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Old Dominion University

2015-2016 Catalog

School of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training

3118 Health Sciences Building
757- 683-4519
http://www.odu.edu/ptat

Bonnie Van Lunen, Chair
George Maihafer, Graduate Program Director

Doctor of Physical Therapy

The Doctor of Physical Therapy degree is designed to professionally prepare students with the knowledge and clinical experiences to become licensed physical therapists who will enter general physical therapy practice. Upon graduation, students will be prepared to sit for licensure in any United States jurisdiction and practice in any health care setting where physical therapy is offered. The curriculum consists of 117 credit hours over a three-year period of time including summers. There are five full-time clinical internships totaling 40 weeks. The first three are completed over the second and third summers, with the final 16 weeks of clinical education occurring in the spring semester preceding graduation. A variety of clinical facilities locally, throughout Virginia, and the United States are used for internship experiences. Students are responsible for providing their own transportation to these off-campus clinical sites.

Requirements for Admission

Students are admitted to the program after completion of a bachelor’s degree and prerequisite course work. The application deadline is November 1 of each year, and the program begins the last week in June. Specific procedures for admission must be followed including the verification of meeting the technical standards. Admission into the program is competitive.

An application to the University and a separate application to the Physical Therapy Centralized Application Service (PTCAS) must be submitted. The PTCAS website will be open to applicants August 1 each year at www.PTCAS.org. Deadline for application submission is November 1 each year.  Please follow the directions for application found at the PTCAS site.

A competitive admission process is used for determining acceptance. Excellent ODU students may qualify for guaranteed entry into the Doctor of Physical Therapy program. For criteria and additional information, please contact the Pre-Health Undergraduate Advisor from Exercise Science (757) 683-4995 or College of Health Sciences advisor at (757) 683-5137.

Degree Requirements

Prerequisite courses include the following:

STAT 130MElementary Statistics3
BIOL 121NGeneral Biology I3
BIOL 122NGeneral Biology I Lab1
BIOL 123NGeneral Biology II3
BIOL 124NGeneral Biology II Lab1
BIOL 250Human Anatomy and Physiology I4
BIOL 251Human Anatomy and Physiology II4
Two semesters of Chemistry, including labs8
Two semesters of Physics, including labs8
Psychology3
An introductory course in Biomechanics or Kinesiology recommended but not required
Total Hours38

 Students are required to pass written and oral comprehensive examinations prior to graduation. Comprehensive examinations take place in the final academic semester prior to the terminal two clinical internships.

Curriculum Schedule
Year 1
Summer
PT 621Introduction to Physical Therapy2
AT 691Gross Anatomy for the Rehabilitation Sciences4
Fall
PT 627Theory and Practice I4
PT 630Concepts in Histology for Physical Therapy1
PT 634Clinical Sciences I3
PT 640Patient Evaluation I3
PT 655Clinical Problem Solving I2
PT 665Biomechanics/Kinesiology I3
PT 792Neuroscience I3
Spring
PT 628Theory and Practice II4
PT 635Clinical Sciences II3
PT 641Patient Evaluation II3
PT 656Clinical Problem Solving II2
PT 666Biomechanics/Kinesiology II2
PT 638Exercise Physiology2
PT 793Neuroscience II3
Year 2
Summer
PT 669Clinical Internship I4
Fall
PT 810Scientific Inquiry I3
PT 826Theory and Practice III4
PT 836Clinical Sciences III3
PT 842Patient Evaluation III3
PT 857Clinical Problem Solving III2
PT 884Clinical Teaching and Professional Communication3
Spring
PT 822Scientific Inquiry II2
PT 827Theory and Practice IV4
PT 837Clinical Sciences IV3
PT 858Clinical Problem Solving IV2
PT 865Prosthetics and Orthotics3
PT 881Management of Special Populations2
PT 895Topics in Physical Therapy I1
Year Three
Summer
PT 871Clinical Internship II4
PT 872Clinical Internship III4
Fall
PT 892Scientific Inquiry Seminar2
PT 880Psychosocial Aspects of Patient Care2
PT 882Practice Management3
PT 890Differential Diagnosis Seminar3
PT 883Professional Issues in Physical Therapy2
PT 891Seminar in Integrative Case Reports3
PT 896Topics in Physical Therapy II1
Spring
PT 873Clinical Internship IV4
PT 874Clinical Internship V4
Total Hours115

