7022 Batten Arts and Letters Building
757-683-3849

Dr. Francis Adams, Chair
Dr. Glen Sussman, Chief Departmental Advisor for Political Science
Dr. Jonathan Leib, Director and Chief Departmental Advisor for Geography

Certificate in Spatial Analysis of Coastal Environments (Undergraduate and Graduate)

The certificate in spatial analysis of coastal environments provides an interdisciplinary program for students wishing to pursue careers in coastal management or research, remote sensing, or geographic information system (GIS) applications. Rendered upon completion of the requirements, the certificate is an academic affidavit comprised of courses in geography and ocean, earth, and atmospheric sciences, and is administered by the two departments. Students must take courses in the areas listed below and complete them with a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or higher and no grade below a C (2.00). The certificate is available to postgraduate professionals who meet the requirements. Students with comparable professional experience may be able to show competence in selected courses through examination.

Students seeking undergraduate certification must complete the 400-level courses, and those seeking graduate certification must complete the 500-level courses:

Core courses:
GEOG 404/504Digital Techniques for Remote Sensing3
Select one of the following:3-5
Wetland Plants
Principles of Plant Ecology
Structural Geology
Concepts in Oceanography for Teachers
Interpretive Analysis Courses:
Select two of the following:6
Geographic Information Systems
Coastal Geography
Applied Cartography/GIS
Special Topics
Capstone Seminar:
GEOG 419/519/OEAS 419/519Spatial Analysis of Coastal Environments3
Total Hours15-17

GEOGRAPHY Courses

GEOG 500. Seminar in Geography. 3 Credits.

Advanced study of a specialized topic in geography. The choice of the topic may vary according to the availability of faculty expertise and student interest.

GEOG 502. Geographic Information Systems. 3 Credits.

A study of the conceptual basis of GIS as a tool for manipulating spatial information. The course focuses on how geographic information can be input and organized within the framework of a GIS. Students will work on a computer-based GIS to gain a greater understanding of spatial database structures and analytical operations.

GEOG 504. Digital Techniques for Remote Sensing. 3 Credits.

Study of the theory and application of remote sensing, emphasizing environmental applications and aerial and satellite imagery. Covers the fundamentals of multispectral digital image processing, including sensors pre-processing, enhancement, classification, accuracy assessment, and GIS data integration.

GEOG 505. Seminar in International Resource Management. 3 Credits.

Discussion of the ecological and management principles underlying international resource management and the goal of attaining a sustainable, ecologically balanced world.

GEOG 508. Cartography. 3 Credits.

Computer-assisted methods and techniques employed in the design, construction, and use of maps and other graphics as tools for data analysis and communication.

GEOG 510. Seminar in Urban Geography. 3 Credits.

Discussion of specific urban and metropolitan problems based on outside readings and individually selected research topics.

GEOG 511. Urban and Regional Planning. 3 Credits.

A study of planning concepts and powers used to guide contemporary metropolitan growth and development. Emphasis is on the application of social science principles and methods to the planning process.

GEOG 512. Cities of the World. 3 Credits.

An examination of cities of the world’s major cultural realms with an emphasis on the urban landscape as it varies between developed and developing countries.

GEOG 519. Spatial Analysis of Coastal Environments. 3 Credits.

The course integrates remotely sensed and field techniques for scientific investigation and practical management of coastal environmental systems. Spatial modeling of coastal processes and management tools using Geographic Information System (GIS). Prerequisites: GEOG 504.

GEOG 520. Marine Geography. 3 Credits.

An analysis of human-sea relationships with particular emphasis on resource management and political organization from global, regional, and national perspectives.

GEOG 522. Coastal Geography. 3 Credits.

An examination of the physical and human geography of the coastal zone. Considers problems of managing coastal resources with an emphasis on North America. Lectures focus on coastal patterns, processes, and problems at the global, national, and local scales. Students investigate a section of the local coastline and write a report on the physical and human geography on the basis of field study, library, and internet research.

GEOG 525. Internet Geographic Information Systems. 3 Credits.

Theoretical and practical exploration of methods, standards, and policies related to the development and utilization of geographic information systems on the Internet. Students will create and utilize distributed geospatial data and analytical systems using the WWW and the Internet to address geographical problems. Prerequisites: GEOG 502.

GEOG 532. Advanced GIS. 3 Credits.

The study of a series of advanced topics in the field of geographic information systems/science. Focus is placed on the development of projects/models and a survey of several advanced techniques. Students will work on a computer based GIS to implement topics from lectures. Prerequisites: GEOG 502.

