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Old Dominion University

2013-2014 Catalog

Department of English

5000 Batten Arts and Letters
757-683-3991

Dana Heller, Chair

Graduate Programs in English

There are four graduate programs in the English department:

  1. Master of Arts in English;
  2. Master of Arts in Applied Linguistics;
  3. Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing and
  4. Ph.D. in English.

Each program has its own guidelines and admissions policy.

Master of Arts - English

Imtiaz Habib, Graduate Program Director

The Master of Arts program in English develops professional competency in literary and textual analysis and in writing. The program offers emphases or options in literature, the teaching of English, rhetoric and composition, and professional writing. The program prepares students for further graduate study in English; for professional writing and editing; for teaching in secondary schools and colleges; for further study in such fields as anthropology, law, psychology, and philosophy; for careers in government and industry; and for other professions requiring analytical, literary, linguistic, digital media, or writing skills.

Admission Information

The student must initially meet all general University admission requirements. Scores from the Graduate Record Examination general test are required. For regular admission, students must generally have at least 24 undergraduate hours in English, or a closely related field, with a grade point average of 3.0 or better. However, students applying to the professional writing concentration (see professional writing option) may have little or no undergraduate course work relating to English, provided that they have an average of 3.0 or better in their undergraduate major. Students applying to all concentrations must also, in addition to other admissions materials, provide a writing sample, preferably of previous professional or academic work, that demonstrates their preparation for graduate-level writing. All students in the English graduate program must demonstrate a high level of skill in written expression.

International students must submit scores from the TOEFL examination, a sample of scholarly writing, and three recommendations, at least one of which evaluates ability in English. For regular admission, students must score 230 on the computer-based TOEFL (the equivalent of 570 in the older, paper-based score scale or 80 on the TOEFL iBT). Students may be admitted provisionally with a TOEFL score of 213 (550 in the paper-based scale), but must attain the scores required for regular admission after 12 hours of graduate work.

Degree Requirements

The Master of Arts degree in English requires 30 credit hours and the passing of a comprehensive oral examination. No more than 12 credit hours on the 500 level may be counted toward a degree. An identifiable unifying principle is required for each student’s program.

Master of Arts Thesis Option

The opportunity to undertake a long research project or other appropriate project is available to students in the Master of Arts in English. Writing a thesis may be of particular benefit to those who contemplate further graduate work or who have a strong desire to pursue a single topic in great depth. Under the guidance of an advisor (a member of the graduate faculty), the student may earn six hours of credit for a completed, approved thesis.

Master of Arts Oral Comprehensive Examination

During the first three weeks of the semester in which they intend to graduate, students must contact the graduate program director in English to schedule their comprehensive examination. The oral comprehensive examination covers each student’s particular program of study. Based on the courses taken by the student, the examination tests the student’s mastery of materials and concepts, interpretive skills, and ability to make critical distinctions and connections. The examination of a thesis student will also cover the thesis and its related areas. Students who fail the oral comprehensive examination may retake the test only once in a different semester. Students who fail a second time will no longer be eligible to receive the Master of Arts in English from Old Dominion University.

Literature Option

This option, which offers a comprehensive grounding in literary and cultural studies and critical theory, prepares students for careers in community college and four year university teaching, public media, and a variety of jobs in the public sphere. It also prepares students for advanced literary and cultural studies at the Ph.D. level. For students in other programs this option offers as well a Certificate in Literature which helps to qualify them for secondary school teaching.

Edward Jacobs, Coordinator

This option requires:

ENGL 600Introduction to Research and Criticism3

 

Controlled Electives (18 hours)

British Literature before 1800:

One course from:3
Medieval Literature
Chaucer's Canterbury Tales
English Renaissance Drama
British Literature 1660-1800
Origins and Early Development of the British Novel to 1800
Shakespeare
18th Century British Literature
Topics in English (when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator)
Topics in English (when topic is approved by the Literature Coordinator)
Topics (when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator)
Seminar in Textual Studies (Seminar in Textual Studies [when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator])
Seminar in Literary Studies (Seminar in Literary Studies [when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator])
Topics (when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator)

  

British Literature after 1800:

One course from:3
The Romantic Movement in Britain
Victorian Literature
The Twentieth-Century British Novel
New Literatures in English
19th Century British Literature
Nineteenth-Century British Novel
20th Century British Literature
Postcolonial Literature and Theory
Topics in English (when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator)
Topics in English (when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator)
Topics (when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator)
Seminar in Textual Studies (Seminar in Textual Studies [when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator])
Seminar in Literary Studies (Seminar in Literary Studies [when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator])
Topics (when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator)

 

American Literarure before 1870

One course from:3
American Literature to 1810
American Literature 1810-1870
Topics in English (when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator)
Topics in English (when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator)
Topics (when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator)
Seminar in Textual Studies (when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator)
Seminar in Literary Studies (Seminar in Literary Studies [when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator])
Topics (when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator)

 

American Literature after 1870:

One course from:3
American Travel Literature
Studies in American Drama
The American Novel to 1920
The American Novel 1920 to Present
African-American Literature
Asian American Literature
American Literature 1870-1946
American Literature 1945-Present
Topics in English (when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator)
Topics in English (when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator)
Topics (when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator)
Seminar in Textual Studies (when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator)
Seminar in Literary Studies (Seminar in Literary Studies [when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator])
Topics (when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator)

    

Methodology: 

One course from:3
Scholarly Editing and Textual Scholarship
The Digital Humanities
Postcolonial Literature and Theory
Critical Race Theory
Theories of Literature
Seminar in Textual Studies (when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator)
Seminar in Literary Studies (Seminar in Literary Studies [when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator])
Topics (when topic is appropriate as approved by the Literature Coordinator)

  

Seminar:

One course from:3
Seminar in Textual Studies
Seminar in Literary Studies (Seminar in Literary Studies)

 

Free Electives 9
Note: 6 hours must be from Literature courses

 

Total needed to graduate 30
Note: Of the total 30 hours needed to graduate no more than 12 hours can be at the 500 level

For any further questions regarding course offerings contact the Literature Advisor or the Graduate Program Director for the M.A. in English. 

 

Professional Writing Option

Julia Romberger, Coordinator

Designed to prepare students to expand and theorize their practices of workplace writing and to prepare students for doctoral work in the field. This option requires:

ENGL 539Writing in Digital Spaces3
ENGL 685Writing Research3
ENGL 706Visual Rhetoric and Document Design3
ENGL 715Professional Writing Theories and Practices3
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to Rhetoric and Writing Studies
Classical Rhetoric and Theory Building
Modern Rhetoric and Theory Building
Select one of the following:3
General Linguistics
American English
Language, Gender and Power
Topics in English
Select one of the following:3
Teaching College Composition
Teaching Writing with Technology
Second Language Writing Pedagogy
Pedagogy and Instructional Design
Select one of the following:3
Writing in the Disciplines
Management Writing
Writing with Video
Advanced Public Relations
Topics in English
Cybercultures and Digital Writing
Teaching College Composition
Teaching Writing with Technology
Graduate Internship and Project in Professional Writing
Discourse Analysis
Second Language Writing Pedagogy
Introduction to Rhetoric and Writing Studies
Topics
Texts and Technologies
International Professional Writing
Pedagogy and Instructional Design
Classical Rhetoric and Theory Building
Modern Rhetoric and Theory Building
New Media Theory and Practice I
New Media Theory and Practice II
Six hours of electives6
Total Hours30

Portfolio Option:

As one of their oral exam options (the exam alone and thesis plus exam being the other two), students may choose to develop a portfolio as the capstone project for the MA in English professional writing option. Students choosing the portfolio will propose the scope of their individual projects to the graduate program director and the committee chair. Portfolios are a collection of individual texts with a meta-narrative that explains the connection between these texts and the portfolio’s intellectual underpinnings. The entire portfolio should range between 10,000 and 15,000 words. Portfolios can be, but are not limited to, a collection of extensively revised course work, a collection of teaching materials, or a collection of new media texts. Portfolios can be submitted in a notebook or electronically. To help prepare the portfolio, students will be encouraged to take an independent study for up to 3 credits as one of their electives; the student’s committee chair should direct this independent study.

Rhetoric and Composition Option

Kevin Moberly, Coordinator

Designed to prepare students to teach and administer writing in language arts, community college, or university contexts, and to prepare students for doctoral work in composition and/or rhetoric.

ENGL 539Writing in Digital Spaces3
ENGL 664Teaching College Composition3
ENGL 685Writing Research3
Select one of the following:3
Introduction to Rhetoric and Writing Studies
Classical Rhetoric and Theory Building
Modern Rhetoric and Theory Building
Select one of the following:3
General Linguistics
American English
Language, Gender and Power
Topics in English
Select one of the following:3
Compositions as Applied Rhetoric
Classical Rhetoric and Theory Building
Modern Rhetoric and Theory Building
Select two of the following:6
Writing in the Disciplines
Media Law and Ethics
Topics in English
Cybercultures and Digital Writing
Teaching Writing with Technology
Discourse Analysis
Second Language Writing Pedagogy
Colloquium for Teachers of English
Topics
Texts and Technologies
Visual Rhetoric and Document Design
Pedagogy and Instructional Design
Compositions as Applied Rhetoric
Classical Rhetoric and Theory Building
Seminar in Discourse Analysis
Modern Rhetoric and Theory Building
New Media Theory and Practice I
New Media Theory and Practice II
Topics
6 hours of electives6
Total Hours30

Portfolio Option:

As one of their oral exam options (the exam alone and thesis plus exam being the other two), students may choose to develop a portfolio as the capstone project for the MA in English rhetoric and composition option. Students choosing the portfolio will propose the scope of their individual projects to the graduate program director and the committee chair. Portfolios are a collection of individual texts with a meta-narrative that explains the connection between these texts and the portfolio’s intellectual underpinnings. The entire portfolio should range between 10,000 and 15,000 words. Portfolios can be, but are not limited to, a collection of extensively revised course work, a collection of teaching materials, or a collection of new media texts. Portfolios can be submitted in a notebook or electronically. To help prepare the portfolio, students will be encouraged to take an independent study for up to 3 credits as one of their electives; the student’s committee chair should direct this independent study.

