http://www.odu.edu/nursing 

3009 Health Sciences Building
757-683-4298

Karen Karlowicz, Chair
Carolyn Rutledge, Associate Chair for Graduate Programs

Graduate Nursing Programs

The School of Nursing offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N) and the Doctor of Nursing Practice (D.N.P). Graduate nursing programs are  designed to prepare graduates with expertise in theory, research, and advanced nursing practice. Through academic courses and clinical experiences, graduate students are prepared to meet the present nationwide demand for nurses in advanced practice, leadership and education. The graduate nursing program is fully accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

Students in the program may specialize in a variety of roles. All specialties emphasize development of the nursing role through advanced theory and research. The program strives to instill in its graduates leadership responsibility, professional commitment, and a holistic approach to health and nursing care.

The number of credits required for the Master of Science in Nursing degree varies and reflects specific courses and practicum requirements necessary for certification in a specialty area of professional nursing practice. Tracks in the MSN program are designed for completion in five consecutive semesters following a full-time schedule; a part-time curriculum schedule is available for selected tracks upon request. 

Eight credits of course work, incorporated into the MSN core, represents content common to both the MSN and DNP degrees.  Completion of these credits also count toward degree requirements for the DNP.  Upon admission to the program, MSN students will be asked to indicate their intent of whether or not to continue their studies to earn the DNP.

Refer to the School of Nursing website at www.odu.edu/nursing for program specific curriculum plans.

Program Application Deadlines

Master of Science in Nursing

Nurse Practitioner

  • Family Nurse Practitioner - March 1st
  • Neonatal Nurse Practitioner - June 1st - Completed applications will be reviewed prior to June 1st for fall enrollment.
  • Pediatric Nurse Practitioner - March 1st

Nurse Administrator - June 1st

Clinical Nurse Specialist - Completed applications will be reviewed prior to June 1st for fall enrollment for :

  • Adult Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist/Educator
  • Adult Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist/Administrator
  • Neonatal Clinical Nurse Specialist
  • Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist

Nurse Midwifery - June 1st

Doctor of Nursing Practice

Post-Master's Doctor of Nursing Practice (Advanced Practice Track) - August 1

Post-Master's Doctor of Nursing Practice (Nurse Executive Track) - August 1

Nurse Anesthesia - October 1

Admission Requirements for the MSN Graduate Program

In addition to meeting University requirements, applicants must meet the admission criteria below.

*Note: Some MSN tracks may have additional requirements. See program description for more information.

  1. Current, unencumbered license as a registered nurse (RN) with 1 year of current experience in the role.
  2. Must have completed an undergraduate physical/health assessment course and an undergraduate statistics course as confirmed by an official college transcript. Applicants who have not completed these pre- requisites prior to the application deadline will not be reviewed for admission.
  3. Baccalaureate degree in nursing or related science field from a regionally accredited college or university with a minimum of a 3.0 grade point average.
  4. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) combined score of 300 or higher or Miller Analogy Test (MAT) score of 400. The tests must have been taken within 5 years of the application. Note: GRE and MAT Standardized tests are waived for students with a GPA of 3.5 or above in their baccalaureate nursing degree.
  5. Three letters of recommendation, with at least one from a former faculty member and at least one from a former employer while in the RN role.
  6. A 500-700 word essay that addresses the applicant's goals and reasons for seeking certification as a family nurse practitioner
  7. At least one year of recent clinical nursing practice experience.

MSN Degree Requirements

In addition to general University requirements, the following apply to candidates for the Master of Science in Nursing degree:

  1. Only degree-seeking students may take graduate MSN nursing courses.
  2. Full-time study only for FNP, PNP and Midwifery. Full and part time options are available for Administrator, CNS and NNP. Contact the graduate nursing office regarding study options for each program at (757) 683-4298 or the program director for the specific role.
  3. A written comprehensive examination covering the program of study is required by the final semester of study for MSN students not electing to complete a thesis. A student must be registered in the semester the comprehensive exam is taken.
  4. The student must make arrangements three months in advance to take a nursing course with a laboratory or practicum component to assure appropriate and available placement for the learning experience. Arrangements are made through the School of Nursing Student Clinical Services Coordinator.
  5. The B grade (3.00) is the minimal acceptable grade for all courses with a NURS prefix or any course required for the degree for continuation in the master’s program. Satisfactory performance in the laboratory or practicum component of a nursing course is required. Students achieving less than a B grade (3.00) in a nursing course may request an opportunity from the role program director to repeat the course once. Two course failures will result in termination from the nursing program. Students may not progress with an incomplete in prerequisite courses as listed in the curriculum plan.

Additional requirements include physical exams, CPR certification, immunization requirements, professional liability insurance, computer competencies and technical standards, background checks and urine drug screening.

Master of Science in Nursing – Core Courses

Tracks in the MSN programs share a set of core courses that meet nursing accreditation and state approval guidelines for the degree. Regardless of the role concentration, all MSN students are required to complete the following 23 credits of core courses.

NURS 709Evidence-Based Research and Theories for Nursing Practice3
NURS 715Ethical Concepts of Advanced Practice Nursing3
NURS 761Pharmacology for Advanced Practice Nursing3
NURS 770Pathophysiology for Advanced Nursing Practice3
NURS 771Physical Assessment for Advanced Nursing Practice3
NURS 800Introduction to Healthcare Disparities, Vulnerable Populations, and Epidemiology *3
NURS 802The Business of Advanced Nursing Practice *3
NURS 805Application of Practice-Based Research Methods *2
Total Hours23
*

 These courses count toward the DNP.

Transfers Between MSN Programs

Students may not transfer between programs in the MSN. Any student wishing to change programs may apply to a new program for admission during the regularly scheduled application process and deadline for the program. Their applications will be considered and reviewed as a new admission with the entire application pool.

Progression to the DNP

MSN students wishing to pursue a DNP must declare their intention on admission and no later than the end of their first semester in the MSN program. Any student who has completed their MSN and did not declare their intent to pursue the DNP must apply and be considered with all post masters applicants as a new admission to the DNP program.

Transfer Credit Evaluation Policy

Any transfer credit requests must be submitted to the Associate Chair for Graduate Programs within two weeks of notification of admission to the program. Once coursework has commenced for your program of study, all coursework must be completed at Old Dominion University, and no further transfer credits will be awarded.

Master of Science in Nursing – Family Nurse Practitioner Role

Deborah Gray, FNP Advisor

The family nurse practitioner (FNP) role prepares graduate students to provide a full range of primary care services to individuals and families throughout the life span. In collaboration with other health care professionals, graduate students provide health promotion, health maintenance and restorative care to well, at-risk, and chronically ill clients and their families. Student clinical experiences are provided in a variety of primary care settings. Successful completion of the program qualifies students to register for the AANP or ANCC examination for certification as a family nurse practitioner.

Family Nurse Practitioner Curriculum

In addition to the 23 credits of MSN core courses the following courses are required for degree completion of the FNP/MSN for a program total of 51 credits.     

Each semester in the program students are assessed a non-refundable program fee of $450 to be paid in addition to tuition.  The fee covers a variety of program-related expenses outside of tuition and books.                                                                                 

Core Courses23
Additional Requirements for Family Nurse Practitioner
NURS 705Primary Care Approaches for Children3
NURS 719Family and Community Primary Care Assessment1
NURS 721Aging in the 21st Century3
NURS 760Advanced Family Nursing I Practicum3
NURS 762Advanced Family Nursing I: Management of Acute Illnesses3
NURS 763Health Promotion and Maintenance2
NURS 764Advanced Family Nursing II Practicum4
NURS 765Advanced Family Nursing II: Management of Chronic Illnesses3
NURS 766Primary Care Approaches for Women3
NURS 767Advanced Family Nursing III Practicum3
Total Hours51

Masters of Science in Nursing - Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Role

Diana Cartagena, PNP Program Advisor
Rebecca Poston, PNP Admissions Advisor

The pediatric nurse practitioner (PNP) role prepares graduate students to provide a full range of services to pediatric patients in acute or primary care settings. In collaboration with other health care professionals, graduate students provide health promotion, health maintenance and restorative care to well, at-risk, and chronically ill pediatric patients and their families.  Student clinical experiences are provided in a variety of primary care settings for students pursuing the primary care pediatric role.  Successful completion of the program qualifies students to register for the examination for certification as a pediatric nurse practitioner.