Master of Science in Athletic Training

Bonnie Van Lunen, Graduate Program Director of Athletic Training
School of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training
3118B Health Sciences Building
757-683-3516

The Master of Science in Athletic Training degree is designed to prepare athletic trainers for advanced study in the areas of research, clinical application, and education. The associated course work will involve exploration of lower extremity injury management strategies, advanced clinical practice techniques, and preparation of the entry level educator.

Admission and Entrance Requirements

Students must have:

  1. a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution with a cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.0 and a GPA of 3.0 in the undergraduate major courses;
  2. the Board of Certification credential for certification as an Athletic Trainer, OR eligibility to take the Board of Certification examination; and
  3. a score of at least 291 (900 by former scoring standard) between quantitative and verbal on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) for admission to regular status.

Acceptance into the graduate school does not imply automatic acceptance into the athletic training program. All applicants must complete the application materials for the Office of Graduate Admissions, and the Athletic Training Selection Committee will then invite qualified candidates for an on campus interview.  If the applicant is unable to interview on campus, then a phone interview will be scheduled.  The application deadline is January 1, however applications will be reviewed as soon as they are complete.  Applications will also be accepted after the deadline until all positions are filled.

Continuance and Exit Requirements

Students must meet all requirements for continuance as outlined in the graduate continuance policy for the University. Students completing the program of study must:

  1. have an overall grade point average of 3.0;
  2. have a GPA of 3.0 in the major;
  3. demonstrate writing proficiency;
  4. satisfy all course competencies;
  5. pass a comprehensive examination;
  6. complete a research project or thesis;
  7. have an exit interview with the program director; and
  8. file the necessary paperwork for graduation.

Curriculum

Core courses17
The Spine: Evaluation and Rehabilitation
Education in Athletic Training
Lower Extremity Injury Management Strategies
Gross Anatomy for the Rehabilitation Sciences
Advanced Orthopaedic Evaluation and Rehabilitation
Research Core6
Integration of Evidence for Clinical Decision Making in Sports Medicine
Statistical Techniques for Clinical Decision Making in Sports Medicine
Requirements for different tracks are as follows:18
Thesis Track
Includes 6 credit hours for Thesis and 12 credit hours for electives.
Thesis
Thesis
Electives (12 credit hours)
Research-Problem Track
Athletic Training Research I
Athletic Training Research II
Athletic Training Research III
Electives (12 credit hours)
Total Hours41

Center for Brain Research and Rehabilitation

The School of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training has opened a 3,800 square foot research facility with a large gait/movement assessment area, a room for virtual reality and rehabilitation studies, a multipurpose room for neurologic testing, and office space for faculty and graduate students. A primary research focus relates to neuromechanical basis of human movement under healthy and pathological conditions, with more clinically oriented studies on methods to improve gait and function in people with neurologic impairments. Lab Director Dr. Steven Morrison is a leading researcher in identifying risks for falling and testing interventions to prevent falls. This research laboratory is designed for multidisciplinary use by faculty and graduate students in Physical Therapy, Human Movement Sciences, and Electrical and Computer Engineering. Collaboration among disciplines and with the Virginia Modeling and Simulation Center (VMASC) allows us to participate in exciting research projects exploring new technology in rehabilitation.

ODU Monarch Physical Therapy

The School of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training, with support from the College of Health Sciences and Old Dominion University, operates a physical therapy clinic on the ODU campus. It is located at 1015 West 47th Street. To contact them, call (757) 683-7041. The clinic provides service to ODU faculty, staff and students as well as the neighboring community. It also serves as a site for students to learn to apply assessment, decision-making, and treatment skills. In addition, clinical research studies coordinated with the Center for Brain Research and Rehabilitation are conducted at the clinic.