Teaching of English Option

Tim Bostic, Coordinator

This option requires:

British Literature before 18003
British Literature after 18003
ENGL 559New Literatures in English3
or ENGL 735 Postcolonial Literature and Theory
American Literature3
ENGL 600Introduction to Research and Criticism3
ENGL 555The Teaching of Composition, Grades 6-123
or ENGL 664 Teaching College Composition
ENGL 687Colloquium for Teachers of English3
ENGL 760Classical Rhetoric and Theory Building3
or ENGL 765 Modern Rhetoric and Theory Building
Linguistics3
Electives6
Total Hours33

Graduate Certificate in Literature

Easily completed in one calendar year, this certificate gives students who already hold at least a master’s degree in a different field the 18 hours of graduate study in literature that are the minimum requirement for teaching that subject at the post-secondary level in Virginia. Requirements are:

British Literature before 18003
British Literature after 1800 *3
American Literature3
Electives in Literature **9
Total Hours18

*

Or Post-colonial Literature and Theory.

**

which may include ENGL 600 and ENGL 764.

NOTE: at least nine of the 18 hours must be at the 600-level.

Graduate Certificate in Professional Writing

Easily completed in one calendar year, this certificate is designed for professionals who want to supplement their undergraduate degrees and sharpen their writing and communication skills. To apply for the certificate contact the coordinator of Professional Writing.

Select four of the following:12
Writing in the Disciplines
Management Writing
Writing in Digital Spaces
Writing with Video
Advanced Public Relations
Advanced News Reporting
Feature Story Writing
Editorial and Persuasive Writing
Media Law and Ethics
Teaching College Composition
Teaching Writing with Technology
Graduate Internship and Project in Professional Writing
Writing Research
Introduction to Rhetoric and Writing Studies
Colloquium for Teachers of English
Topics
Professional Writing Theories and Practices
International Professional Writing
Classical Rhetoric and Theory Building
Modern Rhetoric and Theory Building
New Media Theory and Practice I
New Media Theory and Practice II
Total Hours12

Graduate Certificate in the Teaching of Writing

Easily completed in one calendar year, this certificate gives students who already hold at least a master’s degree in a different field the 18 hours of graduate study in the teaching of writing that are the minimum requirement for teaching that subject at the post-secondary level in Virginia. Requirements are:

Pedagogy3
Teaching College Composition
Rhetoric3
Introduction to Rhetoric and Writing Studies
Classical Rhetoric and Theory Building
Modern Rhetoric and Theory Building
Technology3
Writing in Digital Spaces
Teaching Writing with Technology
Language3
General Linguistics (Language)
English Grammar
American English
Language, Gender and Power
English electives in Rhetoric, Professional Writing, Journalism, Linguistics, or Creative Writing6
Total Hours18

NOTE: At least nine of the 18 hours must be at the 600-level.

Master of Arts - Applied Linguistics

Bridget Anderson, Graduate Program Director.

The Master of Arts in Applied Linguistics prepares students to pursue advanced graduate study or to teach in colleges, adult education programs, businesses, private schools, or institutions in the U.S. or abroad. The program’s two emphases are Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) and Sociolinguistics. Students in the program may also earn a certificate in TESOL and/or use appropriate courses in the program as requirements toward obtaining the Commonwealth of Virginia Endorsement for English as a Second Language.

Admission Information

In addition to general University admission requirements, applicants must have a grade point average of 3.0 or better, and must have taken at least 9 hours of upper-level English, linguistics, or foreign language courses. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE), General Test, is required of all applicants. International students must submit scores from the TOEFL iBT, (88 for regular admission and 80 for provisional admission) or from the TOEFL PBT (570 for regular admission and 550 for provisional admission), a sample of scholarly writing, and three recommendations, one of which evaluates proficiency in English. After 12 hours of graduate work, international students must meet the TOEFL requirement for regular admission.

Degree Requirements

The M.A. in Applied Linguistics requires 33 credit hours, and the passing of an oral comprehensive examination, and the completion of a language requirement (12 credits or the equivalent in a single foreign language; international students may meet the requirement based on English proficiency as measured by the TOEFL).  No more than 12 hours may be taken on the 500 level. Courses taken PASS/FAIL are not included in the 33 credit hours.

Continuance

Students must:

    1.  meet all university and program requirements;

    2.  maintain a 3.0 grade point average or better;

    3.  retake any core course in which grades below B- are earned.

Exit

In order to graduate from the program, students must

  1. complete the required course of study for a total of  at least 33 credit hours of course work.  Credit hours with grades below B- and courses taken PASS/FAIL are not included in the 33 credit hour total. 
  2. complete the language requirement by having 12 credits or the equivalent in a single foreign language; this can be at the undergraduate level; international students may meet the requirement based on English proficiency as measured by the TOEFL;
  3. submit a program portfolio;
  4. pass an oral comprehensive examination;
  5. fulfill all university exit requirements.     

Curriculum - TESOL Emphasis

ENGL 540General Linguistics3
ENGL 670Methods and Materials in TESOL3
ENGL 671Phonology3
ENGL 672Syntax3
ENGL 675Practicum in TESOL3
ENGL 679First and Second Language Acquisition3
Select three of the following:9
English Grammar
Southern and African American English
History of the English Language
American English
Language, Gender and Power
Discourse Analysis
Internship in Applied Linguistics
Semantics
Language and Communication Across Cultures
Sociolinguistics
Topics
Discourse and Rhetoric Across Cultures
Research Methods in Applied Linguistics
Seminar in Discourse Analysis
Seminar in Sociolinguistics
Electives *6

*

Or a thesis approved by the graduate program director. In some cases, a 700-level course may be substituted for the corresponding 600-level course.

Sociolinguistics Emphasis

ENGL 540General Linguistics3
ENGL 550American English3
ENGL 671Phonology3
ENGL 672Syntax3
ENGL 673Discourse Analysis3
ENGL 678Sociolinguistics3
Select three of the following:9
History of the English Language
English Grammar
Southern and African American English
Language, Gender and Power
Methods and Materials in TESOL
Internship in Applied Linguistics
Practicum in TESOL
Semantics
Language and Communication Across Cultures
First and Second Language Acquisition
Topics
Discourse and Rhetoric Across Cultures
Research Methods in Applied Linguistics
Seminar in Discourse Analysis
Seminar in Sociolinguistics
Electives *6
Total Hours33

*

Or a thesis approved by the graduate program director. In some cases a 700-level course may be substituted for the corresponding 600-level course.

Master of Arts - Applied Linguistics Thesis Option

Writing a thesis may benefit those who contemplate further graduate work, as well as those who have a desire to pursue a single topic in depth. Under the guidance of a member of the graduate faculty, a student may earn six hours of credit for a completed approved thesis. Students who write a thesis will defend the thesis early in their final semester and complete their oral exam in a separate examination.

Master of Arts - Applied Linguistics Oral Comprehensive Examination

At the end of the program, all students must complete an oral comprehensive examination that covers each student’s program of study and, where applicable, the thesis. Students who fail the oral comprehensive examination may take the test one more time in a different semester. Students who fail a second time will no longer be eligible to receive the Master of Arts degree in applied linguistics from Old Dominion University. One week before the oral examination, students must submit a portfolio that will include all course syllabi, major assigned papers and a reflection about the entire M.A. experience.

Graduate Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of other Languages (TESOL)

This certificate may be of interest to students who want to teach English abroad or in the private sector. It includes five courses (some of which have ENGL 540 as a prerequisite): 

ENGL 670Methods and Materials in TESOL3
ENGL 671Phonology3
ENGL 672Syntax3
ENGL 675Practicum in TESOL3
ENGL 677Language and Communication Across Cultures3

The certificate may be taken independently of the degree, but students must be admitted to the graduate program. A maximum of 6 semester hours of graduate credit may be transferred into the TESOL certificate program. This certificate does not provide a Commonwealth of Virginia endorsement in ESL.

Master of Fine Arts - Creative Writing

Luisa Igloria, Graduate Program Director

The Master of Fine Arts in creative writing is widely regarded as a terminal degree. It is designed to prepare students for careers as published writers in fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. A secondary goal is to emphasize not only preparation for college-level teaching (the practical vocational goal of most M.F.A. programs in creative writing), but also includes preparation of graduates for careers in literary editing and publishing, or as free-lance writers (magazines, newspapers, reviews, and features).