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Curriculum

In addition to the 23 credits of MSN core courses the following courses are required for degree completion of the PNP/MSN for a program total of 51 credits.

Each semester in the program students are assessed a non-refundable program fee of $450 to be paid in addition to tuition.  The fee covers a variety of program-related expenses outside of tuition and books.

Core Courses23
Additional Requirements for Pediatric Nurse Practitioner
NURS 705Primary Care Approaches for Children3
NURS 719Family and Community Primary Care Assessment1
NURS 763Health Promotion and Maintenance2
NURS 781Advanced Pediatric Nursing: Practicum I Primary Care3
NURS 782The Growth and Development of Children in the 21st Century3
NURS 783Management of Acute Pediatric Conditions 13
NURS 784Advanced Pediatric Nursing: Practicum II4
NURS 785Seminar in Pediatrics: Management of Chronic and Complex Clinical Conditions3
NURS 786Management of Acute/Critical Pediatric Conditions II3
NURS 788Advanced Pediatric Nursing: Practicum III3
Total Hours51

Master of Science in Nursing - Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Role

Susan Braid, Program Director

The neonatal nurse practitioner (NNP) provides population-focused health care to preterm (<37 weeks) and term neonates, infants, and children up to 2 years of age. As a key member of an interprofessional team, the NNP participates in a wide variety of complex patient care activities in settings that include, but are not limited to, all levels of neonatal inpatient care in both academic and community-based settings; transport, acute care, and chronic care settings; delivery rooms; and outpatient settings. Student clinical experiences are designed to prepare the graduate to practice as an NNP providing direct patient care in a newborn nursery, or in a Level II, III, or IV NICU. Successful completion of the program qualifies students to register for the examination for certification as neonatal nurse practitioner. For admission requirements see the website for the School of Nursing at  http://www.odu.edu/nursing or contact the program director.

Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Curriculum

In addition to the 23 credits of MSN core courses the following courses are required for degree completion of the NNP/MSN for a program total of 52 credits.

Each semester in the program students are assessed a non-refundable program fee of $450 to be paid in addition to tuition.  The fee covers a variety of program-related expenses outside of tuition and books.

Core Courses23
Additional Requirements for Neonatal Nurse Practitioner
NURS 751Developmental Neonatal Physiology2
NURS 772Foundations of Advanced Neonatal Nursing3
NURS 773Pharmacology for Advanced Neonatal Nursing3
NURS 774Advanced Neonatal Nursing: High Risk Management I3
NURS 775Advanced Neonatal Nursing: High Risk Management II3
NURS 776Advance Neonatal Nursing Practicum I3
NURS 778Advanced Neonatal Nursing: Practicum II4
NURS 779Seminar in Pediatrics:Managment of Chronic and Complex Neonatal Clinical Problems3
NURS 787Assessment of the Child-Bearing Family1
NURS 789Advanced Neonatal Nursing Practicum III4
Total Hours52

Master of Science in Nursing - Nurse Administrator Role

Nancy Sweeney, Program Director

ODU's online Master of Science in Nursing program for the Nurse Administrator role prepares nurses for leadership positions in a variety of health care areas. The curriculum is designed to address the competencies from the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) and the Essentials of Masters Education in Nursing (AACN, 2011).  Graduate students are prepared to coordinate health care programs within complex systems in an era of health care reform.  Coursework is based on diverse leadership and organizational theories, and is designed to promote critical thinking, creativity, and problem solving skills that result in the application of research findings to address today's clinical and administrative healthcare issues. New models of leadership, management, and the role of the advanced practice nurse in assuring effective organizations are analyzed throughout the program.  Graduates are also prepared for doctoral study in nursing and continued personal and professional development.

Note: Curriculum changes that occur over the course of a part-time plan may impact students due to the extended time required to complete the program.

Nurse Administrator Curriculum

In addition to the 23 credits of MSN core courses the following courses are required for degree completion of the Administrator/MSN for a program total of 47 credits.     

Each semester in the program students are assessed a non-refundable program fee of $450 to be paid in addition to tuition.  The fee covers a variety of program-related expenses outside of tuition and books.

Core Courses23
Additional Requirements for the Nurse Administrator
NURS 716Organizational Leadership Practicum3
NURS 717Strategic Leadership Practicum3
NURS 718Practicum Immersion for Novice Nurse Executives3
NURS 735Organizational and Management Theory3
NURS 740Strategic Leadership3
NURS 750Professional Relationships and Human Resource Management3
NURS 780Financial Issues in Nursing Administration *3
NURS 801Roles and Responsibilities for Transforming Practice *3
Total Hours47
*

 Course counts toward DNP.

Master of Science in Nursing - Adult Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist/Educator Role

Tina Haney, Co-Program Director

Pamela Sharp, Co-Program Director

The School of Nursing offers a curriculum leading to the degree of Master of Science in Nursing with an advanced practice area of Adult Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist/Educator.  The program of study prepares students as expert clinicians in the application of evidence-based knowledge within the realms of nursing interventions, teaching and research.  Students also receive preparation as nurse educators, and are therefore dually prepared for clinical and academic roles.

The program requires course content in theory, research, education, Adult Gerontology CNS professional and clinical cores, and the advanced practice area with a selected secondary focus.  Applicants are admitted for either full-time or part-time study and begin in the fall.  The curriculum is designed to prepare nurses as Adult Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialists with a secondary clinical focus in an area of their choice.  Graduates of this program are eligible to sit for the American Nurses' Association (ANCC) Adult Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist Certification Exam or the American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN) Acute Care Adult-Gerontology (AACNS-AG) Exam.

In addition to the 23 credits of MSN core courses the following courses are required for degree completion of the CNS/Educator program for a total of 51 credits.

Core Courses23
Additional Requirements for the Adult Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist/Educator Curriculum
NURS 720Instructional Delivery Methods & Learner Assessment3
NURS 721Aging in the 21st Century3
NURS 730Nursing Curricular Design and Program Evaluation3
NURS 734Educator Internship: Classroom Instruction3
NURS 738Clinical Nurse Specialist I: Introduction to Practice2
NURS 739Clinical Nurse Specialist I: Role Socialization4
NURS 756Clinical Nurse Specialist II: Transition to Practice3
NURS 757Clinical Nurse Specialist Practicum II: Role Transition2-5
NURS 763Health Promotion and Maintenance2
Total Hours48-51

Master of Science in Nursing - Adult Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist/Administrator Role

The School of Nursing offers a curriculum leading to the degree of Master of Science in Nursing with an advanced practice area of Adult Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist/Administrator.  The program of study prepares students as expert clinicians in the application of evidence-based knowledge within the realms of nursing interventions, teaching and research.  Students also receive preparation as nurse administrators, and are therefore dually prepared for clinical and administrative or advanced leadership roles. The Nurse Administrator role prepares the graduate for leadership positions in a variety of health care settings. The administration portion of the curriculum is designed to address the competencies defined by the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) and the Essentials of Masters Education in Nursing (AACN, 2011). New models of leadership, management, and the role of the advanced practice nurse in assuring effective organizations are analyzed throughout the curriculum. Graduates of this program are eligible to sit for the American Nurses' Association (ANCC) Adult Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist Certification Exam or the American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN) Acute Care Adult-Gerontology (ACCNS-AG) Exam.

Adult Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist/Administrator Curriculum

In addition to the 23 credits of MSN core courses the following courses are required for degree completion of the CNS/Administrator program for a total of 51 credits.

Core Courses23
Additional Requirements for the Adult Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist/Administrator Curriculum
NURS 721Aging in the 21st Century3
NURS 735Organizational and Management Theory3
NURS 738Clinical Nurse Specialist I: Introduction to Practice2
NURS 739Clinical Nurse Specialist I: Role Socialization4
NURS 740Strategic Leadership3
NURS 756Clinical Nurse Specialist II: Transition to Practice3
NURS 757Clinical Nurse Specialist Practicum II: Role Transition2-5
NURS 763Health Promotion and Maintenance2
NURS 780Financial Issues in Nursing Administration3
Total Hours48-51

Master of Science in Nursing - Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist Role

The School of Nursing offers a curriculum leading to the degree of Master of Science in Nursing with an advanced practice area of Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist.  The program of study prepares students as expert clinicians in the application of evidence-based knowledge within the realms of nursing interventions, teaching and research. 

