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Old Dominion University

2014-2015 Catalog

Department of History

http://al.odu.edu/history

8000 Batten Arts and Letters Building
757-683-3949

Austin Jersild, Chair

Master of Arts - History

Maura Hametz, Graduate Program Director

The Department of History offers courses of study leading to the Master of Arts with a major in history.

Admissions

Applicants must meet all University requirements and regulations for admission. Their applications must include a short essay of 500 words or less, addressing their academic interests and goals, and two letters of recommendation. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE), General Test, is required for all applicants.

An undergraduate major or minor in history is desirable but is not required for admission. Generally, 18 semester credit hours in history and closely related cognates are sufficient for admission on a provisional basis. These credit hours should include survey and upper-level courses. The graduate program director may prescribe certain undergraduate courses to be completed before recommending admission to the program. Under certain circumstances, students can be admitted to graduate courses while simultaneously completing an undergraduate prerequisite.

The requirement for admission to full standing (regular status) is 24 semester credit hours with an average of at least 3.00 in history and a general GPA of 3.00. Provisional admission requires 18 credits (as described above) with an average of 3.00 in history and a GPA of 2.70. Students with averages below these minimums can attempt to improve their standing in undergraduate courses approved by the graduate program director. However, they cannot be admitted to graduate courses until they have achieved acceptable averages in history. Applicants who are denied admission to the M.A. program in history are not permitted to enroll in history graduate courses as non-degree students.

Prospective applicants with questions about their admission status should contact the graduate program director in the Department of History. Those certain of their qualifications should apply through the Office of Admissions.

Admissions forms should reach Old Dominion University well in advance of the intended term of entry, but no later than November 1 for spring admission and April 1 for summer or fall. All required forms and documents should be sent directly to the Admissions Office, which creates a central file for each applicant. Only the one-page application for graduate financial assistance along with a duplicate copy of the 500-word essay should be sent directly to the graduate program director.

Graduate Financial Aid

Old Dominion University offers financial assistance to qualified graduate students. Types of aid include research and teaching assistantships, fellowships, grants, scholarships, and part-time employment. Nearly all forms of aid require that the student be engaged in full-time graduate study.

Fellowships, assistantships, tuition grants, and small research grants may be available. Departmental funds may affect fellowship and assistantship amounts. The establishment of student need and academic promise also affect some grant amounts. The application deadline is February 15. International students must pass the SPEAK test (or an equivalent) of spoken English to become eligible for teaching assistantships.

Degree Requirements

Two courses of study are available. One is a 30-credit program capped by written comprehensive examinations in two general fields and an oral examination. The other is a 30-credit program, comprising 24 hours of course work, a thesis for which students earn six credits (HIST 698-HIST 699) on a pass/fail basis, and an oral examination. Either alternative leads to an M.A. in history.

All candidates for the M.A. in history must meet the general graduate degree requirements established for the University. In addition, all students must complete HIST 600 during their first year in the program. No more than nine of the required 30 hours may be earned in 500-level courses. Students are permitted a maximum of six credits in other departments offering graduate courses if the work is germane to their historical studies; prior approval of the graduate program director is required. Students who have received two grades of C+ or below will be indefinitely suspended from the program. Those students whose grade point average falls below 3.00 will be subject to the University’s probation/suspension policy.

Curriculum

Examination Option

Students pursuing the exam option must take course work as follows:

30 credits total: Hist 600 Historical Theory and Praxis (3 credits), 24 credits of Hist 500, 600, or 700 level classes thereof at least 6 credits American History and 6 credits Non-American History, and Hist 675 Exam Preparation (3 credits).

Students choose two fields of concentration for the Examination Option, which will conform to the expertise of two of the three committee members who constitute the student’s exam committee. The fields can be tailored to the following geographic areas: North America, Europe, Russia, Latin America, Asia, or Africa.

Students pursuing the examination option must complete HIST 675 during their last year in the program. Written comprehensive field examinations may be taken in conjunction with HIST 675. The two field exams are taken during a designated time over the course of two weeks with a two-hour oral examination following the completion of written exams. Exams are individualized by the student’s examining committee but competence in the entire field is essential. Examinations are completed no later than 30 days before the end of a semester, and thus are normally scheduled in March, July, and November. A field exam is judged in its entirety and is rated Pass or Fail by the examining committee; the same is true of the oral examination. Students who fail an exam can be re-examined in the next scheduled round of exams. Only one re-examination is permitted.