Admission

Applicants must have completed a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution with at least a 3.0 G.P.A., including a minimum of 24 credit hours in English with at least a B average. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE), General Test, is required of all applicants. Candidates must also submit writing samples in the genre for which they wish to be considered; final admission will depend on faculty evaluation of those writing samples. Students who have not completed 24 undergraduate credit hours in English may be admitted provisionally and make up the required undergraduate courses.

Requirements

Students in the M.F.A. program must complete 54 total credit hours (39 hours of required courses and 15 hours of approved electives). In addition, students must also maintain a 3.00 GPA overall, satisfy a mid-program review at the end of the third semester in the program, and complete all work within three years (full-time students) or six years (part-time students). Students choose courses based upon their genre of study, and should consult the graduate program director or their advisor when selecting a schedule.

Students must take at least 12 credit hours of ENGL 650 (CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP), most of these in the genre area of concentration, to count toward core requirements for the degree.12
Creative Writing *
ENGL 660Craft of Narrative3
or ENGL 661 Craft of Poetry
Literature (select four of the following): **12
Medieval Literature
Chaucer's Canterbury Tales
English Renaissance Drama
British Literature 1660-1800
The Romantic Movement in Britain
Victorian Literature
The Twentieth-Century British Novel
Studies in American Drama
The American Novel to 1920
The American Novel 1920 to Present
New Literatures in English
The Literature of Fact
Poetry of the Early Twentieth Century
Sacred Texts as Literature
African-American Literature
Asian American Literature
Modern World Drama
Contemporary World Literature
Topics in English
Shakespeare
18th Century British Literature
19th Century British Literature
20th Century British Literature
Topics in World Literature
American Literature to 1810
American Literature 1810-1870
American Literature 1870-1946
American Literature 1945-Present
Seminar in Literary Studies
Topics (The following courses are specifically recommended for MFA Creative Writing students: 695 Topics: Literary Publishing and Editing; 695 Topics: Literature for Writers; and 695 Topics: The Thesis Reading List.)
ENGL 694Thesis Colloquium ***3
Students must complete 3-9 Thesis Hours to complete curricular requirements in the program9
Thesis Research
Thesis
Electives +15
Total Hours54

*

These are the Graduate Creative Writing Workshops in Fiction, Poetry, and Nonfiction; course may be repeated up to 6 times with 3 different topics).

Cross-genre experience is recommended (taking  ENGL 650 Creative Writing Workshops in a concentration other than the student's major), but ONLY after the first  year in the program. Instructor approval must be sought. 

**

No more than 12 hours of courses at the 500 level may be counted toward the degree.

***

 Should be taken in the last semester of the second year, or the first semester of the third year.

+

Additional Creative Writing Workshops, additional American, British, or World Literature Courses, or courses in other fields (approved in advance by GPD).

MFA Creative Writing students may also elect to take ENGL 596 Topics: Writing Tutorial (1 credit), which offers the opportunity to work in tutorials with the program's Visiting Writer in Residence. Three (3) of these 1-credit ENGL 596 Writing Tutorial courses are equivalent to one Elective (3 credits) in the MFA Creative Writing curriculum.

Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing Thesis

All candidates for the M.F.A. in creative writing must complete a thesis manuscript of publishable quality in their chosen genre (poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction). Each student will select an advisor from the graduate faculty and work with that advisor and a committee of readers to prepare the manuscript. At the completion of the thesis, students will schedule an oral defense with the advisor and the committee, at which point the thesis will be adjudged as to its readiness for final acceptance, printing, and binding.

Master of Science in Education - English

Refer to the Darden College of Education section of this Catalog.

Doctor of Philosophy - English

Kevin DePew, Graduate Program Director

The Ph.D. in English is an innovative program that integrates writing, rhetoric, discourse, technology, literary, and textual studies. Offering opportunities for creative reinterpretation of these fields within the discipline of English, the program emphasizes research that examines texts in a variety of overlapping and sometimes competing language-based worlds. Our focus is on how the creation and reception of texts and media are affected by form, purpose, technology of composition, audience, cultural location, social practices, and communities of discourse.  Students may pursue full- or part-time study through a combination of on-campus and distance learning courses. There are four emphasis: 1) Writing, Rhetoric, and Discourse Studies; 2) Literary and Cultural Studies; 3) Technology and Media Studies; and 4) Student-created emphasis (must be approved by the graduate program director). This program prepares students for academic careers, as well as other careers in which reading and writing figure prominently; the program also helps students professionalize within their current careers.

Admission Information

Applications are accepted for entrance in fall semester only and must be submitted no later than February 1.  Late applicants not applying for financial assistance may be considered until March 15, but only if openings remain after the first round of decisions.  Applications submitted after March 15 will not be considered.  Applicants residing in other countries should mail materials well in advance of those dates.  All required forms and documents should be sent directly to the Office of Graduate Admissions.  Applications packets are available online at the Office of Graduate Admissions website.  The following should be submitted along with the appropriate applications forms:  1) a 1500-word statement of the applicant’s academic and professional goals and discussion of how the Ph.D. in English will contribute to the achievement of those goals; 2) three letters of reference from sources capable of commenting on the applicant's readiness for advanced graduate study in English; 3) a 15-20 double-spaced-page writing sample on a topic related to the applicant’s projected plan of study; 4) a resume or curriculum vitae; 5) GRE general exam scores (taken within the last five years).  The GRE score is not optional nor can another test substitute for it. 

Admission standards include the following, which are required, unless otherwise stated:  1) A completed master’s degree (or its equivalent) in English or in an appropriate field (such as rhetoric, composition, English education, communications, journalism, linguistics, science, or technology) from a regionally accredited institution of higher education; 2) A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.5 (on a 4.0 scale) overall for the master’s degree; 3) A score in the 70th percentile or higher on the verbal and writing sections of the GRE General Exam (recommended); 4) For students whose first language is not English, a current score for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) of at least 600 on the paper version, 250 on the computer-based version, or 80 on the iBT version.  Students without at least some significant background in an English-related field are encouraged to take master’s level coursework in English before applying.

Degree Requirements

The Doctor of Philosophy degree in English requires 48 credit hours (39 credit hours of course work and 9 credit hours of dissertation), completion of a research competency, and the passing of a candidacy examination and an oral defense of the dissertation. An identifiable unifying principle is required for each student’s program.


Curriculum

ENGL 810Major Debates in English Studies3
ENGL 840Empirical Research Methods and Project Design3
ENGL 892Dissertation Seminar3
Emphasis 1 *9
Emphasis 2 *9
Electives **12
ENGL 899Dissertation9
Total Hours48

*

 Students are allowed to take only one English 897 per emphasis with a total of two different sections of English 897 for the entire course of study.

**

Students are allowed to take one course at the 600-level towards their course of study.


 

Emphasis Courses

(18 credit hours)

Students will choose two nine-hour emphases from those described below.  NOTES:
    A.    Some courses appear in multiple emphases, but the same course cannot be counted toward the required nine hours in multiple emphases.  (No “double-dipping” is allowed.)
    B.    An emphasis is defined by a minimum of three courses, but students are free to select additional courses from their emphasis areas as electives (see below, ELECTIVES).
    C.    Students who choose the “Student-Designed Emphasis” as one of their two emphases MUST follow the process for defining it specified in the description below in order for courses they take to constitute an emphasis.
    D.    Students may count only one “Student-Designed Emphasis” toward the requirement to complete two emphases.  That is, all students must select as least one of the pre-defined disciplinary emphases, but all students may also design their own emphasis according to the process stipulated below.
 
1.     Literary and Cultural Studies
The Literary and Cultural Studies emphasis will teach students to apply a range of methodologies to the study of literature and other textually informed cultural practices.  Although the emphasis includes course offering intensive study of specific literary-cultural topics (such as Victorian Gothic or Women & Indian Film), the emphasis aims more to professionalize students as experts in the methods of critical traditions of literary, textual, and cultural interpretation than to credential students as specialists in particular literary-cultural periods.  By the conclusion of their studies in this emphasis, students will be proficient in interpreting texts and cultural practices by critically employing methodologies that include:

  • Theories of Form, such as the technical protocols of scholarly editing and the physical description of manuscript and printed texts.
  • Critical Theories such as New Historicism, Feminism, Queer Theory, and Poststructuralism.
  • Cultural Theories such as Critical Race Theory, Mass/Popular Culture Theory, and Post Colonial Studies.
ENGL 801Texts and Technologies3
ENGL 805Discourse and Rhetoric Across Cultures3
ENGL 825Scholarly Editing and Textual Scholarship3
ENGL 830The Digital Humanities3
ENGL 835Postcolonial Literature and Theory3
ENGL 864Theories of Literature3
ENGL 890Seminar in Textual Studies3
ENGL 891Seminar in Literary Studies3
ENGL 895Topics (when appropriate for emphasis)3

 

2.     Rhetoric, Writing, and Discourse Studies
This emphasis prepares students for placement and advancement in careers centered on the history and theory of rhetoric, composition, writing program administration, workplace studies, and/or rhetorical and linguistic approaches to discourse and culture.  It emphasizes how communications are composed, constructed, and produced as well as how they affect (inter) personal, social, cultural, and political situations.  Possible areas of inquiry include:

  • Institutional assessment procedures for writing and critical thinking
  • Writing practices and language use in a variety of educational, public, professional, and workplace settings
  • The influence of institutional, cultural, and disciplinary assumptions about language and language users upon rhetorical and linguistic choices.
  • The rhetorical constraints and strategies of underrepresented groups.
  • The historical development of rhetoric and composition and professional writing in terms of theory, practice, and instruction.
ENGL 801Texts and Technologies3
ENGL 805Discourse and Rhetoric Across Cultures3
ENGL 806Visual Rhetoric and Document Design3
ENGL 815Professional Writing Theories and Practices3
ENGL 816International Professional Writing3
ENGL 820Pedagogy and Instructional Design3
ENGL 821Compositions as Applied Rhetoric3
ENGL 860Classical Rhetoric and Theory Building3
ENGL 863Seminar in Discourse Analysis3
ENGL 865Modern Rhetoric and Theory Building3
ENGL 878Seminar in Sociolinguistics3
ENGL 883Seminar in Professional Writing3
ENGL 893Seminar in Rhetoric3
ENGL 895Topics (when appropriate for this emphasis)3

 

3.     Technology and Media Studies
The study of technology as a political, cultural, economic, systematic, and aesthetic force is a crucial area of analysis in contemporary scholarship.  This emphasis prepares students for interdisciplinary work with a focus on domains of technological complexity with foundations in the materiality of rhetorical work.  A major tenet of this emphasis is that in addition to studying issues of technology, society, communication, and media design, we also develop practical solutions for the situations we confront.  This emphasis prepares students for both academic and industry positions where they can use their skills as researchers and strategists.  Possible areas of research and application include:

  • Ethical, social, and political dimensions of information, technology, and networked communication
  • Copyright and intellectual property, including the legal implications of technological regulation and change
  • Privacy issues in information technologies and media
  • Implications of digital methods in the humanities
  • Design and development of digital humanities tools
  • Technologically mediated communication such as experience design, usability studies, and information architecture
  • Visual and participatory cultures
ENGL 806Visual Rhetoric and Document Design3
ENGL 830The Digital Humanities3
ENGL 866New Media Theory and Practice I3
ENGL 871New Media Theory and Practice II3
ENGL 894Seminar in New Media3
ENGL 895Topics ((when appropriate to emphasis))3

 

4.     Student Designed Emphasis
A student-designed emphasis is a coherent cluster of at least three courses that are not included in the other emphasis chosen by the student.  The courses selected must define a cross-curricular focus that is clearly different from the foci of the pre-defined disciplinary emphases listed above.  Examples might include methodology; pedagogy; gender studies; visual rhetoric; discourse and rhetoric across cultures; or professional writing for international contexts.  Students should construct emphases under the guidance of an advisor, with advice from other mentors as needed.  Students must submit a proposal for the emphasis that includes a title, a description of the focus, and a tentative or exemplary selection of at least three courses.  Both the advisor and the GPD must approve the proposal and place a signed approval letter in the student’s advising file.  Because course offerings may change, a final description of the emphasis (including a title, a description of the focus, and a justification of how courses taken support the focus) must be approved by the student’s advisor (in a signed letter) and submitted with the letter to the GPD before the student enrolls in ENGL 892 Dissertation Seminar.

Electives

(12 credit hours)

The remaining four courses are electives, which may include additional courses in the student’s chosen emphases, course in other emphases, or other 800-level courses from other programs.  Students are encouraged to select electives that contribute to defining a coherent area of specialization or subfield.  Note:  Students and advisors should select a pedagogy course when students’ previous work experience or course work does not prepare them for instructional activities related to their field.

Dissertation Seminar

(3 credit hours)

Taken in the semester of the student’s candidacy examination, this course supports students in preparing their dissertation prospectus. It sets up writing groups for cohorts of students entering the dissertation stage of their graduate studies.

Dissertation Credits

(minimum of 9 credit hours)

A dissertation is required of all Ph.D. students.  A dissertation prospectus will be submitted after the student’s successful completion of the candidacy exam.  If the student’s proposed dissertation committee approves the prospectus, the student will proceed to research and write the dissertation.  An oral defense of the dissertation will be scheduled after a draft of the completed dissertation is approved by the student’s dissertation committee.

Research Competency

Because the Ph.D. is a research degree, all students are expected to present evidence of mastery of a basic research competency over and above the usual course work.  Students select one of the following three options to meet this requirement:

Foreign Language

To enter candidacy for the doctoral degree, students may present evidence of mastery of a foreign language equivalent to second-year undergraduate facility.  This can be done by transcript, by demonstration of native language proficiency (for those who speak English as a second language), by taking coursework at Old Dominion or elsewhere equivalent to second-year language facility (at Old Dominion University, through language courses numbered 202), by passing a standardized test at the appropriate level, or by passing an examination administered by the Department of Foreign Languages geared to second-year language mastery.  A grade of B or above in both semesters of second-year instruction will demonstrate competency in that language.  Evidence of completion of the foreign language requirement should be presented to the GPD as soon as possible in the student’s career and certainly before enrolling in the Dissertation Seminar.

New Media Application

Students may choose the option of presenting evidence of mastery of computer and new media applications beyond the usual knowledge of word processing, spread sheets, projection applications (e.g., PowerPoint), portable document format (pdf), and similar, common applications and software. This would include programming languages such as

  • InterDev
  • PERL
  • JavaScript
  • C#
  • PHP
  • CSS/XML
  • Ruby 

In lieu of standardized examinations to test such knowledge, students choosing this option must submit a multimodal, new-media project in which demonstration of one of the allowed programming languages is paramount.  The project should include:

  • a project proposal for approval,
  • a project log,
  • 3 versions (revisions) of a portfolio of self-produced material,
  • a statement of which applications or programs one is presenting and level of expertise,
  • and, if needed, a demonstration of facility before members of the Ph.D. Advisory Council, which shall have final say on whether the option has been satisfied.

Projects should be multimodal and interactive. As with seeking credit in a foreign language, students should submit evidence of completion of the requirement to the GPD as soon as possible in their careers and certainly before enrolling in the Dissertation Seminar. 

Statistics

Students whose research requires advanced knowledge of quantitative research design and statistics may show mastery of statistical methods through the following:

  • Successful completion of one graduate-level course in statistics with a grade of B or higher (courses completed as part of the student’s master’s degree may count for this requirement).  Courses offered at ODU that may fulfill this requirement include:
  • STAT 613
  • FOUN 722

OR

  • Successful completion of two undergraduate-level courses in quantitative research design and statistics with a grade of B or higher in both courses.

 AND

  • Providing evidence to the GPD that they designed and completed a project using statistical methods (e.g., a course project, conference paper, or journal article).

Candidacy Exams

After students have completed all course requirements and research requirements, they must pass a written examination related to their chosen field.  Exams are designed in consultation with an examination committee approved by the graduate program director of English, and they are directed toward the critical or scholarly project the student plans to pursue in the dissertation.  Students who fail the written exam will not be allowed to submit their dissertation proposal or to begin work on their dissertation.  The written exam may be retaken only once and no earlier than the semester following the student’s initial attempt.

Grade Requirements

All Ph.D. students will be graded on the traditional A, B, C, F scale (with pluses and minuses) in all courses.  Pass/Fail evaluations will be used only in the case of registration for internships or for thesis or dissertation research, or when specifically approved by the director.  Graduate students whose grade point averages fall below 3.00 (B) will be placed on a probationary status.  After two consecutive semesters below this average or the accumulation of two grades of “C” or below, the graduate program director and the Ph.D. advisory committee may dismiss the student from the doctoral program.

Time Limit and Residency Requirements 

The doctoral program must be completed within eight years of entry into Ph.D. course work. 

Transfer Credit

Twelve graduate hours not used to fulfill the requirements of a degree at other institutions or at Old Dominion University may be applied toward the fulfillment of degree requirements.  Transfer credit is accepted as degree credit at the discretion of the graduate program director. 

Financial Aid

Full-time students are eligible to apply for university fellowships and teaching and research assistantships, which are awarded on a competitive basis.

Nondegree Students

Nondegree students may not register in doctoral-level English courses.

Additional Information

Additional information is available on the English Department website.

ENGLISH Courses

ENGL 503. Medieval Literature. 3 Credits.

An introduction to representative works of English literature(some in translation) from Beowulf through Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, The Book of Margery Kempe, The Second Shepherd’s Play, and Malory’s Morte d’Arthur. Students will discover how medieval literature has contributed to and continues to complicate modern conceptions of reading, writing, and aesthetics.

ENGL 506. The Teaching of Literature. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide an intensive examination of issues, approaches, and methods utilized in the teaching of literature, particularly literature written for children and young adults.

ENGL 507. Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. 3 Credits.

A study of The Canterbury Tales with an introduction to Middle English language and culture.

ENGL 514. Motherhood: Texts and Images. 3 Credits.

This course examines the role of the mother, the experience of mothering and the institution of motherhood through a number of disciplinary and theoretical lenses. It considers how motherhood functions to women’s advantage or disadvantage in professional and economic areas as well as the mother’s ideological construction in public discourse, imagery, non-fiction, and film.

ENGL 516. English Renaissance Drama. 3 Credits.

An extensive survey of the secular national dramas of Renaissance England that were written and performed by Shakespeare’s contemporaries in London between 1576 and 1642. Students study the literary features, social contexts and ideological underpinning of representative works by Kyd, Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, Ford, and others.