The program requires course content in theory, research, education, Pediatric CNS professional and clinical cores, and the advanced practice area with a selected secondary focus. The curriculum is designed to prepare nurses as Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialists. Graduates of this program are eligible to sit for the American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN) Acute Care Pediatric (ACCNS-P) Exam.

Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist Curriculum

In addition to the 23 credits of MSN core courses the following courses are required for degree completion of the CNS/Pediatric program  for a total of 51 credits.

Core Courses23
Additional Requirements for the Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist
NURS 705Primary Care Approaches for Children3
NURS 738Clinical Nurse Specialist I: Introduction to Practice2
NURS 739Clinical Nurse Specialist I: Role Socialization4
NURS 756Clinical Nurse Specialist II: Transition to Practice3
NURS 757Clinical Nurse Specialist Practicum II: Role Transition2-5
NURS 758Clinical Nurse Specialist Practicum III: Role Synthesis3
NURS 763Health Promotion and Maintenance2
NURS 782The Growth and Development of Children in the 21st Century3
NURS 783Management of Acute Pediatric Conditions 13
NURS 785Seminar in Pediatrics: Management of Chronic and Complex Clinical Conditions3
Total Hours51-54

Master of Science in Nursing - Neonatal Clinical Nurse Specialist Role

The School of Nursing offers a curriculum leading to the degree of Master of Science in Nursing with an advanced practice area of Neonatal Clinical Nurse Specialist.  The program of study prepares students as expert clinicians in the application of evidence-based knowledge within the realms of nursing interventions, teaching and research. 

The program requires course content in theory, research, education, Neonatal CNS professional and clinical cores, and the advanced practice area with a selected secondary focus.  Applicants are admitted for full-time or part-time study and can begin in the fall.  The curriculum is designed to prepare nurses as Neonatal Clinical Nurse Specialists with a secondary clinical focus in an area of their choice.  Graduates of this program are eligible to sit for the American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN) Acute Care Neonatal (ACCNS-N) Exam. 

Neonatal Clinical Nurse Specialist Curriculum

In addition to the 23 credits of MSN core courses the following courses are required for degree completion of the CNS/Neonatal program for a total of 52 credits.

Core Courses23
Additional Requirements for the Neonatal Clinical Nurse Specialist
NURS 738Clinical Nurse Specialist I: Introduction to Practice2
NURS 739Clinical Nurse Specialist I: Role Socialization4
NURS 751Developmental Neonatal Physiology2
NURS 756Clinical Nurse Specialist II: Transition to Practice3
NURS 757Clinical Nurse Specialist Practicum II: Role Transition2-5
NURS 772Foundations of Advanced Neonatal Nursing3
NURS 773Pharmacology for Advanced Neonatal Nursing3
NURS 774Advanced Neonatal Nursing: High Risk Management I3
NURS 775Advanced Neonatal Nursing: High Risk Management II3
NURS 787Assessment of the Child-Bearing Family1
Total Hours49-52

Master of Science in Nursing - Nurse Midwifery (cooperative program with Shenandoah University)

Susan Braid, ODU Advisor

Karen Feltham, Shenandoah University Program Director

The Master’s in Nursing, with specialization in nurse midwifery, is a joint program with Shenandoah University. The two-year program includes advanced practice nursing content offered by Old Dominion University. Midwifery specific courses taken in the second year are through Shenandoah University. The Master of Science in Nursing is awarded by Old Dominion University and a certificate of midwifery specialty is awarded by Shenandoah University. Graduates are eligible to take the national midwifery certification examination. The program is full time study.

Nurse Midwifery Curriculum

In addition to the 23 credits of MSN core courses the following courses are required for degree completion of the MW/MSN for a program total of 47 credits.                                               

Core Courses23
ODU Courses
NURS 721Aging in the 21st Century3
NURS 763Health Promotion and Maintenance2
Shenandoah Courses19
NM 610 Primary Care of Women
NM 620 Comprehensive Antepartal Care
NM 630 Midwifery Practicum
NM 640 Comprehensive Perinatal Care
NM 651 Integrated Midwifery Program
NM 652 Evidence Based Practice Project
NM 660 Advanced Nurse-Midwifery Role Development
Total Hours47

                                           

Doctor of Nursing Practice

The Doctor of Nursing Practice program is designed for nurses that are seeking a terminal degree in nursing practice.  DNP-prepared nurses are equipped to serve as clinical experts, change agents, and advocates in addressing healthcare in our nation.  Specific areas of focus include: advanced practice skills, healthcare policy, organizational and systems leadership, interprofessional collaboration, evidence-based research, healthcare technology, informatics, and patient advocacy.  The DNP program at ODU is fully accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE).

ODU offers three tracks in the DNP programs: 1) Post-Master’s Advanced Practice (build on traditional master's programs for nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, nurse midwives, and nurse anesthesia), 2) Post-Master’s Nurse Executive, and 3) Post-Baccalaureate Nurse Anesthesia (CRNA).  In order to graduate from Old Dominion University’s Post-Master’s DNP program, a student must successfully complete all 37 post-masters credit hours of required course work, including an evidence-based DNP project, and all clinical practica. It will take a full-time student four semesters (spring, summer, fall and spring) to complete the program. A part-time student will complete the DNP program in seven semesters (spring, summer, fall, spring, summer, fall, and spring). All of the master’s programs in nursing at ODU include 8 credits that also meet requirements for the DNP program allowing students to complete the DNP in three additional semesters.

See detailed information on each track in the following sections. Refer to the School of Nursing (SON) website for program specific curriculum plans www.odu.edu/nursing

Admission Requirements for the DNP Program

*Note: For admission requirements to the Nurse Anesthesia program refer to the website at http://www.odu.edu/nursing

In addition to meeting University requirements, applicants must meet the admission criteria below..

  1. Current, unencumbered license as a registered nurse (RN).
  2. Master's degree in nursing or a related field from a regionally accredited college or university with a minimum of 3.0 grade point
  3. Baccalaureate degree in nursing or related field from a regionally accredited college or university with a minimum of a 3.0 grade point average.
  4. Three letters of recommendation, with at least one from a former faculty member and at least two from a former employer. 
  5. A 500-700 word essay that should speak specifically to the concentration area to which you are applying.

Application Deadlines for the DNP Programs

Post Master's Advanced Practice - August 1

Post Master's Nurse Executive - August 1

Nurse Anesthesia - October 1

Doctor of Nursing Practice - Post Master's Advanced Practice

Carolyn Rutledge, Associate Chair for Graduate Programs

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree will provide additional education for advanced practice nurses in:

  1. Advanced diagnostics and practice skills;
  2. Care of the underserved and increasingly diverse population; and
  3. Incorporation of emerging care technologies. The program may be completed as a full-time or part-time student and is distance friendly.

In order to graduate from Old Dominion University’s DNP Program, a student must have successfully completed all 36 post-masters credit hours of required course work, including an evidence-based capstone project and all clinical practica. It will take a full-time student four semesters (spring, summer, fall and spring) to complete the program. A part-time student will complete the DNP program in seven semesters (spring, summer, fall, spring, summer, fall, and spring).

Advanced Practice Curriculum

NURS 800Introduction to Healthcare Disparities, Vulnerable Populations, and Epidemiology *3
NURS 801Roles and Responsibilities for Transforming Practice3
NURS 802The Business of Advanced Nursing Practice *3
NURS 803Leadership and Interprofessional Practice in Healthcare3
NURS 805Application of Practice-Based Research Methods *2
NURS 806Proposal Development and Database Management4
NURS 807Informatics and Healthcare Technology3
NURS 809Advocacy for Healthcare Public Policy for Advanced Practice3
NURS 865DNP Clinical Practicum I2
NURS 866DNP Clinical Practicum II2
NURS 867DNP Clinical Practicum III3
NURS 868DNP Clinical Practicum IV3
NURS 890DNP Nursing Capstone3
Total Hours37
*

 Courses are included in the master's program.

Doctor of Nursing Practice  – Post- Master's Nurse Executive

Nancy Sweeney, Program Director

The Nurse Executive role prepares top level nurse executives for leadership positions in a health system. The program outcomes are consistent with the American Organization of Nurse Executive guidelines for nurse executive practice. Content focuses on executive leadership skills, working with vulnerable populations, fiscal and human resource management, quality magnet achievement, emerging technology, and organizational research in clinical issues. Students participate in executive internships throughout the program in their home area. Upon program completion, graduates are eligible to take the national certification examination.