ATHLETIC TRAINING Courses

AT 618. Current Research in Athletic Training. 1 Credit.

Designed to provide an understanding of evidence-based practice to the sports medicine setting and the intricacies of performing evidence-based practice research projects.

AT 623. Athletic Training Practicum I. 1 Credit.

This course is designed to provide practical experience in the athletic training setting and an understanding of evidence-based practice in sports medicine.

AT 626. Advanced Orthopaedic Evaluation and Rehabilitation. 4 Credits.

This course is designed for sports medicine clinicians and will focus on advanced topics in the study of orthopaedic evaluation, assessment, management, and rehabilitation of common athletic injuries. A combination of discussion, lecture, critical review of literature, laboratory activities, and student presentations will be employed throughout the course.

AT 628. The Spine: Evaluation and Rehabilitation. 3 Credits.

A course designed to provide information relative to the recognition, evaluation, and treatment of athletic injuries involving the spine.

AT 630. Interprofessional Healthcare in Clinical Practice. 3 Credits.

This clinical experience entails interaction with healthcare providers associated with sports medicine specialties and general medical concerns.

AT 633. Athletic Training Practicum II. 1 Credit.

This course is designed to provide practical experience in the athletic training setting and an understanding of evidence-based practice in sports medicine.

AT 643. Athletic Training Practicum III. 1 Credit.

This course is designed to provide practical experience in the athletic training setting and an understanding of evidence-based practice in sports medicine.

AT 650. Integration of Evidence for Clinical Decision Making in Sports Medicine. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce the graduate student to research processes in the athletic training field. The focus is on understanding and recognizing principles of EBP in athletic training, understanding the elements of evidence, appraising the evidence, and considering the evidence for use in clinical practice.

AT 651. Statistical Techniques for Clinical Decision Making in Sports Medicine. 3 Credits.

This course includes conceptual and computational applications associated with the common statistical techniques relevant to sports medicine clinicians. The intent is to provide students with an introduction to frequently used descriptive and inferential statistical methods for clinical or research purposes in sports medicine. Lectures and laboratory exercises will be utilized to instruct students on using statistics to be intelligent consumers of the research literature. Emphasis will be placed on using statistics to make informed, evidence-based clinical decisions with the goal of enhancing patient care. Prerequisite: AT 650.

AT 653. Athletic Training Practicum IV. 1 Credit.

This course is designed to provide practical experience in the athletic training setting and an understanding of evidence-based practice in sports medicine.

AT 655. Teaching Strategies and Assessment. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide information related to teaching strategies and techniques along with supervised and mentored teaching experiences within fields applicable to athletic training.

AT 657. Lower Extremity Injury Management Strategies. 3 Credits.

Stresses clinical techniques used in the management and assessment of the lower extremity and spine through utilization of evidence-based practice.

AT 670. Athletic Training Research I. 1 Credit.

This course is designed to systematically guide post-professional athletic training students through the research process. Coursework will focus on development of an original research idea, building the theoretical background, and identifying the rationale for a research project. Based on the nature of this course, students will be required to meet with a research supervisor outside of the time permitted for class. Prerequisite: AT 650.

AT 671. Athletic Training Research II. 2 Credits.

This is a course designed to guide post-professional athletic training students through aspects of the research process. Coursework will focus on writing the Methods sections for a research manuscript, writing the results section for a research manuscript and proper data entry techniques for a research project. Based on the nature of this course, students will be required to meet with a research supervisor and collect data for their respective project outside of the time permitted for class. Prerequisites: AT 670.

AT 672. Athletic Training Research III. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to guide post-professional athletic training students through aspects of the research process. Coursework will focus on writing the discussion section for a research manuscript, writing a research abstract for submission to a conference, developing an oral research presentation for a conference, and creating a poster presentation for a conference. Based on the nature of this course, students will be required to meet with a research supervisor outside of the time permitted for class. Prerequisites: AT 671.