ENGL 518. Jewish Writers. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the Jewish literary traditions and the cultural trends shaping these traditions and the Jewish identity. It will examine the impact of such issues as immigration, family, marginality, the Holocaust, assimilation, cultural diversity, feminism, Israel, race and religion. The readings will consist of short stories, poems, essays, novels, and autobiographical writing.

ENGL 521. British Literature 1660-1800. 3 Credits.

British literature from the Restoration of the monarchy after the Civil War and Puritan Commonwealth to the French Revolution, focusing on how cultural changes (legalized female actors, commercialized printing, colonialism, and growing market capitalism) interacted with the flowering of satire and scandalous theatrical comedy, and the emergence of modern literary forms (periodical journalism, “picturesque” poetry, and the novel).

ENGL 523. The Romantic Movement in Britain. 3 Credits.

A study of the literature written in Britain between 1770-1830, focusing on how the literary experiments and innovations of poets like Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Percy Shelley, Keats, Burns, and Barbauld, and of novelists like Mary Shelley, Radcliffe, and Scott interacted with cultural changes such as the Industrial Revolution, the French Revolution, and the emergence of feminism and working-class radicalism.

ENGL 524. Short Works in Narrative Media. 3 Credits.

This course examines short narrative forms in film, video, literature, and multi-media. Individual works will be considered, both for the specific ways in which they make use of the medium in which they appear and for the qualities they share. Particular emphasis will be placed on the relationship between writing and visualization. Students will engage in both creative and critical exercises, so as to see the process from both sides: creative production and critical analysis.

ENGL 525. World Film Directors in Context. 3 Credits.

This course will explore the works of several directors from a variety of world regions. Films will be considered as part of the body of work by each director, as well as in the context of the regions’ other arts, traditions, popular culture, and historical events. Students will become familiar, therefore, with aesthetic, literary, sociological, anthropological and historical approaches to the analysis of film.

ENGL 527. Writing in the Disciplines. 3 Credits.

This is a discussion/workshop course emphasizing contexts and strategies of text production in and across academic disciplines and professional settings. Students will produce a variety of texts designed to meet the needs of specific audiences. (This is a writing intensive course.).

ENGL 532. Origins and Early Development of the British Novel to 1800. 3 Credits.

A study of early novels and how the novel developed from other traditions such as the epic, romance, criminal biography, and travel narrative.

ENGL 533. Victorian Literature. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. A study of the chief writers and the cultural and philosophical backgrounds of the Victorian era, touching on the changes from the early to the later part of the period. Works analyzed include fiction, nonfiction prose, and poetry.

ENGL 535. Management Writing. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course focuses on writing as a means of making and presenting management decisions. (This is a writing intensive course.).

ENGL 538. The Twentieth-Century British Novel. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Examination and analysis of a variety of novels in their editorial and cultural contexts.

ENGL 539. Writing in Digital Spaces. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course offers composition practice in critical contemporary digital environments. Readings and discussions will provide the history of and context for these digital spaces. Students should expect to participate in, develop, and engage in critical discussions about a range of digital spaces, including websites, wikis, blogs, and various interactive media.

ENGL 540. General Linguistics. 3 Credits.

An introduction to linguistic analysis. Emphasis is on the analysis of sound systems (phonetics, phonology) and the structure of words and sentences (morphology and syntax).

ENGL 541. American Travel Literature. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This is a survey course that examines the American experience, American identity and American culture through travel “texts” that include prose, poetry, art, and film. The course takes an interdisciplinary American Studies approach, using lenses such as race, gender, and class.

ENGL 542. English Grammar. 3 Credits.

This course is a descriptive study of English grammar as it relates to the contexts in which it is used, with implication for grammar pedagogy and TESOL classrooms.

ENGL 543. Southern and African American English. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the linguistic diversity of the American South, with emphasis on Southern White and African American varieties of English. It examines variation and change in the phonological, lexical, and syntactic systems, language contact, and dialect discrimination directed towards Southern and African American speakers both inside and out of the South.

ENGL 544. History of the English Language. 3 Credits.

A study of the origins and development of the English language. Primary focus is on sound, word, and grammatical changes.

ENGL 546. Studies in American Drama. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. With rotating topics, this course will pursue particular themes or periods in American drama and theater. Potential areas of inquiry might include melodrama, the early transatlantic stage, rise of stage realism, age of O’Neill, or the contemporary drama.

ENGL 547. The American Novel to 1920. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Examination of the American novel from its origins in the late eighteenth century through World War I. The course will emphasize the novel as a genre, cultural trends during the period, and such relevant literary modes as romanticism, realism, and naturalism.

ENGL 548. The American Novel 1920 to Present. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Examination of the American novel from the end of World War I to the present day. The course will emphasize formal issues related to the genre of the novel and relevant literary and cultural trends during the period including modernism and postmodernism.

ENGL 549. Craft of Literary Nonfiction. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of technique in literary nonfiction with an emphasis on the memoir, the essay, reportage, and travel narrative. Especially designed for, but not limited to, creative writing students; supplements the creative writing workshops.

ENGL 550. American English. 3 Credits.

This course explores the geographic, social and stylistic diversity of English spoken in the U.S. It also examines how perceptions of dialect diversity affect access to education and other socioeconomic opportunities.

ENGL 551. Advanced Fiction Workshop. 3 Credits.

This course, an expansion of the principles and techniques learned in ENGL 451, focuses on the writing and criticism of the short story, the novella, and the novel. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: ENGL 351 or permission of the instructor, based on writing samples submitted.

ENGL 552. Advanced Poetry Workshop. 3 Credits.

This course, an expansion of the principles and techniques learned in ENGL 452, focuses on the writing and criticism of poetry. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: ENGL 352 or permission of the instructor, based on writing samples submitted.

ENGL 554. Creative Nonfiction. 3 Credits.

A course in the techniques of writing nonfiction imaginatively within a factual context. Emphasis is placed on concern for reader psychology, selection of significant detail, and the development of a style at once lively and lucid. Assignments are made individually with regard to the student’s field of interest—history, biography, science, politics, informal essay, etc. Advice is given on the marketing of promising manuscripts. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: ENGL 327W or ENGL 351 or permission of the instructor, based on writing samples submitted.

ENGL 555. The Teaching of Composition, Grades 6-12. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. A study of the theory and practice of teaching writing. Special attention will be given to the ways effective teachers allow theories and experiences to inform their pedagogical strategies.

ENGL 556. The Craft of Fiction. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of fictional technique in the novel and short story, with emphasis on character development, conflict, point of view, plot, setting, mood, tone, and diction. Especially designed for, but not limited to, creative writing students; supplements the creative writing workshops. Prerequisites: ENGL 300 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 557. The Craft of Poetry. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of technique in poetry, with emphasis on form, imagery, rhythm, and symbolism. Especially designed for, but not limited to, creative writing students; supplements the creative writing workshops. Prerequisites: ENGL 300 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 559. New Literatures in English. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. A study of the diverse “new” literatures in English of the Caribbean and Central America, Africa, India, as well as of Canada and Australia, in their current historical and political contexts.

ENGL 560. The Literature of Fact. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of the literary tradition of creative nonfiction. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

ENGL 561. Poetry of the Early Twentieth Century. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Works of major British and American poets from 1900 to 1945 are studied.

ENGL 562. Sacred Texts as Literature. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. A study of how sacred texts reshape a variety of literary forms (narratives, drama, poetry, biography, history). The course may focus on a particular text or a collection of texts drawn from a variety of faith traditions and/or spiritual experiences.

ENGL 563. Women Writers. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course applies concepts developed through women’s studies scholarship and feminist literary criticism to works by women writers of different races and cultures.

ENGL 565. African-American Literature. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An investigation of the ways in which literary movements, historical events, social transitions, and political upheavals have influenced African-American literature.

ENGL 566. Asian American Literature. 3 Credits.

The course introduces students to key texts in Asian American literature, supported by critical studies (and on occasion films) to interrogate the theme of Asian American identities in their multiple forms. The course will examine sociopolitical histories that undercut the literature, and the contributions of Asian American writers to the breadth and scope of American as well as global literatures today. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

ENGL 572. America in Vietnam: The Government and the Media in Conflict. 3 Credits.

An examination of America’s role in Vietnam and how the interaction of the media with political and military leaders shaped the subsequent foreign policy decisions and military conduct.

ENGL 573. Writing with Video. 3 Credits.

This course engages students in a comprehensive exploration of video as a rhetorical narrative medium, with emphasis on the actual production of video work. Writing is also integrated into the production process. From brainstorming to storyboarding and critique, writing is positioned as an integral part of the course.

ENGL 577. Language, Gender and Power. 3 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course explores how language reflects and interacts with society, with particular emphasis on gender and race. Topics include definition, framing, stereotypes, language taboos, and powerful and powerless language.

ENGL 580. Investigative Reporting Techniques. 3 Credits.

This course explores how journalists pursue investigative projects that expose waste, mismanagement, conflicts of interest, dangerous business practices, and otherwise challenge the status quo. With a focus on both high tech and traditional research skills, the course will provide instruction in accessing government records kept by local, state and federal agencies. In pursuing in-depth stories that make a difference, contemporary journalists develop strategies for gathering and analyzing data, use social media in pursuit of stories and present stories for print, broadcast and online platforms.

ENGL 581. Advanced Public Relations. 3 Credits.

Designed to strengthen the skills of the public relations practitioner with emphasis on the creative aspects of problem solving. Attention is given to crisis public relations, interviewing, speech writing, and graphics.

