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Old Dominion University

2014-2015 Catalog

Department of Communication Disorders and Special Education

http://odu.edu/esse

Anastasia Raymer, Chair
Child Study Center
757 683-4117

The Department of Communication Disorders and Special Education is housed in the Lions Child Study Center (4501 Hampton Blvd.), a building that was made possible through the generosity of civic clubs, alumni, patrons and students and which opened in 1997. The clinical programs, housed in the center, give students valuable practical experience, deliver needed professional and educational services to members of the Hampton Roads community, and provide a laboratory setting for innovative faculty and student research. The department’s strategic objective is to prepare future clinicians, educators, leaders, researchers, and policy makers to be a resource for state and national initiatives, and to serve as an exemplary center for educational research and practice. The faculty is dedicated to preparing professionals to serve as recognized leaders in the fields of education, clinical settings and agencies. PhD program is offered in special education, and master’s degree programs are offered in special education, and communication sciences and disorders. Post-baccalaureate endorsement programs are offered in special education.

Due to changing University requirements, national accreditation standards, and Commonwealth licensure regulations, the programs in the Darden College of Education are under constant revision. Any changes resulting from these factors supersede the program requirements described in the catalog. Students should obtain current program information from their advisors and the Darden College of Education website at http://www.odu.edu/education.

Individual programs are described on the following pages in this order:

Special Education

  • Master of Science in Education with Research Emphasis
  • Master of Science in Education with Special Education: General Curriculum, K-12 Licensure
  • Master of Science in Education with Special Education: Adapted Curriculum, K-12 Licensure
  • Master of Science in Education with Early Childhood Special Education Licensure
  • Post Baccalaureate Endorsement Program with Special Education: General Curriculum, K-12 Licensure
  • Post Baccalaureate Endorsement Program with Special Education: Adapted Curriculum, K-12 Licensure
  • Post Baccalaureate Endorsement Program with Early Childhood Special Education
  • Post Baccalaureate Endorsement Program with Visual Impairments, K-12 Licensure
  • Autism Certificate Program
  • Applied Behavior Analysis Certificate Program
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Education with a concentration in Special Education

Communication Sciences and Disorders

  • Master of Science in Education

Master of Science in Education–Special Education

Sabra Gear, Graduate Program Director

Child Study Center, (757) 683-4383

Within the Master of Science in Education Special Education degree program, there are two programs: one for licensed teachers who seek an advanced degree with a research emphasis and the other for those who seek initial licensure in special education and a master’s degree. The special education graduate program is committed to a philosophy of serving as a catalyst to promote awareness, understanding, and acceptance of individuals with disabilities. The course work focuses on the improvement of the quality and scope of educational and related services available to individuals with disabilities from infancy to adulthood.

Note to students in Washington State from the Student Achievement Council (SAC) concerning the Master of Science in Education -Master of Science in Education (Special Education):  Eligibility for initial educator certification in Washington is based on completion of a state approved educator preparation program.  This program is approved in Virginia and is authorized for field placements in Washington by the Professional Educators Standards Board.  Even though you may be residing in Washington while in this program, your application for educator certification in Washington will be processed as an out-of-state application.  Go to http://pathway.pesb.wa.gov/outofstate for more information.  Teachers are advised to contact their individual school districts as to whether or not this program may qualify for teacher advancement.

Special Education, Research Emphasis

Old Dominion University's Master's Degree in Special Education with Research Emphasis is designed to provide fully licensed special educators with an advanced professional degree and competencies beyond endorsement. This online master's degree will include a focus on scholarly research, advanced instructional strategies, and the foundations of special education leadership. The ODU Master's Degree in Special Education with Research Emphasis features:

  • Interactive instructional technology
  • Select cohort of students
  • Participation in an online community
  • Professional development using Council for Exceptional Children Advanced Program and National Board for Professional Teaching (NBPTS) standards
  • Synchronous and asynchronous components
  • Experiences congruent with National Board Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) certification requirements

The ODU Master's Degree in Special Education with Research Emphasis program is delivered in a cohort model with a new cohort of students entering the program each spring.  As a cohort program, the availability and sequence of courses is predetermined and restricted to the cohort.  This program also utilizes a field-based model for practicum experiences.  As such, student classrooms will be used for all practica experiences in the program. The research emphasis also will serve as the prerequisite course work to the PhD concentration in special education, thereby facilitating entry into the PhD program for master educators seeking terminal degrees.

Admissions

Admission to the graduate program in special education is granted by the department's graduate program director in conjunction with special education faculty. The following requirements are necessary for admission to the program.*

Applicants must:

  1. hold a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution or an equivalent degree from a foreign institution;
  2. hold a renewable, current, and valid teaching license with endorsement(s) in special education.;
  3. be currently teaching preK- 12 students with disabilities;
  4. have a minimum of two years teaching experience teaching preK- 12 students with disabilities;
  5. have an undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 or better;
  6. take and receive satisfactory scores on either the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) (i.e., a score of 291 combined on Verbal and Quantitative with a minimum Verbal Reasoning score of 150  for regular admission and 4.5 on the Analytical Writing section) or Miller Analogies Test (MAT) (i.e., score of 403 for regular admission);
  7. provide three letters of recommendation, including at least two professional recommendations; and
  8. submit a brief essay that highlights the student's research/professional development interests. Discussion of research/professional development interest areas should include empirical support for proposed lines of inquiry.

*Note: Admission and prerequisite requirements: admission to the graduate program in special education is granted by the department's graduate program director in conjunction with special education faculty. Under certain circumstances, applicants who do not fully meet the requirements for regular admission to the program may be admitted on a provisional basis subject to conditions specified by the graduate program director.

Additional requirements:

  • Technology: Participation in this online program requires reliable access to and facility with updated technology.  Applicants must have consistent access to high speed Internet and computer equipment capable of high levels of connectivity such as two-way video/audio conferencing. Admitted students must plan to buy the headphones, microphones (or headset) and webcam for synchronous communication during and outside class.  While wireless connections generally work, we recommend the use of a computer connected via cable to the modem/router. Dial up access is not sufficient.
  • Basic Skills and Dispositions: Additional required competencies: Students admitted to the special education program are expected to be able to complete the essential abilities outlined in the CDSE Technical Standards document (pdf) and to exhibit the dispositions noted in the ODU Teacher Dispositions statement (pdf).
  • Additional Software: All individuals seeking admission into any Teacher Education Program at Old Dominion University, upon enrolling/registering for their first education class, are required to purchase LiveText, a web-based portfolio assessment system approved by the ODU Teacher Education Council.  LiveText must be purchased either from the ODU bookstore or http://www.livetext.com/.  More information on LiveText:  http://education.odu.edu/livetext/.   Additional software may be necessary.
  • Classroom Requirements: Students will be expected to complete practica, including the filming of classroom practices, in their classrooms.  As such, applicants must be currently assigned to teach students with disabilities and must be able to gain permission to record their students (for educational purposes only).
  • Class Attendance: The program of study consists of asynchronous and syncronous instruction.  Students admitted to the program are expected to attend all syncronous class sessions using communication software (e.g., Adobe Connect).

Continuance

 Students must:

  1. complete the CITI Responsible Conduct of Research training modules.  See http://www.odu.edu/research/responsible-conduct-of-training.
  2. maintain a grade point average of 3.00 overall and receive a B or better in all practicum courses;
  3. participate in a continuance review; and
  4. successfully complete all competencies relative to their program of study.

Exit

Students must:

  1. have a grade point average of 3.00 overall and a grade of B- or better in all course work;
  2. satisfactorily complete all program requirements including the written comprehensive exam (see written comprehensive exam application and checklist);
  3. complete a Graduate Student Assessment; and
  4. submit a professional research project according to program guidelines prior to the awarding of the master's degree in special education.

Curriculum

Foundation and Perspectives
CDSE 695Topics in Education1-3
SPED 701/801Historical and Contemporary Research in Special Education3
SPED 720/820Curriculum and Instruction: Research Into Practice3
Advanced Intervention Strategies
SPED 621Effective Interventions for Children and Youth with Challenging Behavior3
SPED 702/802Cognitive Processes and Learning Strategies for Students with Special Needs3
SPED 705Advanced Student and Program Evaluation in Special Education3
SPED 707/807Advanced Instructional Procedures in Special Education3
Research9
FOUN 611Introduction to Research Methods in Education3
FOUN 722Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis3
CDSE 636Problems in Education3
Total Hours37-39

Special Education, K – 12 Licensure

The special education master’s program prepares teachers and agency personnel to design and implement programs for individuals with disabilities in a variety of settings. This master’s degree program, with endorsement, can be completed in approximately two years during which the enrolled students will specify either special education: general curriculum K – 12, early childhood special education, or special education: adapted curriculum, K - 12. Due to changing University requirements, national accreditation standards, and state licensure regulations, the programs in teacher education are under constant revision. Students are encouraged to obtain current program information from the Special Education Program website at: http://education.odu.edu/esse/.

The graduate licensure programs in special education, in addition to meeting the Master of Science in Education degree requirements, satisfy Virginia Board of Education teacher endorsement competencies. Graduates are prepared to work effectively with children, adolescents, and adults who require special educational services. Classroom instruction is supplemented by field experiences with children, adolescents, and adults in a variety of settings. Teacher interns have been placed in children’s hospitals, special education classes in public and private facilities, regional education programs, residential psychiatric hospitals, mental health centers, and community agencies.

Graduates in special education serve as key members of child study teams and are prepared to address educational, emotional, and physical disabilities. They also find employment as educational therapists, psycho-educational diagnosticians, and special education teachers and staff members in public and private schools.

Admission

Admission to the graduate program in special education is granted by the department’s graduate program director in conjunction with special education faculty. The following requirements are necessary for admission to the licensure program. Individuals who have a non-teaching B.S. or B.A. and wish to earn an M.S. Ed. and qualify for a teaching license in special education must meet the liberal arts and sciences content requirements by successfully passing the Praxis II Elementary Education: Context Knowledge test (0014; 5014).

Regular admittance requirements

  1. a baccalaureate degree in the liberal arts and sciences from an accredited institution.  For candidates with other degrees from accredited institutions, successful completion of the Praxis II Elementary Education: Content Knowledge exam (0014; 5014) prior to exit from the program may be substituted to meet the liberal arts and sciences requirements. The Virginia Board of Education determines passing Praxis II scores;
  2. an undergraduate grade point average of 2.80 or better in an academic content area;
  3. a Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score of at least 291 (Verbal and Quantitative sections with a minimum Verbal score of 150 or better) and a 4.5 on the Analytical Writing section; Revised Graduate Record Examination (see graduate program director) OR a Miller Analogies Test (MAT) minimum score of 403;
  4. a 400-500 word goal statement indicating why the student wishes to enroll in the special education program; and
  5. successful completion of the Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent according to the scores established by the Virginia Department of Education .

Provisional admittance requirements

Provisional admittance may be offered to students with marginal GRE or MAT scores or grades. In this case, the committee takes into consideration other factors. Individuals who do not meet the Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or SAT requirements or with low test scores or a low undergraduate GPA will not be admitted to the graduate program. Provisional admittance requires:
  1. a baccalaureate degree in the liberal arts and sciences from a regionally accredited institution or equivalent foreign institution. For candidates with other degrees from accredited institutions, successful completion of the Praxis II Elementary Education: Content Knowledge exam (0014; 5014) prior to exit from the program may be substituted to meet the liberal arts and sciences requirements.  The Virginia Board of Education determines passing Praxis II scores;
  2. an undergraduate grade point average of 2.80 or better in an academic content area;
  3. a Graduate Record Examination score of at least 286 (Verbal and Quantitative sections with minimum Verbal score of 146 or better), Revised Graduate Record Examination (see graduate program director) and 4.0 on the Analytical Writing section OR a Miller Analogies Test (MAT) minimum score of 396;
  4. a 400-500 word goal statement indicating why the student wishes to enroll in the special education program; and
  5. successful completion of the Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent according to the scores established by the Virginia Department of Education.

Fast Track Teacher Preparation Admission Policy

Please refer to the appropriate section in the undergraduate catalog.

Continuance

Students must:

  1. complete the Pre-Task Rating Form at time of admission;
  2. complete the CITI Responsible Conduct of Research training modules. See http://education.odu.edu/docs/Responsible_Conduct_of_Research_Programs.pdf;
  3. maintain a grade point average of 3.00;
  4. achieve a grade of B- or better in all course work and a grade of B or better in all practicum coursework;
  5. successfully complete all competencies relative to their area(s) of emphasis; and
  6. must successfully pass the Virginia Board of Education Professional Assessments required for licensure prior to the start of the teacher candidate internship. The following assessments must be completed with a passing score: Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) with a passing composite score of 470; Praxis II Elementary Education: Content Knowledge (0014; 5014) exam with a passing score of 143; and Virginia Reading Assessment (VRA) with a passing score of 235 or Reading for Virginia Educators (RVE) (5306) with a passing score of 157.

Exit

Students must:

  1. maintain a grade point average of 3.00 and a grade of B- or better in all course work;
  2. provide passing scores on the Praxis II: Elementary Education Content Knowledge assessment, the written comprehensive examination (with no more than one successful re-examination) and the internship/student teaching experience;
  3. complete a Graduate Student Assessment;
  4. complete the Post Task Rating Form; and
  5. submit a professional portfolio according to program guidelines before the awarding of the master's degree. Candidates seeking initial special education licensure will be required to successfully complete the Virginia Reading Assessment (VRA) or Reading for Virginia Educators (RVE) assessment and the Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) (see Continuance section for passing scores).
  6. Candidates seeking initial special education licensure will be required to successfully complete the child abuse recognition and intervention training, technology standards for instructional personnel (TSIP), and certification/training in emergency first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and the use of automated external defibrilators.