Thesis Option

Students pursuing the thesis option must take course work as follows:

30-36 credits total: Hist 600 Historical Theory and Praxis (3 credits), 21 credits of Hist 500, 600, or 700 level classes thereof at least 6 credits American History and 6 credits Non-American History,  Hist 698 Thesis (3-6 credits) and Hist 699 (3-6 credits).

The thesis option will be recommended for those students who have maintained a high GPA and have the support of a faculty director. A review of the thesis prospectus is required before the completion of 18 hours of course work. The master’s thesis is written under the direction of a thesis advisor selected by the candidate in consultation with the graduate program director. The thesis is reviewed and the candidate examined by a faculty committee chaired by the thesis advisor. The thesis defense—normally a two-hour oral examination—focuses on the thesis, the historical context, and related aspects of the student’s concentration. Final approval of the thesis is the responsibility of the thesis advisor, the graduate program director, and ultimately of the dean of the College of Arts and Letters, who certify the candidate for graduation.

HISTORY Courses

HIST 508. War and American Society in the Twentieth Century. 3 Credits.

This course is an exploration of the content and meaning of wartime experiences within American society between 1898 and 1975. Emphasis is on comparing the levels of national, institutional and personal experiences of war as they affected people at home and in battle, and on considering the relationships between warmaking and social development at particular times.

HIST 509. History of US-Mexico Borderlands. 3 Credits.

The course examines the history of the region straddling the U.S.-Mexico Border from the Spanish Conquest to the present day, focusing on issues of immigration, economic and political integration and the complicated nature of state-building in a transnational environment.

HIST 520. Fascism in Europe. 3 Credits.

This course explores the genesis and development of fascism in Europe between World Wars I and II. Particular emphasis on Fascism in Italy and National Socialism in Germany. Appeal of fascist movements to populations across the socioeconomic spectrum, fluidities of ideology and practice, fascism’s impact on political, economic, social, and cultural life in the interwar period are explored.

HIST 539. Politics and Society in East Asia Since 1945. 3 Credits.

This course explores the political and social developments in Japan, China, and Korea since the end of World War II.

HIST 555. African-American Historiography. 3 Credits.

This course is an examination of the ways historians have addressed specific issues in African-American history.

HIST 556. Research in Local History. 3 Credits.

The course explores the history of Hampton Roads through student use of research materials.

HIST 570. Democracy and Development in Modern Latin America. 3 Credits.

This course analyzes, from a historical perspective, two core problems in Latin America’s modern (since c. 1880) history: political authoritarianism and economic underdevelopment. The temporal and spatial dimensions of change are highlighted in discussions of patron-client political systems, military autonomy and impunity, social movements and revolution, export-oriented economic growth, industrialization, and the roles of national, ethnic and gender identities.

HIST 575. History of Modern Africa. 3 Credits.

The course is designed to enrich students’ understanding of the intersections of political, economic, social and cultural forces that shaped Africa in the last 150 years and continue to affect the lives of peoples throughout the continent. It will focus on a series of major historical transitions that have shaped the development of modern Africa, including the end of the Atlantic slave trade, European imperial conquest and colonial rule, African resistance to European rule, social and cultural transformations, the end of colonial rule and post-colonial challenges.

HIST 595. Topics in History. 1-3 Credits.

The course is an advanced study of selected topics designed for small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which may not be offered regularly. These courses appear in the course schedule, and will be more fully described in information distributed to academic advisors.

HIST 597. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in History. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate.

HIST 598. Tutorial Work in Special Topics in History. 3 Credits.

Independent reading and study on a topic to be selected under the direction of an instructor. Conferences and papers as appropriate.

HIST 600. Historical Theory and Practice. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Analysis of the development of historical theories, principles and methods and their application to historical research and writing. Required of all graduate students in history.

HIST 602. Studies in American Colonial and Revolutionary History. 3 Credits.

Seminar; 3 credits.

HIST 604. Studies in American History, 1787-1877. 3 Credits.

Seminar; 3 credits.

HIST 608. Studies in American History, 1933 to the Present. 3 Credits.

Seminar; 3 credits.

HIST 612. Studies in the History of the South. 3 Credits.

Seminar; 3 credits.

HIST 616. Studies in American Diplomatic History. 3 Credits.

Seminar; 3 credits.

HIST 618. Studies in American Social History. 3 Credits.

Seminar; 3 credits.

HIST 622. The Atlantic Slave Trade. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The course will explore the trans-Atlantic slave trade from its beginnings in the 15th century to its suppression in the 19th century. It will examine the vast body of historical literature on Africa, the Atlantic slave trade and the New World. The course will provide students with a general orientation to the broad context of the Atlantic slave trade. Locating the trade in the context of the expansion of capitalist Europe, students will examine the economic and cultural forces, as well as personal experiences of slavery from Africa, across the Atlantic Ocean, to the Americas. The course will also look at how the trade transformed Africa and how Africa and Africans in turn transformed the Atlantic World.