ENGL 582. Sports Journalism. 3 Credits.

This is primarily a sportswriting course in which students are introduced to various types and styles of sports stories that are representative of sports journalism as practiced in newspapers and magazines. The course also explores the role of sports in American society.

ENGL 583. Advanced News Reporting. 3 Credits.

Designed to familiarize students with the fundamentals of beat reporting and its practice in the multi-media environment of “converged” newsrooms. The course emphatically focuses on writing but also provides instruction on how the tools and techniques of multimedia platforms are used to enhance storytelling. Emphasis is also placed on accessing information through web-based resources and government documents.

ENGL 584. Feature Story Writing. 3 Credits.

Course includes discussion and practice of writing a variety of newspaper and magazine feature stories. Students will write and critique stories on people, places, businesses, trends, and issues. Assistance is given in the marketing of manuscripts.

ENGL 585. Editorial and Persuasive Writing. 3 Credits.

A study of the practice and function of writing editorials, commentary, reviews and columns for newspapers and online media. Lectures will focus on the techniques of crafting a persuasive argument, content analyses of Pulitzer Prize-winning editorials and columns, and guest lectures by newspaper editorial writers.

ENGL 586. Media Law and Ethics. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Designed to introduce students to components of communication law that may affect the professional writer or broadcaster. Topics include defamation, constitutional constraints, freedom of information, privacy, copyright, and telecommunications law. Ethical issues relating to the mass media will also be examined.

ENGL 592. Modern World Drama. 3 Credits.

A comparative study of selected major dramatic works of the world, featuring texts drawn from a range of cultures from around the globe. The course will begin in the late nineteenth century and continue to the present. Works written in languages other than English will be read in translation.

ENGL 593. Contemporary World Literature. 3 Credits.

Fiction, poetry, and plays written during the last fifty years in nations throughout the world. Most texts will have been written originally in languages other than English. The course will focus on the comparative study of works produced in a variety of cultural contexts, and will explore a range of approaches to defining or circumscribing world literature.

ENGL 595. Topics in English. 1-3 Credits.

1-3 credits each semester. The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, because of their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors.

ENGL 596. Topics in English. 1-3 Credits.

The advanced study of selected topics designed to permit small groups of qualified students to work on subjects of mutual interest which, because of their specialized nature, may not be offered regularly. These courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

ENGL 600. Introduction to Research and Criticism. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Required of most graduate students in English, usually in the first semester. Survey of English as an academic discipline; issues and trends in scholarly journals; research strategies and conventions for graduate-level papers and master's theses; critical approaches to literature.

ENGL 615. Shakespeare. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An application of advanced theoretical and critical approaches to Shakespeare’s works. May be repeated more than once for credit if different group of works or themes is being studied.

ENGL 632. 18th Century British Literature. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. A study of the literature written in the British Isles from the “Glorious Revolution” of 1688 until 1800, focusing on how the flowering of satire and the emergence of literary forms such as periodical journalism, “picturesque” poetry, and the novel interacted with the growth of distinctly modern institutions and philosophies such as a free, commercial press, market capitalism, colonialism, political radicalism, and industrialism.

ENGL 641. 19th Century British Literature. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. A study of a selection of the literature written in Britain during the romantic and Victorian ages, focusing on the social, historical, and ideological contexts informing its production. Texts analyzed include poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.

ENGL 642. Nineteenth-Century British Novel. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. A study of 19th Century British novels in context of the economic, social, and political issues of the period, emphasizing their formal and aesthetic concerns.

ENGL 645. 20th Century British Literature. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Studies of major poets, dramatists and prose writers. Some attention will be given to the movements, trends, forces, and ideas of the period.

ENGL 650. Creative Writing. 3 Credits.

Guided study and practice in writing short stories, novels, poetry, and creative nonfiction, offered in specific sections of Fiction, Poetry, and Nonfiction. This course can be repeated for credit. Students planning to write a creative thesis must take this course at least twice with their thesis director. Prerequisites: Admission to the MFA program and permission of the instructor.

ENGL 655. Topics in World Literature. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Examination of a theme, genre, or other literary topic as it appears in the literature of several countries. All works are assigned in English translation if not originally written in English. Specific topics are listed in the schedule booklet, and course descriptions appear in a booklet distributed to all academic advisors.

ENGL 656. American Literature to 1810. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Intensive study of a variety of texts from several genres reflecting the historical forces, aesthetic movements, social trends, and representative works of the period.

ENGL 657. American Literature 1810-1870. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Intensive study of a variety of texts from several genres reflecting the historical forces, aesthetic movements, social trends, and representative works of the period.

ENGL 658. American Literature 1870-1946. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Intensive study of a variety of texts from several genres reflecting the historical forces, aesthetic movements, social trends, and representative works of the period.

ENGL 659. American Literature 1945-Present. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Intensive study of a variety of texts from several genres reflecting the historical forces, aesthetic movements, social trends, and representative works of the period.

ENGL 660. Craft of Narrative. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of the techniques of fiction and nonfiction with some emphasis given to the various theories informing the genres. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGL 661. Craft of Poetry. 3 Credits.

A detailed study of the techniques of poetry with some emphasis on the various theories informing the genre. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGL 662. Cybercultures and Digital Writing. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: three units of digital writing or instructor’s permission. In this course, students will explore the social, theoretical, and cultural implications of composing with the ever-evolving digital writing technologies. They will also consider how to study the practices the writers use to compose with these technologies.

ENGL 664. Teaching College Composition. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An intensive examination of alternative approaches to teaching first-year and advanced composition at the college level, with special attention to current schools of composition theory and research.

ENGL 665. Teaching Writing with Technology. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL 539 and either ENGL 555 or ENGL 664. Students in this course will explore different writing environments and educational applications and learn how they are designed to help writers compose, collaborate, research, and think. Students will assess the values and thoretical assumptions underlying those applications and learn to articulate their own philosophies of using technologies in the writing classroom.

ENGL 668. Graduate Internship and Project in Professional Writing. 1-3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisites: 15 graduate credits in English. Structured work experience involving extensive writing and editing in a professional setting. The result of the internship is an analytic paper and a portfolio of written work.

ENGL 670. Methods and Materials in TESOL. 3 Credits.

A practical introduction to methods, materials, and course organization in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages). The course includes language assessment and teaching language in its cultural context as well as technology-enhanced language teaching.

ENGL 671. Phonology. 3 Credits.

An examination of the sound systems of natural languages, with emphasis on English and how it differs from other languages. The course includes articulatory and acoustic phonetics with analyses of data and exercises in transcription, as well as introduction to different phonological theories and their assumptions and notations. Prerequisites: ENGL 540 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 672. Syntax. 3 Credits.

A detailed examination of morphosyntactic structures found in the world’s languages with an emphasis on English grammar. Prerequisites: ENGL 540 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 673. Discourse Analysis. 3 Credits.

A survey of approaches to the analysis of spoken discourse. Readings and assignments emphasize issues related to transcription methods, conversational discourse, narrative, social interaction, the influence of prior discourses on texts, and relationships between discourse and power. Prerequisites: ENGL 540 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 674. Internship in Applied Linguistics. 3 Credits.

A structured work experience involving teaching or work in applied linguistics in a professional setting. To be documented by a portfolio of written work. Prerequisites: 12 graduate credits in linguistics.

ENGL 675. Practicum in TESOL. 3 Credits.

Supervised practice in teaching English to speakers of other languages. Available to those enrolled in the M.A. in Applied Linguistics or TESOL Certificate who have completed core courses. Prerequisites: ENGL 670 and permission of the instructor.

ENGL 676. Semantics. 3 Credits.

This class is an advanced survey of semantic theories and practices. Topics include terminology and taxonomies used in the study of meaning; relationships between linguistic meaning, culture, and cognition (e.g. reference, linguistic relativity, categorization); word meaning; and ways in which contexts of language use influence interpretation. Prerequisites: ENGL 540 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 677. Language and Communication Across Cultures. 3 Credits.

An investigation of how language and cultural differences affect communication. Readings from linguistics, anthropology, and literature address problems of intercultural communication.

ENGL 678. Sociolinguistics. 3 Credits.

Sociolinguistics is the study of language in its social context with emphasis on ethnography and other qualitative methods, quantitative methods, and linguistic and social differentiation between individuals and groups. Prerequisites: Any upper-division linguistics course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 679. First and Second Language Acquisition. 3 Credits.

An investigation of first and second language acquisition with emphasis on examining evidence about second language learning which supports or fails to support different approaches to teaching a second language.

ENGL 680. Second Language Writing Pedagogy. 3 Credits.

Students engage in many of the theoretical debates about teaching L2 writers, as well as practical responses to these debates. With this knowledge students are prepared to enter the debate, teach L2 writers, and conduct research on L2 writers and writing.

ENGL 681. Contemporary Classics: The Thesis Reading List. 3 Credits.

This course offers students enrolled in the MFA in Creative Writing program the opportunity for rigorous study of contemporary master works in a particular genre. Designed to provide students with the opportunity to deeply investigate contemporary works for the required thesis reading list, this course counts as one of the literature requirements for the MFA degree. The course is best suited for students in the second year of the program; however, any MFA student may register. The course cannot be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ENGL 683. Literary Editiing and Publishing. 3 Credits.