Comprehensive Examination

All students seeking a master’s degree in special education are required to complete successfully a written comprehensive examination. On this examination, students will be required to answer questions in general special education and questions from their areas of specialization. Specialization questions will be congruent with the student’s academic and professional preparation. If not passed during the first administration, the exam may be repeated only one time. Failure to successfully pass the comprehensive examination will result in not completing the requirements for the Master of Science in Education.

Program Requirements

For all students who have the prerequisite undergraduate course work in special education, the master’s degree requires a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate study in special education to complete licensure. Students are expected to demonstrate dedication to special education clients and to programming in classroom and clinical settings before graduation is certified.

Special Education, K-12 Licensure – General Curriculum K-12

This program is designed to prepare professionals who are able to design and to implement appropriate educational programs for students who manifest mild disabilities. The program combines course work, supervised practica and internship to facilitate the integration of theory and practice in the development of evidence-based interventions applicable for individuals with special needs from preschool through adult in both public and private facilities. Program competencies prepare students to work in school-based programs, clinics, hospitals, and agency settings. Program practica and internship allow students opportunities to apply management, instructional and problem-solving skills in one-to-one and group settings.

Note to students in Washington State from the Student Achievement Council (SAC) concerning the Master of Science in Education (Special Education - General Curriculum K-12):  Eligibility for initial educator certification in Washington is based on completion of a state approved educator preparation program.  This program is approved in Virginia and is authorized for field placements in Washington by the Professional Educators Standards Board.  Even though you may be residing in Washington while in this program, your application for educator certification in Washington will be processed as an out-of-state application.  Go to http://pathway.pesb.wa.gov/outofstate for more information.  Teachers are advised to contact their individual school districts as to whether or not this program may qualify for teacher advancement.

Curriculum

Prerequisite Courses (or Undergraduate Minor or IDS in special education)
SPED 313Fundamentals of Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence3
SPED 400/500Foundations of Special Education: Legal Aspects and Characteristics3
SPED 402/502Instructional Design I: Learner Characteristics and Assessment3
SPED 411/511Classroom and Behavioral Management Techniques for Students with Diverse Needs3
SPED 415/515Instructional Design II: Curricular Procedures and Individualized Education Planning *3
SPED 417/517Collaboration and Transitions3
TLED 468/568Language Acquisition and Reading for Students with Diverse Learning Needs3
TLED 430/530PK-12 Instructional Technology3
Graduate Course Work
Select two of the following:6
Characteristics and Advanced Procedures: Emotional and Behavioral Disorders *
Characteristics and Advanced Procedures: Intellectual Disabilities *
Characteristics of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Characteristics and Advanced Procedures: Learning Disabilities *
Instructional Strategies for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders *
Both of the following6
Characteristics of Students Accessing the General Curriculum
Instructional Strategies for Students accessing the General Education Curriculum *
Select one of the following:3
Reading to Learn Across the Curriculum
Diagnostic Teaching of Reading in the Classroom
Required
SPED 586Teacher Candidate Internship for Special Endorsement **9
SPED 621Effective Interventions for Children and Youth with Challenging Behavior *3
SPED 720Curriculum and Instruction: Research Into Practice3
Total Hours54
*

Requires a practicum of 45 hours and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent exemption. (See Practicum Experiences Policy)

**

Pre-requisite SPED 483/SPED 583

Special Education, K-12 Licensure - Early Childhood Special Education and Special Education - Adapted Curriculum K - 12

The early childhood special education program is designed to prepare students to teach children from birth to age six who manifest disabilities or who are at risk of later school failure. Students endorsed in the area of early childhood special education will be eligible to teach in infant and preschool programs in both public and private settings. The adapted curriculum program is designed to prepare teachers to instruct individuals traditionally labeled with multiple, moderate, severe, or profound disabilities who may have disabling conditions such as cerebral palsy, autism, or a sensory impairment. Students following the early childhood special education endorsement will take the prerequisite, core, and early childhood special education course blocks and teacher candidate internship. Students wishing to be endorsed in special education: adapted curriculum will take the prerequisite, core, and adapted curriculum course blocks and teacher candidate internship.

Curriculum

Prerequisite Courses (or Undergraduate Minor or IDS in special education)
SPED 313Fundamentals of Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence3
SPED 400/500Foundations of Special Education: Legal Aspects and Characteristics3
SPED 402/502Instructional Design I: Learner Characteristics and Assessment3
SPED 411/511Classroom and Behavioral Management Techniques for Students with Diverse Needs3
SPED 415/515Instructional Design II: Curricular Procedures and Individualized Education Planning *3
SPED 417/517Collaboration and Transitions3
TLED 430/530PK-12 Instructional Technology3
Graduate Core Courses
SPED 504Characteristics and Medical Aspects of Disabling Conditions3
SPED 569Communication/Language Development/Intervention for Students with Significant Disabilities3
SPED 633Teaching Students with Severe Physical and Sensorimotor Disabilities *3
TLED 568Language Acquisition and Reading for Students with Diverse Learning Needs3
Early Childhood Special Education OR
SPED 630Teaching Preschoolers with Disabilities *3
SPED 631Developmental and Ecological Assessment Strategies *3
SPED 637Infant/Family Intervention and Teamwork *3
Special Education - Adapted Curriculum K-12 ***
SPED 621Effective Interventions for Children and Youth with Challenging Behavior *3
SPED 623Characteristics and Advanced Procedures: Intellectual Disabilities *3
SPED 625Characteristics of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders3
SPED 628Instructional Strategies for Students Accessing the Adapted Curriculum *3
Internship9
Teacher Candidate Internship for Special Endorsement **
Total Hours63
*

Requires a 45-hour practicum and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education Assessment for admission to an approved teacher education program (see Practicum Experiences Policy).

**

SPED 483/SPED 583 prerequisite.

***

 SPED 621 and SPED 628 are required. Choose either SPED 623 or SPED 625 for a total of nine hours.

Due to changing University requirements, national accreditation standards, and Commonwealth licensure regulations, the programs in the Darden College of Education are under constant revision. Any changes resulting from these factors supersede the program requirements described in the catalog. Students are encouraged to obtain current program information from their advisors and the Darden College of Education website at http://education.odu.edu/.

Post Baccalaureate Endorsement Program

Sabra Gear, Graduate Program Director
Child Study Center
(757) 683-4383

Many students who already possess an undergraduate degree enter Old Dominion University for the sole purpose of meeting Virginia’s teaching licensure standards. When these students apply for admission into an approved teacher education program, they are considered to be post baccalaureate endorsement only candidates and must meet the college’s policy for admitting students into an approved teacher education program. Admission to Old Dominion University does not guarantee admission into degree and/ or teacher preparation programs in the Darden College of Education. The special education post baccalaureate endorsement option is available for those students who wish to pursue licensure in special education and do not meet the master’s degree admission requirements or hold provisional licensure in special education and wish to complete licensure requirements.

The ODU  Post Baccalaureate Endorsement Program meets Virginia Department of Education endorsement requirements. Graduates find employment as special education teachers within the continuum of services provided for children with special needs and may also serve as key members of child study teams; they are prepared to address the educational, emotional, and physical needs of students with disabilities.

Admission

Regular admittance requires:

  1. completion of an undergraduate degree in the arts and sciences (or equivalent); a major in interdisciplinary studies or passing scores on Praxis II (0014; 5014) Elementary Education: Content Knowledge;
  2. admission to Old Dominion University as a non-degree seeking graduate student;
  3. cumulative GPA of 2.80 for all college credit courses taken in the baccalaureate degree program from an accredited college/university;
  4. passing Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent assessments scores;
  5. an interview and recommendation for admittance from a department representative, Teacher Education Services advisor, or site director; and
  6. submission of an application for admittance into the Darden College of Education Teacher Post-Baccalaureate Endorsement Program.

Provisional admittance requires:

  1. completion of an undergraduate degree in the arts and sciences (or equivalent); a major in interdisciplinary studies or passing scores on Praxis II (0014; 5014) Elementary Education: Content Knowledge;
  2. admission to Old Dominion University as a non-degree seeking graduate student;
  3. cumulative GPA of 2.50-2.74 for all college credit courses taken in the baccalaureate degree program from an accredited college/university;
  4. passing Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent assessment scores;
  5. an interview and recommendation for admittance from a department representative, Teacher Education Services advisor, or site director; and
  6. submission of an application for admittance into the Darden College of Education Teacher Post-Baccalaureate Endorsement Program.

Continuance Requirements

  1. completion of the Pre-Task Rating Form upon acceptance;
  2. complete the CITI Responsible Conduct of Research training modules. See http://education.odu.edu/docs/Responsible_Conduct_of_Research_Programs.pdf;
  3. successful completion of all courses required for licensure in an endorsement area(s);
  4. maintenance of a GPA of 3.0 with a B- or better in all course work, and B or better in all practicum coursework; and
  5. computer literacy (or completion of TLED 430/530 or demonstrated evidence of proficiency in the Virginia Department of Education Technology Standards For Instructional Personnel [TSIP]).

Exit Requirements

  1. completion of the Post Task Rating form;
  2. passing scores on the Reading for Virginia Educators (RVE) or Virginia Reading Assessment (VRA) and Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) prior to teacher candidate internship (student teaching);
  3. completion of all requirements for the program inclusing passing scores on the Praxis II Elementary Education: Content Knowledge exam ( 0014; 5014)
  4. completion of SPED 583 prior to teacher candidate internship (student teaching); and
  5. passing scores on the Special Education Exit Exam.
  6. Candidates seeking initial special education licensure will be required to successfully complete the child abuse recognition and intervention training, technology standards for instructional personnel (TSIP), and certification/training in emergency first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and the use of automated external defibrilators.

Curriculum

Special Education Endorsement Only—General Curriculum, K - 12

SPED 313Fundamentals of Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence3
SPED 400/500Foundations of Special Education: Legal Aspects and Characteristics3
SPED 402/502Instructional Design I: Learner Characteristics and Assessment3
SPED 411/511Classroom and Behavioral Management Techniques for Students with Diverse Needs3
SPED 415/515Instructional Design II: Curricular Procedures and Individualized Education Planning *3
SPED 417/517Collaboration and Transitions3
TLED 468/568Language Acquisition and Reading for Students with Diverse Learning Needs3
SPED 610Characteristics of Students Accessing the General Curriculum3
SPED 611Instructional Strategies for Students accessing the General Education Curriculum *3
READ 680Reading to Learn Across the Curriculum3
TLED 430/530PK-12 Instructional Technology3
Internship9
SPED 583Field Experience Seminar in Special Education1
SPED 586Teacher Candidate Internship for Special Endorsement9
Total Hours52
*

Requires a practicum of 45 hours and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education Assessment for admission to an approved teacher education program (see Practicum Experiences Policy).

Early Childhood Special Education Endorsment Only

Core Requirements
SPED 313Fundamentals of Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence3
SPED 400/500Foundations of Special Education: Legal Aspects and Characteristics3
SPED 415/515Instructional Design II: Curricular Procedures and Individualized Education Planning *3
SPED 404/504Characteristics and Medical Aspects of Disabling Conditions3
SPED 411/511Classroom and Behavioral Management Techniques for Students with Diverse Needs3
SPED 417/517Collaboration and Transitions3
SPED 469/569Communication/Language Development/Intervention for Students with Significant Disabilities3
TLED 468/568Language Acquisition and Reading for Students with Diverse Learning Needs3
TLED 430/530PK-12 Instructional Technology3
Early Childhood Special Education Licensure Only
SPED 630Teaching Preschoolers with Disabilities *3
SPED 631Developmental and Ecological Assessment Strategies *3
SPED 637Infant/Family Intervention and Teamwork *3
Internship9
SPED 583Field Experience Seminar in Special Education1
SPED 586Teacher Candidate Internship for Special Endorsement9
Total Hours55
*

Requires a practicum of 45 hours and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education Assessment for admission to an approved teacher education program (see Practicum Experiences Policy).

Special Education—Adapted Curriculum, K - 12 Endorsement Only

Core Requirements
SPED 313Fundamentals of Human Growth and Development: Birth through Adolescence3
SPED 400/500Foundations of Special Education: Legal Aspects and Characteristics3
SPED 415/515Instructional Design II: Curricular Procedures and Individualized Education Planning3
SPED 404/504Characteristics and Medical Aspects of Disabling Conditions3
SPED 411/511Classroom and Behavioral Management Techniques for Students with Diverse Needs3
SPED 417/517Collaboration and Transitions3
SPED 469/569Communication/Language Development/Intervention for Students with Significant Disabilities3
TLED 468/568Language Acquisition and Reading for Students with Diverse Learning Needs3
TLED 430/530PK-12 Instructional Technology3
Adapted Curriculum Licensure Only
SPED 621Effective Interventions for Children and Youth with Challenging Behavior *3
SPED 633Teaching Students with Severe Physical and Sensorimotor Disabilities *3
SPED 628Instructional Strategies for Students Accessing the Adapted Curriculum *3
Internship9
SPED 583Field Experience Seminar in Special Education1
SPED 586Teacher Candidate Internship for Special Endorsement9
Total Hours55
*

Requires a practicum of 45 hours and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education Assessment for admission to an approved teacher education program (see Practicum Experiences Policy).

Due to changing University requirements, national accreditation standards, and Commonwealth licensure regulations, the programs in the Darden College of Education are under constant revision. Any changes resulting from these factors supersede the program requirements described here. Students are encouraged to obtain current program information from their advisors and the Darden College of Education website at http://education.odu.edu/.