GEOG 551. Europe. 3 Credits.

A geographical analysis of the interrelationships among physical, cultural, economic, and political factors in Europe.

GEOG 552. Africa. 3 Credits.

A geographical analysis of the interrelationships among physical, cultural, economic, and political factors in Africa.

GEOG 553. Asia. 3 Credits.

A geographical analysis of the interrelationships among physical, cultural, economic, and political factors in Asia excluding the Middle East and the former USSR.

GEOG 554. Latin America. 3 Credits.

A geographical analysis of the interrelationships among physical, cultural, economic, and political factors in Latin America.

GEOG 555. The Middle East. 3 Credits.

A geographical analysis of the interrelationships among physical, cultural, economic, and political factors in the Middle East.

GEOG 556. Geography of Southeast Asia. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the physical, historical, cultural, economic, environmental, and political patterns and problems of Southeast Asia. The focus is on the diversity of the region and on the nature and impact of development.

GEOG 558. Geography of Virginia. 3 Credits.

An analysis of Virginia’s population, resources, and regional landscapes as they have been influenced by physical, cultural, historical, and economic factors.

GEOG 590. Applied Cartography/GIS. 1-3 Credits.

Practical experience in applying the principles of cartography and geographical information systems to the design and construction of maps and other graphics.

GEOG 595. Topics in Geography. 1-4 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors.

GEOG 596. Topics in Geography. 1-4 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors.

GEOG 597. Independent Research in Geography. 1-3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of the instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate.

GEOG 598. Tutorial Work in Geography. 1-3 Credits.

Independent research under the supervision of a faculty member.

GEOG 620. Seminar in Political Geography. 3 Credits.

A study of the interrelationships of political and geographic phenomena, and theories of geopolitics; examines in a seminar format the political geography both of specific topics such as the national integration of states, refugees and resources, and of particular regions of the world.

GEOG 625. Ethno-Regionalism. 3 Credits.

An examination of the geopolitics of world ethnic minorities with special reference to selected “trouble spots” on the world political map.

GEOG 626. Lifespan Communication, Geography, and Food. 3 Credits.

This course examines the intersections of communication, geography, and food from lifespan and global perspectives. Topics to be covered include communication and cooking; dinner table talk; food and folk culture; victual rituals; the portrayal of food in media (e.g., film, television, CMC, print); the role of race, class, and gender in food production/consumption; the commercialization of food; fast food and slow food; globalization vs. the 'locavore' movement; visualization and symbolic communication about food and nutrition; and market and supermarket geographies.

GEOG 650. Seminar in Regional Geography. 1-3 Credits.

Advanced seminar on a particular country or world region.

GEOG 668. Internship. 1-6 Credits.

Individualized practical experience.

GEOG 695. Selected Topics in Geography. 1-3 Credits.

Advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest.

GEOG 696. Selected Topics in Geography. 1-3 Credits.

Advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest.

GEOG 697. Independent Research in Geography. 1-3 Credits.

Independent research in geography under the supervision of a faculty member.

GEOG 720. Cultural Geography Seminar. 3 Credits.

This seminar examines the field of cultural geography with: 1) an emphasis on theories and concepts developed over the past twenty years in 'new' cultural geography, and 2) cultural geography's emphasis on issues such as place, power, landscape and identity.

POLITICAL SCIENCE Courses

POLS 503. First Amendment Freedoms. 3 Credits.

The course deals with the development and practice of conflicting judicial and legal theories concerning our substantive guaranties. Students are asked to act as advocates in developing and substantiating theories of their own.

POLS 510. African American Politics. 3 Credits.

This course examines the political development of Black people in the United States by focusing on the relationship and processes of the American political system. The political dynamics of Black political thought, the Civil Rights Movement, and Black protest politics are also analyzed.

POLS 512. Politics of the Civil Rights Movement. 3 Credits.

Examines the political activities which resulted in the passage of the nation’s second Civil Rights policy, the 1960 and 1964 Civil Rights Acts, the 1965 Voting Rights Act and the 1968 Fair Housing Act. The course analyzes the underpinnings, leadership, and political strategies of the Civil Rights Movement.

POLS 514. Politics of Education. 3 Credits.

The question of power, often ignored by education policy analysts and researchers, is a principal focus of this seminar. Issues ranging from the role of education in political socialization and the politics of affirmative action and equal opportunity are examined.

POLS 515. Women and Politics in America. 3 Credits.

Examines women’s place in political theory and the practice of politics in the United States. A major focus is to trace the development of women’s political rights, the impact of public policy on the lives of American women and to see how women influence and participate in the political process.

