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Old Dominion University

2014-2015 Catalog

Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice

6000 Batten Arts and Letters Building
757-683-3794

Randy Gainey, Chair

Master of Arts - Applied Sociology

Dianne Carmody, Graduate Program Director

The Master of Arts degree in Applied Sociology emphasizes research skills necessary in many professions. The M.A. degree may serve as professional training for students seeking employment in federal, state and local government agencies or in private-sector organizations. In addition, the M.A. program provides excellent training in the fundamentals of sociology for students who wish to pursue a Ph.D. in the social sciences.

The program provides students with training in theory and methods, as well as opportunities to participate in three areas of specialization:

  1. General sociology
  2. Criminal justice
  3. Women’s studies

Admission

Students must hold a bachelor’s degree with at least a 3.00 average on a 4.00 scale and must have completed at least 12 hours of undergraduate work in sociology or criminal justice, including courses in theory, research methods, and statistics. The Graduate Record Examination is required for all applicants.

Those who fail to meet one or more of the above requirements may be admitted as provisional students by the graduate program committee.

Deadlines

This program admits students in the fall semester only. February 15 is the deadline for students applying for funding (Graduate Assistantship). Students who do not wish to apply for funding must apply by March 1. All students must submit original application materials directly to Old Dominion University’s Graduate Admissions Office.

Requirements

All students must complete 30 hours of course work including five required core courses (15 credit hours):

SOC 610Applied Social Research Methods3
SOC 620Proseminar in Sociological Theory3
SOC 630Applied Social Statistics3
SOC 640Sociological Application of Computer and Data Analysis3
SOC 650Research Seminar3
Total Hours15

Each student must also complete a thesis (six credit hours), which will be supervised by a faculty committee from the department.

Any student earning less than a B in a required core course will be required to repeat that course. If the student earns less than a B in the second attempt, that student will be dismissed from the program.

Sociology Track

In addition to the core course requirements listed above, students choosing the sociology track must complete 15 credit hours of electives chosen from graduate sociology courses offered by the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice, Old Dominion University.  Selection of elective courses will be based upon individual advising.

Criminal Justice Track

In addition to the core course requirements listed above, students choosing the criminal justice track must complete CRJS 625 and 12 credit hours of electives chosen from graduate criminal justice courses offered by the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice, Old Dominion University. Selection of elective courses will be based upon individual advising.

Women’s Studies Track

In addition to the requirements listed above, students choosing the women’s studies track must complete WMST 560 and WMST 570 and nine credit hours of electives chosen from selected graduate women’s studies courses and/or courses cross-listed with women’s studies. No more than six hours of these credits can be taken in any one discipline (sociology and criminal justice are considered two separate disciplines). Selection of elective courses will be based upon individual advising. Students will be awarded the Certificate in Women’s Studies upon completion of the Master of Arts degree.

Curriculum

Required Core Courses:

SOC 610Applied Social Research Methods3
SOC 620Proseminar in Sociological Theory3
SOC 630Applied Social Statistics *3
SOC 640Sociological Application of Computer and Data Analysis *3
SOC 650Research Seminar **3
Total Hours15

*

Prerequisite: SOC 610

**

Prerequisites: SOC 610, SOC 620, SOC 630, SOC 640.

Criminal Justice Track:

CRJS 625The Administration of Criminal Justice3
Electives12
Total Hours15

Women’s Studies Track:

WMST 560Feminist Theory3
WMST 570Feminist Research Methods3
Electives9
Total Hours15

Electives Courses:

A variety of graduate elective courses in sociology and criminal justice are offered every semester. All courses are 3 credit hours. Recent elective courses include the following:

  • Social Inequalities
  • Globalization, Justice and Human Rights
  • Violence Against Women
  • Criminological Theory and Public Policy
  • Cultural Adaptations
  • Drugs and Society
  • Diversity and the Criminal Justice System
  • American Jury
  • Community Justice
  • Crime in the Workplace
  • Life Course Perspective on Crime and Deviance
  • Criminal Justice and the Law

Doctor of Philosophy – Criminology & Criminal Justice

Dawn L. Rothe, Graduate Program Director (GPD)

http://al.odu.edu/sociology/phdprogram

The Ph.D. in Criminology and Criminal Justice is a sociological criminology program that highlights social inequality and public policy in the study of crime and justice issues. The program produces scholars with strong backgrounds in the substantive areas of criminology, criminal justice, theory, inequality, and policy as well as in research methods and statistics. Designed primarily for students who are interested in pursing careers in higher education, the course offerings also provide students the education and skills needed to be employed as researchers in public and private agencies. Graduates are prepared as scholars able to conduct research, teach college and university courses in their areas of specialization, and to provide service to the discipline and community.