Special Education – Visual Impairments, PreK-12 Endorsement only

Endorsement Requirements **
SPED 400/500Foundations of Special Education: Legal Aspects and Characteristics3
SPED 411/511Classroom and Behavioral Management Techniques for Students with Diverse Needs3
SPED 417/517Collaboration and Transitions3
SPED 432/532Characteristics of Students with Visual Impairments1
SPED 433/533Braille Code3
SPED 434/534Medical and Educational Implications of Visual Impairments *3
SPED 435/535Orientation and Mobility *2
SPED 436/536Curriculum and Assessment of Students with Visual Impairments *3
SPED 437/537Assistive Technology for People with Sensory Impairments3
TLED 468/568Language Acquisition and Reading for Students with Diverse Learning Needs3
SPED 638Teaching Methods for Students with Visual Impairments *3
SPED 639Braille Reading and Writing *3
Internship
SPED 583Field Experience Seminar in Special Education1
SPED 586Teacher Candidate Internship for Special Endorsement9
Total Hours43
*

Requires a 45-hour practicum and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education assessment for admission to an approved teacher education program (see Practicum Experience Policy).

**

 READ 680 is recommended.

Autism Certificate Program

Old Dominion University is pleased to offer a 12 credit hour certificate program designed to prepare teachers and related service providers to effectively work and provide support for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This coursework can be completed separately from, or integrated into, the Master’s Degree in Special Education.

Required Courses:

SPED 625Characteristics of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders3
SPED 627Instructional Strategies for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders *3
SPED 569Communication/Language Development/Intervention for Students with Significant Disabilities3
SPED 621Effective Interventions for Children and Youth with Challenging Behavior *3
Total Hours12
*

Requires practicum of 45 hours and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education Assessment for admission to an approved teacher education program (see Practicum Experiences Policy).

Applied Behavior Analysis Certificate Program

As part of the Virginia Applied Behavior Analysis Consortium (VA-ABA) with George Mason University, Lynchburg College and Virginia Commonwealth University, ODU is pleased to offer an 18 credit sequence of courses leading to a post-masters certificate in applied behavior analysis (ABA).  The VA-ABA Consortium is comprised of four universities: George Mason University, Lynchburg College, Old Dominion University, and Virginia Commonwealth University. Old Dominion University has opted to join the VA-ABA Consortium to help in meeting Virginia staffing needs for ABA-certified teachers. The Consortium's primary goal is to provide teachers with instruction in applied behavior analysis that will broaden the range of empirically-supported teaching methodologies that they effectively use to meet the academic, social, and behavioral learning needs of diverse students. The Consortium's secondary goal is to provide teachers with the educational and experiential requirements needed for them to sit for the national Behavior Analyst Certification Examination.This program will be offered in a cohort model with a group of qualified students admitted once per academic year.  Course work will be delivered via distance learning modalities from participating universities. An applicant must have a master's degree from a regionally accredited university or the equivalent from a foreign institution in one of the following areas:  education, psychology or behavior analysis.Successful completion of the certificate program, in addition to a supervised internship that meets BACB guidelines, will allow the participant to apply for the national Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) exam. Courses required to complete the ODU Applied Behavior Analysis Certificate Program include the following courses.

SPED 640Applied Behavior Analysis: Principles, Procedures, and Philosophy3
SPED 641Applied Behavior Analysis: Empirical Bases3
SPED 642Ethics and Professional Conduct for Behavior Analysts3
SPED 643Applied Behavior Analysis: Assessments and Interventions3
SPED 644Applied Behavior Analysis: Applications3
SPED 645Applied Behavior Analysis: Verbal Behavior3
Total Hours18

Doctor of Philosophy in Education – Special Education Concentration

Sabra Gear, Graduate Program Director

The Doctor of Philosophy is the degree most often desired for those who wish to become faculty in colleges and universities and those who aspire to senior administrative roles in institutions and agencies. The Ph.D. in special education is intended to prepare individuals for administrative and faculty positions and to provide students with the skills to carry out scholarly research, lead organizations, and create new research.

The Ph.D. in special education is designed to address the acute shortage of doctoral level special education personnel in the Commonwealth and across the nation. Program graduates will be prepared as content experts in pre-referral intervention and early intervention to assume positions of leadership as special education faculty at the university and college level. Additionally, graduates of the special education program will have the professional research skills to work with school systems to address the diverse learning needs and behavior challenges associated with the education of students with special needs and those students at risk. Program graduates will attain a degree of proficiency in research and writing that will prepare them to make contributions to the professional literatures of special education and related disciplines.

The curriculum described below contains elements that will provide research expertise, administrative skills and experience, and the ability to serve the nation’s colleges, universities, and agencies providing special education services.

Admission

The criteria for admission into the Ph.D. in special education will include:

  1. A completed master’s degree in special education or an equivalent degree, in an appropriate discipline from a regionally accredited university. A minimum grade point (GPA) of 3.60 (on a 4.0 scale) overall for the master’s degree and in the major area of study in the master’s degree will be expected. In extraordinary circumstances, an individual may be accepted into the Ph.D. in special education program on a provisional status without having received a master’s degree. This individual first must complete the master’s degree in the selected concentration area and meet all other admission criteria prior to beginning Ph.D. coursework;
  2. An acceptable overall total score on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE)  (minimum 150 on the verbal portion) and no less than a 4.5 on the writing sample. Applicants whose native language is not English must submit a current score for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) that meets the University’s current standard;
  3. Submission of a professional vitae (3 years minimum teaching experience preferred);
  4. A 500-800 word statement of academic and professional goals. This statement must address how the applicant would work within the research agenda of the concentration to achieve his/her goals;
  5. Three letters of reference from sources capable of commenting on the applicant’s readiness for the advanced graduate study. At least two of these letters must be from an academic source;
  6. Prior course work in statistics and in theories of learning. If this requirement is not met, a student may be admitted and additional course work will be added to the candidate’s program of study; and
  7. An on-campus interview with concentration area faculty.

Applications for admission will be reviewed by the admissions committee from the special education concentration. Admission to the special education program is competitive with the number of applications expected to exceed the number of available openings. Admission criteria will be weighted with competitive applicants invited to participate in an on campus interview. Most full time students will begin their course of study each fall semester as a cohort following a summer orientation.

Continuance

Students must:

  1. maintain a grade point average of 3.00 overall;
  2. complete the CITI Responsible Conduct of Research training modules. See http://education.odu.edu/docs/Responsible_Conduct_of_Research_Programs.pdf;
  3. complete an annual continuance review; and
  4. successfully complete all competencies relative to their program of study.

Exit

In order to complete the program, students must fully complete the curriculum below and all requirements noted elsewhere in the University catalog for graduate students and within the Ph.D. in Education Handbook. It is the responsibility of the student to obtain these materials and comply with all requirements.

Program Requirements

The Ph.D. program in special education is comprised of courses totaling a minimum of 60 academic credit hours beyond the master’s degree. The curriculum includes a content concentration totaling 24 credit hours, an introductory core of nine hours, a research component including 15 credit hours, and the dissertation, which will include a minimum of 12 hours. The dissertation will often include more than 12 credit hours depending on the length of time necessary for completion. Students entering the program may also need to complete one introductory statistics course if they have not had such a course or cannot demonstrate competency at a satisfactory level. Students who come into the Ph.D. program with a master’s degree in an academic field that is unrelated to special education and/or who have not completed courses to develop competency in specified areas may need to complete additional prerequisite course work.

Under normal circumstances, admissions will be offered once a year in order to build efficient cohort groups for this type of advanced study. In order to enhance the experience of the students and to increase the efficiency by which courses are offered, a cohort of 10 students will be admitted each year. This limited number of students is necessary to ensure that there is an adequate number of full-time faculty to serve the students through advising and other duties, particularly when the cohorts reach the dissertation stage of the program.

Applicants must submit completed applications and all related material no later than February 1 of each year, and students will be admitted for study beginning in June or July of the same year.

Curriculum

Prerequisite Course work
FOUN 722Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis3
SPED 701/801Historical and Contemporary Research in Special Education3
Introductory Core
SPED 821Critical Issues I: Readings in Special Education and Professional Writing3
SPED 822Critical Issues II: Research and Professional Writing3
SPED 893Professional Seminar: Teaching, Research, and Service3
Research Core
FOUN 822Applied Linear Models in Educational Research3
FOUN 812Research Design and Analysis3
FOUN 813Program Evaluation in Education3
FOUN 814Qualitative Research Design in Education3
FOUN 816Single Subject Research Designs3
Special Education Concentration
SPED 700/800Social/Emotional Aspects of Child Development3
SPED 702/802Cognitive Processes and Learning Strategies for Students with Special Needs3
SPED 707/807Advanced Instructional Procedures in Special Education3
SPED 720/820Curriculum and Instruction: Research Into Practice3
CDSE 795/895Topics in Education3
SPED 868Internship: Special Education3
Electives *6
Dissertation
SPED 899Dissertation12
Total Hours66
*

With approval of the graduate program director, elective courses may be substituted for those within the special education core. This allows students to take up to 6 hours as electives. Such substitutions must be approved in writing. Electives may be taken in other areas in the College of Education (e.g., educational leadership, higher education, early childhood education, instructional design and technology) or in other colleges with the approval of the appropriate graduate program director or department.

Due to changing University requirements, national accreditation standards, and Commonwealth licensure regulations, the programs in the Darden College of Education are under constant revision. Any changes resulting from these factors supersede the program requirements described in the catalog. Students are encouraged to obtain current program information from their advisors and the Darden College of Education website at http://education.odu.edu/.

Practicum Experiences Policy

A candidate may participate in a course with a practicum experience through one of two tracks:

  1. A candidate may be eligible to participate in the early practicum experience course if s/he has been admitted into an approved teacher education program. This requires that candidates pass the Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education Assessment for admission to an approved teacher education program (see Practicum Experiences Policy).   In addition, candidates must meet the GPA for their individual programs, professional education courses, and minimum grade requirements, along with any other course prerequisites.
  2. A provisionally licensed teacher may participate in an early practicum course if s/he is currently employed with a school division, has a letter from the Virginia Department of Education listing the course as a needed requirement, and has passing Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) scores. The provisionally licensed teacher will have to meet all the requirements of the course as stated in the syllabus.
  3. Candidates seeking admission to an approved teacher education program must satisfy one of the Virginia Board of Education Prescribed Assessment for Admission to an Approved Teacher Education Program. This requirement can be satisfied by meeting a passing score in one of the selected criteria below:
    1. Passing Praxis I composite score of 532 (before January 1, 2014) or passing scores on the Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests ; or
    2. Approved substitute test score for Praxis I/Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests:
      1. SAT score of 1000 with at least 450 verbal and 510 mathematics taken prior to April 1, 1995; or
      2. SAT score of 1100 with at least 530 verbal and 530 mathematics taken after April 1, 1995; or
      3. ACT composite score of 21 with ACT mathematics score of less than 21, and ACT English plus Reading score of no less than 37, taken prior to April 1, 1995. ACT scores taken prior to 1989 are not valid; or
      4. ACT composite score of 24 with ACT mathematics score of less than 22, and ACT English plus Reading score of no less than 46, taken after April 1, 1995; or
      5. Praxis I Math test score of 178 or Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Math Test score of 150 and a composite Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (hereafter referred to as the VCLA) composite score of 470; or
      6. SAT Mathematics test score of at least 510 taken prior to April 1, 1995 and a VCLA composite score of 470; or
      7. SAT Mathematics test score of at least 530 taken after April 1, 1995 and a VCLA composite score of 470; or
      8. ACT Mathematics test score of at least 21 taken prior to April 1, 1995 and a VCLA composite score of 470; or
      9. ACT Mathematics test score of at least 22 taken after April 1, 1995 and a VCLA composite score of 470.

Master of Science in Education – Speech Language Pathology

Child Study Center
757-683-4117

Anastasia Raymer, Graduate Program Director

This program leads to a Master of Science in Education with a major in communication sciences and disorders. The program is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation (CAA) in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology affiliated with the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (2200 Research Boulevard #310, Rockville, Marylang 20850, phone: 800-498-2071 or 301-296-5700). The program is intended to prepare professionals to understand, identify, assess and structure intervention programs for children and adults who present a wide array of speech and language disorders. Content areas of coursework include language development and disorders, articulation and phonological disorders, voice disorders, fluency disorders, hearing disorders and evaluation, dysphagia, aphasia, motor speech disorders, orofacial disorders and social dialects, among others. Students engage in supervised on-campus practica in the university Speech and Hearing Clinic/Scottish Rite Center for Childhood Speech and Language Disorders. They also engage in off-campus practica in a variety of area hospitals, private practice settings, rehabilitation centers, clinics and public schools. Graduate students also complete a research paper in an area of their interest under the supervision of a program faculty member and must successfully pass a written comprehensive examination. All students must complete the national examination in Speech-Language Pathology (Praxis II) and essential paperwork for ASHA certification prior to graduation.

Graduates of the program hold positions as speech-language pathologists in a variety of professional settings, such as public schools, hospitals, children’s hospitals, private practice agencies, and rehabilitation centers. Many graduates have become administrators, clinical supervisors and instructors at universities, and researchers.

Students with and without an undergraduate degree in communication sciences and disorders are eligible for acceptance into the program. The normal matriculation for a student who holds an undergraduate degree in the field is two full years (6 semesters) of full-time enrollment. Students who do not hold an undergraduate degree in the field typically require two additional semesters to complete prerequisite and required master’s degree coursework.

Application and Admission

Application to the ODU graduate program in communication sciences and disorders takes place through Communication Sciences and Disorders Central Application System (CSDCAS, www.capcsd.org/csdcas/students/php). All documents (transcripts, letters, essay) are to be submitted to CSDCAS by February 1 of each year. Students then must go to the ODU graduate application system (www.odu.edu/admission/graduate) to complete a secondary application form. No additional documents are needed with the ODU application.