To obtain the DNP degree, students must successfully complete all DNP courses and 1000 hours of supervised clinical practice.  The DNP program provides a minimum of 560 clinical hours within four practicum courses.  MSN courses with a supervised clinical practicum component will be considered for transfer credit toward the total clinical hour requirement.  A review of MSN transcripts or course descriptions/syllabi are helpful to determine whether clinical hours are acceptable.  Students entering the Nurse Executive DNP program, who require additional clinical hours, will be advised of their options by the Program Director.

Nurse Executive Curriculum

NURS 800Introduction to Healthcare Disparities, Vulnerable Populations, and Epidemiology *3
NURS 805Application of Practice-Based Research Methods *2
NURS 806Proposal Development and Database Management4
NURS 807Informatics and Healthcare Technology3
NURS 809Advocacy for Healthcare Public Policy for Advanced Practice3
NURS 810Leadership in Complex Systems and Organizations3
NURS 812Evidence-Based Management for Quality Healthcare3
NURS 814Competitive Resource Design and Utilization3
NURS 816DNP Executive Practicum I2-5
NURS 817DNP Executive Practicum II2-5
NURS 818DNP Executive Practicum III3-5
NURS 819DNP Executive Practicum IV3-5
NURS 890DNP Nursing Capstone3
Total Hours37-47
*

 Courses included in the master's program.

Doctor of Nursing Practice - Nurse Anesthesia

Nathaniel Apatov, Program Director

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) with specialization in nurse anesthesia prepares the graduate to provide a variety of anesthetics to patients across the lifespan and wellness continuum. Graduates are groomed to translate research and evidence into clinical practice, to care for underserved and diverse populations, incorporate emerging care technologies, develop leadership skills and measure patient outcomes in an effort to improve safety and quality of patient care. 

The Old Dominion University DNP program with specialization in nurse anesthesia is 103 credit, 36 month full time program that begins in May each year. The program is a hybrid of on-campus and on-line classes. The curriculum is an assimilation of nurse anesthesia specialty and DNP courses. Each student is required to complete a scholarly project that addresses patient care, quality improvement, process improvement, or practice improvement. The Nurse Anesthesia program is accredited by the Council on Accreditation for Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs. For admission requirements see the website for the School of Nursing  http://www.odu.edu nursing or contact the program director.

Nurse Anesthesia Curriculum

NURS 709Evidence-Based Research and Theories for Nursing Practice3
NURS 715Ethical Concepts of Advanced Practice Nursing3
NURS 761Pharmacology for Advanced Practice Nursing3
NURS 770Pathophysiology for Advanced Nursing Practice3
NURS 771Physical Assessment for Advanced Nursing Practice3
NURS 800Introduction to Healthcare Disparities, Vulnerable Populations, and Epidemiology3
NURS 801Roles and Responsibilities for Transforming Practice3
NURS 802The Business of Advanced Nursing Practice3
NURS 803Leadership and Interprofessional Practice in Healthcare3
NURS 805Application of Practice-Based Research Methods2
NURS 806Proposal Development and Database Management4
NURS 807Informatics and Healthcare Technology3
NURS 809Advocacy for Healthcare Public Policy for Advanced Practice3
NURS 865DNP Clinical Practicum I2
NURS 866DNP Clinical Practicum II2
NURS 867DNP Clinical Practicum III3
NURS 868DNP Clinical Practicum IV3
NURS 890DNP Nursing Capstone3
NURA 745Applied Chemistry and Physics for Nurse Anesthestists2
NURA 746Advanced Physiology for Nurse Anesthetists4
NURA 750Applied Principles of Anesthesia Practice I4
NURA 751Applied Principles of Anesthesia Practice II4
NURA 752Applied Principles of Anesthesia Practice III4
NURA 753Advanced Pharmacology for Nurse Anesthesia Practice3
NURA 761Evidenced-Based Seminar for Anesthesia Practice I1
NURA 762Evidenced-Based Seminar for Anesthesia Practice II1
NURA 763Nurse Anesthesia Clinical Practicum A3
NURA 764Nurse Anesthesia Clinical Practicum B5
NURA 856Nurse Anesthesia Clinical Practicum C4
NURA 857Nurse Anesthesia Clinical Practicum D4
NURA 858Anesthesia Clinical Practicum E4
NURA 859Anesthesia Clinical Practicum F4
NURA 863Evidenced-Based Seminar for Anesthesia Practice III1
NURA 864Evidenced-Based Seminar for Anesthesia Practice IV1
NURA 865Evidenced Based Seminar for Anesthesia Practice V1
NURA 866Evidenced Based Seminar for Anesthesia Practice VI1
Total Hours103

Certificate Programs 

Certificate programs offered by the School of Nursing are post-graduate, non-degree offerings.  These highly focused programs are designed to provide nurses with knowledge and skills to complement their advance practice roles.  

Nurse Educator Certificate Program

Karen Karlowicz, Advisor

The Nurse Educator Certificate program offers valuable knowledge and practical experience related to teaching in entry-level or graduate nursing education programs.  Courses provide an overview of nursing curriculum design, program evaluation, student assessment, instructional methodologies, and professional/ethical/legal issues in nursing/health professions education.  Completion of a teaching practicum is required.

This certificate program is targeted to nurses with at least one graduate degree in nursing who may be seeking faculty positions in entry-level or graduate nursing education programs. Admission is also open to students currently enrolled in a graduate nursing program as well as currently enrolled or graduates of other Health Sciences graduate degree programs. The expected time to complete the certificate is three semesters. It is recommended that students begin the course sequence in fall semester.

Nurse Educator Certificate Curriculum

NURS 676Professional, Ethical and Legal Concepts of Nursing Education3
NURS 720Instructional Delivery Methods & Learner Assessment3
NURS 730Nursing Curricular Design and Program Evaluation3
NURS 734Educator Internship: Classroom Instruction3
Total Hours12

Nurse Executive Certificate Program

Nancy Sweeney, Advisor

This program is designed for students to develop competency in serving in leadership or administrative roles within healthcare organizations, hospitals and ambulatory care settings. Core courses in this program cover the basic knowledge of informatics, leadership, evidence-based management, and competitive resources design and utilization.   This program is targeted to nurses, particularly those enrolled in the MBA program, who desire to complete the certificate as part of the Health Science concentration. Completion of course credits for the Nurse Executive Certificate program gives qualified students advanced placement and counts toward requirements for the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree. Students may also be enrolled in or a graduate of an advanced practice nursing program at the master’s or doctoral level (DNP) level. The expected time to complete the certificate is three semesters.

Nurse Executive Certificate Curriculum

NURS 707/807Informatics and Healthcare Technology3
NURS 710/810Leadership in Complex Systems and Organizations3
NURS 712/812Evidence-Based Management for Quality Healthcare3
NURS 714/814Competitive Resource Design and Utilization3
Total Hours12

Healthcare Executive Certificate Program

Nancy Sweeney, Advisor

This program is designed for students to develop competency in serving in leadership or administrative roles within healthcare organizations, hospitals and ambulatory care settings. Core courses in this program cover the basic knowledge of informatics, leadership, evidence-based management, and competitive resources design and utilization.   This program is targeted to non-nurses, particularly those in the MBA program, who desire to complete the certificate as part of the Health Science concentration. As well, students may be enrolled in or a graduate of programs at the master’s or doctoral level (PhD, DPT) level. The expected time to complete the certificate is three semesters.

Healthcare Executive Curriculum

HLSC 806Leadership in Complex Systems and Organizations3
HLSC 807Informatics and Healthcare Technology3
HLSC 808Evidence-Based Management for Quality Healthcare3
HLSC 816Competitive Resource Design and Utilization3
Total Hours12

NURSE ANESTHESIA Courses

NURA 655. Principles of Anesthesia Practice III. 4 Credits.

Prerequisites: NURA 653. Continuation of role preparation in administration of anesthesia.

NURA 695. Topics in Nurse Anesthesia. 1-6 Credits.

NURA 745. Applied Chemistry and Physics for Nurse Anesthestists. 2 Credits.

This course is a review of the principles of organic chemistry, biochemistry, and physics. It is designed as a foundation for the students' understanding of pharmacology, physiology, and the anesthesia gas machine. This course will also provide an introduction to the chemical structure-activity relationships, metabolism and mechanism of action of selected agents.

NURA 746. Advanced Physiology for Nurse Anesthetists. 4 Credits.