Regular Admission Requirements

  1. A completed master’s degree (or its equivalent) in criminology, criminal justice, or in an appropriate field (e.g., administration of justice, sociology, or political science) from a regionally accredited institution of higher education – a thesis is generally expected;
  2. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.25 (on a 4.0 scale) overall for the master’s degree;
  3. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required of all applicants;
  4. Successful completion of prior coursework in research methods and statistics at least equivalent to that required by the ODU B.A. in sociology/criminal justice and M.A. degree in applied sociology (research methods, statistics, computer and data analysis);
  5. Three letters of reference from sources capable of commenting on the applicant’s readiness for advanced graduate study in criminology & criminal justice;
  6. A writing sample of at least 20 double-spaced pages on a topic related to the applicant’s expertise or area of interest;
  7. A typed statement of approximately 1,000 words summarizing the individual's motivation for applying to the program as well as the professional contributions s/he intends to make assuming successful completion of the degree;
  8. If the applicant’s native language is not English, a current score for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOFEL) of at least 540 and/or an interview in which the applicant’s comprehension and fluency in English can be assessed.

Conditional Admission

Provisional admission may be granted on rare occasions when an applicant’s credentials suggest aptitude for doctoral study but do not meet the criteria outlined above. Admission under this standard requires a variable amount of preliminary coursework in addition to that which is normally required for the degree. The amount and content of additional coursework required for conditional admissions is determined by the Ph.D. Committee on a case-by-case basis.

Students who have an appropriate undergraduate degree and a law degree (J.D.) but lack graduate work in the social sciences will normally be required to complete 18 hours of graduate work as follows: 12 hours in theory, research methods, social statistics, computer statistical applications, and 6 hours of substantive courses.

International Students

Graduate international students on non-immigrant visas whose native language is not English or who have not lived in the U.S. ten years must provide evidence of English language proficiency through one of the following:

  1. Submission of a minimum required TOEFL score or successful completion of Old Dominion University’s Graduate Bridge Program,
  2. Possession of an American Bachelor’s or Master’s degree equivalent from an accredited institution located in a country where English is the native language,
  3. GRE verbal score of 480.

Non-degree seeking students must secure permission from the GPD prior to registering for doctoral classes in the program.

Deadlines

January 15 – Students applying for funding (Graduate Assistantship) and fall admission; there is no spring admission. All students must submit all original application materials directly to Old Dominion University’s Graduate Admissions Office. Students requesting funding (Graduate Assistantship) must submit the Application for Graduate Financial Assistance to the Program Director.

Degree Requirements

The Ph.D. in Criminology & Criminal Justice requires a minimum of 48 credit hours at the post-master’s level (i.e., courses at the 700 to 800 level) as detailed below. Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 3.25. In addition, each of the core courses must be completed with a grade of B or better. The core courses may be taken a maximum of two times. Students who receive two grades of B- or below in any course, or whose grade point average falls below a 3.25 will be dismissed from the program. 

Coursework

Core Courses
CRIM 800Proseminar in Criminology and Criminal Justice3
CRIM 801Criminology and Public Policy3
CRIM 802Advanced Criminological Theory3
CRIM 803Inequality, Crime and Justice3
CRIM 890Professional Development and Dissertation Seminar3
Research Skills
CRIM 805Multivariate Statistics in Criminological Research3
CRIM 810Qualitative Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice3
CRIM 815Advanced Quantitative Techniques in Criminology & Criminal Justice3
CRIM 820Advanced Research Methods in Criminology & Criminal Justice3
Electives12
Dissertation Credits 9
CRIM 899Dissertation9
Continuous Enrollment
CRIM 999Criminology 9991
Total Hours58

Comprehensive Examinations

The comprehensive exam assesses a student’s expertise of the literature in criminology and criminal justice (in terms of both breadth and depth) in theory, research methods and statistics, inequality and policy as applied to questions of criminological interest; and her/his ability to think broadly and critically and to present her/himself as a sophisticated intellectual thinker. Preparation for the comprehensive exam gives students the opportunity to organize their knowledge of the field as gained from coursework, their own independent readings, teachings, and research.