Admission to the graduate program in communication sciences and disorders is granted after a competitive review completed by the graduate program director and faculty of the communication sciences and disorders program. Individuals entering the master’s degree program must possess an undergraduate degree.

The following minimum requirements are necessary in order to be considered for admission to the program.

Regular admittance requires:

  1. a baccalaureate degree from an institution accredited by a regional accrediting body or an equivalent degree from a foreign institution;
  2. an undergraduate grade point average of 2.80 or better;
  3. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) minimum scores of 146 verbal, 140 quantitative, and 4.0 analytic. Students meeting these minimal scores enter a selection pool of candidates;
  4. three letters of recommendation, at least two of which should be from prior university instructors;
  5. a maximum 500 word essay indicating the student’s academic and professional goals as well as a description of the reasons the student believes he or she is a competitive candidate.

Continuance

Students must:

  1. maintain a grade point average of 3.00;
  2. satisfactorily complete all practica;
  3. earn no more than two grades below B-. Students must retake courses in which grades below B- are earned and receive grades of B- or higher. Obtaining three grades below B- leads to expulsion from the program;
  4. meet prerequisite competencies, including the Grammatical Categories Test, in order to be admitted to clinical practica;
  5. receive permission from the faculty in order to be admitted to any clinical practicum.

Exit

Students must:

  1. have a grade point average of 3.00;
  2. pass the department writing proficiency examination;
  3. meet all academic competencies;
  4. meet all clinical competencies;
  5. pass a written comprehensive examination;
  6. complete Praxis II (Speech-Language Pathology);
  7. successfully complete a written research project; and
  8. complete an exit interview with the graduate program director.

Comprehensive Examination

All students seeking a master’s degree in communication sciences and disorders are required to successfully complete a written comprehensive examination. Areas of examination are based upon program coursework and related areas of professional preparation. If any area is not successfully completed during the first administration, the student is allowed only one more attempt. Failure of any question on the second administration leads to expulsion from the program.

Program Requirements

All students who have met prerequisite requirements must complete a minimum of 36 semester hours of graduate study in communication sciences and disorders. Students are expected to satisfy all professional, academic, and clinical requirements and demonstrate ethical and interactive behaviors commensurate with the standards of the profession.

Curriculum

Prerequisite
CSD 351Anatomy of Speech, Language, and Swallowing3
CSD 352Phonetics3
CSD 450Survey of Communication Disorders3
CSD 451/551Articulation and Phonological Disorders3
CSD 452/552Voice Disorders3
CSD 453/553Language Development3
CSD 458/558Speech and Hearing Science3
CSD 459/559Augmentative and Alternative Communication Methods and Materials3
CSD 460/560Hearing Disorders and Basic Audiometry3
CSD 461/561Aural Rehabilitation I3
Required
CSD 554Clinical Practica in Speech Pathology/Audiology I-II-III4
CSD 649Clinical Procedures in Speech-Language Pathology (Required for all non-ODU undergraduates; ODU undergraduates complete CSD 449W)3
FOUN 612Applied Research Methods in Education3
CDSE 597Independent Study in Special Topics in Education1-4
CDSE 636Problems in Education3
CSD 650Organic Speech-Language Disorders3
CSD 651Language Development and Language Disorders3
CSD 652Articulation and Phonological Disorders3
CSD 654Advanced Clinical Techniques in Speech Pathology3
CSD 655Cleft Palate3
CSD 656Theories and Therapies in Stuttering3
CSD 657Aphasia and Related Cognitive Disorders3
CSD 658Swallowing Disorders3
CSD 660Procedures in Audiology3
CSD 653Language Diagnosis and Remediation3

COMMUNICATION DISORDERS AND SPECIAL EDUCATION Courses

CDSE 595. Topics in Education. 1-6 Credits.

Selected topics in education.

CDSE 597. Independent Study in Special Topics in Education. 1-4 Credits.

Independent study of selected topics.

CDSE 636. Problems in Education. 3 Credits.

Application of research procedures culminating in student study of selected topics. Prerequisites: FOUN 612.

CDSE 695. Topics in Education. 1-3 Credits.

This course offers selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest in the special education field. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

CDSE 699. Thesis. 3-6 Credits.

Supervised graduate student research. Prerequisites: permission of instructor.

CDSE 795. Topics in Education. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics and emergent research related issues that permits small groups of qualified students to study subjects of mutual interest, which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CDSE 895. Topics in Education. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics and emergent research related issues that permits small groups of qualified students to study subjects of mutual interest, which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CDSE 998. CDSE 998. 1 Credit.

CDSE 999. Communication Disorders/Special Education 999. 1 Credit.

A one-hour pass/fail registration required of all graduate students to maintain active status during the final semester prior to graduation. After successfully passing the candidacy examination, all doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit each term until the degree is complete.

COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS Courses

CSD 548. Speech-Language and Hearing Programs in the Public Schools. 3 Credits.

The emphasis of this course is on the organization and administration of public school speech-language and hearing programs, as well as clinical, professional and legal issues related to service delivery. Prerequisites: CSD 550 and CSD 560.

CSD 550. Survey of Communication Disorders. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to acquaint the student with recognition, identification, and understanding of speech and language disorders. Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.

CSD 551. Articulation and Phonological Disorders. 3 Credits.

This course emphasizes causes, identification and treatment of articulation and phonological disorders. Prerequisites: CSD 352 and CSD 450/550.

CSD 552. Voice Disorders. 3 Credits.

This course focuses upon anatomical and physiological bases, etiologies, assessment and treatment of voice disorders.

CSD 553. Language Development. 3 Credits.

This course emphasizes language development from the perspective of the speech-language pathologist.

CSD 554. Clinical Practica in Speech Pathology/Audiology I-II-III. 4 Credits.

These practica are designed to provide students with experiences in the evaluation and treatment of communication disorders. (qualifies as a CAP experience) Prerequisites: CSD 351, CSD 449W or CDSE 597, CSD 450 or CSD 550, CSD 451 or CSD 551, CSD 453 or CSD 553, CSD 460 or CSD 560, and permission of program faculty.

CSD 558. Speech and Hearing Science. 3 Credits.

The content of this course focuses upon basic acoustics, speech acoustics, psychoacoustics, speech perception, and clinical laboratory instrumentation. The course is designed to provide fundamental information regarding normal and abnormal aspects of speech and hearing processes. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in CSD 460 or CSD 560.

CSD 559. Augmentative and Alternative Communication Methods and Materials. 3 Credits.

This course focuses upon current augmentative and alternative communication methods, equipment, and materials that are utilized in the management of severe communication disorders.

CSD 560. Hearing Disorders and Basic Audiometry. 3 Credits.

A study of the physics of sound, anatomy, and physiology of the human ear, basic audiometry and hearing disorders.

CSD 561. Aural Rehabilitation I. 3 Credits.

A study of audiological findings and the implications for hearing therapy; speech and language development of the deaf.

CSD 565. Signing I-Beginning Nonverbal Communication. 3 Credits.

Study of the grammatical structure and use of American sign language; exposure to ideals and culture of the deaf community. (This course does not satisfy the general education foreign language skills requirement.) Prerequisites: permission of the instructor.

CSD 649. Clinical Procedures in Speech-Language Pathology. 3 Credits.

This course teaches students basic clinical procedures and competencies in speech-language pathology with an emphasis on language sampling and identification of grammatical categories, skills required by professionals practicing in the field of speech-language pathology. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

CSD 650. Organic Speech-Language Disorders. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The content of this course focuses upon the structural and neurological bases of speech and language disorders, particularly those related to laryngeal and central nervous system pathologies.

CSD 651. Language Development and Language Disorders. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: CSD 553 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. This course provides a detailed analysis of current literature pertinent to language development, diagnosis and intervention.

CSD 652. Articulation and Phonological Disorders. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: CSD 551. The principal emphasis of this course is clinical intervention for phonological and articulation disorders including motor speech disorders.

CSD 653. Language Diagnosis and Remediation. 3 Credits.

This is an advanced course on the diagnostic methods and remediation techniques for the child with language disorder and the child who is nonverbal. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

CSD 654. Advanced Clinical Techniques in Speech Pathology. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course emphasizes current techniques in the management of voice, language, stuttering and articulation disorders.

CSD 655. Cleft Palate. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The purpose of this course is to investigate the etiologies, communicative disorders, diagnostic methods, and therapeutic techniques related to cleft palate and related disorders.

CSD 656. Theories and Therapies in Stuttering. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course emphasizes current etiological theories, research, diagnostic procedures and therapeutic techniques related to stuttering.

CSD 657. Aphasia and Related Cognitive Disorders. 3 Credits.

The objective of this course is to investigate the etiologies, communicative disorders, diagnostic methods and therapeutic techniques related to aphasia, dementia, and traumatic brain injury.

CSD 658. Swallowing Disorders. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course reviews the structures and neural bases of swallowing, common etiologies that cause dysphagia, and clinical techniques used in assessment and management of swallowing disorders in pediatric and adult populations.

CSD 660. Procedures in Audiology. 3 Credits.

Advanced study of the physics of sound, anatomy, and physiology of audition, hearing disorders, and audiometric procedures, providing knowledge and skills necessary for a speech-language pathologist.

FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION Courses

FOUN 611. Introduction to Research Methods in Education. 3 Credits.

The primary goal of the course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to access, evaluate, and synthesize empirical research. The course examines types of educational research and criteria for evaluating empirical studies. It introduces various types of research questions and associated research designs, components of research reports, sampling, validity of measures, threats to internal and external validity, and simple statistics.

FOUN 612. Applied Research Methods in Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. The primary goal of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to write a research proposal and conduct research. It is intended for those students who are completing a thesis to meet their program requirements, those planning on pursuing a doctoral degree, or those who anticipate conducting research for any other reasons. The course examines types of educational research and criteria for selection of topics for research projects; describes criteria for effective collection and organization of data; review of literature, analysis of data and proposal writing.

FOUN 615. Research and Application of the Evolution of Education: History, Issues, Technology and Assessment. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Course focuses on foundations of U.S. education system; legal aspects for educational delivery in the U.S. and Virginia; use and contributions of technology integration to learning outcomes; formative and summative assessment for improving learning outcomes of urban children and youth.

FOUN 640. Fundamentals of Measurement and Assessment. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. This course stresses the use of measurement and assessment for evaluation and decision making focusing on basic concepts applicable to all types of assessment: statistical concepts, reliability, validity, and interpretive frameworks for cognitive and non-cognitive measures.

FOUN 641. Assessment and Evaluation of Student Learning. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. The valid use of formative and summative assessment and evaluation principles for monitoring and promoting students' learning and development will be addressed. Students will learn how to construct and use a variety of formal and informal teacher assessment procedures.

FOUN 650. Human Development and Student Learning. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; 3 credits. Corequisite: Student must be a participant in the Teacher Residency Grant. This course will focus on understanding children's and adolescents' physical, social, emotional, intellectual, and speech/language development; integrating and incorporating children and adolescent differences (economic, social, racial, ethnic, religious, physical, and mental) into understanding developmental issues as they relate to instruction, including the identification and instruction of students with exceptionalities as well as special needs. Research related to the classroom application of these theories is examined and evaluated based on principles of research design and interpretation.

FOUN 662. Assessment and Evaluation for Schools Serving Military Connected Children and Families. 4 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours; Service learning, 1 hour. 4 credits. Prerequisite: COUN 605 and acceptance into the Military Child and Family Education Certificate Program. This course is designed to create educators and educational support service providers capable of assessing the needs of military children and able to self-assess their schools in terms of the comprehensive elements of a military conscious and supportive school. Students will become familiar with the Military Consciousness Assessment Toolkit (Mil-CAT), a comprehensive and dynamic self-assessment tool developed at ODU that provides a process and system for analyzing and prioritizing support structures and needs of military students across the school. Students will also apply basic constructs of assessment in order to develop skills for determining the individual academic, social, and emotional needs of military students and their families, as well as to design ways to assess classroom and school-wide interventions. Use of assessments of individual, group, and school-wide needs to design, implement, and evaluate contextually tailored interventions that support military connected students will be modeled and practices. This course is required for completion of the Military Child and Family Education graduate certificate. Students must be accepted to the certificate program or receive approval from the certificate program director in order to enroll.

FOUN 722. Introduction to Applied Statistics and Data Analysis. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Introduction to basic topics in statistical analysis, including descriptive statistics and simple inferential statistics such as correlation, regression, t-tests, one-way analysis of variance, and chi-square.

FOUN 812. Research Design and Analysis. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the application of advanced research design as it is applied in various educational disciplines. It provides an in-depth examination of quantitative research approaches, sampling techniques, threats to validity, ethical considerations and reviewing, writing quantitative methodology descriptions for research proposals and reports.

FOUN 813. Program Evaluation in Education. 3 Credits.

Examines procedures and problems in the design and utilization of program evaluation in education. Identifies evaluation purposes and the methods of evaluation especially as affected by organizational behavior, ethical considerations, and political influences. Evaluation methodology includes, but is not limited to, design considerations, data utilization, and teacher evaluation. Both quantitative and qualitative strategies will be covered.

FOUN 814. Qualitative Research Design in Education. 3 Credits.

This course concentrates on the theoretical underpinnings of qualitative research; methodology and methods incuding identification of ways to collect and analyze qualitative data; examination of ethical issues; development of proposals; and writing up studies.

FOUN 815. Advanced Qualitative Research. 3 Credits.