This course focuses on normal physiological functioning of body systems building on undergraduate anatomy and physiology to further examine structure and function focusing on cellular, subcellular, genetic and biochemical processes. The goal is to provide an in-depth understanding of the function and regulation of body systems to maintain homeostasis.

NURA 750. Applied Principles of Anesthesia Practice I. 4 Credits.

This course integrates scientific concepts with basic principles of anesthesia practice and prepares the student for their new role in the safe and effective delivery of anesthesia. Emphasis is on vital anesthesia monitoring and delivery systems. Airway management and general anesthesia techniques will also be discussed. Simulation is incorporated into the learning process to reinforce principles introduced in class. Prerequisite: NURA 745.

NURA 751. Applied Principles of Anesthesia Practice II. 4 Credits.

This course formulates a basic level of cognitive, affective, and psychomotor expertise for the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative anesthesia periods. Students will analyze and apply basic physiological principles in preparation for the anesthesia management of patients undergoing complex surgical procedures. Human Simulation is incorporated into the learning process to reinforce principles introduced in class. Prerequisites: NURA 746 and NURA 750.

NURA 752. Applied Principles of Anesthesia Practice III. 4 Credits.

This course is the third course in a series of three and is intended to further the foundation for safe and effective delivery of anesthesia. It is designed to prepare the student for the decision making necessary for the complex issues of anesthesia in clinical practice. Students will apply knowledge of pathophysiological conditions to formulate safe plans of care for patients undergoing complex surgical procedures. Human Simulation is incorporated into the learning process to reinforce principles introduced in class. Prerequisites: NURS 770 and NURA 751.

NURA 753. Advanced Pharmacology for Nurse Anesthesia Practice. 3 Credits.

The major focus of the course is synthesizing principles learned in Advanced Pharmacology for Nursing Practice and applying them to anesthetic pharmaceuticals. Emphasis is placed on the critical thinking process used to choose and prescribe drugs in the management of anesthesia.

NURA 754. Anesthesia Practicum. 4 Credits.

Orientation to the operating room and anesthesia. Additional selected clinical experiences. Prerequisites: NURA 652.

NURA 755. Clinical Practicum A. 6 Credits.

Each course consists of orientation to the Operating Room and the Anesthesia Department. Provides actual administration of general and regional anesthesia with qualified clinical instructors (Anesthesiologists and/or CRNA’s). Weekly classroom sessions consist of clinical conferences; journal club; and seminars dealing with current topics, including, but not necessarily limited to, respiratory, cardiovascular, thoracic, neuro, regional, obstetrical, pediatric, and special areas of anesthesia. Various special projects and competency examinations are administered throughout this phase. Prerequisites: admission to the program.

NURA 756. Clinical Practicum B. 10 Credits.

Each course consists of orientation to the Operating Room and the Anesthesia Department. Provides actual administration of general and regional anesthesia with qualified clinical instructors (Anesthesiologists and/or CRNA’s). Weekly classroom sessions consist of clinical conferences; journal club; and seminars dealing with current topics, including, but not necessarily limited to, respiratory, cardiovascular, thoracic, neuro, regional, obstetrical, pediatric, and special areas of anesthesia. Various special projects and competency examinations are administered throughout this phase. Prerequisites: admission to the program.

NURA 757. Clinical Practicum C. 10 Credits.

Each course consists of orientation to the Operating Room and the Anesthesia Department. Provides actual administration of general and regional anesthesia with qualified clinical instructors (Anesthesiologists and/or CRNA’s). Weekly classroom sessions consist of clinical conferences; journal club; and seminars dealing with current topics, including, but not necessarily limited to, respiratory, cardiovascular, thoracic, neuro, regional, obstetrical, pediatric, and special areas of anesthesia. Various special projects and competency examinations are administered throughout this phase. Prerequisites: admission to the program.

NURA 758. Clinical Practicum D. 10 Credits.

Each course consists of orientation to the Operating Room and the Anesthesia Department. Provides actual administration of general and regional anesthesia with qualified clinical instructors (Anesthesiologists and/or CRNA’s). Weekly classroom sessions consist of clinical conferences; journal club; and seminars dealing with current topics, including, but not necessarily limited to, respiratory, cardiovascular, thoracic, neuro, regional, obstetrical, pediatric, and special areas of anesthesia. Various special projects and competency examinations are administered throughout this phase. Prerequisites: admission to the program.

NURA 759. Advanced CRNA Clinical Course. 12 Credits.

This advanced placement credit is awarded to the certified registered nurse anesthetist who has demonstrated knowledge of selected complex nursing concepts for the provision of anesthesia services. Prerequisites: B.S.N. degree with CRNA license.

NURA 761. Evidenced-Based Seminar for Anesthesia Practice I. 1 Credit.

This course is the first in a series of six seminar courses that helps prepare advanced practice nurses with an opportunity to assess clinical and scientific evidence through appraisal of the literature. The course explores the philosophical underpinnings for nursing knowledge and evidence in nursing practice. Pre- or corequisite: NURA 752, NURA 754, and NURS 801.

NURA 762. Evidenced-Based Seminar for Anesthesia Practice II. 1 Credit.

The course is designed to build on the understanding gained in NURA 761 and to expand the advanced practice nursing student's understanding of research methods, design, and statistics. Prerequisite: NURA 761.

NURA 763. Nurse Anesthesia Clinical Practicum A. 3 Credits.

This introductory-level course is designed to integrate didactic knowledge with basic practical application to the art and science of nurse anesthesia. It is designed to cultivate the novice student nurse anesthetist in selected clinical settings under direct supervision of qualified clinical preceptors.

NURA 764. Nurse Anesthesia Clinical Practicum B. 5 Credits.

Orientation to the Operating Room and the Anesthesia Department. Provides actual administration of general and regional anesthesia with qualified clinical instructors (Anesthesiologists and/or CRNA’s). Weekly classroom sessions consist of clinical conferences; journal club; and seminars dealing with current topics, including, but not necessarily limited to, respiratory, cardiovascular, thoracic, neuro, regional, obstetrical, pediatric, and special areas of anesthesia. Various special projects and competency examinations are administered throughout this phase.

NURA 856. Nurse Anesthesia Clinical Practicum C. 4 Credits.

Orientation to the Operating Room and the Anesthesia Department. Provides actual administration of general and regional anesthesia with qualified clinical instructors (Anesthesiologists and/or CRNA’s). Weekly classroom sessions consist of clinical conferences; journal club; and seminars dealing with current topics, including, but not necessarily limited to, respiratory, cardiovascular, thoracic, neuro, regional, obstetrical, pediatric, and special areas of anesthesia. Various special projects and competency examinations are administered throughout this phase.

NURA 857. Nurse Anesthesia Clinical Practicum D. 4 Credits.

Orientation to the Operating Room and the Anesthesia Department. Provides actual administration of general and regional anesthesia with qualified clinical instructors (Anesthesiologists and/or CRNA’s). Weekly classroom sessions consist of clinical conferences; journal club; and seminars dealing with current topics, including, but not necessarily limited to, respiratory, cardiovascular, thoracic, neuro, regional, obstetrical, pediatric, and special areas of anesthesia. Various special projects and competency examinations are administered throughout this phase.

NURA 858. Anesthesia Clinical Practicum E. 4 Credits.

This clinical course is the fifth of six in an increasingly more complex six-course series, and continues the integration of didactic knowledge and practical application to the art and science of nurse anesthesia. It is designed to cultivate the proficient student nurse anesthetist in a variety of clinical settings in collaboration with qualified clinical preceptors. The student will be immersed in the anesthesia clinical environment for this course. Course content is based on the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists Standards for Nurse Anesthesia Practice. Prerequisite: NURA 857.

NURA 859. Anesthesia Clinical Practicum F. 4 Credits.

This clinical course is the final in an increasingly more complex six-course series, and continues the integration of didactic knowledge and practical application to the art and science of nurse anesthesia. It is designed to cultivate the proficient student nurse anesthetist in a variety of clinical settings in collaboration with qualified clinical preceptors. The student will be immersed in the anesthesia clinical environment for this course. Course content is based on the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists Standards for Nurse Anesthesia Practice. Prerequisite: NURA 858.

NURA 863. Evidenced-Based Seminar for Anesthesia Practice III. 1 Credit.

This course is the third in a series of six seminar courses designed to enhance the nurse anesthesia student’s understanding of research methods, design and analysis. A journal club format is used to evaluate anesthesia care for optimum outcomes using published research studies. Prerequisite: NURA 762.