This course is for MFA Creative Writing students, and is meant to provide basic concepts of literary editing and publishing, theoretical and practical frameworks, and hands-on/internship types of experiences managing/reading/editing for the MFA program’s literary journal, Barely South Review. This course can count once toward elective credit in the MFA curriculum and may not be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Students must be in good graduate standing and must have earned at least 9 credit hours in the MFA program. Pre- or corequisite: This course is a co-requisite for actual internship work in the journal, though students who take this course are NOT automatically guaranteed a staff position in the journal.

ENGL 685. Writing Research. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisites: 6 graduate credits in English. This course explores current methods and methodologies in writing research. Students will design and carry out original studies of academic, professional, or personal writing as it is practiced in classrooms, work places, and other settings.

ENGL 686. Introduction to Rhetoric and Writing Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course presents key concepts, principles, traditions, and conversations that define the field of rhetoric and composition, surveying major texts, movements, issues, and methodologies. This course is designed primarily to prepare students for advanced courses in professional writing; however, it will also benefit any student who is interested in gaining insights about language, knowledge, and power from the perspective of rhetoric.

ENGL 687. Colloquium for Teachers of English. 3 Credits.

This course discusses theories of teaching, writing and literature and helps explore the challenges facing 21st century educators in terms of finding ways to reach the 21st century student. The course investigates ways to help students understand the inherent value of reading and writing. Additionally, the course looks at pedagogical models and examines how they can be applied to individual areas of expertise. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

ENGL 694. Thesis Colloquium. 3 Credits.

All MFA students are required to take ENGL 694 before their final semester. The course brings together all genres in a collaborative focus in which students discuss specific thesis projects, format requirements, publishing opportunities and reading lists for the 10-page prefatory essay required for their defense. Prerequisites: May be taken after 24 graduate hours have been completed.

ENGL 695. Topics. 1-3 Credits.

3 credits. The advanced study of a selected topic in English. Topics courses will appear in the course schedule and will be more fully described in information distributed to all academic advisors.

ENGL 696. Independent Readings. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Designed for the advanced student (15-20 hours) who wants to study in-depth a sharply focused area of literature, linguistics, or pedagogy. Before registering for the course, the student must make out a prospectus with the instructor and submit it. No graduate student is permitted to take more than two independent readings courses.

ENGL 698. Thesis Research. 1-9 Credits.

Lecture 1-9 hours; 1-9 credits. Instructor approval required. Prerequisite: Student must have completed 30 hours of course work first. Preparatory course designed to assist students in the writing of a thesis. Students will consult regularly with the faculty.

ENGL 699. Thesis. 3-9 Credits.

Lecture1-9 hours; 1-9 credits. Instructor approval required Prerequisite: Student must have completed 30 hours of course work first. Writing of the creative thesis.

ENGL 701. Texts and Technologies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Tracing the development of writing technologies from Ancient Greece through contemporary blogs and wikis, this course focuses on the relationships between a text’s physical qualities and its composition, production, and reception.

ENGL 705. Discourse and Rhetoric Across Cultures. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Admission into the Applied Linguistics M.A. or the Ph.D. in English. The course is a survey of language use both within and across cultures. Topics include relationships between language and conceptualization (linguistic relativity); description and interpretation of linguistic and rhetorical patterns; the organization, expression, and analysis of cultural meaning (e.g. frames, cultural models, narratives); relational aspects of language use; and literacy practices.

ENGL 706. Visual Rhetoric and Document Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course focuses on how visual elements, whether verbal or graphic, work within different types of documents. Theory and research in visual rhetoric and technical communication will be used to develop models for how people process visual information in terms of a variety of social and cultural contexts.

ENGL 710. Major Debates in English Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course introduces students to the principal questions and concerns of the field and includes a comparison and contrast of the subspecialties in English, including how they form and address key issues.

ENGL 715. Professional Writing Theories and Practices. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course surveys the history of professional writing, competing theories and research methodologies in the field. The tensions between workplace practices, professional writing scholarship, and professional writing pedagogy will also be explored.

ENGL 716. International Professional Writing. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL 715. This course focuses on the linguistic and cultural factors that business writers and technical writers must consider when working with/for global audiences. Students will learn to approach cross-cultural communication as a process that starts with researching the target audience.

ENGL 720. Pedagogy and Instructional Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Students in this course will be prepared to develop pedagogical plans, teach and assess writing in four instructional areas: advanced and professional writing courses, writing across the curriculum, workplace instruction, and distributed learning. New pedagogical tools, especially computer-based technologies, will be taught, analyzed and tested.

ENGL 721. Compositions as Applied Rhetoric. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: 3 credits of a graduate level rhetoric or composition course or instructor’s permission. Students will examine how the field of rhetoric has shaped composition pedagogy in the United States from its inception at Harvard to postmodern possibilities of today’s writing classroom.

ENGL 724. Online Writing Instructions. 3 Credits.

Students will learn how to negotiate the intersection between online instruction and writing pedagogy by exploring and interrogating the ways that various means of course mediation shapes the literacy pedagogy an instructor can develop. ENGL 664 is recommended as a prerequisite.

ENGL 725. Scholarly Editing and Textual Scholarship. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Instructor approval required. Surveys the theory and practice of scholarly editing, of the physical description of texts as material artifacts, and of the historical and social contextualization of texts as material artifacts. Focus is on texts produced in manuscripts and print, but consideration is given to oral texts and digital texts.

ENGL 730. The Digital Humanities. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Taking historical, cultural, and theoretical views, this course bridges literary studies with new media. How has technology historically affected literature and culture? Can the democratization of information accelerate literary development? Topics will include digital archives, intellectual property in the information age, and electronic textuality.

ENGL 735. Postcolonial Literature and Theory. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Any equivalent graduate level critical theory course or instructor permission. An examination of the discourse of postcolonial critical theory literature produced in postcolonial, diasporic and global contexts.

ENGL 740. Empirical Research Methods and Project Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course focuses on the theory and design of empirical research conducted in academic and nonacademic settings. Students will examine the methodological complexities of ethnography, meta-analysis, feminist research and other approaches.

ENGL 750. Service Learning in English Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Instructor approval required. Students will engage in service-learning activities and apply various concepts and skills from their experience and coursework to identify and respond to the needs in the community. An analytical paper and portfolio of service-learning materials are required.

ENGL 755. Critical Race Theory. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The goal of this course is to examine various approaches to Critical Race Studies and, in light of its theoretical commitments, explore its problems, possibilities, and limitations. How might we better understand our history and contemporary politics through the methodologies of critical race theory? Does critical race theory open up new areas for exploration or does it make our understanding of race and ethnicity more indefinite? Such an exploration will require us to think carefully about race and racism, but also other forms of identity like gender, class, and sexuality.

ENGL 760. Classical Rhetoric and Theory Building. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Analysis and discussion of classical theories of rhetoric, with attention to how rhetoric describes discourse in the public sphere.

ENGL 763. Seminar in Discourse Analysis. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: ENGL 540 or permission of the instructor. This course focuses on relationships among language users, text, grammar, context, and purpose within a discourse perspective. Readings and assignments emphasize theoretical and methodological issues related to interactive discourse, registers and genres, narrative and identity, and language, ideology and power.

ENGL 764. Theories of Literature. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An in-depth study of selected theories about the form, history, and cultural significance of literature, such as narrative theory, poststructuralism, Marxism, and feminism. Specific topics may vary by semester, but all sections will engage comprehensively with a body of theoretical texts and concerns.

ENGL 765. Modern Rhetoric and Theory Building. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course concerns the development of rhetoric as an academic discipline in the twentieth century, in particular how rhetoric has distinguished itself from literary, historical, philosophical, and linguistic modes of inquiry.

ENGL 766. New Media Theory and Practice I. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course involves hands-on instruction in a variety of software packages used to create websites and multi-media projects. Students will explore the rhetorical, literary, and technical aspects of their own projects as well as other web-based and multi-media compositions/products.

ENGL 770. Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. This course introduces basic concepts, methods, and techniques used to investigate topics and problems in applied linguistics. Both quantitative and qualitative approaches are presented. Methods include surveys, ethnographies, case studies, and experimental designs. Two major goals are emphasized: to become better readers of research reports and develop research and analytical skills applicable to applied linguistics and related fields.

ENGL 771. New Media Theory and Practice II. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 hours. Prerequisite: ENG 766. This course builds on the study of new media textual production and consumption in English Studies begun in New Media Theory and Practice I and gives students the opportunity to engage in more advanced theoretical and production work. This course will focus on the integration of multiple modes and media using a variety of software and hardware.

ENGL 775. Seminar in English Studies Pedogogy and Curriculum Design. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to literacy theory and challenges them to apply it in specific disciplines within English Studies. ENGL 720 or ENGL 820 is recommended as a prerequisite.

ENGL 778. Seminar in Sociolinguistics. 3 Credits.

This seminar investigates socially meaningful language variation. The focus will be on everyday types of speech that people use to situate themselves in social worlds. Topics include ethnography of communication, language ideologies, social and regional variation, and quantitative analysis.

ENGL 783. Seminar in Professional Writing. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 hours. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. This course will provide an intensive examination of a specific topic or issue in professional writing and serve as a field course for Professional Writing and New Media.

ENGL 790. Seminar in Textual Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. This course will provide an intensive examination of a specific topic or issue in textual studies and serve as a field course for Rhetoric and Textual Studies.