POLS 520. Southern Politics. 3 Credits.

This seminar focuses on the politics of the American South from the 1940s to the present. Emphasis is on introducing students to contrasting explanations and analysis about the politics of the American South.

POLS 521. International Law. 3 Credits.

Surveys major areas of public international law (e.g., laws of warfare, law of the sea, conflict resolution, etc.). Emphasizes the relationship between international law and international politics.

POLS 524. International Organization. 3 Credits.

Course provides a basis for understanding the role and importance of international organizations in contemporary international relations. Focuses on development and history of global organizations, with particular emphasis on the United Nations, and regional and functional organizations.

POLS 534. Political Participation in the United States. 3 Credits.

An examination of current theories and research on political behavior, conventional and unconventional modes of political participation, and the impact of participation on the political system.

POLS 535. Chinese Politics. 3 Credits.

A study of origins of the Chinese revolution; development and functions of the Chinese Communist Party; government institutions; the defense establishment; evolution of foreign policy; and post-Mao political and economic reforms.

POLS 536. Japanese Politics. 3 Credits.

A study of Japan’s historical political development and social patterns; government institutions; problems of the constitution; and foreign and defense policy.

POLS 537. International Relations in East Asia. 3 Credits.

A study of contemporary issues (political, economic, and strategic) in the East Asia area; the interactions of China, Japan, the United States, and the former Soviet republics in East Asia.

POLS 539. International Relations of African States. 3 Credits.

This course aims to expose students to an examination of the workings of international politics from the viewpoint of Africans and African states. International relations have tended to look at the world from the viewpoint of its most powerful states. Yet, most the world's states - notably in Africa - are weak but have great potential global impact.

POLS 542. Twentieth Century Dictatorships. 3 Credits.

A study of the Fascist, Nazi, Stalin and Mao regimes and the forces that brought them to power and sustained them, including a study of the impact of their policies on their people and neighboring states.

POLS 555. The Politics of Climate Change. 3 Credits.

An examination of the science of climate change and how United States political actors have responded to this global environmental challenge.

POLS 566. Politics of the Middle East. 3 Credits.

An analysis of the political processes throughout the region and in selected nations of the Middle East. Topics to be discussed include inter-Arab relations, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Iran-Iraq rivalry and foreign power involvement in the Middle East.

POLS 595. Topics in Political Science. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly.

POLS 596. Topics in Political Science. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly.

POLS 597. Independent Research in Political Science. 1-3 Credits.

Independent research in political science under the supervision of a faculty member.

POLS 602. Seminar in American Foreign Policy. 3 Credits.

The formulation and conduct of U.S. foreign policy under changing domestic and external circumstances. Models of decision making; interrelationships of economic, political, and military factors; major trends in contemporary American foreign policy making.

POLS 623. Foreign Policy Analysis. 3 Credits.

Comparative study of foreign policy behavior. Internal and external factors in formation and implementation of foreign policy. Examination and application of foreign policy models.

POLS 624. National Security Policy. 3 Credits.

Examines U.S. national security policy, strategy and the use of force, the formulation and execution of policy, the international dimension of national security, and contemporary issues in national security.

POLS 626. Seminar in Politics of Russia and the Soviet Successor States. 3 Credits.

Power and authority in Russia and the other successor states of the former Soviet Union. Although focusing on Russia, the course embraces the contemporary internal politics of the states in the space between Germany and Japan/China including Central Asia and the Caucasus. Emphasizes research methodology and strategies.

POLS 631. Seminar in Chinese Politics. 3 Credits.

An advanced survey and research on contemporary Chinese politics, political and economic reforms; intellectuals and politics; China's experience of socialist revolution and economic construction; and foreign policy.

POLS 650. Interdependence, Power and Transnationalism. 3 Credits.

This course covers the fundamental concepts, ideas, and approaches to the study of interdependence and transnationalism. It seeks to expose students to the nature, role, and impact of economic, technological, strategic, and cultural interdependence. Cases of interdependence and transnationalism are explored in the post-Cold War era. Some focus is placed on how interdependence and transnationalism are impacting the power of the state. Prerequisites: Permission of director or instructor.

POLS 665. International Political Economy. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the forces shaping national and transnational economic institutions and their policies on a range of contemporary issues, including North-South relations.

POLS 695. Selected Topics in Political Science. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly.

POLS 696. Selected Topics in Political Science. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics which, due to their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly.

POLS 697. Independent Research in Political Science. 1-3 Credits.

Independent research in political science under the supervision of a faculty member.