NURA 864. Evidenced-Based Seminar for Anesthesia Practice IV. 1 Credit.

This course is the fourth in a series of six seminar courses designed to enhance the nurse anesthesia student’s understanding of research methods, design and analysis. A journal club format is used to evaluate anesthesia care for optimum outcomes using published research studies. Prerequisite: NURA 863.

NURA 865. Evidenced Based Seminar for Anesthesia Practice V. 1 Credit.

This course is the fifth in a series of six seminar courses designed to enhance the nurse anesthesia student’s understanding of research methods, design and analysis. A journal club format is used to evaluate anesthesia care for optimum outcomes using published research studies. Prerequisite: NURA 864.

NURA 866. Evidenced Based Seminar for Anesthesia Practice VI. 1 Credit.

This course is the sixth in a series of six seminar courses designed to enhance the nurse anesthesia student’s understanding of research methods, design and analysis. A journal club format is used to evaluate anesthesia care for optimum outcomes using published research studies. Prerequisite: NURA 865.

NURA 998. Master's Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course for master's students in their final semester. It may be taken to fulfill the registration requirement necessary for graduation. All master's students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour in the semester of their graduation.

NURSING Courses

NURS 595. Topics in Nursing. 1-3 Credits.

The study of selected topics that may not be offered regularly. Special topics will appear in the schedule of classes each semester. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

NURS 644. Clinical Teaching Methods for the Nurse Educator. 2 Credits.

This course describes practice settings for nursing clinical instruction, identifies characteristics of effective clinical teachers, describes models and methods for clinical instruction that facilitate learning, and explores clinical evaluation methods and instruments.

NURS 645. Nursing Curriculum Design and Course Development. 3 Credits.

Factors that influence the development of entry-level nursing curricula are explored in relation to workforce trends and accreditation standards and guidelines. The importance of a philosophical and theoretical foundation for nursing education is highlighted in relation to the development of a curricular framework that identifies instructional competencies and outcomes to guide course design and determine course content and sequencing.

NURS 650. Shenandoah University Midwifery Courses. 19 Credits.

This course provides for the award of credit for selected courses taken at Shenandoah University in fulfillment of Midwifery program requirements: NM 610, NM 620, NMLB 630, NM 640, NMLB 651, NM 652, and NM 660.

NURS 654. Assessment and Evaluation in Nursing Education. 3 Credits.

This course concentrates on strategies to measure and improve nursing student performance in the classroom, as well as enhance course and program effectiveness. Emphasis is on the selection of instruments, data collection methods and reporting procedures to guide assessment and evaluation processes that are appropriate for what is being examined. Corequisite: NURS 676. Prerequisites: NURS 634, NURS 636, NURS 644, NURS 645, and NURS 649.

NURS 676. Professional, Ethical and Legal Concepts of Nursing Education. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to prepare students for the role of educator in higher education environments. Emphasis is on the identification of functions, rights, and responsibilities of nursing faculty in relation to students, colleagues, administrators, the institution, community, and profession.

NURS 699. Thesis/Research Project. 1-3 Credits.

Thesis/research project completion. Variable credit to be determined by research advisor. May be repeated as needed. Prerequisites: NURS 611, NURS 640.

NURS 705. Primary Care Approaches for Children. 3 Credits.

This course for the family nurse practitioner focuses upon primary health care problems in the pediatric population. Emphasis is placed upon assessment and management of healthy and ill children. Prerequisites: NURS 661, NURS 670, NURS 671, NURS 672.

NURS 707. Informatics and Healthcare Technology. 3 Credits.

This course will cover the use of data in health care as well as other informatics applications. Students will explore healthcare technology used to improve the delivery and evaluation of care.

NURS 709. Evidence-Based Research and Theories for Nursing Practice. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the development of advanced nursing knowledge related to the utilization of evidence-based research for best practice. The focus is on understanding nursing and non-nursing models, concepts, and theories as the supporting framework for professional nursing practice and research. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation and application of research and evidence for use in advanced practice.

NURS 710. Leadership in Complex Systems and Organizations. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on the leadership that comprises two types: informal and formal leadership. Competencies will include communication, knowledge of health care environment, leadership, professionalism, and business skills.

NURS 712. Evidence-Based Management for Quality Healthcare. 3 Credits.

This focus of the course is on the development of systems processes to ensure quality health care. The evidence-based model will be applied to organizational systems.

NURS 714. Competitive Resource Design and Utilization. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the competitive design and utilization of organizational and human resources. Emphasis will be placed on the strategic process to ensure that resources are applied in ways to ensure high-quality care and excellent patient outcomes. The course will cover the business models for effective financial and personnel management of healthcare organizations. Analysis of the costs and quality of care will be performed.

NURS 715. Ethical Concepts of Advanced Practice Nursing. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide students with core ethical knowledge necessary to describe and analyze ethical concepts foundational to the advanced practice nursing role. Students will develop and evaluate strategies, including ethical decision making frameworks, to address ethical dilemmas inherent in patient care, health organizations and research.

NURS 716. Organizational Leadership Practicum. 3 Credits.

This practicum provides opportunities for advanced nursing practice in a variety of settings and with diverse clients. In addition, students examine issues related to the advanced practice role in a chosen focus area. The course is designed to provide students with experience in application of theories and assessment tools explored in Organizational Leadership. Pre- or corequisite: NURS 735 or permission of instructor.

NURS 717. Strategic Leadership Practicum. 3 Credits.

This practicum course emphasizes the advanced practice nurse's role in strategic planning and program development. Students enrolled in this advanced practice course will participate in clinical practice experiences in a chosen focus area. This course is designed to provide students with experiences in applying the knowledge acquired in Strategic Leadership. Pre- or corequisite: NURS 740 or permission of instructor.

NURS 718. Practicum Immersion for Novice Nurse Executives. 3 Credits.

This practicum course serves as a bridge between the roles of nurse administrators and nurse executives. Targeted practicum experiences will enable the nurse administrator to examine the role of the nurse executive related to implementation of change, meeting strategic initiatives, program evaluation, and outcome management in a chosen focus area. Application of futuristic and visionary theory to health care system trends is explored to provide optimal strategic positioning in the future healthcare market.

NURS 719. Family and Community Primary Care Assessment. 1 Credit.

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop advanced practice skills for assessing families and family members across the life span and throughout generations. This course will focus on theoretical, research and practice foundations used to develop strategies to maximize safe, comprehensive, and holistic care given by the advanced practice nurse.

NURS 720. Instructional Delivery Methods & Learner Assessment. 3 Credits.

This course describes models and methods for clinical instruction that facilitate learning, and explores clinical evaluation methods and instruments. Emphasis is on identifying ways to blend traditional teaching strategies with technology-based instruction in classroom and clinical settings. Pre- or corequisite: NURS 734 or permission of instructor.

NURS 721. Aging in the 21st Century. 3 Credits.

This course explains the history of the specialty of geriatrics, the social impact, health maintenance goals and physical changes associated with aging. The role of interprofessional teams in meeting the needs of the aging population will be explored.

NURS 724. Management of Chronic Problems and Illnesses. 3 Credits.

The focus on this course is on the management of chronic and acute illness in children.

NURS 730. Nursing Curricular Design and Program Evaluation. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on factors impacting the development of nursing curricula including theory, professional practice trends, education standards, accreditation guidelines and institutional policy/procedure. Components of curricula are evaluated, and strategies for program evaluation are explored.

NURS 732. Health Care Populations, Diversity and Outcomes. 3 Credits.

This course examines current topics and issues related to health disparities in underserved populations. Students will examine intervention and policy research using an interdisciplinary perspective as well as the structural, financial and personal barriers to optimal health outcomes.

NURS 734. Educator Internship: Classroom Instruction. 3 Credits.

This internship course is designed to provide the student with experience facilitating classroom instruction in an entry level nursing program.

NURS 735. Organizational and Management Theory. 3 Credits.

This course provides a theoretical foundation focusing on leadership theory and assessment strategies for use in the health care systems. Theories on leadership, organizations, policy, administration, and change will be applied to current health care system issues. Assessment tools for applications of theories will be utilized. Principles of organizational behavior and human resource management will be explored in the context of health care system needs.

NURS 738. Clinical Nurse Specialist I: Introduction to Practice. 2 Credits.