ENGL 791. Seminar in Literary Studies. 3 Credits.

Intensive seminar in a variable topic within literary or literary/cultural studies.

ENGL 793. Seminar in Rhetoric. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. This course will provide an intensive examination of a specific topic or issue in rhetoric and serve as a field course for Rhetoric and Textual Studies.

ENGL 794. Seminar in New Media. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. This course will provide an intensive examination of a specific topic or issue in new media and serve as a field course for Professional Writing and New Media.

ENGL 795. Topics. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisite: students must be enrolled in a graduate program to take this course. Variable course material for students in PhD in English degree program.

ENGL 797. Independent Study in English. 3 Credits.

Hours to be arranged; 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Provides opportunities for doctoral students to do independent research in areas of their interests.

ENGL 801. Texts and Technologies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Tracing the development of writing technologies from Ancient Greece through contemporary blogs and wikis, this course focuses on the relationships between a text’s physical qualities and its composition, production, and reception.

ENGL 805. Discourse and Rhetoric Across Cultures. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Admission into the Applied Linguistics M.A. or the Ph.D. in English.The course is a survey of language use both within and across cultures. Topics include relationships between language and conceptualization (linguistic relativity); description and interpretation of linguistic and rhetorical patterns; the organization, expression, and analysis of cultural meaning (e.g. frames, cultural models, narratives); relational aspects of language use; and literacy practices.

ENGL 806. Visual Rhetoric and Document Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course focuses on how visual elements, whether verbal or graphic, work within different types of documents. Theory and research in visual rhetoric and technical communication will be used to develop models for how people process visual information in terms of a variety of social and cultural contexts.

ENGL 810. Major Debates in English Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course introduces students to the principal questions and concerns of the field and includes a comparison and contrast of the subspecialties in English, including how they form and address key issues.

ENGL 815. Professional Writing Theories and Practices. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course surveys the history of professional writing, competing theories and research methodologies in the field. The tensions between workplace practices, professional writing scholarship, and professional writing pedagogy will also be explored.

ENGL 816. International Professional Writing. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL 815. This course focuses on the linguistic and cultural factors that business writers and technical writers must consider when working with/for global audiences. Students will learn to approach cross-cultural communication as a process that starts with researching the target audience.

ENGL 820. Pedagogy and Instructional Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Students in this course will be prepared to develop pedagogical plans, teach and assess writing in four instructional areas: advanced and professional writing courses, writing across the curriculum, workplace instruction, and distributed learning. New pedagogical tools, especially computer-based technologies, will be taught, analyzed and tested.

ENGL 821. Compositions as Applied Rhetoric. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: 3 credits of a graduate level rhetoric or composition course or instructor’s permission. Students will examine how the field of rhetoric has shaped composition pedagogy in the United States from its inception at Harvard to postmodern possibilities of today’s writing classroom.

ENGL 824. Online Writing Instruction. 3 Credits.

Students will learn how to negotiate the intersection between online instruction and writing pedagogy by exploring and interrogating the ways that various means of course mediation shapes the literacy pedagogy an instructor can develop.

ENGL 825. Scholarly Editing and Textual Scholarship. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Instructor approval required. Surveys the theory and practice of scholarly editing, of the physical description of texts as material artifacts, and of the historical and social contextualization of texts as material artifacts. Focus is on texts produced in manuscripts and print, but consideration is given to oral texts and digital texts.

ENGL 830. The Digital Humanities. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours, 3 credits. Taking historical, cultural, and theoretical views, this course bridges literary studies with new media. How has technology historically affected literature and culture? Can the democratization of information accelerate literary development? Topics will include digital archives, intellectual property in the information age, and electronic textuality.

ENGL 835. Postcolonial Literature and Theory. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Any equivalent graduate level critical theory course or instructor permission. An examination of the discourse of postcolonial critical theory literature produced in postcolonial, diasporic and global contexts.

ENGL 840. Empirical Research Methods and Project Design. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course focuses on the theory and design of empirical research conducted in academic and nonacademic settings. Students will examine the methodological complexities of ethnography, meta-analysis, feminist research and other approaches.

ENGL 850. Service Learning in English Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Instructor approval required. Students will engage in service-learning activities and apply various concepts and skills from their experience and coursework to identify and respond to the needs in the community. An analytical paper and portfolio of service-learning materials are required.

ENGL 855. Critical Race Theory. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. The goal of this course is to examine various approaches to Critical Race Studies and, in light of its theoretical commitments, explore its problems, possibilities, and limitations. How might we better understand our history and contemporary politics through the methodologies of critical race theory? Does critical race theory open up new areas for exploration or does it make our understanding of race and ethnicity more indefinite? Such an exploration will require us to think carefully about race and racism, but also other forms of identity like gender, class, and sexuality.

ENGL 860. Classical Rhetoric and Theory Building. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Analysis and discussion of classical theories of rhetoric, with attention to how rhetoric describes discourse in the public sphere.

ENGL 863. Seminar in Discourse Analysis. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: ENGL 805 or permission of the instructor. This course focuses on relationships among language users, text, grammar, context, and purpose within a discourse perspective. Readings and assignments emphasize theoretical and methodological issues related to interactive discourse, registers and genres, narrative and identity, and language, ideology and power.

ENGL 864. Theories of Literature. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. An in-depth study of selected theories about the form, history, and cultural significance of literature, such as narrative theory, poststructuralism, Marxism, and feminism. Specific topics may vary by semester, but all sections will engage comprehensively with a body of theoretical texts and concerns.

ENGL 865. Modern Rhetoric and Theory Building. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course concerns the development of rhetoric as an academic discipline in the twentieth century, in particular how rhetoric has distinguished itself from literary, historical, philosophical, and linguistic modes of inquiry.

ENGL 866. New Media Theory and Practice I. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. This course involves hands-on instruction in a variety of software packages used to create websites and multi-media projects. Students will explore the rhetorical, literary, and technical aspects of their own projects as well as other web-based and multi-media compositions/products.

ENGL 870. Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. 3 Credits.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. This course introduces basic concepts, methods, and techniques used to investigate topics and problems in applied linguistics. Both quantitative and qualitative approaches are presented. Methods include surveys, ethnographies, case studies, and experimental designs. Two major goals are emphasized: to become better readers of research reports and develop research and analytical skills applicable to applied linguistics and related fields.

ENGL 871. New Media Theory and Practice II. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 hours. Prerequisite: ENG 866. This course builds on the study of new media textual production and consumption in English Studies begun in New Media Theory and Practice I and gives students the opportunity to engage in more advanced theoretical and production work. This course will focus on the integration of multiple modes and media using a variety of software and hardware.

ENGL 875. Seminar in English Studies Pedagogy and Curriculum Design. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to literacy theory and challenges them to apply it in specific disciplines within English Studies. ENGL 720 or ENGL 820 is recommended as a prerequisite.

ENGL 878. Seminar in Sociolinguistics. 3 Credits.

This seminar investigates socially meaningful language variation. The focus will be on everyday types of speech that people use to situate themselves in social worlds. Topics include ethnography of communication, language ideologies, social and regional variation, and quantitative analysis.

ENGL 883. Seminar in Professional Writing. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 hours. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. This course will provide an intensive examination of a specific topic or issue in professional writing and serve as a field course for Professional Writing and New Media.

ENGL 890. Seminar in Textual Studies. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. This course will provide an intensive examination of a specific topic or issue in textual studies and serve as a field course for Rhetoric and Textual Studies.

ENGL 891. Seminar in Literary Studies. 3 Credits.

Intensive seminar in a variable topic within literary or literary/cultural studies. Prerequisites: Student must be enrolled in doctoral program to take this course.

ENGL 892. Dissertation Seminar. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: All core, field, and elective coursework must be completed prior to enrollment. This course is taken prior to doctoral candidacy exams. It enables students to develop and refine a topic for the dissertation, do preliminary research, and construct a bibliography under the guidance of a faculty mentor. Students will also us the seminar to prepare bibliographies to be used in candidacy exams.

ENGL 893. Seminar in Rhetoric. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. This course will provide an intensive examination of a specific topic or issue in rhetoric and serve as a field course for Rhetoric and Textual Studies.

ENGL 894. Seminar in New Media. 3 Credits.

Lecture 3 hours; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Instructor approval. This course will provide an intensive examination of a specific topic or issue in new media and serve as a field course for Professional Writing and New Media.

ENGL 895. Topics. 3 Credits.

3 credits. Prerequisite: students must be enrolled in a graduate program to take this course. Variable course material for students in PhD in English degree program.

ENGL 897. Independent Study in English. 1-3 Credits.

Hours to be arranged; 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Provides opportunities for doctoral students to do independent research in areas of their interests.

ENGL 898. Directed Research. 1-9 Credits.

1-9 credits. Prerequisite: instructor approval. This course can be taken as a supplement to the Dissertation Seminar for independent investigation in the topic for dissertation.

ENGL 899. Dissertation. 1-9 Credits.

1-9 credits. Prerequisite: 892 Dissertation Seminar and passing Candidacy examination. This course is to be taken only by students who have passed the candidacy exams for the purpose of researching and writing the dissertation.

ENGL 999. English 999. 1 Credit.

1 credit. A one-hour pass/fail registration required of all graduate students to maintain active status during the final semester prior to graduation. After successfully passing the candidacy examination, all doctoral students are required to be registered for at least one graduate credit each term until the degree is complete.