AT 691. Gross Anatomy for the Rehabilitation Sciences. 4,6 Credits.

This course will include dissection of a human cadaver and will be supplemented with classroom lectures. The course is designed to teach graduate athletic training students the principles and concepts of human gross anatomy as they apply to clinical practice. Emphasis will be on the musculoskeletal, nervous, and vascular systems of the extremities.

AT 711. Analysis of Human Motion for Sports Medicine Clinicians. 3 Credits.

This course includes theories and applications of techniques concerning the analysis of human motion for the sports medicine clinician. The intent of this course is to provide students with an introduction to quantitative analysis of human motion and the concepts and equipment to collect objective quantifiable data for clinical or research purposes.

AT 756. Education in Athletic Training. 4 Credits.

Designed to introduce current concepts of curriculum development, evaluation methods, course construction and testing as related to the athletic training clinical and didactic experience. Designed to introduce the graduate student to aspects of the management of learning and instruction; how learners learn and how teacherscan facilitate their learning as related to the athletictraining didactic and clinical experience.

AT 811. Analysis of Human Motion for Sports Medicine Clinicians. 3 Credits.

This course includes theories and applications of techniques concerning the analysis of human motion. It is designed to provide opportunities for the advanced study of motion analysis techniques for the study of human movement. The intent of this course is to provide students with an extensive knowledge concerning quantitative analysis of human motion and the concepts and equipment to collect objective quantifiable data to be used for clinical or research purposes.

PHYSICAL THERAPY Courses

PT 621. Introduction to Physical Therapy. 2 Credits.

Students will be exposed to basic medical terminology, patient management skills involving draping, positioning, transfers, and gait training with assistive devices.

PT 627. Theory and Practice I. 4 Credits.

Several instructional units introduce the student to the basic areas of physical therapy. Units include orientation to the profession, basic safety procedures, physical modalities of heat and cold, electrotherapy, bandaging and sterile technique, and massage.

PT 628. Theory and Practice II. 4 Credits.

Instructional units in this course include introduction of therapeutic exercise approaches for patient types with differing diagnoses. Through critical thinking and problem solving, students learn how to design specific exercise approaches based upon the goals developed for various diagnostic groups. They also learn how to assess the effectiveness, success, and potential risks associated with exercise and develop strategies to modify the treatments based upon those factors.

PT 630. Concepts in Histology for Physical Therapy. 1 Credit.

The emphasis in this course in histology is on connective tissue, muscle tissue, tissues of the nervous system as well as the skeletal system. The course is intended to give the physical therapy student a basic understanding of cell structure and function in these major systems. The course integrates with human anatomy and neuroscience.

PT 634. Clinical Sciences I. 3 Credits.

A series of lectures designed to acquaint the student with the clinical areas related to pathological conditions frequently seen in physical therapy practice. The course develops an understanding of the disease processes and guides the student in the application and analysis of pathology in the care of the patient.

PT 635. Clinical Sciences II. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to acquaint the student with medical aspects and pathological conditions associated with musculoskeletal and cardiopulmonary disease and disorders. Subunits also include presentations on cancer, hospice care, and hematological disorders.

PT 638. Exercise Physiology. 2 Credits.

This course provides an overview of human physiology as it relates to exercise and the clinical practice of physical therapy. Energy systems and cardiopulmonary physiology will be covered, including electrocardiogram interpretation, as well as resistance training and weight loss.

PT 640. Patient Evaluation I. 3 Credits.

A beginning course in patient examination skills which focuses on documentation, vital signs and history/interviewing skills, Respiratory and cardiac examination, range of motion, surface anatomy palpation, reflex testing, and vascular status assessment are introduced.

PT 641. Patient Evaluation II. 3 Credits.

A continuation of the study of patient evaluation. The focus of this course is on the musculoskeletal respiratory and cardiovascular systems, and includes examination of posture and gait.

PT 655. Clinical Problem Solving I. 2 Credits.