The written comprehensive exam is taken by students following completion of all coursework except the dissertation seminar; students may petition the Ph.D. Committee to take the exam prior to the completion of all coursework. The written exam will be in a take-home format distributed during August. Details about the structure of the exam will be announced to students by the end of the spring semester before the exam. Student names will be removed from the exams for grading. No more than three faculty members will grade each section of the exam as “pass” or “fail” and more than one negative vote from the exam committee will result in a failure of the section. Students may pass or fail the exam in whole or in part. Students need to retake only those sections that are failed. Students who fail any section of the exam may register for fall classes but must retake the failed section in accordance with the directions stipulated by the comprehensive exam committee, generally in late November/early December of that same year. Students who do not successfully pass the written comprehensive exam following the retake will be dismissed from the program; they may complete the classes they are enrolled in that semester for credit if they wish. Students may not defend a dissertation proposal until they have passed the written comprehensive exam.

Admission to Candidacy

A student is admitted to candidacy for the degree once the following criteria are satisfied:

  • S/he has completed all Ph.D. coursework (excepting dissertation hours) with a GPA of at least 3.25;
  • S/he has successfully passed the comprehensive examinations;
  • S/he has successfully defended a dissertation prospectus.

The Dissertation

The dissertation is a scholarly work investigating a problem of significance and should constitute a meaningful contribution to the body of existing knowledge regarding matters of criminology and criminal justice policy or practice. It is the culmination of a program of advanced study leading to a doctoral degree and, as such, is expected to demonstrate a high level of scholarly competence. It must show that the candidate is capable of conceptualizing and conducting sophisticated original research, as well as analysis and reporting on an approved topic related to crime and justice by use of accepted scientific methods. Complete information about the dissertation is found on the program's website.

CRIMINOLOGY Courses

CRIM 700. Proseminar in Criminology and Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with a broad overview of enduring topics and emerging issues in criminology and criminal justice. It also explores the history and role of criminology as an academic discipline and criminal justice as an institutional system in American society.

CRIM 701. Criminology and Public Policy. 3 Credits.

This course covers the policy process as it relates to crime legislation, criminological theory and implications for public policy.

CRIM 702. Advanced Criminological Theory. 3 Credits.

This course is an examination of criminological theory for the advanced student. The focus is on critical analysis of both contemporary and historical criminological theories. In order to aid in the development of a critical understanding of theory, beyond understanding the content of central theories, the class focuses on discussion of theory development and testing. In addition, the class focuses on an understanding of the relationship of one theory to another as well as the state of empirical evidence surrounding each theory.

CRIM 703. Inequality, Crime and Justice. 3 Credits.

This course examines the linkages between social characteristics and crime. The course concentrates on what we know about the impact of gender, age, race and social class on crime and criminal justice.

CRIM 705. Multivariate Statistics in Criminological Research. 3 Credits.

This course teaches multivariate statistical techniques to train criminal justice researchers and policy makers to explore the causes and consequences of crime and criminal justices policies. Although the exact statistical techniques covered may vary, they will typically include multiple regression, multiple discriminate analysis, logistic regression, factor analysis, cluster analysis and path analysis.

CRIM 710. Qualitative Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

The central goal of this graduate seminar is to enable students to create and critique qualitative research designs focused on contemporary issues in criminology and criminal justice. A number of qualitative approaches will be covered including field observational research, focused interviews, case studies and content analysis. The seminar explores techniques, strengths and limitations of these varied qualitative methodologies.

CRIM 715. Advanced Quantitative Techniques in Criminology & Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

This course explores advanced statistical techniques commonly used in research on crime and justice. The major focus of the course will be hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), a diverse set of techniques that extend standard multivariate analysis to accommodate nested data. Other advanced techniques will also be covered: event history/survival models, time series, etc.