This course provides the graduate student with knowledge of core concepts that provide the foundation for Clinical Nurse Specialist practice.

NURS 739. Clinical Nurse Specialist I: Role Socialization. 4 Credits.

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist in the practice environment.

NURS 740. Strategic Leadership. 3 Credits.

Principles of organizational strategy and program development are the major components for this course. Relevant theories associated with organizational development, setting program strategic initiatives, strategic planning, and organizational level analysis and evaluation will be explored. Prerequisites: admission to program or approval of instructor.

NURS 745. Visionary Leadership. 3 Credits.

The final course in the leadership series provides the opportunity to examine outcomes at the program and health care system level and project future health care system needs. The focus is on activities necessary for effective evaluation of health care programs and meeting strategic initiatives by successfully implementing change. Capability for envisioning profound changes within the health care system will be developed. Transformation/Futuristic theory will be applied to envision market change for health care systems to be strategically positioned for future trends. Prerequisites: Admission to program or approval of instructor.

NURS 750. Professional Relationships and Human Resource Management. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the constructive use of power, influence, and politics that have an impact on the nursing profession and the healthcare system at large. Theories of communication, group dynamics, motivation and incentives, and conflict resolution/negotiation strategies will be examined.

NURS 751. Developmental Neonatal Physiology. 2 Credits.

This course provides an in-depth examination of human genetics, embryologic development and normal physiologic functioning of developing body systems. Mechanisms involved in cell division, gametogenesis, and inheritance patterns will be addressed. Basic genetics and epigenetics will be included. The structural and functional development of fetal systems, during critical periods, will be emphasized. Abnormalities and alterations in fetal development will be explored.

NURS 756. Clinical Nurse Specialist II: Transition to Practice. 3 Credits.

This course provides the graduate student with knowledge necessary for developing Clinical Nurse Specialist practice and leadership skills. Pre- or corequisite: NURS 757.

NURS 757. Clinical Nurse Specialist Practicum II: Role Transition. 2-5 Credits.

This clinical course focuses on Clinical Nurse Specialist practice. Concepts presented in the didactic component (NURS 756) will be actualized in the clinical setting. Pre- or corequisite: NURS 756.

NURS 758. Clinical Nurse Specialist Practicum III: Role Synthesis. 3 Credits.

This capstone course focuses on synthesis and application of key concepts related to the Clinical Nurse Specialist practice. Prerequisites: NURS 738, NURS 739, NURS 756, and NURS 757.

NURS 760. Advanced Family Nursing I Practicum. 3 Credits.

This course will explore current clinical concepts related to the care of healthy and pregnant women. Roles and responsibilities of the family nurse practitioner in these subspecialties will also be discussed.

NURS 761. Pharmacology for Advanced Practice Nursing. 3 Credits.

This course will develop and enhance the advanced practice nurse's knowledge of pharmacological management of the patient. Expanded knowledge and application of advanced pharmacologic concepts across the lifespan will build upon previous elemental concepts in pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics obtained in undergraduate education and clinical practice.

NURS 762. Advanced Family Nursing I: Management of Acute Illnesses. 3 Credits.

Focus is on acute health problems in the primary care setting, including assessment and management. Inclusion of geriatric content relating to acute illnesses will be added. Prerequisites: NURS 761, NURS 770, and NURS 771.

NURS 763. Health Promotion and Maintenance. 2 Credits.

This course provides the nurse practitioner student the opportunity to work with students from other professions as they develop health promotion strategies that consider the expertise of each discipline. Students will incorporate technology in promoting health.

NURS 764. Advanced Family Nursing II Practicum. 4 Credits.

The purpose of this clinical course is to prepare the family nurse practitioner student to deliver primary care services to families in which a patient has either acute, women’s health or pediatric care disorders. Prerequisites: NURS 761, NURS 770, and NURS 771.

NURS 765. Advanced Family Nursing II: Management of Chronic Illnesses. 3 Credits.

The focus of this course is on the accurate diagnosis and management of chronic health problems within the primary care setting for the family nurse practitioner (FNP). Prerequisites: NURS 761, NURS 763, NURS 770, and NURS 771.

NURS 766. Primary Care Approaches for Women. 3 Credits.

This course will explore current clinical concepts related to the care of healthy and pregnant women. Roles and responsibilities of the family nurse practitioner in these sub-specialties will also be discussed.

NURS 767. Advanced Family Nursing III Practicum. 3-4 Credits.

This clinical emphasizes integration of primary care skills and clinical course decision-making in populations with acute chronic, complex, pediatric or women’s health disorders for family nurse practitioner students. Prerequisites: NURS 761, NURS 760, NURS 770, NURS 771, NURS 762, and NURS 764.

NURS 770. Pathophysiology for Advanced Nursing Practice. 3 Credits.

This course explains the pathophysiology of disease as a basis for advanced practice and assessment for prevention and management of health conditions.

NURS 771. Physical Assessment for Advanced Nursing Practice. 3 Credits.

Emphasis is on advanced history taking, physical assessment and interviewing skills for advanced practice nursing. Advanced practice students will be provided with hands-on opportunities to practice physical assessment skills across the lifespan.

NURS 772. Foundations of Advanced Neonatal Nursing. 3 Credits.

The foundations of advanced neonatal nursing course provides the theoretical and practical knowledge for the neonatal nurse practitioner to manage the health care needs of the neonate in the newborn nursery or level II neonatal intensive care unit. Prerequisites: NURS 776, NURS 768 and NURS 787.

NURS 773. Pharmacology for Advanced Neonatal Nursing. 3 Credits.

The course offers scientific inquiry into the use of pharmacologic agents in the advanced nursing care of infants, including fetal, neonatal life, and early childhood. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, drug use in pregnancy and lactation, pharmacologic agents used in disease prevention and treatment, drug monitoring and drug safety in the home are explored. Pre- or corequisite: NURS 761.

NURS 774. Advanced Neonatal Nursing: High Risk Management I. 3 Credits.

This course develops the students' ability to manage high-risk neonates. This is the second of three sequential management courses that provide the theoretical and practical knowledge for the neonatal nurse practitioner to manage the health care needs of the neonate at the highest level of nursing practice. Pre- or corequisite: NURS 778.

NURS 775. Advanced Neonatal Nursing: High Risk Management II. 3 Credits.

An organ systems approach is used to explore the diagnosis and management of neonates requiring surgery and advanced technologies. Additional topics will include developmental follow-up of the medically fragile infant and withdrawal of life support in the NICU. Pre- or corequisite: NURS 789.

NURS 776. Advance Neonatal Nursing Practicum I. 3 Credits.

The development of foundational skills associated with the physical assessment and management of the neonate is the focus of this practicum experience. Pre- or corequisites: NURS 768, NURS 787 and NURS 790.

NURS 778. Advanced Neonatal Nursing: Practicum II. 4 Credits.

The focus of this course is the accurate diagnosis and management of high risk neonatal clinical problems. Pre- or corequisite: NURS 775.

NURS 779. Seminar in Pediatrics:Managment of Chronic and Complex Neonatal Clinical Problems. 3 Credits.

This course utilizes a journal club approach and is designed to acquaint the advance practice neonatal nurse with issues associated with the management of chronic and complex clinical problems. Emphasis is on the identification of clinical conditions requiring timely referral for diagnosis and treatment. Topics will include, but are not limited to, genetics and congenital conditions, palliative/end-of-life care and complications of prematurity.

NURS 780. Financial Issues in Nursing Administration. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on planning, designing, and monitoring of a nursing budget with special emphasis on personnel, supply, and capital equipment budgeting. Specific financial problems of a nursing service department are addressed.

NURS 781. Advanced Pediatric Nursing: Practicum I Primary Care. 3 Credits.

This course provides the opportunity to practice clinical decision-making and primary care assessment skills within a primary care setting. Collaborative strategies will be emphasized related to health promotion/maintenance and the management of common health problems for pediatric patients and their families.

NURS 782. The Growth and Development of Children in the 21st Century. 3 Credits.

Physical, cognitive, psychosocial, psychosexual, and social-moral growth and development milestones from infancy through adolescence will be explored from a nursing perspective. Emphasis is on the assessment and management of the child within the context of environmental, cultural, and social factors affecting growth and development.

NURS 783. Management of Acute Pediatric Conditions 1. 3 Credits.

An organ systems approach is used to explore the diagnosis and management of childhood disorders. The actions of the PNP and the needs of the child are considered across the continuum of care from urgent/primary care to acute care. Corequisite: NURS 784.

