social, political, and economic processes shaping U.S. higher education in particular. Research and policy literature on current issues in global higher education is used to examine topics including cross-border higher education, student and scholar mobility patterns, the impact of emerging technologies, and transnational research and development partnerships.

HIED 892. Higher Education and Society. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. A graduate seminar that focuses on the socio-political contexts within which public policy for higher education is developed in the U.S. It examines who makes policy for higher education, how competing policy agendas are negotiated, and what broader forces affect the policy process.

HIED 893. The History of Higher Education in the United States. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the historical development of higher education with a concentration on American higher education and its growth and development since the founding of Harvard in 1636. Because of its importance within the spectrum of higher education in the United States, some concentration will be spent upon the development of higher education in Virginia as well.

HIED 894. Organization and Administration of Higher Education in the United States. 3 Credits.

Lecture and discussion 3 hours; 3 credits. Through lectures, visiting presenters, student presentations of literature, and projects and readings, this course is designed to be an introduction/survey of administration, organization and governance of higher education institutions in the United States. In addition to introducing students to the issues, this experience is intended to help students understand the competencies and training necessary to undertake various operational roles in higher education.

HIED 895. Topics in Higher Education Administration. 1-6 Credits.

1-3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

HIED 899. Dissertation. 1-12 Credits.

1-12 credits. Prerequisite: permission of faculty advisor.

HIED 999. Higher Education 999. 1 Credit.

1 credit. A one-hour pass/fail registration required of all graduate students to maintain active status during the final semester prior to graduation. After successfully passing the candidacy examination, all doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit each term until the degree is complete.