CRIM 720. Advanced Research Methods in Criminology & Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with advanced understanding of issues in criminology/criminal justice research including: history, philosophy, sociology, epistemology, politics and ethics of social science research; methodological questions of reliability, validity, conceptualization, operationalization, scale construction, data collection methodologies, sampling.

CRIM 740. Social Structures, Crime and Justice. 3 Credits.

This course examines the links between social structures and institutions, and justice at the individual, neighborhood, city, state and country levels. Students explore the ways in which structures and institutions are both agents of social control and facilitators or initiators of crime. Emphasis will be placed on theories, methodologies and empirical assessments.

CRIM 745. Crime and Communities. 3 Credits.

This course provides a foundation of the most important theories and research relating to residential communities and crime. The casual linkages between features of neighborhoods and social disorder will be explored in the context of criminological theories. Students will emerge with sufficient knowledge to develop a class or design a significant research project.

CRIM 750. Crimes of the State. 3 Credits.

This course explores crimes of the state from a sociological and criminological perspective by examining historical and current cases of governmental crime. This will cover the history, theory and method of the field; controls of and constraints on state crime; and cases of state crime.

CRIM 755. Researching the Criminal Justice System. 3 Credits.

Students will develop original research projects on the criminal justice system, police, courts and /or corrections. Projects will be designed to culminate in a publishable paper.

CRIM 760. Life Course Criminology. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to life-course perspectives for understanding crime and deviant behavior. Students discuss the various methodologies, both quantitative and qualitative, most commonly found in studies of the life course today.

CRIM 795. Topics in Criminal Justice. 1-3 Credits.

Topics vary by semester.

CRIM 797. Independent Study. 1-3 Credits.

Supervised independent study arranged with instructor and approved by graduate program director.

CRIM 800. Proseminar in Criminology and Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with a broad overview of enduring topics and emerging issues in criminology and criminal justice. It also explores the history and role of criminology as an academic discipline and criminal justice as an institutional system in American society.

CRIM 801. Criminology and Public Policy. 3 Credits.

To familiarize students with the policy process as it relates to crime legislation, criminological theory and implications for public policy.

CRIM 802. Advanced Criminological Theory. 3 Credits.

This course is an examination of criminological theory for the advanced student. The focus is on critical analysis of both contemporary and historical criminological theories. In order to aid in the development of a critical understanding of theory, beyond understanding the content of central theories, the class focuses on discussion of theory development and testing. In addition, the class focuses on an understanding of the relationship of one theory to another as well as the state of empirical evidence surrounding each theory.

CRIM 803. Inequality, Crime and Justice. 3 Credits.

This course examines the linkages between social characteristics and crime. The course concentrates on what is known about the impact of gender, age, race and social class on crime and criminal justice.

CRIM 805. Multivariate Statistics in Criminological Research. 3 Credits.

This course teaches multivariate statistical techniques to train criminal justice researchers and policy makers to explore the causes and consequences of crime and criminal justices policies. Although the exact statistical techniques covered may vary, they will typically include multiple regression, multiple discriminate analysis, logistic regression, factor analysis, cluster analysis and path analysis.

CRIM 810. Qualitative Methods in Criminology and Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

The central goal of this graduate seminar is to enable students to create and critique qualitative research designs focused on contemporary issues in criminology and criminal justice. A number of qualitative approaches will be covered including field observational research, focused interviews, case studies and content analysis. The seminar explores techniques, strengths and limitations of these varied qualitative methodologies.

CRIM 815. Advanced Quantitative Techniques in Criminology & Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

This course explores advanced statistical techniques commonly used in research on crime and justice. The major focus of the course is hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), a diverse set of techniques that extend standard multivariate analysis to accommodate nested data. Other advanced techniques are also covered: event history/survival models, time series, etc.

CRIM 820. Advanced Research Methods in Criminology & Criminal Justice. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with advanced understanding of issues in criminology/criminal justice research including: history, philosophy, sociology, epistemology, politics and ethics of social science research; methodological questions of reliability, validity, conceptualization, operationalization, scale construction, data collection methodologies, sampling.

CRIM 840. Social Structures, Crime and Justice. 3 Credits.