This advanced qualitative course is an introduction to emerging research approaches and alternative data collection methods and analyses in education, counseling and other related disciplines. Content addressed includes visual and audio research, historical movements in qualitative research, critical theory, feminism, queer theory, ethnomethodology, autoethnography, content analysis, and mixed methods research. Prerequisites: Instructor approval required.

FOUN 816. Single Subject Research Designs. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. This course is designed to provide the student knowledge and skills that relate to single subject methodology. It includes an overview of historical and philosophical foundations, basic issues in behavioral assessment, and single subject research and design methodology, including trend and statistical analysis in single subject research. Students will analyze critically empirical research and be able to plan, implement, and evaluate original research.

FOUN 818. Analysis with Large Datasets. 3 Credits.

This course concentrates on sample designs, design-based estimation/inference, data preparation, and analysis of complex survey data in education. Prerequisites: FOUN 822.

FOUN 822. Applied Linear Models in Educational Research. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the general linear model with emphasis on concepts and applications of multiple linear regression (MLR) to problems in educational research. Topics include estimation and interpretation of MLR models, relationships between MLR and analysis of variance (ANOVA), logistic regression analysis, and trend analysis. Prerequisite: FOUN 722.

FOUN 823. Analysis of Variance Applied to Educational Research. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Prerequisite: FOUN 722. Introduction of analysis of variance models as applied in education and human services, including two-way and three-way factorial designs, analysis of covariance, repeated-measures, and mixed-model analysis.

FOUN 824. Design and Analysis for Causal Inference in Educational Contexts. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Prerequisites: FOUN 822 and 823 or permission of instructor. Introduction to research design and statistical analysis for studies intended to support causal inferences. Topics include experimental, quasi-experimental, and ex post facto design and appropriate models for data analysis.

FOUN 825. Applied Multilevel Modeling in Educational Research. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on advanced applications of statistics that are used in educational research in various educational disciplines. Specifically, the course will offer an introduction to hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) of nested data as applied to education. Topics include conceptual and statistical background of two- and three-level designs, cross-level interaction effects, and application of multilevel models for repeated measures designs. Emphasis is on estimation, interpretation, and diagnostics for multilevel models of continuous outcomes. Prerequisites: FOUN 822 and FOUN 823 or instructor permission.

FOUN 826. Applied Structural Equation Modeling in Educational Research. 3 Credits.

Introduction to structural equation modeling and related multivariate procedures applied to research problems in education. Topics include a brief review of exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory (structural) factor analysis, path analysis, and structural equation modeling with observed and latent variables. Prerequisite: FOUN 822 and FOUN 823 or permission of instructor.

FOUN 827. Applied Logistic Regression. 3 Credits.

A practical and conceptual introduction to applying logistic and probit regression models to typical questions in the social sciences. Will utilize SPSS for practical applications covering simple and multiple regression models, interactions and curvilinear effects, multinomial models, testing of assumptions, and select advanced applications such as propensity score matching and missing data analysis. Prerequisites: FOUN 822 and FOUN 823 or permission of instructor.

FOUN 830. Theories of Learning and Instruction. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. The course consists of critical discussion and analysis of major learning theories that have influenced learning and instruction in today's schools. Applications of current research to instructional design will be emphasized.

FOUN 840. Educational Measurement and Assessment. 3 Credits.

Overview of advanced educational measurement and assessment ideologies as well as methods. Students will identify, critique, construct and administer educational measures. Psychometric topics such as reliability and validity will be explored as well as advanced assessment issues such as scale construction and item response theory.

FOUN 848. Assessment and Evaluation in Content Areas. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits.

FOUN 850. Sociological and Philosophical Foundations of Education. 3 Credits.

Students examine the relationship between education and society by reviewing a variety of theoretical perspectives and empirical studies. Topics include: social mobility and stratification; social reproduction; the dynamics of race, class, and gender in education; social capital; the student-teacher relationship; teaching as a profession; and higher education.

FOUN 861. Ethnographic Research and Narrative & Historical Research Methods and Design. 3 Credits.

In this advanced qualitative research course, we invite students to focus on ethnographic methods such as ethnography, ethnomethodology, and autoethnomethodology. Students will also learn about participatory research methods. The course will examine narrative and historical research approaches including biography and autobiography. Prerequisites: FOUN 815.

FOUN 862. Critical and Indigenous Research Methods and Design. 3 Credits.

In this advanced qualitative methods course, we invite students to explore readings related to critical and indigenous research, methodologies and paradigms as well as engage in activities to decolonize traditional research approaches with specific groups. In this course we refer to Indigenous peoples as individuals and groups belonging to developing or underdeveloped regions nationally or internationally. Prerequisites: FOUN 815.

FOUN 863. Emerging Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Credits.

This advanced qualitative research course examines emerging and lesser known qualitative research methods such as self-study, portraiture, arts-based research, photovoice, rhizomatic analysis and critical policy analysis. Prerequisites: FOUN 815.

FOUN 864. Case Study, Grounded Theory & Phenomenological Research Methods & Design. 3 Credits.

This advanced qualitative research course examines the intricacies of case study methods. It also delves into the various qualitative research methods surrounding experience and theory formation such as Grounded Theory, Phenomenology, Heuristic Inquiry and Consensual Qualitative Research. Prerequisites: FOUN 815.

FOUN 865. Independent Qualitative Research. 3 Credits.

This capstone course involves the student developing and completing an original qualitative research project independent from the dissertation. Prerequisites: FOUN 815.

FOUN 869. Teaching Statistics Practicum. 3 Credits.

Advanced graduate students in the Ph.D. Educational Research, Evaluation and Educational Psychology concentration or other Ph.D. concentrations will have the opportunity to participate in research, consulting, internship, or assisting in teaching research methods and statistics courses. Prerequisites: FOUN 822 and FOUN 823.

FOUN 870. Formative Assessment of Student Learning for School Leaders and Curriculum Specialist. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Overview of advanced educational measurement and assessment ideologies as well as methods. Students will identify, critique, construct and administer educational measures. Psychometric topics such as reliability and validity will be explored as well as advanced assessment issues such as scale construction and item response theory.

FOUN 881. Dissertation Seminar. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: FOUN 812, 814 and FOUN 822 or 823. Instructor approval required. The primary goal of the course is to develop a dissertation proposal. It is intended for doctoral students who have completed all other coursework. The course covers literature reviews, proposal writing, and obtaining approval from Human Subjects committees. Outlets for disseminating the research findings will be explored.

FOUN 897. Special Topics in Educational Foundations. 3 Credits.

Three hours; 3 credits. Special Topics in Educational Foundations will be used for independent studies with Foundations faculty members.

FOUN 899. Dissertation. 1-12 Credits.

Dissertation credit.

FOUN 999. Foundations of Education 999. 1 Credit.

1 credit. A one-hour pass/fail registration required of all graduate students to maintain active status during the final semester prior to graduation. After passing the candidacy examination, all doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit each term until the degree is complete.

READING Courses

READ 612. Action Research in Reading. 3 Credits.

This course will introduce students to action research, a form of self-reflective, systematic inquiry by educators of their own practice. Students will learn about research methods, design, and implementation, and they will develop action research proposals based on a line of structured inquiry emanating from events occurring within their own classrooms. Teachers will study student learning related to their own teaching, a process which allows them to learn about their own instructional practices and to continue monitoring improved student learning. Conducting action research provides educators with an avenue to reflect on their own teaching practices with the aid of empirical data and engage in self-directed learning with the ultimate goal of improving student learning. Must have completed 15 Graduate credit hours in reading coursework.

READ 618. Approaches to Teaching Literature and Writing K-12. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Explores the theory and practice of teaching literature, including young adult and children's literature, and writing. Considers some of the characteristics of writing processes, the role of the teacher in structuring and responding to student writing, the role of the teacher in literary text selection, the relationships between writing and literacy understanding, and the authentic assessment of K-12 students' reading, writing and learning.

READ 619. Word Study, Phonics, and Linguistics. 3 Credits.

Provides an overview of the field of linguistics, the scientific study of language and word study, an approach to spelling instruction that relies on an understanding of English orthography that incorporates instruction in phonics, spelling and vocabulary. Students will learn to recognize characteristics of readers and writers at different levels of development. The course provides multiple opportunities for hands-on practice and application.

READ 620. Multicultural Children’s Literature and Literacy. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Provides for the examination, evaluation, and use of multicultural library materials and resources for elementary and middle school children.

READ 622. Culturally Responsive Literacy for All Learners. 3 Credits.

Explores curriculum, instructions, materials and issues related to teaching literacy and language to diverse learners regardless of their ethnic, cultural, linguistic, cognitive, religious, gender, backgrounds, etc.

READ 625. Issues and Trends in Literacy Education. 3 Credits.

This course provides an opportunity for students to explore the critical trends and issues being debated within the field of Literacy Education. This course will provide students with an in-depth understanding of significant issues, trends, and practices in reading instruction at the K-12 level. The course is designed to deal with questions and problems of the type facing teachers, supervisors, and administrators. In addition to providing students with a deeper understanding of current trends and the latest literacy research, this course will also help students to critique ideas and issues surrounding informed instruction within literacy education.

READ 628. New Literacies, Digital Technologies, and Learning. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide a context in which in-service teachers can explore a range of "new" literacies and consider their relationships to school-based literacy education. Participants will explore these new literacies, specifically the socially immersive experiences of youth and their new media practices. These participating educators will examine the role of multimodality in literacy learning across the curriculum with an emphasis on how to bridge the digital literacies of students' private lives with the traditional print practices valued in school. Teachers will gain insight into and understanding of how young people's participation in a shifting media landscape can help shape and form learning and literacy in the 21st Century classroom.

READ 637. Problems in Reading Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture, 3 hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FOUN 612 and 15 hours in Reading Education. Presents an overview of current reading research and its application to instruction. Provides study and practice in the use of quantitative or qualitative techniques, including analytical processes, in solving problems in reading education.

READ 680. Reading to Learn Across the Curriculum. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This class has an emphasis on advanced techniques in reading for classroom teachers who are not reading specialists. Students develop an understanding of the process of reading to learn across the curriculum including a wide variety of comprehension strategies and an understanding of the complex nature of reading throughout the disciplines. Lecture, demonstrations, development of materials, and practice in the techniques of reading for elementary and secondary classroom teachers and library media specialists are provided.

READ 683. Diagnostic Teaching of Reading in the Classroom. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Provides classroom teachers with strategies/techniques to employ to ongoing diagnosis and remediation through the use of informal and standardized tests to select apropriate instructional strategies for pupils' existing reading capabilities.

READ 685. Organizing and Supervising Reading Program Development. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: 9 graduate hours in reading. Presents an overview of the total school reading program (K-12), and not only prepares the prospective reading supervisor to make decisions pertaining to the procurement of materials for the program but also explores modes for integrating reading into the general curriculum.

READ 686. Advanced Language Development and Reading. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Explores current theories of cognitive development and their relationship to language development and reading as bases for evaluating methods and materials of teaching reading and the related communicative arts: spelling, writing, and speaking.

READ 689. Survey of Reading Instruction. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Surveys the linguistic, psychological, sociological, philosophical, and historical foundations of current reading pedagogy.

READ 693. Practicum in Reading. 3 Credits.

Hours to be arranged. Prerequisite: 15 hours in graduate reading to include READ 683 and permission of the instructor. This course provides graduate teachers with opportunities to practice and further refine their understandings of the reading process in clinical and classroom settings. Teachers provide both individual and group reading lessons with students from the local community. Advanced diagnostic tests of learning processes and intellectual capacity are covered. These advanced diagnostic techniques are in addition to those covered in the initial diagnostic reading course.

READ 998. READ 998. 1 Credit.

SPECIAL EDUCATION Courses

SPED 500. Foundations of Special Education: Legal Aspects and Characteristics. 3 Credits.

The course provides an introduction and overview of the field of special education from the perspective that it is a subsection of general education and that the field is in transition by virtue of philosophical, legislative and programmatic changes. Legal aspects, regulatory requirements, and critical analyses of research are addressed. This course includes a broad overview of the expectations associated with the identification, characteristics, and education of students with disabilities. Prerequisite: junior standing.

SPED 502. Instructional Design I: Learner Characteristics and Assessment. 3 Credits.

The intent of this course is to provide pre-service teachers with: (a) knowledge of the characteristics of students with mild disabilities who are accessing the general curriculum, K-12, including, but not limited to learning disabilities, emotional disabilities and intellectual disabilities and (b) the ability to develop knowledge and skill in the selection, administration, scoring and interpretation of standardized/norm-referenced assessments of exceptional learners. Administering formal and informal assessment tools and the development of an IEP are emphasized. The use of assessment data to improve instruction and student performance is discussed. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500.

SPED 503. Directed Field Experience in Special Education. 2 Credits.

This course provides variable hours of direct participation in a community or educational setting with individuals with special needs. The course includes specific skills of program planning, implementation, evaluation and classroom management. Practicum of 45 hours required. Corequisite: SPED 583. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500 and SPED 402/SPED 502 and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education.

SPED 504. Characteristics and Medical Aspects of Disabling Conditions. 3 Credits.

This course reviews medical conditions present among individuals with disabilities and implications for classroom instruction. Prerequisites: SPED 500.

SPED 506. Students with Diverse Learning Needs in the General Education Classroom. 3 Credits.

This course introduces general education teachers to the legal aspects and educational needs of at-risk students and those with disabilities. Emphasis is on characteristics of children with special needs and procedures for effective academic, behavioral, and social integration of these children in the general education classroom. Prerequisites: junior standing.

SPED 511. Classroom and Behavioral Management Techniques for Students with Diverse Needs. 3 Credits.