HIST 625. Studies in African-American History. 3 Credits.

Seminar; 3 credits.

HIST 633. Studies in International History. 3 Credits.

Seminar; 3 credits.

HIST 634. Studies in the History of Military Affairs. 3 Credits.

Seminar; 3 credits.

HIST 637. Studies in War and the Humanities. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The impact of war on society, literature and the arts.

HIST 640. Studies in East Asian History. 3 Credits.

Seminar; 3 credits.

HIST 645. Studies in Latin American History. 3 Credits.

Seminar; 3 credits.

HIST 646. Studies in Russian History. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Research in Soviet archives in the past decade has enriched and enlarged the study of Stalin’s era (1924-1953). This reading seminar samples new literature on traditional topics, such as Stalin’s rise to power, methods of rule, and foreign policies, as well as scholarship in newly emerging fields. These areas include social history, gender and the family, cinema and popular culture, nationalities, patron-client relations, and the history of science.

HIST 647. Studies in Maritime History. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The seminar will explore the major recent developments in maritime historiography. The course will explore how maritime history both presents unique understandings of human history while also working within or redefining broader historical constructs. Students must learn to recognize and analyze historical interpretations and develop, write, and present their own interpretations of primary sources related to a specific topic of local maritime history.

HIST 650. Studies in Ancient History. 3 Credits.

Seminar; 3 credits.

HIST 652. Studies in Medieval History. 3 Credits.

Seminar; 3 credits.

HIST 654. Studies in European History from 1350-1600. 3 Credits.

Seminar; 3 credits.

HIST 656. Studies in European History from 1600-1815. 3 Credits.

Seminar; 3 credits.

HIST 658. Studies in European History from 1815-1914. 3 Credits.

Seminar; 3 credits.

HIST 660. Studies in European History from 1914 to the Present. 3 Credits.

Seminar; 3 credits.

HIST 662. North Atlantic Resources. 3 Credits.

This class will examine how coastal societies around the North Atlantic have developed their use of fish stocks and other marine resources since the late medieval period. Furthermore it will analyze how and why fisheries led to a more or less complete over-fishing of nearly all major species and how international agreements were negotiated to secure a sustainable use of the biological resources of the oceans as common heritage of mankind.

HIST 668. Internships in History. 3 Credits.

Seminar; 3 credits. Minimum of 120 hours. Student works with professionals in areas such as museum management, archives administration, historical editing, historical preservation, electronic records management, archaeology, or oral history. Students will be supervised by a graduate faculty member, who will assign academic reading and written work, such as an historiographic essay, research paper, or final project. Individually arranged.

HIST 675. M.A. Exam Preparation and Research. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the graduate program director. This advanced seminar integrates the skills needed to pass the M.A. exam in history. Exercises include designing examination reading lists, learning the historiography of the exam fields, preparing for orals, and writing and evaluating a practice exam. This course is not open to students pursuing the thesis option.

HIST 695. Topics in History. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits.

HIST 696. Tutorial in Maritime History. 3 Credits.

Individually arranged with appropriate professor and with permission of the graduate program director. Prerequisite: HIST 647.

HIST 697. Tutorials in History. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits. Individually arranged with appropriate professor and with the permission of the graduate program director.

HIST 698. Thesis. 3 Credits.

3 credits.

HIST 699. Thesis. 3-9 Credits.

3-9 credits.

HIST 718. Mao’s China. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This reading seminar will focus on the changes of the Chinese society since the beginning of the 20th century. It will examine the pivotal historical events that led to the Chinese revolution, which put Mao’s Communist regime in power and has changed Chinese society ever since. While studying the history chronologically, students will identify issues and factors that affect the Chinese political system and society, and examine the legacies of Mao’s revolution from social and individual perspectives. The course will also focus on political formation and transformation of the government, social structure and upheavals, economic reforms, and foreign policies. (cross listed with IS 718/818).

HIST 755. Conflict and Violence in Modern Africa. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course will confront the theme of conflict and violence in Africa since the mid-20th century. It will explore the reasons behind the level of violent conflicts in the continent today, seek to understand their larger significance, and explore ideas for conflict resolution and prevention. (cross listed with IS 755/855).

HIST 795. Selected Topics in International Studies. 1-3 Credits.

3 credits. The advanced historical study of selected topics in international studies.

HIST 998. HIST 998. 1 Credit.

HIST 999. History 999. 1 Credit.