This course examines the links between social structures and institutions, and justice at the individual, neighborhood, city, state and country levels. Students explore the ways in which structures and institutions are both agents of social control and facilitators or initiators of crime. Emphasis will be placed on theories, methodologies and empirical assessments.

CRIM 845. Crime and Communities. 3 Credits.

This course provides a foundation of the most important theories and research relating to residential communities and crime. The casual linkages between features of neighborhoods and social disorder will be explored in the context of criminological theories. Students will emerge with sufficient knowledge to develop a class or design a significant research project.

CRIM 850. Crimes of the State. 3 Credits.

This course explores crimes of the state from a sociological and criminological perspective by examining historical and current cases of governmental crime. This course covers the history, theory and method of the field; controls of and constraints on state crime; and cases of state crime.

CRIM 855. Researching the Criminal Justice System. 3 Credits.

Students develop original research projects focusing on the criminal justice system, police, courts and/or corrections. Projects are designed to culminate in a publishable paper.

CRIM 860. Life Course Criminology. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to life-course perspectives for understanding crime and deviant behavior. Students discuss the various methodologies, both quantitative and qualitative, most commonly found in studies of the life course today.

CRIM 890. Professional Development and Dissertation Seminar. 3 Credits.

This course enhances the process of professionalization of students by supporting ongoing dissertation progress as well as preparing the student for publishing, grant writing, and the job market.

CRIM 895. Topics in Criminal Justice. 1-3 Credits.

Topics vary by semester.

CRIM 897. Independent Study. 1-3 Credits.

Supervised study arranged with an instructor and approved by the graduate program director.

CRIM 899. Dissertation. 1-9 Credits.

Dissertation hours.

CRIM 998. CRIM 998. 1 Credit.

CRIM 999. Criminology 999. 1 Credit.

Continued dissertation hours.

SOCIOLOGY Courses

SOC 500. War and Gender. 3 Credits.

In this course students grapple with issues concerning war, gender roles, and gender inequality. The course addresses gender roles in war throughout history, globally and across cultures. However, the United States military and military involvement in the 20th and 21st century will remain the primary focus areas. Discussions include how social norms and ideals of masculinity and femininity shape, and in turn are shaped by, images and realities of war, including gendered aspects of nationalism and just war theories. The military involvement of men, women (and children) in war and in peacetime, as participants and observers, perpetrators and victims, supporters and opponents of war is also discussed.

SOC 502. Sociology of Child Welfare. 3 Credits.

A sociological analysis of the field of child welfare. Topics include social inequality as it applies to children as a group in the U.S. and globally; understanding violence against children within the global context of children’s rights; examining data on the degree to which policies, programs and research in the field fail to protect children and why; prevalence, causes and consequences of child sexual, physical and emotional abuse and neglect; evaluation of programs like ‘family preservation’ and placement in ‘substitute’ care, i.e. foster care, adoption, institutionalization; changes that would protect and advance the interests and rights of children at the parent-child, agency and societal level.

SOC 505. Social Change and Social Movements. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the nature and causes of social change, major social movements, and their impact upon contemporary society.

SOC 521. Deviant Behavior. 3 Credits.

A study of various definitions and forms of deviant behavior, theoretical explanations of causes of deviant behavior and the impact of deviant behavior on society and the individual.

SOC 523. Women, Health and Healing. 3 Credits.

An examination of women’s experiences with health and illness and women’s roles in the health-care system as patients and care providers from a feminist sociological perspective.

SOC 526. The Sociology of Minority Groups. 3 Credits.

The study of the process of and responses to the oppression of racial, religious, ethnic, and national minorities in a variety of countries within a historical and comparative perspective. Special emphasis given to American minorities and especially African Americans.

SOC 527. Violence Against Women. 3 Credits.

A critical analysis of violence against women as an institution of social control. Examines violence in the context of social and political inequality and feminist critique. Issues explored include pornography, prostitution, sexual harassment, incest, battering and rape.

SOC 540. Health, Illness, and Society. 3 Credits.

The study of social and social-psychological factors related to health, illness, and treatment with a focus on social epidemiology, the medical industry, and health, illness, and sick-role behavior.

SOC 541. Drugs and Society. 3 Credits.