This course will address classroom management techniques and individual interventions based upon behavioral, cognitive, affective, social, and ecological theory and practice. The course will focus on the field of applied behavior analysis, including best practices in the areas of data collection, program selection, program implementation, and data analysis. Positive behavior management and supports and functional behavioral assessment will be emphasized. Pre- or corequisite: SPED 400/SPED 500.

SPED 515. Instructional Design II: Curricular Procedures and Individualized Education Planning. 3 Credits.

The intent of this course is to provide preservice teachers with: (a) knowledge of research-based instruction for K-12 students with disabilities and those who are gifted; (b) knowledge and skill in using data collection to make decisions about student progress, instruction, program, accommodations and teaching methodology for exceptional learners, and (c) knowledge and skill in planning, developing and implementing individual educational plans and group instruction for diverse exceptional learners who are accessing the general education curriculum and the Virginia Standards of Learning. Practicum of 45 hours required. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500, SPED 402/SPED 502, and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education.

SPED 517. Collaboration and Transitions. 3 Credits.

This course addresses the complex issues surrounding families and children with disabilities and transitions across the lifespan, as well as effective collaboration with families and professionals to support inclusion and/or effective early intervention services, educational programs and transition services for students at-risk and students with disabilities. Emphasis is on successful professional collaboration and effective relationships in educational, transition, and family settings. Pre- or corequisite: SPED 400/SPED 500.

SPED 532. Characteristics of Students with Visual Impairments. 1 Credit.

Provides an overview of the characteristics of and services to persons with visual impairments, including the impact of visual impairment on infants’ and children’s growth and development, child and adolescent emotional and social development, and family interaction patterns. Considers the educational, conceptual, psycho-social, and physical implications of a visual impairment. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500.

SPED 533. Braille Code. 3 Credits.

This course provides instruction in the development, use, and application of the Braille literary code and its implications for educational/literacy programs for students with visual disabilities. Students will develop the skills to read and write contracted and uncontracted Braille, while acquiring instructional methodologies for teaching children who are blind to read and write. Sources of Braille materials for educational purposes are identified. Pre- or corequisite: SPED 400/SPED 500 and SPED 432/SPED 532.

SPED 534. Medical and Educational Implications of Visual Impairments. 3 Credits.

Provides an introduction to anatomy and physiology of the visual system and the educational implications of visual pathology. Topics include anatomy of the human eye, normal visual development, pathology of the eye, examination procedures for the identification of visual pathology, and the effects of pathology on visual learning and development. Practicum of 25 hours required. Prerequisites: passing Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests scores or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education. Pre- or corequisite: SPED 400/SPED 500 and SPED 432/SPED 532.

SPED 535. Orientation and Mobility. 2 Credits.

Provides the foundation for understanding the components and essence of orientation and mobility. Establishes how the need for independent travel in the blind population created the field of O&M. Explores the philosophy and history of orientation and mobility including cane instruction, dog guides and methods of travel. Addresses techniques in developing orientation skills and basic mobility instruction. Motor and concept skill development are emphasized. Practicum of 45 hours required. Prerequisites: Passing Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests scores or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education. Pre- or corequisite: SPED 400/SPED 500 and SPED 432/SPED 532.

SPED 536. Curriculum and Assessment of Students with Visual Impairments. 3 Credits.

Provides students with knowledge and understanding of the educational assessment of students with visual impairments and additional disabilities including deaf-blindness. Students will practice assessing and planning educational programs for students with visual impairments. Addresses assessment of technology for students with visual impairments. Examines determination of learning needs and appropriate learning media, relationship of assessment, IEP development, and placement. Practicum requires a minimum of 25 hours. Prerequisites: passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education. Pre- or corequisite: SPED 400/SPED 500 and SPED 432/SPED 532.

SPED 537. Assistive Technology for People with Sensory Impairments. 3 Credits.

This course is designed for professionals and/or students interested in serving the visually impaired/blind population or hearing impaired/deaf population. It is designed to heighten the awareness of participants to specific technology and resources available to enhance and improve the ability of individuals with visual and hearing impairments to succeed in school, daily living activities and employment. Knowledge and awareness components of this course will be delivered via distance education. Pre- or corequisite: SPED 400 or SPED 500 and SPED 432 or SPED 532.

SPED 560. Teaching Preschoolers With Diverse Needs. 3 Credits.

This course prepares students in developing skills in curricula, materials, and methods of instruction for preschool-aged (2-6 years) children with diverse needs. Programming for personal-social, language, motor, and cognitive development are addressed. Data collection, programmatic organization, and classroom planning are covered. Practicum of 45 hours required. Pre- or corequisite: SPED 500.

SPED 561. Developmental/Ecological Assessment Strategies. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with the skills necessary for assessment of atypical development as well as best practices involved in assessment. Students explore and give assessments to children from birth through eight years of age or older with severe disabilities. Pre- or corequisite: SPED 400 or SPED 500.

SPED 567. Collaboration, Transitions and Infant-Family Intervention. 3 Credits.

This course prepares professionals from cross-discipline backgrounds to serve families with children who are at-risk and disabled from birth to age three. Emphasis is placed on development of IFSPs, procedures, materials, transitions, and curricula for this population. Pre- or corequisite: SPED 400 or SPED 500.

SPED 569. Communication/Language Development/Intervention for Students with Significant Disabilities. 3 Credits.

This course examines symbolic and non-symbolic communication/language development and acquisition. Emphasis is on routine-based communication training, communication/language facilitation strategies, augmentative communication systems, and informal/functional communication/language assessment procedures for students in early childhood special education, students with autism, and students with multiple disabilities. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500.

SPED 583. Field Experience Seminar in Special Education. 1 Credit.

Prerequisites: SPED 313, SPED 400/SPED 500 and SPED 402/SPED 502. Explores issues, problems, concerns and processes related to teaching and entering the profession of teaching. Passing scores on the Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA), Praxis II: Elementary Education Content Test, and Virginia Reading Assessment (VRA)/ Reading for Virginia Educators (RVE) will be required by the end of the course.

SPED 586. Teacher Candidate Internship for Special Endorsement. 9 Credits.

Seven weeks will be completed at the elementary level and seven weeks will be completed at the middle/secondary level. Qualifies as a CAP experience. Prerequisites: admission to ODU Teacher Education Program; completion of the approved teacher education program in the specific endorsement area; completion of SPED 583; departmental approval; passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests (or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education); passing scores on Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA), the Virginia Reading Assessment (VRA)/Reading for Virginia Educators (RVE), and the appropriate Praxis II content examination.

SPED 595. Topics in Special Education. 1-3 Credits.

This course offers selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest in the special education field. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500.

SPED 610. Characteristics of Students Accessing the General Curriculum. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500. The intent of this course is to provide pre-service and currently licensed teachers with(a) knowledge of the characteristics of students with disabilities who are accessing the general curriculum, K-12, including, but not limited to learning disabilities, emotional disabilities, and intellectual disabilities; (b) the ability to recognize etiologies, underlying factors, and contributing conditions that impact student learning, and (c) the cultural impact of disabling conditions.

SPED 611. Instructional Strategies for Students accessing the General Education Curriculum. 3 Credits.

This course emphasizes effective research-based instructional strategies for teaching students with mild/moderate disabilities in grades K-12 who are accessing the general education curriculum. Practicum of 45 hours in middle/secondary-level setting is required. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500, SPED 415/SPED 515, SPED 610 and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education.

SPED 615. Behavior Change in Classroom. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on the following elements of effective management: integration of instruction for positive learning environment; strategies to provide students the opportunity to be successful academically, emotionally, and socially; assessment of and modifying the learning environment; and group and individualized strategies to affect behavior change in order to increase student learning.

SPED 618. Characteristics and Advanced Procedures: Emotional and Behavioral Disorders. 3 Credits.

This course addresses characteristics and various approaches to the education and treatment of emotional/behavioral disorders. Emphasis is on group/individualized programming that addresses social, emotional, academic and behavioral needs. Behavior measurement and direct observation, problem behavior specification, intervention development and implementation, data collection and analysis, curricular adaptation, and teacher collaboration skills for successful regular classroom reintegration and transition are also discussed. Practicum of 45 hours required. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500, SPED 415/SPED 515, and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education.

SPED 621. Effective Interventions for Children and Youth with Challenging Behavior. 3 Credits.

Students with challenging behavior pose a tremendous challenge to school personnel. Along with the growing incidence of behavior problems, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of research-supported interventions. Emphasis is on assessment of the structural and functional properties of problem behavior to facilitate development of interventions that match the nature and severity of the problem behavior. The course focuses on gaining knowledge of the likely source(s) of challenging behavior, including various strategies to document the environmental determinants of the behavior, establishment of school-wide, classroom-level, and student-specific intervention programs and ways to document the outcome of those interventions. Attention is given to adult- as well as peer-mediated intervention options for problem behavior reduction/replacement among children and youth from diverse backgrounds and across categories of exceptionality. Practicum of 45 hours required. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500, SPED 411/SPED 511, and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education.

SPED 623. Characteristics and Advanced Procedures: Intellectual Disabilities. 3 Credits.

The course examines the characteristics and various approaches to the education and treatment of students with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities. Assessment, curriculum development, instructional design, appropriate placement setting, transition and utilization of environmental resources are emphasized. Practicum of 45 hours required. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500, SPED 415/SPED 515, and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education.

SPED 625. Characteristics of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders. 3 Credits.

This course includes a review of characteristics, etiology, prevalence, and perspectives of students with autism spectrum disorders. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500.

SPED 626. Characteristics and Advanced Procedures: Learning Disabilities. 3 Credits.

This course provides the professional educator with a variety of educational procedures for students with learning disabilities, including diagnostic assessment, causal nature, and research based instructional strategies for teaching students with learning disabilities. This course has an applied emphasis and includes a 45-hour practical experience with students with learning disabilities. Practicum of 45 hours required. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500, SPED 415/SPED 515, and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education.

SPED 627. Instructional Strategies for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders. 3 Credits.

This course includes a review of intervention strategies for students with autism spectrum disorders. Practicum of 45 hours required. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500, SPED 415/SPED 515, and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education.

SPED 628. Instructional Strategies for Students Accessing the Adapted Curriculum. 3 Credits.

This course addresses the characteristics and instructional strategies of students accessing the adapted curriculum. Emphasis is on assessment, program development, academic, and functional skills instruction. This course addresses the needs of individuals with severe and/or profound multiple disabilities. Practicum of 45 hours required. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500, SPED 411/SPED 511, and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education.

SPED 630. Teaching Preschoolers with Disabilities. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to prepare students in curricula, materials and methods of instruction for preschool-aged (2 to 6 years) children with special needs. Programming for self-help, social, language, motor, and cognitive development are addressed. Data collection, program organization, and classroom planning are also covered. Practicum of 45 hours required. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500 and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education.

SPED 631. Developmental and Ecological Assessment Strategies. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with the skills necessary for assessment of atypical early development as well as best practices in assessing functional skills in students with severe disabilities. Students will explore and give assessments to children from birth to 6 years of age and students with severe/multiple/profound disabilities. Practicum of 45 hours required. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500 and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education.

SPED 633. Teaching Students with Severe Physical and Sensorimotor Disabilities. 3 Credits.

This course reviews techniques for working with students who have severe physical and sensorimotor disabilities. Emphasis is on proper positioning and handling for students with atypical motor/muscle development who function at developmental levels between birth and five years. Practicum of 45 hours required. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500 and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education.

SPED 634. Capstone Seminar. 3 Credits.

Capstone seminar.

SPED 637. Infant/Family Intervention and Teamwork. 3 Credits.

This course prepares professionals from cross-discipline backgrounds to serve families with children who are at-risk and disabled from birth through age three. Emphasis is place on the development of the individualized family service plan (IFSP), procedures, materials and curriculum for this population. A family-centered approach is stressed. Practicum of 45 hours required. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500, SPED 630, and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education.

SPED 638. Teaching Methods for Students with Visual Impairments. 3 Credits.

Emphasizes methods of teaching compensatory skills, the core curriculum, and technology for use by students who are blind and visually impaired. Addresses curriculum development, adaptations, and teaching methodology for individuals with visual impairments. Provides information on adaptations within various educational programs and adaptation of general education classroom materials and procedures for use with blind and low vision children and youth. Practicum requires a minimum of 10 hours. Prerequisites: passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education. Pre- or corequisite: SPED 400/SPED 500 and SPED 432/SPED 532.

SPED 639. Braille Reading and Writing. 3 Credits.

This course provide basic instruction on transcription of advanced Braille codes, including: music, foreign language, chemistry, computer Braille, and Nemeth Code (Braille math code). Introduces techniques for teaching skills in each code. Explores technology tools used to create Braille and tactile materials in addition to other assistive technologies used for instruction in math and science. Practicum requires a minimum of 15 hours. Prerequisites: SPED 433/SPED 533 and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education. Pre- or corequisite: SPED 400/SPED 500 and SPED 432/SPED 532.

SPED 640. Applied Behavior Analysis: Principles, Procedures, and Philosophy. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on basic principles and procedures of applied behavior analysis; identification of factors that contribute to behavioral problems and improved performance; and procedures that can be used to minimize behavioral problems, improve performance, teach new behaviors, and increase probability of behaviors occurring under appropriate circumstances. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

SPED 641. Applied Behavior Analysis: Empirical Bases. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on basic content of applied behavior analysis. This course teaches how to implement behavioral procedures and develop behavioral programs for clients with fundamental behavioral needs. Pre- or corequisite: SPED 640 or permission of the instructor.

SPED 642. Ethics and Professional Conduct for Behavior Analysts. 3 Credits.