NURS 784. Advanced Pediatric Nursing: Practicum II. 4 Credits.

This course provides the opportunity to practice clinical decision-making and primary care assessment skills within a primary care setting. Collaborative strategies will be emphasized related to health promotion/maintenance and the management of common health problems for pediatric patients and their families.

NURS 785. Seminar in Pediatrics: Management of Chronic and Complex Clinical Conditions. 3 Credits.

This course explores issues associated with the management of chronic and complex clinical conditions for children. Emphasis is on the identification of clinical conditions requiring timely referral for diagnosis and treatment. Topics will include, but are not limited to genetics, palliative/end-of-life care, and psychiatric/mental issues. Pre- or corequisite: NURS 783 and NURS 784.

NURS 786. Management of Acute/Critical Pediatric Conditions II. 3 Credits.

An organ systems approach is used to explore the diagnosis and management of childhood disorders. The actions of the PNP and the needs of the child are considered across the continuum of care from urgent/primary care to acute /critical care. Corequisite: NURS 788.

NURS 787. Assessment of the Child-Bearing Family. 1 Credit.

Assessment and strategies for managing the issues, concerns and needs of the child-bearing family with normal and sick neonate is the focus of this course.

NURS 788. Advanced Pediatric Nursing: Practicum III. 3 Credits.

This course provides the opportunity to practice clinical decision-making and primary care assessment skills within a primary care setting. Collaborative strategies will be emphasized related to health promotion/maintenance and the management of common health problems for pediatric patients and their families. Pre- or corequisite: NURS 865 or NURS 816.

NURS 789. Advanced Neonatal Nursing Practicum III. 4 Credits.

The focus of this course is on the accurate diagnosis and management of high risk neonatal clinical problems. Pre- or corequisite: NURS 775.

NURS 795. Topics. 3 Credits.

Designed to provide the advanced student with an opportunity to investigate specific topics of current interest in the health services. Prerequisites: Ph.D. standing or permission of the instructor.

NURS 797. Independent Study. 1-3 Credits.

This course is for students completing an independent study or independent clinical hours.

NURS 798. Independent Clinical Study. 1-3 Credits.

This course focuses on clinical and/or research-related competencies of graduate nursing students. Students enroll on an as-needed basis as determined by the instructor or student. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the graduate nursing program and permission of the instructor.

NURS 800. Introduction to Healthcare Disparities, Vulnerable Populations, and Epidemiology. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on four integrative concepts including leadership, advocacy, practice, and translational research. Issues related to planning and providing care related to disparity and issues for vulnerable and underserved populations will be highlighted. The role of epidemiology will be explored.

NURS 801. Roles and Responsibilities for Transforming Practice. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on role expectations for advanced practice nurses; the intersection of models of leadership, advocacy, practice and translational research will be emphasized. Personal strategic planning of the students will be addressed as it applies to disparity issues and vulnerable and underserved populations.

NURS 802. The Business of Advanced Nursing Practice. 3 Credits.

This course will explore the business dimensions of practice including legal, safety, quality and financial. The course will focus on SWOT analysis,developing business plans and community assessments.

NURS 803. Leadership and Interprofessional Practice in Healthcare. 3 Credits.

This is an interprofessional course that explores organizational and structural opportunities and barriers within healthcare organizations through interprofessional collaboration and teamwork. Ethical issues will be explored. The focus is on the role of the healthcare provider as a leader of their profession within healthcare and on healthcare teams. Emphasis is on meeting the needs of underserved populations.

NURS 805. Application of Practice-Based Research Methods. 2 Credits.

This course focuses on the research process used to conduct practice-based research. It prepares advanced practice nurses to develop, implement, and evaluate programs that focus on improving healthcare outcomes.

NURS 806. Proposal Development and Database Management. 4 Credits.

This research course is designed to provide the Advanced Practice Nurse and Nurse Executive student with knowledge and skills regarding the design and methodology used to conduct a practice focused research study. Focus will be on human subjects protection, statistical analysis and database management. Prerequisites: NURS 805.

NURS 807. Informatics and Healthcare Technology. 3 Credits.

This course will cover the use of data in health care as well as other informatics applications. Students will explore healthcare technology used to improve the delivery and evaluation of care.

NURS 809. Advocacy for Healthcare Public Policy for Advanced Practice. 3 Credits.

This course will prepare the DNP to assume a leadership role in developing, implementing, and advocating for health care policy that results in quality, accessible, comprehensive health care for vulnerable populations.

NURS 810. Leadership in Complex Systems and Organizations. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on the leadership that comprises two types: informal and formal leadership. Competencies will include communication, knowledge of health care environment, leadership, professionalism, and business skills.

NURS 812. Evidence-Based Management for Quality Healthcare. 3 Credits.

The focus of the course is on the development of systems processes to ensure quality healthcare. The evidence-based model will be applied to organizational systems.

NURS 814. Competitive Resource Design and Utilization. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the competitive design and utilization of organizational and human resources. Emphasis wiil be placed on the strategic process to ensure that resources are applied in ways to ensure high-quality care and excellent patient outcomes. The course will cover the business models for effective financial and personnel management of healthcare organizations. Analysis of the costs of care and quality of care will be performed.

NURS 816. DNP Executive Practicum I. 2-5 Credits.

This practicum focuses on the application of nurse executive leadership skills in the practice environment. Focus will be on the role of the nurse executive and evidence-based research. Corequisite: NURS 805.

NURS 817. DNP Executive Practicum II. 2-5 Credits.

This experience focuses on the application of executive leadership skills in nursing. Focus will be on the role of the nurse executive and evidence-based research. Corequisite: NURS 806.

NURS 818. DNP Executive Practicum III. 3-5 Credits.

This practicum focuses on the application of executive leadership skills in the practice environment. Focus will be on the role of the nurse executive, evidence-based research and the use of healthcare technology. Corequisite: NURS 807.

NURS 819. DNP Executive Practicum IV. 3-5 Credits.

An examination of the application of executive leadership skills in the practice environment. Focus will be on the role of the nurse executive, evidence-based research, and practice dissemination.

NURS 865. DNP Clinical Practicum I. 2 Credits.

This course is designed to provide the Advanced Practice Nurse with the knowledge and skills to practice at an advanced level in a practice-based setting. Focus will be on enhanced clinical skills and evidence-based research. Corequisite: NURS 805.

NURS 866. DNP Clinical Practicum II. 2 Credits.

This course is designed to provide the Advanced Practice Nurse with the knowledge and skills to practice at an advanced level in a practice-based setting. Focus will be on evidence-based practice, teamwork, evidence-based research, and advanced clinical diagnostics. Corequisite: NURS 806.

NURS 867. DNP Clinical Practicum III. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide the Advanced Practice Nurse with the knowledge and skills to practice as an expert clinician, a program evaluator, and a team leader within a practice-based setting focusing on evidence-based practice. Healthcare technology will be explored.

NURS 868. DNP Clinical Practicum IV. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide the Advanced Practice Nurse with the knowledge and skills to practice as an expert clinician, a program evaluator, a team leader, and a change agent with emphasis on translational and evidence-based research. Corequisite: NURS 890.

NURS 890. DNP Nursing Capstone. 3 Credits.

This capstone course is designed to facilitate the ability of the advanced practice nurse to synthesize, translate, and disseminate practice-focused research findings and apply them to practice settings.

NURS 895. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

Designed to provide the advanced doctoral student with an opportunity to investigate specific topics of current interest in the health services. Prerequisites: DNP standing or permission of the instructor.

NURS 897. Independent Study. 1-3 Credits.

This course focuses on research-related competencies of graduate nursing students. Students enroll on an as-needed basis as determined by the instructor. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the graduate nursing DNP program and permission of instructor.

NURS 898. Independent Clinical Study. 1-3 Credits.

This course focuses on clinical and/or research-related competencies of DNP graduate nursing students. Students enroll on an as-needed basis as determined by the instructor. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the graduate nursing program and permission of instructor.

NURS 998. Master's Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course for master's students in their final semester. It may be taken to fulfill the registration requirement necessary for graduation. All master's students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour in the semester of their graduation.

NURS 999. Doctoral Graduate Credit. 1 Credit.

This course is a pass/fail course doctoral students may take to maintain active status after successfully passing the candidacy examination. All doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit hour every semester until their graduation.