Topics include changes in the legal status of drugs, cross-cultural and historical variations in the control and use of drugs, and social epidemiology of drug use in contemporary society.

SOC 595. Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors.

SOC 596. Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors.

SOC 597. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Sociology. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate.

SOC 598. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in Sociology. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate.

SOC 610. Applied Social Research Methods. 3 Credits.

The application of social science methods to practical problems. The topics of research design, measurement, scaling, sampling, data collection, and research organization are taught with reference to issues of reliability, validity and ethical concerns.

SOC 620. Proseminar in Sociological Theory. 3 Credits.

An examination of classical and contemporary sociological theories about the relations between the individual and society; the ways theory shapes and informs the study of social issues; and the relationship among theory, research and practice.

SOC 627. Violence Against Women. 3 Credits.

This course examines the many ways in which violence against women functions as an agent of social control. Violence is viewed on a continuum in order to determine how a variety of acts contribute to the subordination of women. Specific types of violence are explored including: wife assault, rape, incest, sexual harassment and pornography.

SOC 630. Applied Social Statistics. 3 Credits.

This course is a graduate-level introduction to social statistics as they may be applied to various practical problems. Students will learn the appropriate use of various statistical procedures through discussion and application. Prerequisites: SOC 610.

SOC 640. Sociological Application of Computer and Data Analysis. 3 Credits.

This course is a graduate-level introduction to the use of the computer in problems of data management and analysis. Students will use existing software packages (e.g, SPSS, SAS) to build specified data files and carry out various statistical procedures. Prerequisites: SOC 610.

SOC 644. Current Feminist Research in Sociology. 3 Credits.

The course provides a feminist analysis of the way women and gender traditionally have been studied in mainstream sociology. A minimum of one-third of the course is devoted to feminist critique of conventional conceptual and methodological approaches to gender relations in the social sciences. Feminist epistemological challenges are used to evaluate current research on selected topics reflecting the specialization and research interests of the faculty who teach the course.

SOC 650. Research Seminar. 3 Credits.

This seminar integrates the skills needed to complete a master's thesis. Exercises include formulating research questions, developing a research design, and writing a publishable paper. Students practice these skills assignments in class and by completing their thesis proposal. Prerequisites: SOC 610 or CRJS 610, SOC 620 or CRJS 620, SOC 630 or CRJS 630, and SOC 640 or CRJS 640.

SOC 660. Sociology Seminar. 3 Credits.

An examination of contemporary research and policy issues in the study of sociology. The course also provides an overview for specific concentrations in criminal justice and women's studies when necessary. Prerequisites: SOC 610 and SOC 620 and SOC 630 and SOC 640 and 6 hours of SOC electives at the graduate level.

SOC 668. Internship. 3 Credits.

Students gain first-hand experience in professional settings which are deemed appropriate given their academic background and career objectives. Students will be required to complete a research project which corresponds to their specific internship placement. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

SOC 695. Topics of Sociology. 3 Credits.

Topics vary each semester.

SOC 696. Topics of Sociology. 3 Credits.

Topics vary each semester.

SOC 697. Independent Study in Special Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Approval of the department chair.

SOC 698. Independent Study in Special Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate. Prerequisites: Approval of the department chair.

SOC 699. Thesis. 3-9 Credits.

Credit hours to continue thesis work.

SOC 740. Demographic Techniques. 3 Credits.

Basic methods of demographic analysis. Topics include population estimation and projection and the measurement of fertility, mortality, and migration.

SOC 795. Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

Topics vary by semester. Prerequisites: Six hours of graduate credit.

SOC 797. Independent Study in Sociology. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Prerequisites: Approval of department chair and 6 hours of graduate credit.

SOC 840. Demographic Techniques. 3 Credits.

Basic methods of demographic analysis. Topics include population estimation and projection and the measurement of fertility, mortality, and migration.

SOC 895. Topics in Sociology. 3 Credits.

Topics vary by semester. Prerequisites: Six hours of graduate credit.

SOC 897. Independent Study in Sociology. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Prerequisites: Approval of department chair and 6 hours of graduate credit.

SOC 998. SOC 998. 1 Credit.

SOC 999. SOC 999. 1 Credit.

Thesis hours.