Use of case discussions, sample patients, and small group experiences to challenge student’s abilities to apply information from class to actual patient problems.

PT 656. Clinical Problem Solving II. 2 Credits.

Use of case discussions, sample patients and small group experience to challenge student’s abilities to apply information from spring semester classes to actual patient problems. For this course, the emphasis is on therapeutic exercise, cardiopulmonary rehabilitation, and care of the acutely ill patient.

PT 665. Biomechanics/Kinesiology I. 3 Credits.

This course will review the musculoskeletal system with emphasis on normal movement of the spine and extremities and the coordinated muscle activity necessary to produce that movement. Students will learn manual muscle testing techniques. The course will also introduce basic concepts such as types of muscle contractions, torque production, and joint reaction forces.

PT 666. Biomechanics/Kinesiology II. 2 Credits.

Students will learn to assess the measurement of motion and forces in normal human movement. Trigonometry will be employed in the problem-solving section of the course as the student assesses forces, vectors and loads.

PT 669. Clinical Internship I. 4 Credits.

This first full-time clinical education period begins at the end of the first academic year of the program and is designed to permit progressive responsibility in patient evaluation and treatment based upon material learned in classes during the first year. Each student is required to provide one in-service presentation during the clinical learning experience.

PT 695. Topics in Physical Therapy. 1-3 Credits.

Advanced study of selected topics.

PT 792. Neuroscience I. 3 Credits.

Neuroscience I is the first in a series of courses that provide the student with an understanding of integrated neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. Emphasis will be placed upon basic neurophysiologic principles at the cellular level. Prerequisites: BIOL 889.

PT 793. Neuroscience II. 3 Credits.

Neuroscience II is the second course in the sequence. From the foundation of Neuroscience I, the course will build to the progressively higher order of structural functional relationships that control behavior. Prerequisites: PT 792 and BIOL 889.

PT 810. Scientific Inquiry I. 3 Credits.

This is the first in a series of courses that prepare the graduate to critically analyze and use scientific literature to improve clinical decision-making and practice. This course introduces the terminology and strategies of evidence-based practice applied to physical therapy. It emphasizes the basic concepts such as research design, measurement principles and basic statistics.

PT 822. Scientific Inquiry II. 2 Credits.

This course is a continuation of the graduate’s preparation to practice critical analysis skills related to scientific literature. Its emphasis is placed on knowing the components of research reports and concepts associated with judging the quality and value of research. Students will apply this knowledge to answer clinical questions of diagnosis, prognosis, and intervention.

PT 826. Theory and Practice III. 4 Credits.

A continuation of the important aspects of physical therapy practice. This semester is made up of the following units: spinal cord injury, pediatric neurologic dysfunction, and adult neurologic dysfunction. The course focuses on treatment procedures including proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, current motor control and motor learning concepts, and neurodevelopmental treatment.

PT 827. Theory and Practice IV. 4 Credits.

This course covers advanced and special interest areas of practice such as joint mobilization, sports medicine, special testing equipment, mechanical traction application, and discharge planning for orthopaedic patients.

PT 836. Clinical Sciences III. 3 Credits.

This course continues with the presentation of pathologies and clinical manifestations of selected patient populations. Units within this course include pediatric, adult neurology, and spinal cord injury.

PT 837. Clinical Sciences IV. 3 Credits.

The continuation of a series in clinical areas. Emphasis areas in this course are on radiology, pharmacology, chronic pain, functional capacity evaluation and electrophysiological testing.

PT 842. Patient Evaluation III. 3 Credits.

This course covers the important evaluative elements associated with the neurological system, including evaluation of adult and pediatric patients with congenital or acquired conditions.

PT 857. Clinical Problem Solving III. 2 Credits.

Student must be a second year PT student enrolled in PT curriculum. Use of case discussions, sample patients, and small group experiences to challenge student’s abilities to apply information from class to actual patient problems. For this course, the emphasis is on Neurological and pediatric patients.

PT 858. Clinical Problem Solving IV. 2 Credits.