This course provides a basis in Virginia Behavior Analyst Licensure law, the Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s Guidelines for Responsible Conduct and Disciplinary Standards, and professional conduct consistent with the practice of applied behavior analysis. Prerequisites: SPED 640 or permission of the instructor.

SPED 643. Applied Behavior Analysis: Assessments and Interventions. 3 Credits.

This course further expands on basic content of applied behavior analysis and teaches how to implement behavioral procedures and develop behavioral programs for clients with fundamental behavioral needs. Prerequisites: SPED 640 or permission of the instructor.

SPED 644. Applied Behavior Analysis: Applications. 3 Credits.

This course expands capability to deal with more complex behavioral situations, enabling ability to relate to more sophisticated professional issues and environments. Prerequisites: SPED 640, SPED 641, and SPED 643 or consent of the instructor. Pre- or corequisite: SPED 643.

SPED 645. Applied Behavior Analysis: Verbal Behavior. 3 Credits.

This course further expands capability to deal with more complex behavioral situations, and enables students to relate to more sophisticated professional issues and environments. Prerequisites: SPED 643 or permission of the instructor.

SPED 669. Directed Field Internship Special Education, K-12. 1-6 Credits.

The course provides supervised involvement in a practicum setting where the student and the instructor work together closely to develop curricula and gain expertise in teaching specific topics of importance to special educators. 50 hours per credit. Prerequisites: appropriate graduate instructional strategies course work and passing scores on Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educator Tests or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education.

SPED 700. Social/Emotional Aspects of Child Development. 3 Credits.

The emphasis of this course is on the theoretical approaches to the social/emotional development of the child that include the psychodynamic, humanistic, cognitive, behavioral, and social learning models as applied to responsive practices that promote the healthy emotional wellbeing of children.

SPED 701. Historical and Contemporary Research in Special Education. 3 Credits.

This course covers contemporary and historical topics related to problem issues in special education. This is a course of study that will enable participants to examine various topics in special education and research a position on an issue.

SPED 702. Cognitive Processes and Learning Strategies for Students with Special Needs. 3 Credits.

The intent of this course is to provide an overview of research and critical issues relative to the cognitive and affective development of individuals with disabilities. Research-based interventions that address deficits of cognitive processes will be discussed and specific learning strategies will be presented.

SPED 705. Advanced Student and Program Evaluation in Special Education. 3 Credits.

The intent of this course is to provide scholars with the advanced knowledge of systems and theories of assessment, special education evaluation and eligibility determination, and the skill competence to design and implement research activities, instruction, and student and program evaluation. Scholars will access, evaluate, and use valid formative and summative assessment and evaluation measures for monitoring and promoting student learning and educational performance. Prerequisites: FOUN 611 and SPED 701.

SPED 707. Advanced Instructional Procedures in Special Education. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with advanced skills in educational planning, development, and implementation for students with learning problems. Techniques focus on inclusive and self-contained classroom arrangements. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

SPED 714. Alternative Strategies for Secondary Students. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to examine and develop curriculum strategies and adaptations which may be used to meet the needs of students with diverse learning needs. Practicum of 45 hours required. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500, SPED 415/SPED 515, and passing scores on Praxis I or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education.

SPED 715. Alternative Strategies for Elementary Students: Prevention and Intervention. 3 Credits.

The intent of this course is to provide pre-service and in-service teachers with the knowledge and skill to collaborate with other professionals to identify and remediate students who are at-risk for school problems due to academic challenges and/or behavior, and to effectively support students with identified mild disabilities in general education classrooms. The course focuses on developing proactive pre-referral interventions and working with general educators to develop and implement effective interventions, accommodations, modifications and supports for students with mild difficulties in general education classes. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500, SPED 415/SPED 515, and passing scores on Praxis I or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education.

SPED 720. Curriculum and Instruction: Research Into Practice. 3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of research methods employed in the field of special education. Current trends related to curriculum and instruction in general and special education will be investigated. Strategies and procedures for identifying learner characteristics and application of that knowledge will be included. Implementation of quality curricular modifications and/or instructional accommodations for students with diverse needs in a variety of educational settings and evaluation of instruction will be addressed. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500 or SPED 701/SPED 801.

SPED 769. Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis. 3,6 Credits.

This course may be taken as an elective for students who complete the ABA certificate program and wish to complete the 15 total required practicum hours to sit for the National ABA Board Examination. Course can be repeated up to 5 times.

SPED 800. Social/Emotional Aspects of Child Development. 3 Credits.

The emphasis of this course is on the theoretical approaches to the social/emotional development of the child that include the psychodynamic, humanistic, cognitive, behavioral, and social learning models as applied to responsive practices that promote the healthy emotional wellbeing of children.

SPED 801. Historical and Contemporary Research in Special Education. 3 Credits.

This course covers contemporary and historical topics related to problem issues in special education. This is a course of study that will enable participants to examine various topics in special education and research a position on an issue.

SPED 802. Cognitive Processes and Learning Strategies for Students with Special Needs. 3 Credits.

The intent of this course is to provide an overview of research and critical issues relative to the cognitive and affective development of individuals with disabilities. Research-based interventions that address deficits of cognitive processes will be discussed and specific learning strategies will be presented.

SPED 807. Advanced Instructional Procedures in Special Education. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with advanced skills in educational planning, development, and implementation for students with learning problems. Techniques focus on inclusive and self-contained classroom arrangements. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

SPED 814. Alternative Strategies for Secondary Students. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to examine and develop curriculum strategies and adaptations which may be used to meet the needs of students with diverse learning needs. Practicum of 45 hours required. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500, SPED 415/SPED 515, and passing scores on Praxis I or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education.

SPED 815. Alternative Strategies for Elementary Students: Prevention and Intervention. 3 Credits.

The intent of this course is to provide pre-service and in-service teachers with the knowledge and skill to collaborate with other professionals to identify and remediate students who are at-risk for school problems due to academic challenges and/or behavior, and to effectively support students with identified mild disabilities in general education classrooms. The course focuses on developing proactive pre-referral interventions and working with general educators to develop and implement effective interventions, accommodations, modifications and supports for students with mild difficulties in general education classes. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500, SPED 415/SPED 515, and passing scores on Praxis I or equivalent as prescribed by the Virginia Board of Education.

SPED 820. Curriculum and Instruction: Research Into Practice. 3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of research methods employed in the field of special education. Current trends related to curriculum and instruction in general and special education will be investigated. Strategies and procedures for identifying learner characteristics and application of that knowledge will be included. Implementation of quality curricular modifications and/or instructional accommodations for students with diverse needs in a variety of educational settings and evaluation of instruction will be addressed. Prerequisites: SPED 400/SPED 500 or SPED 701/SPED 801.

SPED 821. Critical Issues I: Readings in Special Education and Professional Writing. 3 Credits.

The intent of this course is to provide doctoral candidates an opportunity to do the following: (a) become thoroughly involved in the literature relating to current critical issues in special education, and (b) begin the process of developing writing skills suitable for positions and tenure in higher education. The course stresses APA writing guidelines and style, conducting literature searches, and beginning development of a writing product that is suitable for publication. The course provides an introduction to the skills necessary for advancement in higher education and professional institutions.

SPED 822. Critical Issues II: Research and Professional Writing. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: SPED 821. This course provides doctoral candidates an opportunity to read, analyze and synthesize research in special education with the intent to contributing to the literature. The course emphasizes skills necessary for developing writing skills suitable for positions and tenure in higher education. APA writing guidelines and style, analyzing and synthesizing research/literature, and producing a lengthy written product suitable for publication are stressed. The course is designed to build skills necessary for advancement in higher education and professional institutions.

SPED 868. Internship: Special Education. 3 Credits.

Internships in teaching, research, and other professional activities will provide experience in the roles that students will assume after completing their doctoral degrees. The successful completion of a 3-credit internship is required to fulfill program requirements and necessitates a commitment of a minimum of 150 contact hours. Internships may be at the regional, national or international levels.

SPED 869. Practicum/Field Experience. 6-12 Credits.

Supervised involvement of the doctoral-level student in a practicum setting, where the student and the instructor work together closely to develop curriculum and gain expertise in teaching specific topics of importance to early childhood educators. A weekly seminar is required.

SPED 893. Professional Seminar: Teaching, Research, and Service. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: SPED 821 and SPED 822. This course prepares doctoral candidates to meet professional standards in teaching, research and service in special education in higher education institutions. Teaching includes an understanding of adult learning and the design, delivery, evaluation of content, and use of technology in college teaching. Research includes recognizing and critically discussing scholarly work, systematically planning and preparing for research, and developing research proposals. Service includes identifying professional organizations and agencies and creating integrated professional development programs. The course is designed to build skills necessary for advancement in higher education and professional institutions.

SPED 899. Dissertation. 1-12 Credits.

Dissertation. Prerequisites: Successful defense of prospectus and admission to candidacy.

SPED 999. Early Childhood and Special Education 999. 1 Credit.

A one-hour pass/fail registration required of all graduate students to maintain active status during the final semester prior to graduation. After successfully passing the candidacy examination, all doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit each term.

TEACHING AND LEARNING-EDUCATION Courses

TLED 506. Teaching in the Multicultural Classroom. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Explores the teaching strategies, materials and understandings needed in developing responsive classroom environments for children from diverse cultural, ethnic, economic and linguistic backgrounds.

TLED 530. PK-12 Instructional Technology. 3 Credits.

In this class, contemporary productivity tools and Internet resources are used to develop and evaluate instructional plans and techniques. The course is designed with three components. The first is on understanding models for effectively integrating technology into the curriculum. Next, the focus is on evidence-based good teaching practices that span across grades and subject levels, and the technologies and ways of using those technologies that support those practices. Finally, the focus is on technological tools that support the teacher in their everyday duties. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to pass, or apply for exemption from their school district’s TSIP exam.

TLED 532. Developing Instructional Strategies PreK-6: Language Arts. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: TLED 530 and 568. Following a theory into practice philosophy, students explore, develop, and use instructional strategies, materials, technologies, and activities to promote children’s development of attitudes, behaviors, and concepts in language arts in grades PreK-6 in support of NCTE national instructional standards and the Virginia Standards of Learning.

TLED 535. Developing Instructional Strategies PreK-6: Social Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: TLED 530. Following a theory into practice philosophy, students explore, develop, and use instructional strategies, materials, technologies, and activities to promote children’s development of attitudes, behaviors, and concepts in social studies in grades PreK-6 in support of NCSS national instructional standards and the Virginia Standards of Learning.

TLED 551. Developing Instructional Strategies for Teaching in the Middle/High School: English. 3 Credits.

Following a theory/research-into-practice philosophy, students explore, develop, and use instructional strategies, materials, technologies, and activities to promote the development of attitudes, behaviors, and concepts in English, grades 6-12, informed by national instructional standards and the Virginia Standards of Learning; 35 hours of teaching practicum required. Prerequisites: TLED 530, or TLED 677, passing scores on PRAXIS I or equivalent SAT scores as established by VA Board of Education, a criminal background check,acceptance into teacher education, no grade less than C- in content area and professional education core, minimum major and overall GPA of at least 2.75. (Additional prerequisites for MCTP students are ECI 608 and 616.).

TLED 555. Developing Instructional Strategies for Teaching in the Middle/High School: Social Studies. 3 Credits.

Following a theory/research-into-practice philosophy, students explore, develop, and use instructional strategies, materials, technologies, and activities to promote the development of attitudes, behaviors, and concepts in social studies, grades 6-12, informed by national instructional standards and the Virginia Standards of Learning; 35 hours of teaching practicum required. Prerequisites: TLED 530, or TLED 677, passing scores on PRAXIS I or equivalent SAT scores as established by VA Board of Education, a criminal background check, acceptance into teacher education, no grade less than C- in content area and professional education core, minimum major and overall GPA of at least 2.75. (Additional prerequisites for MCTP students are ECI 608 and 616.).

TLED 568. Language Acquisition and Reading for Students with Diverse Learning Needs. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course provides an overview of normal language development and language disorders which impact the acquisition of language based curriculum skills such as listening, speaking, reading, and written expression. Emphasis is on instructional techniques to assist students with diverse learning needs to achieve reading and comprehension skills. Effective reading strategies and curricula for individuals with disabilities will also be reviewed.

TLED 574. Foundations and Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course introduces students to objectives, curricula, and organization of early childhood education as it is practiced throughout the United States and other countries. Foundations of education programs and current research and practices related to the education of young children will be addressed with an emphasis on sociological, cultural, historical, and philosophical factors.

TLED 578. Integrating Instruction Across the Curriculum PreK-6. 3 Credits.

Following a theory into practice philosophy and building on the instructional strategies for specific disciplines, students explore, develop, and use advanced instructional materials, technologies, and activities to promote interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary instruction across the curriculum in grades PreK-6 in support of national standards and the Virginia Standards of Learning. The field experience component (40 hours) includes participation in prek-3 and 4th-6th grade classrooms in an accredited public or non-public school, per program requirement. Prerequisites: TLED 301 or TLED 290, passing scores on PRAXIS I or met equivalent scores as established by VA Board of Education, a criminal background check, acceptance into teacher education, no grade less than C in content area and professional education core, minimum major overall GPA of at least 2.8 and at least two of the following: TLED 532, TLED 535, STEM 533, and STEM 534.

TLED 579. Classroom Management and Practice PreK-3; PreK-6. 3 Credits.