Use of case discussions, sample patients, and small group experiences to challenge student’s abilities to apply information from class to actual patient problems. For this course, the emphasis is on orthopedic patients.

PT 865. Prosthetics and Orthotics. 3 Credits.

This course addresses the examination, assessment and fabrication issues associated with the development of prosthetics and orthotics for selected patient populations. Prerequisites: PT 665 and PT 666.

PT 871. Clinical Internship II. 4 Credits.

The student is provided an 8-week opportunity to apply academic philosophy, theory, and practices during a period of clinical education. This internship or PT 872 will consist of a rehabilitation experience (pediatric or adult neurology). The student will be required to collect data for a research case study during this internship or PT 872.

PT 872. Clinical Internship III. 4 Credits.

The student is provided an 8-week opportunity to apply academic philosophy, theory, and practices during a period of clinical education. This internship or PT 871 will consist of a rehabilitation experience (pediatric or adult neurology). The student will be required to collect data for a research case study during this internship or PT 871.

PT 873. Clinical Internship IV. 4 Credits.

Students spend eight weeks at different facilities in a full-time internship. This course provides an opportunity to develop on-site innovative clinical investigations with program and clinical faculty coordination/supervision.

PT 874. Clinical Internship V. 4 Credits.

A final clinical experience for physical therapy students. Students spend eight weeks at different facilities in a full-time internship. This course provides an opportunity to develop on-site innovative clinical investigations with program and clinical faculty coordination/supervision.

PT 880. Psychosocial Aspects of Patient Care. 2 Credits.

This course focuses upon the emotional and psychological elements associated with illness and disease. Students will learn the various societal and personal views of sickness and chronic illness as well as the coping mechanism employed by individuals and families when facing disease and terminal illness.

PT 881. Management of Special Populations. 2 Credits.

This course describes physical therapy management of challenges associated with selected groups of people. Effects of aging on gait and equilibrium will be discussed. Topics will include osteoporosis, breast and prostate cancer, sexuality, nutrition, the female athlete, the senior athlete, health care placement options, and social support in American society.

PT 882. Practice Management. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide the physical therapy student with a review of the principles and practices of managing and administering physical therapy in various clinical settings. The course stresses the principles of management administration in patient care in clinical environments.

PT 883. Professional Issues in Physical Therapy. 2 Credits.

This course is for the identification, analysis, and discussion of issues currently facing the physical therapy profession. The issues focus on the ethical questions as well as the role relationships of physical therapists in the greater health care delivery system of the United States.

PT 884. Clinical Teaching and Professional Communication. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to meet the needs for patient instruction, education within the classroom and clinic, and peer continuing education. The focus of the course is on clear communication in the teaching/learning process.

PT 890. Differential Diagnosis Seminar. 3 Credits.

The focus of this seminar is on the integration of the student’s knowledge in the areas of the foundation and clinical sciences through the application of problem solving in differential diagnosis.

PT 891. Seminar in Integrative Case Reports. 3 Credits.

This course provides the faculty and students the forum to present clinical case studies. The students will have collected the data for their individual case presentations during the previous summer internships.

PT 892. Scientific Inquiry Seminar. 2 Credits.

This is the final course in the Scientific Inquiry series. The purpose is to apply the concepts of research methods and design in the framework of evidence-based practice to specific clinical problems. Students will appraise systematic reviews, guidelines, and the economics of health care in a seminar format.

PT 893. Research Topics. 2 Credits.

Research topics.

PT 895. Topics in Physical Therapy I. 1 Credit.

This course will expose interprofessional students to current trends in health promotion and illness prevention. Topics will include: Healthy People 2020 objectives, age specific clinical guidelines for health promotion and illness prevention, theories on behavior and motivation, sociocultural issues, and screening for a variety of health problems. Measures for promoting and maintaining health throughout the lifespan will be explored with attention to current research from the literature.

PT 896. Topics in Physical Therapy II. 1 Credit.

Students will pick from a variety of clinical specialty practice, service learning or research topics to explore in a small group setting.