Course prepares prospective PreK-3 and PreK-6 teachers to provide instruction and management addressing the intellectual, physical, emotional and social needs of PreK-6 learners founded in empirically based practice. The field based component (70 hours) includes participation in PreK-3 and 4th-6th grade classrooms in an accredited public or non-public school. Students in the Prek-3 program are required to complete 35 hours in the Child Development Center. Attendance at seminars and debriefing sessions is required. Prerequisites: TLED 301 or 290, passing scores on PRAXIS I or met equivalent scores as established by VA Board of Education, a criminal background check,acceptance into teacher education, no grade less than C in content area and professional education core, minimum major and overall GPA of at least 2.8 and at least two of the following courses: TLED 432/532, 435/535, 478/578; STEM 433/533, 434/534.

TLED 583. Seminar in Teacher Education. 1 Credit.

Lecture 1 hour; 1 credit. Corequisite: students enrolling in TLED 551, STEM 553, STEM 554 and TLED 555 must also enroll in TLED 583. Prerequisite: admitted to approved teacher education program. This course explores issues, problems, concerns, and processes related to teaching and entering the profession of teaching. Passing score on PRAXIS II in licensure content area, passing scores on the Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA), and where appropriate passing scores on the Virginia Reading Assessment (VRA) are required to pass this course.

TLED 586. Student Teaching for Special Endorsement. 3-6 Credits.

Internship in school. Available for pass/fail grading only. Prerequisites: Collegiate Professional Certificate and/or completion of an approved program in teacher education, passing scores on PRAXIS I or equivalent SAT or ACT scores as established by VA Board of Education, passing scores on the appropriate PRAXIS II content examination, passing score on the Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment, departmental approval, permission of the director of teacher education services, meet grade requirement in the specific content area and professional education core, minimum major and overall GPA of at least 2.75, and a criminal background check. (qualifies as a CAP experience).

TLED 592. Integrating Mathematics and Science Across the Curriculum, PK-3. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course has a theory-into-practice goal. The focus for this class will be to develop and use teaching strategies and techniques in the content area of mathematics and science, which are based on Piaget’s theory of constructivism and are compatible with the NCIM & NSE Standards and the Virginia SOLs. Practical ways of encouraging thinking about math and science by young children, PK-3, and the natural integration of these subjects across the early childhood curriculum will be emphasized.

TLED 593. Integrating Children's Literature, Language Arts and Social Studies Across the ECE Curriculum. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course offers a review of literary materials suitable for nursery, kindergarten and early elementary school children. Social issues affecting children and early childhood literature related to these issues, the use of teaching strategies and techniques in the content areas of history, geography, economics and civics which are based on Piaget’s theory of constructivism, the National Council of Teachers of English and the National Council for the Social Studies standards, and the Virginia SOLs are emphasized.

TLED 595. Topics in Education. 1-4 Credits.

Lecture 1-4 hours; 1-4 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Explores contemporary problems and trends in education. Emphasis is placed upon topics related to curriculum, instructional strategies, and evaluation.

TLED 596. Topics in Education. 1-3 Credits.

Lecture 1-3 hours; 1-3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Cannot be applied to a Master of Science in Education degree in the Department of Educational Curriculum and Instruction. Explores contemporary problems and trends in education. Emphasis is placed upon topics related to curriculum, instructional strategies, and evaluation.

TLED 597. Topics in Education. 1-3 Credits.

Hours to be arranged: 1-3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Allows the student to engage in independent study of issues and trends in education. Emphasis is placed upon topics related to curriculum, instructional strategies, and evaluation.

TLED 598. Topics in Education. 1-3 Credits.

Hours to be arranged: 1-3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Allows the student to engage in independent study of issues and trends in education. Emphasis is placed upon topics related to curriculum, instructional strategies, and evaluation.

TLED 608. Foundations of Education and Instructional Assessment. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: graduate standing. Provides students with an understanding of historical, philosophical, economic, and sociological issues in American education, their effect on student achievement, and the impact of social change on existing institutions. Includes the development of instruction based on assessment data including the use, construction, interpretation, and analysis of valid assessments. A 30-hour observation/participation experience is required in an appropriate prek-6, 6-8, or 6-12 grade level.

TLED 615. Teaching in the Middle School. 4 Credits.

Lecture 4 hours; 4 credits. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Focusing on middle school teaching, this course examines the organization, curriculum, instructional strategies, classroom management techniques, and teaching methods for working with young adolescents. Also covered are middle school guidance, exploratories, scheduling, and parent-school relations. A 30-hour practicum in a middle school is required.

TLED 616. Design for Effective Instruction. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Assists students in the organization of research on effective teaching for application in diversified classroom settings. Decision-making in the areas of content, learner behavior, and teacher behavior is stressed. Students learn the fundamentals of lesson design and basic instruction through a unit plan project and teaching vignettes.

TLED 619. Classroom Research and Assessment in Curriculum and Instruction. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Students admitted to elementary/middle school education prior to July 1, 2000, must take this course with TLED 669. Students will learn research techniques such as designs and data collection by conducting their own research studies with pupils in grades K-12. Measurement and evaluation principles and procedures for assessing and promoting children's learning and development will be addressed as will the interpretation of standardized tests.

TLED 622. Transitioning from Master Teacher to Mentor Teacher. 1 Credit.

1 hour on-line module. 1 credit. Prerequisite: Licensed teacher, 3 years of experience, recommendation from school division. The course provides information in five areas through online modules identified by teaching staff and human resource officials to develop mentor teachers. These five areas are: professionalism, collaboration, classroom/behavior management, differentiation of instruction, and diversity.

TLED 630. Develop and Enhancing Literacy with Culturally and Linguistical Diverse Learner Across Content Areas. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. This course focuses on the development and implementation of strategies that will accommodate how language and cultural differences affect communication and learning; knowledge of the impact of language-based curriculum skills such as listening, speaking, reading, and writing; instructional techniques needed to assist individuals identified as culturally, linguistically, and academically diverse in achieving reading and comprehension skills; comprehension strategies; and an understanding of reading across the disciplines.

TLED 636. Problems in Education. 3 Credits.

Lectur 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: TLED 635. Provides practice in the use of quantitative or qualitative techniques, including analytical processes, in solving problems in education. Pass/Fail grading only.

TLED 638. Dynamic Assessment of Teaching and Learning. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing. In this first course in the Field Based Graduate Program, students conduct an extensive qualitative and/or quantitative assessment of the teaching/learning dynamic in K-12 school settings. The assessment will include school culture, student demographics, curriculum, instructional practices, technology, and other critical components of teaching and learning. Analysis of the assessment will result in a document that emphasizes a professional development plan.

TLED 639. Seminar in Education. 3 Credits.

Hours to be arranged. 3 credits. Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours in education, including all core courses. Explores in depth a variety of current topics, trends and concerns in K-12 education.

TLED 640. The Management of Learning and Instruction. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Explores problems and develops individual projects in many aspects of education and describes learners—how they learn and how teachers can facilitate their learning.

TLED 648. Digital Media for Educators. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Course surveys a variety of tools, techniques and technologies, as well as strategies and common practices in the design and development of digital learning products using contemporary software such as Acrobat, Flash, Graphic Convertor along with standard productivity tools. Students will gain hands-on experience in the creation of digital media elements suitable for use in traditional and distributed learning environments. Includes design and technical considerations of graphics manipulation and design, sound and video elements, and animation.

TLED 652. Language Arts in the Elementary/Middle School. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Examines the teaching of oral and written expression, reading, spelling, and handwriting and describes conditions necessary for children’s optimum development in the language arts.

TLED 655. Social Studies in the Elementary/Middle School. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Includes advanced preparation of instructional objectives, evaluation procedures, instructional resources, classroom activities, and lesson development, and describes current social studies curriculum projects as well as current trends in the teaching of social studies.

TLED 656. Developing Instructional Strategies for Elementary Education. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. For MCTP students only. This course will focus on the selection of appropriate skills and objectives students require in their learning. Emphasis will be on how to determine which concepts should be taught and on which method/methods best suit both the objectives and the student. Information from previous courses will be taken to the next level of difficulty (i.e. task analysis, sequencing of objectives, and unit planning).

TLED 657. Language Arts Methods for Middle and Secondary School. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. For MCTP students only. This course is designed to teach prospective educators the components of language arts. Particular emphasis will be placed on analyzing the standards of learning for both disciplines, and the planning, development, and implementation of interdisciplinary units of study for middle and secondary school students.

TLED 662. Social Studies Methods for Middle and Secondary School. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. For MCTP students only. Course will provide pre-service teachers the opportunity to learn and make application of teaching methodologies appropriate for the secondary and middle school classrooms. Embracing the purpose of the social studies, the course will emphasize the integrated study of the social sciences and humanities, drawing upon such disciplines as anthropology, archaeology, economics, geography, history, law, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, and sociology, as well as appropriate content from the humanities, mathematics, and the natural sciences.

TLED 665. Digital Video Materials Development. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Design, development, and production of digital video and the use of video as an instructional component. Students will utilize teaching and learning theory to determine the effective use of video, and how to create video segments to enhance the understanding of appropriate knowledge chunks. In addition, technical aspects of digital media delivery in contemporary transmission systems will be explored.

TLED 666. Internship/Student Teaching and Seminar. 9 Credits.

Five days per week for 14 weeks; 9 credits. Prerequisites: completion of an approved program in teacher education, 6-8, passing scores on PRAXIS I or equivalent SAT or ACT scores as established by VA State Board of Education, passing scores on the appropriate PRAXIS II content examination, departmental approval, permission of the director of teacher education services, no grade less than C- in content area and professional education core, minimum major and overall GPA of at least 2.75. Available for pass/fail grading only. Provides practice in teaching in grades 6-8 and in analyzing teaching approaches and behaviors. Examines instructional problems and concerns.

TLED 668. Internship/Student Teaching and Seminar. 9 Credits.

Five days per week for 14 weeks; 9 credits. Prerequisites: completion of an approved program in teacher education PreK-6, passing scores on PRAXIS I or equivalent SAT or ACT scores as established by VA State Board of Education, passing scores on the appropriate PRAXIS II content examination, departmental approval, permission of the director of teacher education services, no grade less than C- in content area and professional education core, minimum major and overall GPA of at least 2.75. Available for pass/fail grading only. Provides practice in teaching in grades PK-6 and in analyzing teaching approaches and behaviors. Examines instructional problems and concerns.

TLED 669. Internship/Student Teaching and Seminar. 3-9 Credits.

Five days per week for 6-14 weeks; 3-9 credits. Available for pass/fail grading only. Provides practice in teaching and in analyzing teaching approaches and behaviors. Examines instructional problems and concerns. Prerequisites: Completion of an approved program in teacher education, passing scores on the appropriate licensure assessments, departmental approval, permission of the director of teacher education services, no grade less than C- in content area and professional education core, minimum major and overall GPA of a least 2.75, GPA of 3.0 required for graduate programs.

TLED 670. Assessment and Evaluation. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Students will design a three-chapter research proposal and study the appropriate statistical references. Evaluation methodologies leading to this research are explored (portfolio/rubrics). Instructional technology and its classroom applications are interwoven into research and evaluation.

TLED 677. Advanced Child Development Theory and Research. 3 Credits.

Lecture. 3 cr. This course focuses on developing an in-depth understanding of major theories of children's learning and development as well as all aspects of their physical, social, emotional, and intellectual development from birth through adolescence. The course requires that students learn the concepts and terminology associated with each theory and be able to use thee in analyzing, interpreting, promoting, and evaluating children's growth and learning in the classroom. Research related to the classroom application of these theories is examined and evaluated based on principles of research design and interpretation.

TLED 679. Advanced Classroom Management and Practicum in PreK-6. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECI 536 for students in the PreK-6 curriculum. This course will examine advanced methods for educators to use in order to make their classroom teaching and management more efficient and effective. This will include supervised involvement of the student in a practicum setting where the student, instructor and classroom teacher work together closely to develop knowledge and gain expertise in teaching children in a positive and effective learning environment. A weekly seminar is required.

TLED 688. Practicum in Early Childhood. 1-6 Credits.

1-6 credits. Supervised involvement of the student in a practicum setting where the student and the instructor work together closely to develop curriculum and gain expertise in teaching specific topics of importance to early childhood educators. A weekly seminar is required.

TLED 690. The Child and the Family. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course will examine children in the context of the families in which they live. Family systems theory provides the basis for study, and students do an in-depth examination of their own families of origin. The stages of the family life cycle are taught; principles of healthy family functioning are emphasized to promote healthy growth for children.

TLED 695. Topics in Education. 1-3 Credits.

Lecture 1-3 hours; 1-3 credits. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Provides opportunities for graduate students to explore current topics, trends and issues related to curriculum, instructional strategies, and evaluation.

TLED 697. Topics in Secondary School Instruction. 1-3 Credits.

Lecture 1-3 hours;1-3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Provides offerings in several content areas to meet the needs of graduate students in secondary education.

TLED 698. Thesis. 3-6 Credits.

6 credits. Prerequisites: graduate standing and permission of the instructor. Master’s-level research and thesis in topics related to curriculum, instructional strategies, and evaluation in educational settings.

TLED 699. Thesis. 3-6 Credits.

6 credits. Prerequisites: graduate standing and permission of the instructor. Master’s-level research and thesis in topics related to curriculum, instructional strategies, and evaluation in educational settings.

TLED 710. Models of Parent, Child, Social Interaction. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course will examine the family with an emphasis on parent/child interactions. In addition, a model for ecological intervention will be discussed.

TLED 810. Models of Parent, Child, Social Interaction. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course will examine the family with an emphasis on parent/child interactions. In addition, a model for ecological intervention will be discussed.

TLED 998. TLED 998. 1 Credit.

TLED 999. Educational Curriculum and Instruction. 1 Credit.

1 credit. A one-hour pass/fail registration required of all graduate students to maintain active status during the final semester prior to graduation. After successfully passing the candidacy examination, all doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit each term until the degree is complete.